1619
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1619

Author: The New York Times

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In August of 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. America was not yet America, but this was the moment it began. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed. On the 400th anniversary of this fateful moment, it is time to tell the story.

“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.

7 Episodes
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Introducing ‘1619’

Introducing ‘1619’

2019-08-1701:00:4567

In August of 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. America was not yet America, but this was the moment it began. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed. On the 400th anniversary of this fateful moment, it is time to tell the story.
America was founded on the ideal of democracy. Black people fought to make it one.“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.This episode includes scenes of graphic violence.
The institution of slavery turned a poor, fledgling nation into a financial powerhouse, and the cotton plantation was America’s first big business. Behind the system, and built into it, was the whip. On today’s episode: Matthew Desmond, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and the author of “Evicted,” and Jesmyn Ward, the author of “Sing, Unburied, Sing.”“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.This episode includes scenes of graphic violence.
Black music, forged in captivity, became the sound of complete artistic freedom. It also became the sound of America. On today’s episode: Wesley Morris, a critic-at-large for The New York Times.“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.This episode contains explicit language.
Black Americans were denied access to doctors and hospitals for decades. From the shadows of this exclusion, they pushed to create the nation’s first federal health care programs. On today’s episode: Jeneen Interlandi, a member of The New York Times’s editorial board and a writer for The Times Magazine, and Yaa Gyasi, the author of “Homegoing.”“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.
More than a century and a half after the promise of 40 acres and a mule, the story of black land ownership in America remains one of loss and dispossession. June and Angie Provost, who trace their family line to the enslaved workers on Louisiana’s sugar-cane plantations, know this story well. On today’s episode: The Provosts spoke with Adizah Eghan and Annie Brown, producers for “1619.”“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.
The Provosts, a family of sugar-cane farmers in Louisiana, had worked the same land for generations. When it became harder and harder to keep hold of that land, June Provost and his wife, Angie, didn’t know why — and then a phone call changed their understanding of everything. In the finale of “1619,” we hear the rest of June and Angie’s story, and its echoes in a past case that led to the largest civil rights settlement in American history.On today’s episode: June and Angie Provost; Adizah Eghan and Annie Brown, producers for “1619”; and Khalil Gibran Muhammad, a professor of history, race and public policy at Harvard University and the author of “The Condemnation of Blackness.”“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.
Comments (156)

Chloe Watson

Damn good episode. This one is a keeper! *****

Jan 21st
Reply

Sheena Martin Svitich

This one of the best podcast episodes of any pocast I have ever heard. And I'm not really into music.

Jan 10th
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Michael Hance

this is garbage revisionist history that historians have already squashed...

Jan 2nd
Reply (1)

Yanwar Cakrasenjaya

Please I need more!! How about an Asian side with the railroad workers.

Jan 2nd
Reply (1)

Yanwar Cakrasenjaya

Johnny cash took that from him

Jan 2nd
Reply (1)

Javier Bassi

Wait, on the episode description it says "In the finale of 1619...". So IT IS the last episode. Weird call. Such publicity for a 7-eps podcast which does not even cover mass incarceration, police brutality and so on. I guess it was planned differently but something happened. If not, the results are quite dissapointing.

Dec 31st
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Javier Bassi

I don't understand why they dedicated two episodes to this family's story. I understand it is representative of a larger issue but still. The class lawsuit seemed much more important to see the big pic. How strange.

Dec 31st
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Javier Bassi

Something happened. It's been two and a half months since the last episode. Episodes used to come out every 10 to 15 days. I am sure the 7th is not the last episode. There is no closure, no conclusions, plus we are not anywhere near XXI century issues. It is strange NYT does not say anything.

Dec 31st
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Johnny Hamilton

What a crock of leftist propaganda bullshit! This podcast is created with the absolute sole intention of painting America as something that it wasn't. You people singing it's praises need to actually do some effing research, because this is aimed at the folks who won't verify. Go find a pre-1950 history book. This has the same leftist lean and inappropriate skewing as the idea that America was wrong to bomb Japan. For the love of God people! Wake up and think for yourselves!!!!!

Dec 30th
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Tameka Smith

There were only 7 episodes?

Dec 24th
Reply (1)

Nervino Karas

I thought the African slave trade began in Africa? Africans enslaving other Africans

Dec 7th
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#Royalebleu

#recommend

Nov 18th
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daisy

will there be any more episodes?

Oct 31st
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Rachel Anderson

this is Queen Sugar in real life!

Oct 18th
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Rachel Anderson

Thank you for this episode!! it was wow :)

Oct 16th
Reply (1)

Alicia Akins

I tell EVERYONE about this podcast. I appreciate the various topics as well as how you tie the past to present situations.

Oct 15th
Reply (1)

Ethan Brooks

lol

Oct 15th
Reply (1)

Sheronne Thorpe Gilchrist

This podcast is very informative and it gives real insight to our country's ongoing racial divide and bias. My opinion is history will always be relayed based on who's telling the story! But facts are facts , no matter how poorly anyone looks. I personally would like to thank the creator of this podcast on shedding factual light on our history.

Oct 14th
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Cory

i was looking for a more objective form of history podcast, and this program is strongly subjective. i dont want to know about feelings. I gave it two episodes and couldnt take the sighing-deep-thought moments anymore. however, I love the idea of this material.

Oct 8th
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Javier Bassi

Listening from Argentina! Hard but necessary listen. The unfairness and brutality of it all do not cease to amaze me. It is incredible all those terrible things happened (and continue to happen, although in different ways: mass incarceration and police brutality). Got here by listening to free jazz and reading about it. Particularly when I found out that Thelonious Monk got his last name from Archibald Monk, his great-great grandfather's owner.

Oct 7th
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