1619
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1619

Author: The New York Times

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In August of 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. America was not yet America, but this was the moment it began. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed. On the 400th anniversary of this fateful moment, it is time to tell the story.

“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.

7 Episodes
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The Provosts, a family of sugar-cane farmers in Louisiana, had worked the same land for generations. When it became harder and harder to keep hold of that land, June Provost and his wife, Angie, didn’t know why — and then a phone call changed their understanding of everything. In the finale of “1619,” we hear the rest of June and Angie’s story, and its echoes in a past case that led to the largest civil rights settlement in American history.On today’s episode: June and Angie Provost; Adizah Eghan and Annie Brown, producers for “1619”; and Khalil Gibran Muhammad, a professor of history, race and public policy at Harvard University and the author of “The Condemnation of Blackness.”“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.
More than a century and a half after the promise of 40 acres and a mule, the story of black land ownership in America remains one of loss and dispossession. June and Angie Provost, who trace their family line to the enslaved workers on Louisiana’s sugar-cane plantations, know this story well. On today’s episode: The Provosts spoke with Adizah Eghan and Annie Brown, producers for “1619.”“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.
Black Americans were denied access to doctors and hospitals for decades. From the shadows of this exclusion, they pushed to create the nation’s first federal health care programs. On today’s episode: Jeneen Interlandi, a member of The New York Times’s editorial board and a writer for The Times Magazine, and Yaa Gyasi, the author of “Homegoing.”“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.
Black music, forged in captivity, became the sound of complete artistic freedom. It also became the sound of America. On today’s episode: Wesley Morris, a critic-at-large for The New York Times.“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.This episode contains explicit language.
The institution of slavery turned a poor, fledgling nation into a financial powerhouse, and the cotton plantation was America’s first big business. Behind the system, and built into it, was the whip. On today’s episode: Matthew Desmond, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and the author of “Evicted,” and Jesmyn Ward, the author of “Sing, Unburied, Sing.”“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.This episode includes scenes of graphic violence.
America was founded on the ideal of democracy. Black people fought to make it one.“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.This episode includes scenes of graphic violence.
Introducing ‘1619’

Introducing ‘1619’

2019-08-1701:00:4559

In August of 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. America was not yet America, but this was the moment it began. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed. On the 400th anniversary of this fateful moment, it is time to tell the story.
Comments (127)

#Royalebleu

#recommend

Nov 18th
Reply

daisy

will there be any more episodes?

Oct 31st
Reply

Rachel Anderson

this is Queen Sugar in real life!

Oct 18th
Reply

Rachel Anderson

Thank you for this episode!! it was wow :)

Oct 16th
Reply (1)

Alicia Akins

I tell EVERYONE about this podcast. I appreciate the various topics as well as how you tie the past to present situations.

Oct 15th
Reply (1)

Ethan Brooks

lol

Oct 15th
Reply (1)

Sheronne Thorpe Gilchrist

This podcast is very informative and it gives real insight to our country's ongoing racial divide and bias. My opinion is history will always be relayed based on who's telling the story! But facts are facts , no matter how poorly anyone looks. I personally would like to thank the creator of this podcast on shedding factual light on our history.

Oct 14th
Reply

Cory

i was looking for a more objective form of history podcast, and this program is strongly subjective. i dont want to know about feelings. I gave it two episodes and couldnt take the sighing-deep-thought moments anymore. however, I love the idea of this material.

Oct 8th
Reply

Javier Bassi

Listening from Argentina! Hard but necessary listen. The unfairness and brutality of it all do not cease to amaze me. It is incredible all those terrible things happened (and continue to happen, although in different ways: mass incarceration and police brutality). Got here by listening to free jazz and reading about it. Particularly when I found out that Thelonious Monk got his last name from Archibald Monk, his great-great grandfather's owner.

Oct 7th
Reply

Roger Seaton

I so appreciated the uplifting, positive and affirming nature of this episode when juxtaposed to the painful, tragic, heart wrenching, and mind numbing truth of the preceding episodes. The power of black music is its self-affirmation in the face of centuries of denigration and effacement. That's true freedom and power. Thanks for the wealth of information in all of these episodes and the tour down musical memory lane!

Oct 5th
Reply

lisa bradford

So happy you are back with a new episode! Dont listen to the haters, this is a great podcast, exquisitely written and artfully produced.

Oct 5th
Reply

S Yvette Carter

Are future episodes forthcoming?

Oct 5th
Reply

Benjamin Miner

Love this project but I am bummed out if there are only to be 4 episodes. Surely there is much much more to be said on this topic.

Oct 4th
Reply

Destined 4 Greatness

2:55 That Micheal McDonald song is fiyyaa!! Now back to regular scheduled programming

Oct 4th
Reply

Destined 4 Greatness

13:00 is a call center today. It amazes how these various stories acknowledge the wrong of slavery but America wont acknowledge it.

Oct 4th
Reply

Sid Leake

All of these comments relating to microeconomics IMO are dismissive. My God, what were our parents, grandparents, g-grandparents, g-g, g-g-g, g-g-g-g, etc et al, thinking! I descend from a long, long line of Christian southerners, and I'm close to being an atheist when contemplating their hatred, hypocrisy and racism. I honor those descendants of slavery much more than those elderly racists that are my contemporaries (I'm almost 80). Those chickens came home to rest over 100 years ago, and today I see many of my white contemporaries still smugly diminishing blacks. Shame, shame!

Oct 3rd
Reply

E J

I wonder when this podcast is going to get around to letting listeners know that these slaves were on the way to what is now known as Mexico?

Oct 2nd
Reply (2)

Alexandra Meyers

Does it stop at #4? Will there be another one?

Oct 1st
Reply

Jonathan Roseman

A fascinating cultural difference of blacks is that unlike Asians and whites, who both dislike dwelling on historical humiliations, abhorring the degradation, blacks love slavery, because it's their leading money-maker, a lever always useful for wheedling money and favors out of simpering liberal whites, and it is an excuse for perennial failure as a people. Without white charity, blacks have nothing.

Sep 28th
Reply (7)

lisa bradford

seriously, is it over?

Sep 28th
Reply
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