1619
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1619

Author: The New York Times

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In August of 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. America was not yet America, but this was the moment it began. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed. On the 400th anniversary of this fateful moment, it is time to tell the story.

5 Episodes
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Black Americans were denied access to doctors and hospitals for decades. From the shadows of this exclusion, they pushed to create the nation’s first federal health care programs. On today’s episode: Jeneen Interlandi, a member of The New York Times’s editorial board and a writer for The Times Magazine, and Yaa Gyasi, the author of “Homegoing.”“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.
Black music, forged in captivity, became the sound of complete artistic freedom. It also became the sound of America. On today’s episode: Wesley Morris, a critic-at-large for The New York Times.“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.This episode contains explicit language.
The institution of slavery turned a poor, fledgling nation into a financial powerhouse, and the cotton plantation was America’s first big business. Behind the system, and built into it, was the whip. On today’s episode: Matthew Desmond, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and the author of “Evicted,” and Jesmyn Ward, the author of “Sing, Unburied, Sing.”“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.This episode includes scenes of graphic violence.
America was founded on the ideal of democracy. Black people fought to make it one.“1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.This episode includes scenes of graphic violence.
Introducing ‘1619’

Introducing ‘1619’

2019-08-1701:00:4543

In August of 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. America was not yet America, but this was the moment it began. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed. On the 400th anniversary of this fateful moment, it is time to tell the story.
Comments (58)

Matt Lamborn

Epic! Absolutely love this podcast. Amazing how much of this history still permeates today's culture, music, etc. Thx NYT.

Sep 18th
Reply

John Moore

Oh boy, the Freedmen's Bureau. If there's an example of attributing malice to stupidity, this is it. The Reformation was the most difficult time in the history of our federal government, hands down, and the only thing close to it is the Great Depression. We just had a bloody, divisive, and crippling civil war. The government needed to be brought back together from a divide so polarized that they were literally two different countries, and compromise just enough not to not piss off the winners and avoid hurting the losers. ALSO, a group of people equivalent to the population of the city of Los Angeles proper was now homeless, unemployed, and freed from the only system (brutal as it may have been) that they had ever known. In a world that would have been free of all racism, you're NOT solving all those problems and doing a perfect job. Hell, let's be honest, you're gonna screw it up, and a LOT of people are gonna die, because you are NOT a fucking god. My guess, there were a lot of racist folks making the problem worse, but there were probably a lot of good people who just couldn't fucking handle a job this big. The government can't solve everything, people. I'd advise you to consider how massive this country is, how many people are living completely separate lives from your own, how many wants and needs they have, before you start to think "The government's got [name an issue] figured out for all of us."

Sep 18th
Reply

Tom MacDonald

or Africans enslaving Africans?

Sep 17th
Reply

Jennifer

Check this out to listen to hear objections to this rewriting of history from within the black community: https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=8hWQmzgiKXQ

Sep 17th
Reply

Jennifer

This is just a fallacy. Here is some basic information on economic success of slavery. https://castbox.fm/vd/185732825

Sep 17th
Reply

Jennifer

A rewriting of history to suit the victim narrative. How convenient.

Sep 17th
Reply

Jennifer

The blogging heads podcast does a great job dissecting the fallacies here.

Sep 17th
Reply

Jennifer

https://castbox.fm/vd/185732825 pure fiction here, a rewriting of history to suit the biased narrative on an aggrieved group of professional victims

Sep 17th
Reply

Vincent Gonzalez

As a professional musician and former music educator who also is part African-American I found this episode not only fascinating and fascinatingly accurate, and extremely well done with class! This episode should be used in every music appreciation/music history class in every high school and college across the nation! THANK YOU!! Rev. Vincent O. Holland-Gonzalez, Sr.

Sep 14th
Reply

Vince Ogletree

this is an excellent podcast and wonderful episode. please don't forget the contributions of Scott Joplin and the Ragtime movement in the 1920s as well!

Sep 12th
Reply

Alex Mercedes

Excellent! and sooooo fresh! lands like a like a brand new take on black music. thanks! this is a keeper episode.

Sep 11th
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lisa bradford

I love this episode! so much! it's what i love about music that I could never put my finger on, he has defined so eloquently, the struggle and pain which transition to hope, which give birth to the hope. there would be no hope without that painful struggle. oh! love this podcast!

Sep 7th
Reply

Andrew Permafide Greaves

QUESTIONs FOR ALL: What percentage of the slave population was from the continent of africa? estimate from each continent? why didnt they focus on closer countries like cuba mexico etc for the slave population?

Sep 5th
Reply

John Moore

I'm really enjoying the stories and history, because they're so interesting, so well written, and the dialogue and cadence are smooth and effective. It's annoying that they mix in these inaccuracies and fallacies that taint such a brilliant program. So this expert does an excellent job of explaining this slave economy, which actually undercuts his own argument about the results of slave economics he makes at the end. 19:14 The "value of all enslaved people exceeded that of factories and railroads combined." "Value" means the COST of assets and capital. If you want to maximize profits, having very expensive assets is TERRIBLE. You want to have inexpensive assets that produce a high amount of productivity, for example, an inexpensive factory machine that spits out large quantities of a product will make much more money than an expensive machine that makes small quantities of a product. Line by line he did a great job of explaining why slavery was not only cruel and terrible, but DOOMED to fail as a business practice. The fact that slavery was such a terrible economic practice could have (and frankly, SHOULD have) ADDED more bullet points to the conversation about why it was so horrible and wrong. Honestly, the desire to shoehorn everything into this overarching narrative is really irritating, and it's messing up this show for me.

Aug 31st
Reply

John Moore

Jennifer Yes, you're absolutely right. The industrialized north was making far more money because they were taking in supplies and using them to create products for a profit. However, relativity is the reality to us, but not to the people who were doing it at the time. I'm gonna make a shitty example, but hear me out. It's like saying that the guy selling steel doesn't make as much as the guy selling Rolex watches. The guy selling steel is making money according to his sales figures, so he's not gonna suddenly give up steel because Rolex watches sell for a good profit. People instinctively want to achieve a stable existence, so they believe that the situation that has created that circumstance will continue to do so if they don't mess with it too much. It's simple ignorance that's invisible to any individual of any era, but glaringly obvious to us with distance and hindsight.

Sep 17th
Reply

Jennifer

John Moore The South and cotton industry did better after slavery than before. Also, economic production of the slave south lagged behind the free north. The bottom line being, slavery was hit indeed an economic boom to the cotton industry (the narrative that was pushed at the time).

Sep 17th
Reply

Joe Heath

how about the endenchered servants that outnumbered African slaves?

Aug 31st
Reply

Andrew Permafide Greaves

Joe Heath endenchered? now thats funny shit!!

Sep 5th
Reply

Steffie

Heartbreaking, defiant, hopeful. This is the must-listen podcast of 2019

Aug 30th
Reply

Ham Dani

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Aug 29th
Reply

lisa bradford

I am both glad to be able to view history from a less biased perspective and disgusted with the view it provides. I was raised in a home where my mother, proudly and often, told the story of seeing Dr. Martin Luther Kings "I Have A Dream" speech live and in person in Washington D.C. Being raised in a home where equal civil rights was the culture being presented to me, I am sad to say, I regarded the civil rights movement as a period of history that has been "made right and accepted by most". With that in mind, I am consistently horrified when I realized that the Civil Rights Movement is still very much necessary in 2019, that it's not the country's culture and it's not mostly accepted. I'm horrified to realize that racial injustices most certainly occur today, in this the most civilized of worlds. This is a perspective that needs to be told to balance the , excuse the phrase, "white-washed" history that is being perpetuated even in the most loving households. We can all admit that history is in the eyes of the beholder, and all points of view must be assimilated to produce a fair assessment of history. thank you for this podcast. necessary

Aug 28th
Reply

Jacob

lisa bradford totally agree

Aug 28th
Reply

John Moore

I like that these stories are being told, but I would caution the show creators to be precise and accurate, and provide proper context, because this episode was inaccurate in several instances, and frankly very biased. 23:40 This speech was given in 1854 entitled "Lincoln's Speech at Peoria", and I'm sure there is an inadvertent conflation of two or more events as I'm not able to find several quotes she gave, like the quote containing the phrase "troublesome presence". Also, the line about equality is proceeded by this line: "...A universal feeling, whether well or ill-founded, cannot be safely disregarded. We cannot, then, make them equals. It does seem to me that systems of gradual emancipation might be adopted..." Lincoln was speaking about the practicalities of implementing immediate equality, not a disdain for blacks in general. He reasoned that a gradual process would be more widely accepted by the south, who they needed to bring into the fold for any emancipation effort to work. We need acknowledge two things about the founders: They failed in the civic duty to abolish the atrocities of slavery. But, they knew the would be succeeded by more moral men, and did what they could to undermine slavery while swallowing the bitter pill in order to unite against Britain. The very intentional words in the declaration were used over and over to grant us all the rights we deserved. The founders also used various methods to stop the spread of slavery, such as the Northwest Ordinance of 1787. They did what they did, but it wasn't enough and they failed, but they were succeeded by better people. I'm sure we're failing in some ways right now, but we'll be succeeded by better people. I think that's the story of this country we should be telling.

Aug 28th
Reply

John Moore

Tom MacDonald Honestly I don't question why things are the way they are. I just do whatever I want and hope it's gonna be a net benefit to the people I affect. We all do what we perceive is the right thing, we're all the hero of our story. I can't fault folks for putting blinders on because I'm not perfect in any way either. However, I can point them out, so I do, and I hope that's a net benefit. I hope people point out my blinders, and I hope that's a net benefit to me.

Sep 17th
Reply

Tom MacDonald

John Moore you ever wonder why you have to be the amateur journalists correcting the professional journalists?

Sep 17th
Reply

Carter Maine

Really Great Perspective, Its very informative and educational. Good job. 👍. I can't wait for the next episode.

Aug 27th
Reply

Carter Maine

보스턴피플 Super Cool and Awesome

Aug 27th
Reply

보스턴피플

Carter Maine yes,its really cool

Aug 27th
Reply
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