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In this podcast, Svetlana Lutsenko, PhD, Professor of Physiology, Associate Director for Basic Science and Clinical Relations, Institute for Basic Biomedical Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medicine, discusses monogenic human diseases, Wilson's disease diagnosis, and copper’s effects on the body. Podcast Points: Does copper play an important role in the body? An overview of metals, and how copper in animal diets has an effect on fat Should I be worried about getting enough copper in my diet? Dr. Lutsenko talks about her interest in human disorders that are associated with copper metabolism. Copper plays a vital role in the production of neurotransmitters as well as in the maintenance of bones, nerves, and blood vessels. Dr. Lutsenko discusses imbalances in the body, genetic disorders, and copper’s role. The PhD continues her discussion of copper deficiency disease and the treatment of genetic disease, with an emphasis on drugs that can remove copper from the body. Dr. Lutsenko’s research has delved into many important areas of science, such as Menkes disease; animal models for Wilson’s disease; proteomics; metal biology (iron, zinc and copper); as well as membrane proteins biochemistry, etc.  Dr. Lutsenko discusses the many things they have observed in animals that exist on a high copper diet. As the PhD states, these animals absorb more fat. She goes on to explain that more copper in the diet can actually end up producing less fat in the body. Additionally, Dr. Lutsenko discusses various treatments and therapies, and the balance that the body needs overall, discussing drugs for treatment, and improvements that could benefit the liver. 
Dr. Scott A. Johnson, a health and wellness advocate, and author of Beating Ankylosing Spondylitis Naturally, discusses his personal battle and ankylosing spondylitis causes. Podcast Points: What is ankylosing spondylitis? Common treatments for ankylosing spondylitis How can essential oils help? Dr. Johnson discusses his personal journey and he explains in detail the symptoms and issues that come from the condition known as, ankylosing spondylitis, such as significant neck and back pain, especially after resting. The condition can also affect the heart, lungs, and eyes, and reduce overall quality of life. Dr. Johnson is a bestselling author, natural health expert, and naturopath. Dr. Johnson’s book provides valuable information on the connections that link AS, eating, and gut health. Additionally, it teaches sufferers how this knowledge can help reduce their AS symptoms. The doctor’s book looks at evidence-based natural remedies as a means to quiet inflammation, combat and ease pain, as well as manage the difficult complications typically associated with AS. The doctor explains that ankylosing spondylitis is considered to be an autoinflammatory condition, slightly different than autoimmune diseases. He discusses the genetic pathways, and modern treatment techniques, as well as some negative effects of various medicines used to treat the condition. He talks about drugs, injections, and surgery, and how each treatment can be used to help people maintain a higher quality of life. Dr. Johnson explains how he came to the current methods that he utilized to heal his own ankylosing spondylitis condition. He talks about the published papers that he studied, as well as clinical trials for essential oils and what he learned about the significance of them. Engaging in an informative conversation about lavender specifically, he extols the virtues of it, discussing physical and emotional improvement possibilities. As he states, most natural solutions are not designed to stop something as much as they are designed to simply promote natural health balance. Wrapping up, Dr. Johnson talks about case studies and how essential oils have been shown to improve conditions for many, but not necessarily all, patients. 
Dr. Abramson is a dentist who specializes in sleep apnea and created a specific oral appliance called the Oasys.  In this discussion, he explains the health risks associated with sleep apnea, the differences between success rates for CPAP machines and oral appliances, and the three zones oral appliances need to manage and why that makes a difference with sleep apnea. As someone who has researched and applied various techniques to treat sleep apnea through dentistry, Dr. Mark Abramson is able to discuss the process and benefits of oral appliances with effective clarity. In this conversation he explains first why it is important to seek solutions to sleep apnea, from general health issues to a correlation between lack of deep sleeping and dementia.  He then describes the blocking that causes apnea and the mechanics for different treatment approaches. He highlights the success rate of oral appliances for several reasons, including the rates at which people stop using or won't even try CPAP machines because of the discomfort and difficulty of wearing the device.  He then articulates the approach through dentistry in more detail, describing how oral appliances bring the jaw forward and can also treat other areas that may need addressing such as nasal dilation and small pads that reposition the tongue. His Oasys system is able to mechanically treat all three issues with one device. Finally, he answers additional questions about oral appliances and dentistry such as effects on TMJ, the efficacy of over-the-counter products, and more.   For more information, see his practice website: Dr. Mark Abramson DDS in Redwood City, CA, at https://www.drtmjsleepapnea.com/. You can learn more about the Oasys device at Dream Systems Dental Lab in Rosewood, CA: https://www.dreamsystemsdentallab.com/ and at http://www.oasyssleep.com/. Dr. Abramsons' office can also help locate dentists in your area that offer oral appliance treatment.
Dr. Tobias Carling performs more adrenal gland surgeries than any other surgeon in America. In this podcast, he offers an overview of the basic functions of the adrenal system, the types of tumors and cancers in the adrenal glands as well as adrenal tumor diagnosis, and  the difficulties and goals for adrenal gland surgery as well as ways for patients to educate themselves. Dr. Tobias Carling left his position as Chief of Endocrine Surgery at Yale in 2020 to open the Carling Adrenal Center in Florida. Early in his medical schooling he found the endocrine system worthy of advanced study.  Eventually the challenges and diverse array of tumors the adrenal gland presents kept his interest and he made it his specialty. After being at Yale for almost 18 years, he started the Carling Adrenal Center in Tampa to continue giving patients exceptional care. In this podcast he begins by explaining the biology of the glands, such as the three hormones they produce: aldosterone, cortisol and catecholamines.  He explains how common it is for tumors to form in the glands and what risks they pose. Primarily, different tumors produce different degrees of hormone levels in the body in excess, which can be toxic. This, he adds, is why adrenal tumor diagnosis is important and sometimes tricky. Some cases, like Conn's Syndrome, can be a silent disease hidden by the presentation of symptoms attributed to high blood pressure. Finally, he explains various issues related to adrenal gland surgery such as when cortical-sparing surgery is advisable and when it's not. Such decisions take into account issues such as the risk of spilling tumors into the body as well as the state of the other gland. He comments that the surgery must be done as quickly as possible yet as precisely as possible because of the vital nature of the surrounding area. To learn more, see the Carling Adrenal Center Website at  https://www.adrenal.com/, which includes  a lot of information to help readers better understand everything from lab numbers to different issues to consider. They've made a concerted effort to help patients educate themselves.
Oliver Rando is a professor and head of the Rando Lab at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. He joins the show to discuss his research on epigenetic inheritance. You’ll learn the following: How the research being done in Rando’s lab has shown that in mouse models, a father’s environment can influence some phenotypes in children When the first example of epigenetic inheritance was discovered in mammals, and how it adds to the understanding of both Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome Whether or not the evidence suggests that changes through epigenetic inheritance may be additive in nature or have the ability to be “locked in” after multiple generations are exposed When data that doesn’t belong to the DNA sequence itself affects the phenotype of an organism in some way, and when that phenotypic change is passed on from a parent to a child, epigenetic inheritance is said to occur. It was only two or three decades ago that there was near consensus in the scientific community that epigenetic information could not be passed between generations. However, a growing number of research studies are now showing that that’s simply not the case. One such study is taking place in Oliver Rando’s lab, where he and his team are using mouse models to demonstrate that the environmental conditions of a father can impact the phenotype of the father’s offspring. In addition to discussing the details of his research, Rando touches on the nature of some other interesting types of research going on in the area of epigenetic inheritance. He also talks about the limitations and gaps in this type of research, and what he aims to accomplish in the coming years. Tune in for the full conversation and learn more at https://www.umassmed.edu/randolab/.
Health coach, author, and top-ranking podcast host Abel James discusses his journey towards health and fitness. When you listen in, you'll hear How a health crisis in his twenties led to today's healthy approach, What his personal daily eating habits are in terms of interval fasting, and Tips on starting a similar path for your own health and fitness goals. Abel James hosts the popular podcast Fat Burning Man, writes a blog, and has published several books including The Wild Diet. In this conversation, he shares why he first decided to shift away from popular eating trends towards a direction that made more sense for what his body was telling him. As he turned away from the carb-loading habit runner's magazines were advising and embraced whole foods, he found a dramatically different health and fitness level.  He talks about the fear-based approach mainstream voices lend to eating choices as well as the circular nature of eating processed foods and experiencing increased cravings for more unhealthy foods. Abel notes that when we step back and eat more as our grandparents might have with a focus on less processed ingredients and more substance, we end up healthier. He also brings in how this different eating emphasis lends itself to interval fasting. By eating more satisfying foods that don't induce craving, ultimately he's able to spend less time eating and more time being active and productive.  For more, see his web page at https://fatburningman.com/, which links to his blog, podcasts, and books. It also provides a way to contact him for coaching opportunities and links to courses.
Dr. Gupta, a leading expert on liver processes and gastroenterology, explains both the science behind how the liver works and the latest efforts towards treating liver diseases. He discusses:  The types of damage that preclude liver regeneration, such as Tylenol overdoses, and why doctors then turn to liver transplants, How liver transplants work across different liver damage scenarios, and  Additional new treatments and research such as tissue engineering, liver regeneration through drug-based approaches, and therapy through cell transplants. Dr. Gupta is a professor of medicine specializing in gastroenterology and liver diseases at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and serves as the Eleazar and Feige Reicher Chair in Translational Medicine. In this podcast, he answers questions about how the liver works, what makes it stop working, and the many ways doctors can then approach medical treatments.  He explains that understanding how the liver is divided, from lobes and sub-compartments to drainage ducts and blood vessels, is important in how a successful transplant and then regeneration can move forward for both the donor and the patient with the damaged liver in cases of liver diseases. But he also explains the immense variety of approaches therein, such as some patients having a "temporary liver" implanted for use until their native liver has more time to regenerate and heal.  Dr. Gupta also explains how the gastroenterology system initiates liver regeneration in conditions of liver diseases. He describes the two pathways toward self-regeneration: hepatocyte division and stem cell or progenitor cell activation. But he also explains how these pathways are connected to liver cancers alongside additional risk factors. Finally, Dr. Gupta comments that researchers can learn from how the liver functions and apply this activity to cures for other organ diseases such as diabetes when the cells stop making insulin. There's hope that the liver regeneration system can lead to the successful regeneration of the insulin-making cells. He finishes the conversation by discussing recent breakthroughs in treating liver diseases such as drug-based therapies to enhance liver regeneration.  For more, including links to his papers, see his web page at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine: http://www.einstein.yu.edu/faculty/8041/sanjeev-gupta/
Dr. Suravajhala works as a dry biologist in next-generation genome-sequencing research. In this podcast, he explains  what we still don't know about the human genome despite the first sequencing in 2003, the difference between introns and exons, and what exactly next-generation sequencing offers scientists in locating mutations that lead to disease. Dr. Suravajhala is a Senior Scientist of Systems Biology in the Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics at Birla Institute in Jaipur, India. He works on next-generation sequencing to better-identify disease-causing mutations. Specifically, this means he works with the protein-coding exome, which makes up about 1.8% of the genome in an arrangement of exons.  As a dry biologist working in systems biology and clinical exomes, he utilizes the newest technology to get a closer look at these exons for sequencing, separating out what is called exon "chunks." To explain next-generation sequencing compared to the initial sequencing, he uses an aerial view analogy, likening the next-generation work as akin to 100x while the 2003 view is more of a 10x magnification. He explains this in more detail and describes how this larger map of about 150 bases at a time can help identify disease-causing mutations, such as a case he worked on that involved the rare disease pouch colon. He and his team were able to identify the mutations that were only present in affected family members. For more information, search pub med and google scholar for papers by Dr. Prashanth N Suravajhala.
Roy A. Black holds a Ph.D. in biochemistry and is a professor at the University of Washington. His research expertise has to do with something that almost every human being has wondered at one point or another: how did life as we know it comes to be? On today’s podcast, Dr. Black talks about the following: What explanation might account for the development and survival of cells despite harsh environments in early life How the relationship between complexity and stability might explain the aggregation of the building blocks of life (e.g. RNA, proteins, fatty acids) How it comes to be that forces like natural selection act upon a molecule Before diving into the field of research on the origin of life, Dr. Black spent many years in biotechnology and the pharmaceutical industry. Having always felt a drive toward understanding our history, he became increasingly compelled to research something that’s been largely unaddressed by scientists: how life began. Answering this question or at least getting closer to an answer will not only satisfy human curiosity but allow for us to say with more confidence what probability there is of other forms of simple or complex life in the universe. Among a number of interesting topics, Dr. Black talks about his hypothesis as to how the building blocks of RNA and protein first came together, and how the answer might explain cell division and molecular stability. He explains the component parts of a cell, similarities between the biochemistry of different species on earth, and what he wants to answer as a researcher on the origin of life.  
Over the course of the past decade or so, there’s been a huge influx of genomic data due to better and more affordable sequencing technologies. How does anyone make sense of it all?  Simon Sadedin joins the show to answer this question and explain his role as a bioinformatician at Victorian Clinical Genetics Services. He talks about the following: How useful bioinformatics is and why it’s become increasingly necessary in recent years What types of difficulties and philosophical dilemmas are encountered by clinical geneticists How short-read sequencing differs from long-read sequencing in important ways Victorian Clinical Genetics Services perform genetic and genomic testing for patients who have or are at risk of developing rare genetic disorders. The amount of data that can be gathered in this field of work is significant, which can complicate the process of providing patients with easy-to-understand, useful information that applies to their lives and the lives of their loved ones. This is where bioinformatics aims to be most useful. Sadedin explains the three primary roles of the bioinformatic work he carries out at Victorian Clinical Genetics Services, and explains that the ultimate goal is to improve patients’ experiences and the quality of healthcare on the whole. He also talks about the ways in which it can be a challenge or even impossible to elucidate what a certain genetic or genomic result means for a specific person, the advantages and drawbacks of current versus emerging sequencing technologies, and how useful it is to obtain genomic data from people who are unaffected by certain rare genetic disorders.   For more, visit https://www.vcgs.org.au/ and https://www.mcri.edu.au/.
Dr. Onyinye Iweala is a professor of medicine in the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy & Immunology at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine whose expertise lies in environmental allergies, including allergic rhinitis, chronic hives, and food allergies. She joins the show to talk about a number of interesting topics, such as: What factors might be causing or contributing to a food allergy epidemic in developed countries The relationship between microbiota and food allergy, allergic rhinitis, and chronic sinusitis Hypotheses as to why some food allergies can be outgrown by a certain percentage of those affected, and why others cannot How the new and only FDA-approved treatment for food allergy works What happens physiologically during an alpha-gal allergy As a junior in college, Dr. Iweala took her first basic immunology class and pretty much knew that that was the path she wanted to pursue as a doctor. Not only did she find it complicated and fascinating, but also very relevant to human health. In recent years, food allergy has been on the rise, particularly in industrial countries like the U.S. This has caused concern for many people, especially since there has only very recently been a food allergy treatment on the market. Dr. Iweala discusses how this new drug functions in the body, and how it is based on the principles of oral immunotherapy.  She also explains the standard understanding of IgE-mediated allergy responses, and how a non IgE-mediated allergy response prompted by an alpha-gal allergy is unique and challenging to detect. She touches on a number of other interesting subjects, such as how multiple food allergies in a single person might be treated, the goal of recent and ongoing studies in the field, and much more.
In this podcast, Dr. Holly Kramer, Professor of Public Health Sciences and Medicine at Loyola University, Chicago, talks about her research in nephrology, and the links between obesity and kidney disease.  Podcast Points: What is the kidney’s primary function? What exactly is nephrology? An overview of obesity-related diseases and problems Dr. Kramer discusses the alarming escalation of obesity in America, and its association to kidney disease, diabetes, hypertension, and other health problems. Dr. Kramer focuses her research on important areas that have an affect on public health. She talks about the interconnections between nutrition and obesity and kidney disease.  Dr. Kramer talks in detail about her current research, and why she is so intensely interested in the role obesity plays in so many diseases. Throughout her career she has worked with many other nephrologists and focused her attention on new ways to treat health ailments, such as kidney stones, kidney failure, and hypertension. Dr. Kramer explains how we lose kidney function as we grow older. She provides a wealth of information on muscle movement and creatine. As she details, when creatine gets old it loses an important water group and thus becomes creatinine, which is actually a waste product produced by muscles from this breakdown. When creatinine leaks into the bloodstream it is then filtered by the kidney. Dr. Kramer states that by looking at levels of creatinine in the blood, they can get a sense of how well the kidney is actually functioning. Continuing, the research doctor provides extensive information on diabetes, discussing insulin, medication, and how ketones are created.
In this podcast, Michelle Mullaley, PhD, Licensed Clinical Psychologist, discusses sleep issues, psychology, child psychology, and the techniques and tools she utilizes to help people at her clinic. Podcast Points: Do kids have different sleep problems than adults? Can ADHD impact sleep? Which cognitive tools can help with calming, relaxation, and anxiety relief? Dr. Mullaley is a seasoned clinical psychology expert. She specializes in child and family psychology. She earned her doctorate at Catholic University in Washington, DC. Dr. Mullaley discusses her background and current focus. As an active researcher, Dr. Mullaley does a lot of testing in addition to her regular schedule of therapy.  Dr. Mullaley talks in detail about sleep problems, specifically sleep deprivation that kids and teens struggle with. As she states, falling asleep can be difficult for some, especially in kids who have ADHD. She provides a wealth of information on circadian rhythms and how they can shift through our lives. As a result of this shifting, some teens tend to feel very awake even late at night, but when they have to get up early to get to school, their bodies feel sleep deprived because they are craving that full nine hours of relaxing sleep but aren’t getting it.  Dr. Mullaley discusses cases she deals with, in regard to sleep problems and issues. The clinical psychologist discusses multiple techniques and treatments—including cognitive challenging, which is a cognitive behavior technique used to bring on calming and relief from anxiety. Continuing, Dr. Mullaley discusses breathing, yoga, various imagery techniques, and even some apps that can help kids, and adults, to relax and calm themselves, which can assist with falling asleep, and getting better sleep. Expanding her discussion on sleep issues, Dr. Mullaley talks about melatonin and how it can play a role in sleep and why we have different issues as we get older. Wrapping up, she talks about the impact of technology, and how smartphones are one thing we should detach ourselves from when we want to fall asleep, and get quality sleep.
Associate professor of sport and exercise physiology, Brendan Egan, PhD has studied physiology and nutrition since he was an undergraduate student. On today’s episode, he discusses how training and nutritional interventions can help slow the loss and decline of muscle mass, function, and strength in ageing adults. Tune in to learn the following: At what ages muscle mass, muscle strength, and aerobic fitness tend to start decreasing, and what types of exercise and diet-related interventions can help Why it can be challenging for adults to consume the recommended amount of protein per meal, and some innovative ideas for addressing this What Dr. Egan has learned from working with elite athletes, and how it’s translated to his work with older adults   “I don’t think there’s an example of a society or a population that’s physically inactive and healthy. We have to acknowledge that physical activity is imperative to health when it comes to the human condition,” says Dr. Egan. He explains that while an adult—without the appropriate interventions—can lose 30 to 50 percent of their muscle mass between the ages of 40 to 80, it is a process that ultimately tapers out. In contrast, muscle strength and function can decline until a person is rendered unable to take care of themselves or even walk. For this reason, he and his group are primarily focused on interventions that address and slow the decline of muscle strength and function that occurs with age. Dr. Egan talks about the importance of resistance and strength-based training and extra protein intake in slowing the decline of muscle function and strength. He explains that some people can benefit even from a single hour of strength training per week, while others might require more frequent training sessions.  Press play for the full conversation and view Dr. Egan’s profile at https://www.dcu.ie/researchsupport/research-profile?PERSON_ID=1631629.
Without long chain omega-3 fatty acids, the development of the brain and nervous system would be impossible. This begs the question: what effects arise from long chain omega-3 fatty acid deficiency? Dr. Alex Richardson joins the show to discuss the following: What has caused nutritional imbalances globally and particularly in those who consume a Western diet In what ways omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids differ How short chain fatty acids differ in important ways from long chain fatty acids What the data suggests about the use of long chain omega-3 fatty acids as antidepressants Dr. Alex Richardson is a research associate in the Department of Physiology, Anatomy, and Genetics at the University of Oxford, and founder of Food and Behavior (FAB) Research. Her interest in researching the role of nutrition in physical and mental health was triggered during her postdoctoral studies when she discovered how impactful long chain omega-3 fatty acids are on vision. Since then, she’s been investigating how this essential nutrient may be related to conditions like ADHD, dyslexia, and disorders that fall on the autism spectrum.  Dr. Richardson published her first study about two decades ago, which demonstrated that omega-3 fatty acids could lower impulsivity, inattention, and hyperactivity in children with above average levels of these. Through a second study, she showed that omega-3 fatty significantly improved reading, spelling, and symptoms of ADHD in children.   Dr. Richardson already has protocols set for two more studies: one that will look at the effects of omega-3 on sleep, and how sleep may be associated with ADHD and autism, and a second that will look at the relationship between omega-3 and sleep health, and common mental health conditions like stress and depression. Tune in for a compelling show that’s full of eye-opening and powerful information. Learn more by visiting https://www.fabresearch.org/viewItem.php.
Richard J. Schwab, MD, DABSM, Head of Sleep Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, and the Co-Medical Director, Penn Sleep Center, discusses the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea, and obstructive sleep apnea treatment. Podcast Points: What is obstructive sleep apnea? What causes sleep apnea in some, when others seem to avoid it, and what can you do about it? How do soft tissues impact sleep? Dr. Schwab provides some background on his work and the various sleep problems that exist. He talks about sleep apnea, and why there is so much left to understand. Why does it happen when we sleep? He discusses soft tissue structures and lateral walls and other factors that can lead to airway paths collapsing.  Dr. Schwab’s extensive research seeks to target the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea by using advanced upper airway imaging techniques. His studies help further explain the motion of various key structures of the upper airway and the role they play in airway closure. Dr. Schwab talks about the biomechanics of apneic events. He provides information on how they utilize magnetic resonance imaging and electronic beam computed tomography during sleep, as well as wakefulness, to study patients. Dr. Schwab talks about abnormal craniofacial structures as well as soft tissue, and how they can potentially impact sleep apnea occurrences. He discusses mouth breathing, studies they conducted on tongue fat, and how it all could impact breathing issues. As he states, if you naturally have a narrow airway, as movement occurs when you sleep, apnea could be initiated. He provides an in-depth discussion of how tissues move, and studies they have done on wakefulness. But he states there are more studies on sleep and breathing that they plan to do in the near future.  Dr. Schwab, through his exhaustive research annually, collaborates regularly with members of the Departments of Radiology and Biomechanical and Computer Engineering. And together, the scientific researcher/developers have designed an extremely advanced, computer graphics-based analysis software that can assist with modeling, in three dimensions, of the biomechanical interrelationships that exist between soft tissue structures and the upper airway.
Dr. Walter studies the many functions of RNA, which combines into the most copious enzyme on our planet. RNA research is catching up with the rest of our genetic findings after DNA dominated the field for so long. Dr. Walter plows into this knowledge by discussing how the extra base oxygen in RNA gives it different abilities than DNA; the many different functional RNA types, from general assembly instructions to specialized directions for unique adjustments; and  how RNA may have been the first spark igniting life at the bottom of the oceans. Dr. Nils Walter is the Francis S. Collins Collegiate Professor of chemistry, biophysics, and biological chemistry at the University of Michigan. He's also the founding codirector of the Center for RNA Biomedicine. The center researches foundational biological RNA discoveries and translates them for use towards future medicines. Dr. Walter has been researching at the University of Michigan for 20 years; for the most part, his work has been focused on functional RNA types. In this conversation he offers a non-coding RNA review and recounts numerous discoveries, such as the structure and function connection and why it’s important that RNA has a more transient nature than DNA. He expands on this review by reminding listeners that when the human genome was sequenced in 2003, researchers discovered that just 1.5% of the genome codes for proteins while the rest is transcribed into RNA. These RNAs form multiple structures that become functional RNA types. As he continues with his non-coding RNA review, he explains that RNA folds into intricate 3D architectures, which enables them to take on complex functions such as the formation of ribosomes. Dr. Nils describes additional jobs of the RNA molecule and articulates how these discoveries will lend themselves to future medicines. For more, see his lab page at https://sites.lsa.umich.edu/walter-lab/ as well as the Center for RNA Biomedicine page at https://rna.umich.edu/.
In this podcast, Larry Simpson, PhD, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, UCLA, provides an overview of his long career in scientific research. Podcast Points: A discussion of RNA editing What’s in a genome?  How does RNA modification occur? Dr. Simpson has long been interested in the molecular biology of the mitochondrial genome of trypanosomes. He was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, and throughout his extensive and celebrated career, Dr. Simpson was elected as a Foreign Member of the Brazilian Academy of Science, as well as a distinguished Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, and as a Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Simpson provides some information about his background, past work, and current research. He talks about his career studying the molecular biology of the mitochondrial genome of trypanosomes, and why this area of study interested him so intently. Continuing, Dr. Simpson discusses the types of molecules he studied in past research.  Throughout the years of research, Dr. Simpson spent a fair amount of time investigating a novel type of RNA modification phenomenon known as ‘RNA editing,’ which occurs in the single mitochondrion. Dr. Simpson goes on to discuss DNA molecules, modification, translation, gene sequences, bacteria and function, and ‘guide RNAs.’ He provides an overview of enzymes within the mitochondrion, discussing types of gene editing. And he goes into an in-depth discussion of how mRNA transcripts of the mitochondrial maxicircle DNA molecules are modified, after transcription, by the insertion, and deletion, of uridine residues at exact sites within coding regions to form a translatable sequence. A list of web sites where people can get information on the parasites and the diseases: Information on kinetoplast DNA with some micrographs of the network: https://kdna.net/parasite_course-old/kDNA/new_page_1.htm Larry Simpson's lab home page: https://kdna.net/simpsonlab/index.html List of published papers: https://kdna.net/simpsonlab/mybib.html Larry Simpson's online course on Molecular Parasitology: https://kdna.net/parasite_course-old/default.htm One of Larry Simpson's lectures on molecular parasitology: https://kdna.net/168-2011/168.html A database for U-insertion/deletion RNA Editing: https://kdna.net/trypanosome/database.html A web site with information on the research in Larry's laboratory: https://kdna.net/simpsonlab/research.html
Bio: A Los Angeles native, Babak holds a clinical doctorate in clinical psychology from the California School of Professional Psychology, where he also obtained a master’s in organizational behavior. He is the originator of the moderative psychotherapy. Currently living in Portland, Oregon with his wife and children, he is in private practice at Integrative NW as a clinical and health psychologist. Babak is also a fiction author and, as Secret Arcade, a music artist. Babak’s writing debuted in North American Review (“Fighting Fish”), and he was a finalist for a Glimmer Train award. His story “Glow,” published in Palo Alto Review, was deemed “flawless” and “brilliant” by Shenandoah literary review. His book, a dystopian psychological novel, A-Void, examines accelerating (exponential) change and information overload, and was selected as a Top Ten Book of 2018. Secret Arcade’s debut electronic rock album, Quarter Century, skyrocketed on college radio. A popular docu-series on A&E/Lifetime recently offered him a role, but he turned it down to focus on his theory, his writing, his music, and his family. In this podcast, Babak Govan, PhD, MAOB, psychologist at Integrative NW, provides an overview of insomnia treatment, psychopathology, and more. Podcast Points: Could too much ‘bad’ news in our daily feed be bringing on depression? Can insomnia be cured? Treatment options An overview of psychological issues Dr. Govan is actively engaged in helping people manage their anxiety and depression, ADHD, self-defeating behaviors, and substance abuse. Dr. Govan talks about his background and discusses health psychology, the interface of medical and psychological issues. Going deeper, Dr. Govan explains how his practice subspecializes in treating insomnia. Dr. Govan explains just how common depression is today in America, and he discusses the various sociogenic factors that may be exacerbating the rise in depression cases nationally. Dr. Govan discusses tools to manage psychological issues, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, but he stresses that cognitive behavioral therapy, CBT, is only one possible avenue for treatment. The PhD elaborates on the importance of limiting our negative influencers, such as the preponderance of negative news that is seemingly always breaking. He discusses his thoughts on the relative impact of modern technology that delivers news 24/7, and ways we can limit our exposure to negative influences. Continuing, the doctor discusses the concept of loneliness, and how technology may be severely disconnecting us. Dr. Govan talks about the kinds of clients they work with. He discusses the problem of insomnia, which can be a psychodynamic, deeper issue. He discusses abrupt insomnia versus cases in which people have had chronic sleep problems for a long period, and how the latter understand that it could be a long term issue for them to solve over time. Dr. Govan reiterates the importance of taking control of the environments in which we exist. He talks about time management, as well as journalistic errors, and how so often in our modern society, things fall through the cracks. Wrapping up, Dr. Govan provides information on the specific types of cases they deal with at Integrative NW, and how they seek to help people manage their many and varied issues.
In this podcast, Dr. Ty Carzoli, chiropractor at Denver Upper Cervical Chiropractic, discusses his facility and their work, providing information on chiropractic orthospinology, treatment, and care. Podcast Points: What are some of the reasons we have neck or back pain? Too much sitting: not a good thing! Overview of the kinds of testing used to assess who should receive cervical chiropractic care Denver Upper Cervical Chiropractic provides chiropractic care to people who suffer from pain and discomfort. Dr. Carzoli earned a doctorate of chiropractic and he holds a master’s degree in sports health science. Dr. Carzoli discusses neck and back problems, explaining the many issues his team treats at their facility, such as migraines and headaches, post-concussion syndrome, neck and back pain, seizures, and more. Dr. Carzoli explains how they exam new potential clients, starting with a complete and thorough digital x-ray analysis to fully assess the current structure, position, and motion of their spine. Testing motor skills and grip strength, Dr. Carzoli makes an assessment and decides if the incoming potential client would benefit from treatment. Further, Dr. Carzoli talks about adjustments, and discusses how the body keeps us aligned, and why alignment issues may happen. He talks in detail about the unnatural forces we can experience at times, from high-impact collisions to excessive sitting, etc. These events, activities, or non-activities, can definitely cause damage to our bodies, and it is Dr. Carzoli’s mission to assist everyone with their pain and discomfort.
Comments (230)

Ronald Smith

Is the best Pod

May 17th
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Wilbur Rutherford

Very Cool

May 17th
Reply

James Hodges

I love all episode.

May 15th
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Jonathan Snyder

Great podcast

May 15th
Reply

George Lopez

Brilliant

May 15th
Reply

Howard McCarthy

Richard Jacobs is best

May 12th
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Robert Smith

Love it

May 12th
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Brett Hernandez

My favorite podcast

May 10th
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Lloyd Rushing

Most listen

May 10th
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Daniel McElroy

Amazing Show

May 8th
Reply

Steven Hunt

Looking for more

May 8th
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Charles Robinson

Good Podcast

May 8th
Reply

Guillermo Clift

Great all episode

May 5th
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Harry Branch

My favorite pod

May 4th
Reply

William Peach

Great, Thank you ❤️

May 4th
Reply

Jim Laroche

i found it great 👍

May 2nd
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Russel Freeman

perfect , thank you❤

May 2nd
Reply

Richard Maggi

👍👍🌹

May 2nd
Reply

Cyril Wilson

Great message

May 2nd
Reply

Brandon Cervantes

loooooove this

Apr 27th
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