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Finding Genius Podcast

Finding Genius Podcast

Author: Richard Jacobs

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Podcast interviews with genius-level (top .1%) practitioners, scientists, researchers, clinicians and professionals in Cancer, 3D Bio Printing, CRISPR-CAS9, Ketogenic Diets, the Microbiome, Extracellular Vesicles, and more.

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Honey bees are one of the most fascinating and complex social organisms on our planet. Scientists like Gene Robinson research how their genomics play a central role in this behavior and how their environment in turn affects their genes. Listen and learn How the honey bee colony is surprisingly flexible and adaptive to changes in numbers and situations, How the genomics discipline altered scientists' one-directional arrow from gene to behavior to a two-directional model, and What developmental milestones a honey bee passes to make it through to full-forager status. Gene Robinson is the director of the Carl R.Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, an institute that practices team science within a multi-disciplinary scheme. He's been studying entomology and different species of bees for over 45 years. In this conversation, he shares some fascinating notes about honey bee behavior with listeners. His group in the institute in particular looks at their social behavior mechanisms and evolution from a genomics perspective. Interestingly, he says that studies indicate layers of individuality and adaptability in bee society—not only are they not all "marching to the same orders," they can change behavior depending on what is happening with the colony. In one study, his lab monitored the entry and exit of the hive and found that a minority of the hive worked as foragers. In addition, a small group within the foragers took on a significant 50% of the work. However, when they removed those power-house foragers, the colony did not collapse. Rather, the other bees "upped their foraging game" and made up for the loss. "So while labor is apportioned, it's not fixed and there's flexibility," adds Robinson. He describes other remarkable modes of flexibility, from pheromone releasing and withholding to determine maturity rates to how a hive survives a queen loss. Along the way he explains how the history of genomics has rearranged how biologists look at bee behavior and development from transcriptomic studies. In fact, dramatic changes are evident in bee brain gene activity depending on their rearing conditions. Based on these studies, their genome is very sensitive to the environment. For more, see the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology and Gene Robinson's lab website. Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
“…Their society and community is so complicated, that in fact you cannot really have a straight answer for why something is happening. You need to see it from a global perspective, and look at it from different angles…it’s the complexity that makes it fascinating for me,” says Dr. Fani Hatjina of bees, which have been the subject of her work for her entire professional life. She focuses specifically on social honey bees, and joins the show to discuss her current research goals and insights. Press play to discover: What royal jelly is, and how it is used by bees and humans How nectar is converted to honey Why beekeepers and scientists are particularly interested in studying and monitoring beehives during the winter months, and the challenges to doing so How bees carry pollen back to the beehive Dr. Hatjina is Director of the Institute of Animal Science & Department of Apiculture in Greece. After completing her PhD on the pollination behavior of bees, she went on to pursue additional research. Currently, her focus is on finding ways of increasing the resistance of local honey bee populations against a primary pest (the varroa mite), searching for alternative methods of controlling disease without chemicals, improving and preserving the local population of honey bees in Greece for the benefit of the species and for beekeepers, and studying the effects of pesticides and other environmental stressors on bees, such as the presence of heavy metals, and even chemicals that are used by beekeepers inside bee colonies. Dr. Hatjina explains ‘pollination behavior,’ which includes the way bees move inside the colony and on flowers or crops, how efficiently they transport pollen, and when they transport pollen. The idea is that by gaining a deeper understanding of this behavior, pollination efficiency can be increased. She also comments on the “many gaps in knowledge” when it comes to understanding what triggers the increase of pathogens and bee mortality in winter. Sensors inside or underneath bee colonies are being implemented in order to gain a better idea of the possible variables contributing to it, as well as generate some sort of image of what is going on within a bee hive during winter months. Infrared light can also be used to gather valuable information about the heat generated by the bees, the size of the swarm inside a colony, the position of bees inside a colony, and how these things can change according to the external temperature. Interested in learning more? Tune in for the full conversation and check out Dr. Hatjina’s publications at https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Fani_Hatjina. Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
Bees can generate five pounds of honey a day under prime nectar-gathering conditions. Numerous factors make that possible and researchers like William Meikle work on modeling honey bee populations, keeping track of how different stressors might affect honey bee colony health. Listen and learn What measures are important for beehive modeling and why, How bees are able to keep their brood area at a constant warm temperature, and What bee health productivity stressors are being analyzed and why, such as neonicotinoid exposure.  Willliam G. Meikle is a research entomologist with the United States Department of Agriculture. He studies the colony-level behavior of bees through placing sensors on colonies and monitoring them over long periods of time. This can gather evidence for how they might respond to sub lethal pesticides and other stressors. He's therefore constantly measuring things like hive weight, temperature, CO2, and internal humidity. These measures are akin to numbers from a monitor your doctor might have used to check your health. Various measures might indicate your activity, from sleeping to eating to drinking a cup of coffee.  No, bees don't drink coffee, but they do get exposed to neonicotinoids, which are a common type of agriculture insecticide affecting bees. Even at low amounts, he says he can see some sort of impact. Higher levels seem to cause bees to stop foraging, for example. Temperature is another abiotic factor he monitors. Bees have an amazing ability to keep the center area, the brood area, quite warm and constant. Bee social behavior is more than just an inclination. Rather, they work as a superorganism, teaming up and taking turns to use their thoracic muscle movement to warm the center of the hive one by one. A healthy brood is dependent on this constant warmth, and bee population increase can only happen with successful brood rearing. Listen in for more indications of bee colony health. For more about his work, see the USDA Honey Bee web page. Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
Pesticides, poor nutrition, pests, and parasites: these are the four factors influencing bee health around the world, and the amount of information we have about each—how exactly they impact bees, whether each relates to the others, and what can be done about them—is constantly growing. Press play to learn: How a particular fungicide may be altering the bioavailability of a critical micronutrient for bees Where bees are kept during commercial pollination, and how this may be contributing to poor nutrition What indicates health within a bee colony, and what metrics are used to measure the health of a bee colony Priyadarshini Chakrabarti Basu is a postdoctoral research associate at Oregon State University Honey Bee Lab, and for over a decade now, she’s been studying environmental impacts on bee populations. Basu’s current work focuses on two specific areas within this field of research: pesticides and poor nutrition. She’s not only investigating each individually, but exploring the ways in which they may be interconnected. When it comes to nutrition, she explains that most research to date has looked into the macronutrients required by bees, which are primarily carbohydrates and proteins. Only recently have a couple of research groups—including hers—put their focus on the importance of micronutrients required by bees. Phytosterols are a group of molecules similar to cholesterol that are a required micronutrient for bees, as they fulfill several functions, including the production of important hormones and the maintenance of cell membrane integrity. Bees source phytosterols naturally from plant pollens, so Basu and the OSU Honey Bee Lab team is trying to collect as many types of pollen as possible in order to look at the phytosterol spectrum available to bees, and determine how they might be able to add this critical micronutrient to the diet of bees that are lacking it. Basu is also involved in a project which is being carried out in collaboration with growers and beekeepers with the goal of following hives across multiple cropping systems in order to evaluate colony health and growth, as well as assess individual bee physiology. The ins and outs of the research being done at the OSU Honey Bee Lab are brought to light in today’s episode, along with many other informative and interesting aspects of bee health, types of apiculture (beekeeping), commercial crop production, methods of pollination (including cross-pollination and self-pollination), and more. Tune in and visit https://honeybeelab.oregonstate.edu/. Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
As we look back on the pandemic, there are clear ways in which our public health strategies failed. From the quarantine to vaccines, understanding the pitfalls in our response will enable us to do better in the future. But who’s brave enough to step forward and identify these issues? Dr. Martin Kulldorff joins the podcast to shed some light on the subject… Dr. Kulldorff is an epidemiologist, a biostatistician, and a founding fellow at Hillsdale College’s Academy for Science and Freedom. He has also been a Professor of Medicine at Harvard University for thirteen years. As the co-author of the Great Barrington Declaration, he advocated for a pandemic strategy of focused protection instead of lockdowns during the 2020 health crisis. Dr. Kulldorff is an expert in infectious disease outbreaks who researches surveillance methods for post-market drug and vaccine safety and early detection and monitoring. How has his perspective shifted the conventional pandemic narrative? Tune in now to find out! In this conversation, we dive into: Why Sweden did so well during and after the pandemic. Dr. Kulldorff’s initial response to COVID-19. Why news outlets were ignoring basic public health principles. Whether or not masks were effective in preventing disease transmission. You can learn more about Dr. Kulldorff and his work by following his Twitter! Want to find out more about Michael and his research? Click here to view his Stanford profile, and here to purchase his latest book! Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
Dr. Michael Marmor, Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology at Stanford University, delves into the captivating realm of the human eye in this thought-provoking podcast episode. Focusing on the profound impact of eyes on various facets of human experience, Dr. Marmor shares his insights and expertise on this intriguing topic — particularly in the realm of art. Dr. Marmor's research interests cover several areas, including the physiology and pathophysiology of retina and pigment epithelium, electrophysiological retinal and RPE function tests, and newer electroretinographic techniques such as multifocal ERG recording. Additionally, he is interested in the relationship between human vision and art, music, history, literature, and sports… Tune in now to uncover: How the human eye and the brain are connected.  What the retina is composed of.  Key facts about how the eye perceives and transmits images.  What is at the core of how the eye sees the world. Whether you’re interested in eye health or the science of art, this conversation promises to captivate and educate. Don't miss out on this engaging discussion that sheds light on the wonders of the human eye and its significance in shaping our perception of the world around us! Want to find out more about Michael and his research? Click here to view his Stanford profile, and here to purchase his latest book! Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
Bonnie J. Kaplan, Professor Emerita at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Canada, and author of The Better Brain: Overcome Anxiety, Combat Depression, and Reduce ADHD and Stress with Nutrition, expresses bewilderment at the reluctance of people to explore a subject so fundamental to our biology. What she's referring to is the intricate relationship between nutrition and brain function, which significantly impacts mental health and overall well-being. Despite common misconceptions, Dr. Kaplan asserts that nutrition is crucial to brain health, mental stability, and life quality. Throughout her career, she has faced numerous challenges in advocating for the use of nutrients in treating mental health issues, emphasizing the biological underpinnings of behavior, and highlighting the impact of nutrition on brain development and function. Intrigued? Dive deeper into: The prevalence of irritability and mood dysregulation across various mental health conditions The notion that mental illness often stems from inadequate nutrient support for the brain Dr. Kaplan's recommendations for a brain-boosting diet The scientifically backed advantages of incorporating a comprehensive micronutrient formula alongside a nutritious diet The role of media coverage in shaping public perception and the challenges it poses Interested in learning more? Tune in for the entire conversation, check out the book The Better Brain: Overcome Anxiety, Combat Depression, and Reduce ADHD and Stress with Nutrition, and visit Bonnie J Kaplan, Ph.D. Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
In this episode, we sit down with Jason P. Dworkin to discuss the cosmos in unprecedented ways. Always interested in the origin of life, Jason is a Senior Scientist for Astrobiology at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center who uses meteoritics, astrobiology, and analytical chemistry to observe our universe and uncover its hidden mysteries. Currently, Jason is working on the OSIRIS-REx mission as a project scientist, contamination science lead, and sample analyst. This mission has several major objectives:  To understand how life on Earth formed and evolved within a planetary context.  Return and analyze a sample of Bennu’s surface Map the asteroid Document the sample site Measure the orbit deviation caused by non-gravitational forces   Compare observations at the asteroid to ground-based observations How does Jason’s work explore life's origin and early evolution while also focusing on the extraterrestrial input and the origin of various molecules? From modern analytical methods to laboratory models of ancient environments, he takes on an intriguing journey into the heart of his research… To learn more about Jason and his work, click here now! Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9 Valuable insights and resources shared by  Jason P. Dworkin: Returned sample: https://blogs.nasa.gov/osiris-rex/2024/02/15/nasa-announces-osiris-rex-bulk-sample-mass/ Maneuvers around Bennu: https://youtu.be/nx1r3HPGC_c?si=mHJ0GdcL6VZYsCAw Surface of Bennu: https://youtu.be/42EwbQ3afPA?si=RHR-0fP0GZp1iGDm Bennu’s orbit and selection: https://youtu.be/Q3qiPXP57SE?si=QqQgKWdTGs8WbMht Bennu impact hazard: orbit in 2135 and 2182: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4921/ Working in the cleanroom: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVKwneTwWm0 Sample return: https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasahqphoto/albums/72177720311435828/ More information: https://science.nasa.gov/mission/osiris-rex https://www.asteroidmission.org https://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/osirisrex/ https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/search/?missions=OSIRIS-REX https://plus.nasa.gov/?s=osiris-rex
Today, we connect with Thomas Licker to discuss his decades of experience managing biohazard investigations and remediations. As a certified bio-environmental infection control remediator and recovery master, Thomas serves as the president of the American Bio-Recovery Association. Here, he has helped create and publish the Bio Recovery Site Risk Assessment (BSRA) guidance document and the Restoration Industry Association (RIA) Environmental Risk Specialist (ERS) program.  Thomas studied environmental science in college. After researching soil, brown water, air, and industrial hygiene, he found himself working for the US Environmental Protection Agency as a contractor — remediating some of the nation's worst sites. Now, he is in the biohazard response industry full-time, a field of work he has discovered a deep passion for… In this conversation, we cover: What biohazard response is, and why it is a necessary service.  How to properly respond to biohazard scenes. OSHA requirements for this type of work.  How the opioid crisis impacts Thomas’s work in biohazard remediation.  To learn more about Thomas and his work, click here now! Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
In this episode, we are joined by Dr. Erika Kohler, a Research Space Scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. With a Ph.D. in Space and Planetary Science and a BS in Meteorology, Dr. Kohler’s research focuses on providing laboratory data that can inform and validate scientific models and mission observations. She does this by designing innovative experiments that simulate the extreme environments found on other planets –  pushing the boundaries of laboratory research as we know it. Dr. Kohler has always been interested in weather and planets, and she built her career on studying these things in tandem. Setting her sights on our sister planet, Venus, she shares some intriguing insights on its atmosphere, surface, and more… Dive in now to find out:  How data is collected for Venus.  The complicated issues that come with landing a craft on the surface of Venus.  How long it takes for probes to get to Venus, and the orbital mechanics that must be worked through.  What isotopes and gasses can tell us about the history of Venus and its current conditions.  New and exciting missions on the horizon.  To learn more about Dr. Kohler and her work, click here now! Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
In this conversation, we sit down with Will Hall, a mental health professional at the forefront of innovative psychosis treatment. He hosts Madness Radio, is the co-founder of Freedom Center, and is a counselor who works with individuals, couples, families, and groups. As a schizophrenia survivor himself, Will is on a mission to uncover new visions of mind – and redefine what it means to be human. In his book, Outside Mental Health: Voices and Visions of Madness, Will presents readers with interviews and essays that reveal the human side of mental illness. By asking, "What does it mean to be called crazy in a crazy world?" he seeks to create a new conversation about empowering the human spirit by transforming society’s perspective as a whole… Dive in now to explore: What it means to challenge the narrative of psychosis. Alternatives to medication for treating mental health issues.  A successful and widely used treatment for schizophrenia and psychosis that has been overshadowed by big pharma.  One of the worst things you can do when talking with patients about their mental health conditions.  The power of empathy and connection.  From trauma and psychosis to medication, Will’s holistic approach to mental health is changing lives across the globe. What sets him apart from other mental health advocates? Click play to find out for yourself! You can find more information about Will and his work by visiting his website. Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
In this episode, we sit down with Joan Cohen to discuss her latest book, The Deepfake: A Novel. Newly released in April 2024, Joan takes us on a journey into the life of Sylvie,  an employee at an AI company. In this gripping story, we are confronted with the ethics of AI, corporate scandals, and a woman’s self-discovery. This incredibly well-timed and thought-provoking narrative highlights the potentially harmful effects of powerful technology with wisdom – with an added bit of romance, too…  Joan is a Massachusetts-based author with a background in sales & marketing at computer hardware and software companies. Once she retired, she returned to school to pursue an MFA in Writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts. Since then, she has written two books, including The Deepfake and her 2019 release, The Land of Last Chances: A Novel. Join us now to explore: Why Joan decided to write a book on AI. When and why creatives started paying attention to AI. The difference between the quality of work created by AI and artists.  How AI may progress and develop as the future unfolds. How The Deepfake was revised and edited over time.  You can find more on Joan by visiting her website! Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
The queen bee has to get it right when she mates, because she only has one intense mating session for the duration of her life. The queen bee's anatomy and basic honey bee biology work together for success and Julian Rangel Posada tells listeners how. Listen and learn Why the queen flies a mile away to mate as well as other interesting details of honey bee social behavior,  What the exact mechanics of honey bee mating are and why drones are "expensive" to maintain, and What she's researching about pollen choice and lipid-to-protein ratios that help bees maintain health and improve recovery from viruses they contract from types of mites. Juliana Rangel Posada is an associate professor of apiculture in the Department of Entomology and leads the Texas A&M University Honey Bee Research Program. She studies biotic and abiotic factors affecting bee health. The number one problem for honey bees is the varroa mite, and she starts the conversation addressing how her lab showed that the chemicals used to treat the mites actually affects both the mites and bees. The wax that makes up the honey comb absorbs the chemicals like a sponge, and bees grow and develop within this wax home, absorbing the chemicals. The chemical buildup causes queens to develop lower reproductive capacity and also affects drone sperm and viability. She shares various ways they advise beekeepers to mitigate this affect, including clearing out the wax every few years. She also describes for listeners a detailed and fascinating description of honey bee matting, one of several honey bee behavioral adaptations evolved to increase genetic diversity and reproductive success. She explains the harsh life of the drone, reared for mating and killed off quickly after they've done their job. She also describes the drone's endophallus and how a queen manages multiple mates and their sperm by taking in this organ. The next mate removes the endophallus of the previous one and so on, until she has sperm from multiple mates to continue producing eggs for years. In addition to reproductive studies, her lab is researching foraging behavior and nutrition to see if honey bees are using certain pollens with various ratios of lipid-to-proteins that affect their survivability. For more, see her lab's Facebook page, facebook.com/TAMUhoneybeelab, which includes a "stay-at-home beekeeping series." Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
From smelly footprints and dances to furry coats and long tongues, Professor Dave Goulson from the University of Sussex talks about it all. We often refer to “bees” as though there’s only one kind, but in fact, over 20,000 species of bee have been identified. Goulson shares fascinating data and insights primarily on two: the bumblebee and the honeybee. Press play to discover: How bumblebees and honeybees differ (in many, many ways!) What two critical pieces of information are conveyed by the waggle dance of honeybees What sensing ability of bees explains why a bee may or may not choose to land on a flower for pollen or nectar Goulson’s lifelong captivation by insects led to a fascination of bees in his adult life, and for the past 25 years, he’s been studying them. Initially, the focus of his research was on the foraging strategies of different species of bee, but it’s since shifted to an investigation of why bee populations are declining, and what can be done about it. As a specialist in the ecology and conservation of bumblebees, Goulson discusses what he believes to be the primary driving force behind the declining numbers: habitat loss, such as hay meadows in the UK and prairie fields in North America. But he’s careful to note that other factors are likely at play too, including the heavy use of pesticides, and the fact that bumblebees suffer from a range of parasites and diseases. What do bumblebees eat, and which nutrients are provided by pollen versus nectar? How can seemingly strange bumblebee behaviors actually make a whole lot of evolutionary sense? How can you differentiate between a male and female bee? What exactly happens when a bee pollinates a flower? What types of technology are used for tracking and gathering data on bees? You’ll get a compelling and thorough answer to all of these questions and more. Tune in and check out https://www.thebuzzclub.uk/. Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
One in every three bites you take are made possible by honey bee pollination. Keeping bees healthy and productive is essential. Honey bee reproduction depends on a queen's ability to have one mating session, store sperm for years, and lay about 1,000 eggs a day during the warmer months: an amazing honey bee characteristic among many. Brandon Hopkins shares fascinating honey bee behavioral adaptations in this discussion. Listen and learn How a queen's anatomy and sperm morphology work to make this reproduction effective, What storage methods are best for honey bees to make the large almond yield in California possible, and How these storage methods also work best to deter certain types of mites from overtaking colonies.  Brandon Hopkins is an assistant research professor and the apiary and laboratory manager with the Washington State University Apiary Program. Studying reproductive biology across different animals led him to a honey bee obsession. "They're fascinating creatures and present lots of room for improvement in assisted reproductive techniques in honey bee breeding," he says. He gives listeners a primer on honey bee social behavior and reproduction, describing the sperm, the queen's spermatheca organ, which stores the sperm in a quiescence state over years, and the complex ability of the queen to continue laying eggs by releasing the sperm through a tube. He also gives us a glimpse into how this works over our geography. While he's worked on methods of cryopreservation of honey bee semen, he's now mainly focusing on practical aspects of beekeeping management. Over two million honey bee colonies have to be moved to California in January for February almond pollination, so the storage and transport of bees is a vital topic for research. Many beekeepers store their bees that will go to California in large warehouse-like buildings for the winter. He explains why this is an advantage, from saving their energy production to keeping mites and bee interaction at a lower state, and for a better quality of life for the keepers themselves. Listen in to understand more about the ways researchers like Brandon Hopkins are keeping bees healthy. For more about his work, see entomology.wsu.edu/directory/faculty/brandon-hopkins. Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
Bee keeping is an ancient practice: even prehistoric cave paintings in Spain depict a keeper reaching for a hive to collect honey while holding a smoker to calm the bees. Cameron Jack shares some of the more interesting details of this ancient art with lucky listeners. Tune in and hear How honey bee characteristics, bee anatomy, and evolution have led to optimal frame and hive size for beekeepers to follow, Why bees are considered a superorganism, which means a honey bee can't survive on its own, and is organized by queen, brooders, and workers, and Why Cameron Jack's prime interest is managing honey bee diseases and pests and what are the main areas of concern.  Cameron Jack holds the unusual position of one-hundred percent lecturer at the University of Florida. He's still involved in research and extension work, but his full lecturer designation means his beekeeping course list at the University of Florida is probably the most extensive college-level beekeeping instruction out there. He teaches seven different beekeeping courses, covering everything from evolution, biology, the annual cycle involved in beekeeping, and more. The courses are complete enough to turn out people who can actively be beekeepers. In this interview, he describes everything from why 3/8 inches is a magic number to how bees find and maintain hives in the wild. Honey bee behavioral adaptations of course take center stage. For hive building, beekeepers who want to maximize honey production must learn such behaviors to know why they might, for example, sequester the queen in the lower level. Bees build their combs vertically and are considered a superorganism—"the whole animal is the whole colony," he adds. They are able to determine their hive sizing in multiple ways and if it gets too big, they swarm—one colony becomes two. Furthermore, the queen designation doesn't mean ruler. She's a producer, laying as many eggs as she can in a systematic spiral through her level of the comb. Cameron Jack's primary interest is the management of pests and diseases bees face like types of mites, beetles, and even wax-eating moths. While the interaction of mites and bees is the most concerning, diseases even involve microorganisms in honey bees' guts. Listen in to hear more about this amazing superorganism. For more see the University of Florida Honey Bee Research and Extension Lab page. Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
It's estimated that 20% of our food is dependent on honey bee pollination. Meanwhile, recent news has highlighted concerns like viral diseases of the honey bee to mites to invading "killer" bees. It's hard to keep straight where honey bee diseases and treatments stand. This conversation does the trick, leaving listeners with a clear and fascinating vision of what's up with the honey bee. Listen and learn Where do our current North American honey bee populations stand and where do they fit in the larger picture of bees worldwide, What pests and diseases of the honey bee and control measures are entomologists most involved with, and How do these concerns fit within agricultural, ecology, and the backyard beekeeper. Jamie Ellis is the Gahan Endowed Professor in the Entomology and Nematology Department at the University of Florida. Fascinated with bees since childhood, he took care of his first honey bee hive at age 12 and hasn't looked back since. He's not alone: humans have been interacting with honey bees for thousands of years. While there are 20,000 of bee species worldwide, only 9 of those species are honey bees. Even more daunting, 8 of those 9 are specific to Asia. That remaining species is the one we're familiar with and it inhabits Africa, Europe, the Middle East, and North America. Honey bees are actually not native to North America; rather, Europeans brought them over hundreds of years ago. Are the populations of this one honey bee species that inhabits such disparate regions the same? Well, while it is the same species, entomologists divide it into about 30 subspecies or races, such as the African bee, which the press has misnamed the "killer bee." North American honey bees have been facing population struggles lately because of a mite, and Ellis describes various pest control and pest management plans, including nature's own adaptation through honey bee evolution. He also helps listeners with the big picture of the many reasons to raise honey bees. While many are familiar with bee hives used for honey, pollination services are also a tremendous business. Others raise colonies to sell and some keepers specialize in raising queens. For more information, including resources on your own bee keeping, see the University of Florida Honey Bee Research and Extension Lab page. Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
It's hard to imagine a world without honey, much less all the fruits they pollinate. That's one reason Zachary Huang's research into honey bee stressors is so important. Listen in as he teaches listeners about Primary bee stressors, including parasites, pathogens, pesticides, and agricultural transportation, In-depth information regarding their primary stressor, the Varroa  mite and how it harms the honey bee, and Honey bee characteristics that make them especially vulnerable to these stressors. Zachary Huang is an associate professor in the Department of Entomology at Michigan State University. He's also an avid photographer of all-things-honey bee, including the plants they pollinate. Honey bees face many stressors and are on the decline. Researchers across the country are trying to figure out why. Dr. Huang tells listeners about the Varroa destructor mite, which hitchhiked from Brazil or Asia on bees into North America. These purplish-red mites are about the size of a pinhead and feed on the fat body of the bee. They are an obligate parasite, meaning they are dependent on the bee for their life cycle. However, their bite transmits several viruses, which weaken and affect the bee anatomy and eventually lead to the death of the bee and increased hive vulnerability. These types of mites are actually responsible for the death of 35% of honey bees a year. Honey bee social behavior increases mite transmission likelihood. They can be transmitted from drifting, if a bee goes to the wrong nest and brings a mite back, or if a new colony takes over another colony's site. Researchers have tried several methods to combat these mites, from chemical methods to Dr. Huang's own method of "zapping" the drones and mites, killing them with heat so that infected drones and mites die and the colony is free to recover. Other research explores utilizing honey bee behavioral adaptations like grooming behaviors and hygiene, working on breeding bees with increased habits that will decrease the mite population in their hives. For more about his work and to see some of his photography, see bees.msu.edu. Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
In this episode, we connect with Aleena Kanner, a Postural Restoration Therapist and Certified Athletic Trainer with a passion for helping others with chronic pain. With a background in athletic training, she works with the neurology and psychology of the body to help restore sensation, realign position, and repattern the nervous system. How can better posture transform your well-being and pave the way for holistic restoration? By putting the root causes of underlying health conditions at the heart of her practice, Aleena guides her clients down an empowering path of healing – and you may be surprised at the results…  During the episode, we delve into: What typical postural evaluations consist of.  How our body movements can dictate internal pressure.  Intricate techniques that teach the brain how to understand its space. The asymmetries that can exist in the body and how to address them. Want to learn more about Aleena and her distinct approach to physical and mental health? Click here now! Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
Dr. Kenneth R. Pelletier joins the podcast to discuss his latest book, Change Your Genes, Change Your Life: Creating Optimal Health with the New Science of Epigenetics. Dr. Pelletier is a Clinical Professor of Medicine at UCSF, a renowned keynote speaker, and a pioneer in mind-body medicine and integrative health research.  Change Your Genes, Change Your Life is renowned for pioneering work in integrative medicine, epigenetics, and longevity. Throughout the book, Dr. Pelletier navigates readers through a captivating journey into the realm of health and wellness – unveiling actionable steps to alter our genetic expression and enhance our well-being for a lifetime… Presently, Dr. Pelletier works as a medical and business consultant to an array of entities, including the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the World Health Organization (WHO), the National Business Group on Health, and the Federation of State Medical Boards. He also serves on the boards of the Healthtrac Foundation, United Behavioral Health, American Institute of Stress, and more.  In this conversation, we dive into: What “adept meditators" are, and how observing them drove Dr. Pelletier’s career interests. The difference between the voluntary and involuntary nervous system, and how they interact.  How practice and repetition can create pathways in the nervous system.  Examples of skills that can be learned through deep concentration.  You can follow along with Dr. Pelletier and his work by visiting his website! Take advantage of a 5% discount on Ekster accessories by using the code FINDINGGENIUS. Enhance your style and functionality with premium accessories. Visit bit.ly/3uiVX9R to explore latest collection. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9
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Comments (731)

Erick Harrison

I started following your show after listening to Dr. Bill McGraw's episode

Apr 2nd
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Ron Fernandez

Brilliant show

Apr 2nd
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Travis Spiller

Richard your show is great

Apr 2nd
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Victor Davies

This may sound weird but this is the podcast I have been looking for for decades. Can you imagine that? Looking for a detailed in-depth scientific explanation of cellular mystery for 60 years and finally finding it now. Imagine how wonderful this feels to me? Thank you thank you thank you keep up the good work.

Feb 23rd
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Donald Norman

Nice to find your show. This is my favorite genre.

Feb 22nd
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Chad Keller

I just finished the Wolfgang Smith Podcast. I missed his evidence for his premise of an objective world, incidently immagined to look the same way as humans experience it . W/o that evidence all the rest are hust claims motivated by an apriori theist worldview.

Feb 22nd
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James Burks

Why are interviews so lengthy? In my opinion, interviews should be a maximum of 30 minutes.

Feb 20th
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Ian Cooperman

Safe drinking water is a fundamental human right for everyone. Let's appreciate all those who are working tirelessly to ensure this basic necessity reaches people.

Feb 19th
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Micheal Fernandez

Interesting information. I'm a gardener. Thank you!

Feb 18th
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Richard Hatton

Can we shift the focus away from religion? Your podcast used to be captivating, but now it's simply exasperating.

Feb 17th
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William Smith

I'm searching for a podcast you hosted on the topic of microbiome. Unfortunately, I've forgotten the name of the guest. Your podcast archive is extensive, making it a bit challenging to locate.

Feb 17th
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Kelly Weaver

The content and guests are excellent, but Richard consistently interrupts the conversation.

Feb 15th
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Joe Butler

Richard is an excellent host; I thoroughly enjoyed our conversation. He effortlessly facilitates engaging and enjoyable discussions.

Feb 14th
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Robert Garling

I find great pleasure in listening to these podcasts. They are both enlightening and inspiring.

Feb 13th
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Corey Beekman

I enjoy every episode. I love the intro of your show very much, I listen it on repeat haha

Feb 3rd
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Robert Demko

Brilliant Show

Feb 1st
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Daniel Foss

Dr. Paul Garner is awesome in his teaching.

Jan 31st
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Salvatore Evers

Feels like both the guest and the interviewer were forcibly thrust into the conversation. Make it a bit exciting man.

Jan 30th
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John Diaz

Hey there, you could have asked a lot of questions that revolve around the fitness supplement industry. For instance, the impact of taking protein powders on kidneys. It would have been nice to know the perspective of someone who is creating the supplements.

Jan 30th
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Stephen Stone

Thank you for inviting Dr. Tom Cowan again. The knowledge he shares about functional medicine is surely the best.

Jan 28th
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