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3 Questions with Bob Evans
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3 Questions with Bob Evans

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They are some of the most prominent people in our society: actors, entertainers, government leaders, athletes and other fascinating individuals - the people you want to hear more from. I'm Bob Evans with FOX 13 News in Salt Lake City, and my goal is to give my guests a place to offer deeper, more substantial answers to questions you won't hear anywhere else. We take those answers, whittle them down and call them "3 Questions with Bob Evans" on TV, but, on this podcast, you get the whole enchilada - the entire interview from which we create our "3 Questions" segment. So, turn it up, listen closely, and prepare to be intrigued, informed and enlightened.

38 Episodes
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Sam Spector

Sam Spector

2019-11-1100:43:04

For hundreds of years, the Jewish people have been the victims of violence, discrimination, and derision. Even in the information age, where we know more about each other than ever before, rather than receiving increased tolerance, Jews continue to be the target of hatred, bigotry, and deadly attacks, both around the world, and here in the United States.While in the religious minority in Utah, Jews in the Beehive state have found somewhat of a refuge dating back to the 1850’s, just years after the Mormon Pioneers settled the valleys of the Rocky Mountains. From that time forward, a special kinship has developed between the Latter-day Saints and the Jews, whose narratives of enduring religious intolerance have paralleled each other to a degree.A recent survey by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany indicates 22% of millennials are either unaware or unsure of what the Holocaust is. In this interview with Rabbi Sam Spector of Congregation Kol Ami in Salt Lake City, FOX 13’s Bob Evans examines the reasons for the growing ignorance of the Holocaust, the reasons for continued animus against the Jews, and how the Jews and Latter-day Saints are getting along in Utah.
John Swallow

John Swallow

2019-11-0400:21:17

John Swallow is a man who is rebuilding his reputation. It was a long drop from Utah Attorney General to defendant in a public corruption trial that ended in his acquittal. When he and his predecessor, Mark Shurtleff, were accused of a complicated “pay for play” scheme, it became known as the biggest political scandal in the history of Utah.But the charges against Shurtleff were dropped. And Swallow was exonerated. And the State was left to pay millions of dollars to retire both men’s legal debts.In this 3 Questions interview, Bob Evans with FOX 13 News in Salt Lake City asks Swallow about the whole ordeal, how it has changed him, and what advice he has for future lawmakers to help them avoid the trouble he’s had.
Carol Lynn Pearson

Carol Lynn Pearson

2019-10-1400:30:08

Carol Lynn Pearson shot to the top of literary awareness among members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the early 70’s and 80’s. Raised as a Latter-day Saint, she married Gerald Pearson in the Salt Lake City Temple, aware that he was gay, but with both of them thinking it was something that could be overcome with prayer and righteous living. But for all of their best efforts, Gerald’s sexual orientation wouldn’t budge. Recognizing their marriage could not survive, they divorced, and continued to love each other as committed friends. In fact, when Gerald contracted HIV Aids in the early days of that disease’s devastating run, it was Carol Lynn who cared for and nursed him until his dying breath. And thus her book, “Goodbye, I Love You”.Since that time, she has actively encouraged love and understanding for LGBTQ members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. But that’s not all.Despite the Church’s abandonment of polygamy long ago, she has been disturbed by the concept of polygamy in the eternities, a mindset that has persisted in LDS thought and practice. As she took the temperature of fellow Latter-day Saint women and men, she found her sentiments were widespread. And thus her book, “The Ghost of Eternal Polygamy”.Bob Evans, with FOX 13 News in Salt Lake City interviewed her in October of 2019, for his segment “3 Questions”.
Gene England

Gene England

2019-10-0700:34:52

At 100 years old, Gene England is a legend in the trucking industry. His father, Chester R. England, started what would become CR England Trucking in 1920, now the largest refrigerated trucking company in the USA.  At the age of 14, Gene and his 11 year old brother Bill, drove a truck load of potatoes from Utah’s Cache Valley to market in Wyoming. Having spilled most of their load when they were forced to take a detour off Highway 30, the boys were all alone through the night, reloading the truck. But the trucking bug bit both of them, and they joined their father in the business. Then, while a US soldier in World War II, Gene managed to save $5,000 dollars to buy his first big rig when he got home. And he’s been driving big rigs ever since. Gene and Bill took over the company when their father retired. And only in recent years has Gene stopped driving. His is a remarkable story of grit and determination, with some very interesting stories of the road along the way.
James Curran

James Curran

2019-09-3000:30:54

Don’t call him James the Mormon anymore. In fact, pretty soon you won’t be able to call him JTM either. For James Curran, getting to the top of the Billboard Rap Chart and having Number One iTunes releases has been the easy part. Dealing with his fame and notoriety in the LDS community has been another story.Raised in an abusive family, James Curran is used to disappointment and negativity. But he never anticipated the mixed reaction he’s gotten from his faith group because of his music. In fact, it has caused to him to abandon his moniker, which had attracted an audience he appreciates, but wasn’t aiming for. So how can he fix the music streaming algorithms that lump his secular rap music with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir? Bob Evans with FOX 13 News in Salt Lake City sat down with rapper James Curran in September of 2019 for a 3 Questions interview.
Jason Curry

Jason Curry

2019-09-1600:24:13

In 2018, there were 58,083 wildfires that scorched 8.8 million acres in the United States. California's Mendocino Complex Fire in July 2018 was the largest in state history. But it was the Camp Fire in Butte County, Northern California in November of 2018 that became the deadliest and most destructive, killing 88 people, and all but decimating the city of Paradise, California. Who are the people that fight these fires? What does it take to put these fires out? And how do they know which fires to allow to burn, and which to throw everything they have into put it out?Bob Evans with FOX 13 News in Salt Lake City sat down with Jason Curry with the Utah Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands in September of 2019, for a 3 Questions interview.
Jonathan Johnson

Jonathan Johnson

2019-09-0900:27:44

What do you do when the CEO of your multi-million dollar company steps down because of his involvement in FBI investigations of the Clintons and Russian collusion with the Trump campaign? It was hard for many to believe was actually happening, but happen it did. To Overstock.com. Patrick Byrne established the company in the 1990’s, and built it into one of the largest online companies in the world. Now, it is being run by his long-time associate and confidant, Jonathan Johnson. Bob Evans of FOX 13 News in Salt Lake City sat down with Jonathan Johnson in August of 2019, for a 3 Questions interview.
Jeanette Herbert

Jeanette Herbert

2019-09-0900:39:21

They are often the strength behind their husband-Governors; the mostly-silent partners in politics whose advise, counsel, and support is absolutely vital. What is it like to be the first lady to a Governor? What do they do? How does politics affect their families? And what about that Governors Mansion; is it haunted? Bob Evans of FOX 13 Salt Lake City sits down with Jeanette Herbert, wife of Governor Gary Herbert, and First Lady of the great state of Utah for a 3 Questions interview.
Gail Halvorsen

Gail Halvorsen

2019-08-2600:35:20

It was post-World War II. The Russians had seized control of East Berlin, Germany… and were systematically trying to starve West Berliners by cutting them off from food and supplies. But the United States was not about allow the brutality of Russia to take any more West German lives, and began to fly food and supplies into West Berlin’s Tempelhoff airport. It was a daunting task, requiring round-the-clock flights. Gail Halvorsen of Garland, Utah flew many of those flights, noticing the German children waving their gratitude to the supply planes from the end of the runway. When he greeted them through the fence one day, he was impressed with how, despite their desperate circumstances, none of them had their hands out to beg, but rather, stood and smiled, thanking him profusely for bringing them what they needed to stay alive, and offering handshakes through the fence. He offered the only treats he had. Two sticks of chewing gum. They carefully received them, delicately removed the paper wrapping, and broke the sticks into as many pieces as they could to share with each child. When the gum ran out, they circulated the paper wrapper, and let each child smell the aroma of the gum.That’s when Gail Halverson knew he had to do something. And what he did has reverberated through seven decades now, touching and inspiring the lives of countless people, past and present.Bob Evans of FOX 13 News in Salt Lake City sat down in August of 2019 with the now-98 year old Gail Halvorsen for a 3 Questions interview.
Derek Miller

Derek Miller

2019-08-1900:21:40

Utah is widely known as one of the best places in the United States to do business. It’s highly educated, multi-lingual workforce, combined with relatively low taxes and business-friendly environment make it a destination for many companies looking to locate in the beautiful Rocky Mountains.Utah is also known as “the crossroads of the west”, making it logistically ideal to create an Inland Port that could serve as a hub for importing and exporting a wide range of goods and services. But there is significant concern about what creating an Inland Port would do to Utah’s delicate environment.Because of temperature inversions, northern Utah’s topography often traps air pollutants in the winter months, and ozone in the summer, which creates health hazards for at-risk populations. So, would the benefits of jobs and economic growth be worth the cost to Utah’s air and landscape, and the health of Utah citizens and visitors?Bob Evans with FOX 13 News in Salt Lake City explores these questions with Derek Miller, the President and CEO of the Salt Lake Chamber, and Chairman of the Inland Port Authority Board.
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Comments (1)

deannerjones@msn.com

incredible interview! thank you!!

Apr 3rd
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