ANDERS LEVERMANN

“A lot of people think climate change is about avoiding the extinction of mankind. In my opinion, climate change is about putting pressure on society and disrupting society to an extent that it can't function properly anymore. So my greatest fear is that if we don't combat climate change, the weather extremes will hit us with a frequency and intensity that we will not be able to recover after each impact. And then we will start to fight with each other.” Anders Levermann is a professor at the Physics Institute of Potsdam University, Germany, as well as an adjunct senior research scientist of Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Earth Institute at Columbia University, New York. Levermann’s research focuses on climate dynamics and its social-economic impact. His work is used to advise political and economic stakeholders on the issue of climate change. Levermann has been involved in the assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change since 2004. He is a member of the scientific advisory body of UNEP Finance Initiative’s Net-Zero Asset Owner Alliance. He is also the head of global economic stability project Zeean. · www.pik-potsdam.de/~anders/ · www.pik-potsdam.de/en/output/transfer/projects/zeean· www.oneplanetpodcast.org· www.creativeprocess.info

01-20
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(Highlights) ANDERS LEVERMANN

“A lot of people think climate change is about avoiding the extinction of mankind. In my opinion, climate change is about putting pressure on society and disrupting society to an extent that it can't function properly anymore. So my greatest fear is that if we don't combat climate change, the weather extremes will hit us with a frequency and intensity that we will not be able to recover after each impact. And then we will start to fight with each other.” Anders Levermann is a professor at the Physics Institute of Postdam University, Germany, as well as an adjunct senior research scientist of Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Earth Institute at Columbia University, New York. Levermann’s research focuses on climate dynamics and its social-economic impact. His work is used to advise political and economic stakeholders on the issue of climate change. Levermann has been involved in the assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change since 2004. He is a member of the scientific advisory body of UNEP Finance Initiative’s Net-Zero Asset Owner Alliance. He is also the head of global economic stability project Zeean. · www.pik-potsdam.de/~anders/ · www.pik-potsdam.de/en/output/transfer/projects/zeean· www.oneplanetpodcast.org· www.creativeprocess.info

01-20
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(Highlights) DR. JOERI ROGELJ

“A key part of how I go about doing my research is being involved in policy discussions, policy conversations, and also by following the international climate negotiations very closely. Actually, I started my research career as a part of the Presidency of the International Climate Negotiations in 2009. After that I remained an advisor to country delegations in the international negotiations, particularly small island development states or least developed countries. That really helped me to get a sense of what the real questions are that they are struggling with.”Dr. Joeri Rogelj is Director of Research at the Grantham Institute at Imperial College and also at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis. He studies how societies transform towards more sustainable futures, connecting Earth sciences to policy. He publishes on 1.5°C pathways, UN climate agreements, carbon budgets and net zero targets. He is a long-serving author on authoritative science assessment reports of the UN Environment Programme and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.· www.imperial.ac.uk/people/j.rogelj· www.oneplanetpodcast.org · www.creativeprocess.info

01-18
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(Highlights) JEAN WEINER

“We’re coming out of one of the worst times for resource exploitation, waste and everything related to that waste of resources, so trying to set the example, especially for my kids, recycling, trying to be reasonable about purchasing things, about where things end up after you’re done using them, just in general being careful about what you do, what impacts there are down the line. Even for them already, they’re 18 and 20 now–What are you going to do to try to protect the planet for your kids? Already trying to put that mindset for them because it’s very difficult for our generation to change the way it has done things for so long, but trying to at least bring that change. Be responsible, be reasonable, think about the impacts.”Born and raised in Haiti, Jean Weiner has worked on coastal and marine since 1991.  In 1992, Jean founded Haiti’s first coastal and marine environmental non-profit the Foundation for the Protection of Marine Biodiversity. He is the head of the organization today and he specializes in coastal and marine sciences, environmental monitoring and management, and community development, and has executed a wide range of projects including resource assessments, association building, environmental rehabilitation, community needs evaluations, as well as pure scientific research for institutions as diverse as the Ministry of Environment of Haiti, the UN. He is Haiti’s most awarded environmentalist and has received the Goldman Environmental Prize.· www.foprobim.org · www.oneplanetpodcast.org · www.creativeprocess.info

01-18
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DR. JOERI ROGELJ

Dr. Joeri Rogelj is Director of Research at the Grantham Institute at Imperial College and also at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis. He studies how societies transform towards more sustainable futures, connecting Earth sciences to policy. He publishes on 1.5°C pathways, UN climate agreements, carbon budgets and net zero targets. He is a long-serving author on authoritative science assessment reports of the UN Environment Programme and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.· www.imperial.ac.uk/people/j.rogelj· www.oneplanetpodcast.org · www.creativeprocess.info

01-18
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JEAN WEINER

Born and raised in Haiti, Jean Weiner has worked on coastal and marine since 1991.  In 1992, Jean founded Haiti’s first coastal and marine environmental non-profit the Foundation for the Protection of Marine Biodiversity. He is the head of the organization today and he specializes in coastal and marine sciences, environmental monitoring and management, and community development, and has executed a wide range of projects including resource assessments, association building, environmental rehabilitation, community needs evaluations, as well as pure scientific research for institutions as diverse as the Ministry of Environment of Haiti, the UN. He is Haiti’s most awarded environmentalist and has received the Goldman Environmental Prize.· www.foprobim.org · www.oneplanetpodcast.org · www.creativeprocess.info

01-18
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(Highlights) ROB PRINGLE

“For nature and natural beauty to survive, people have to want it. If they don’t ever experience it, why should they want it? What could see of value in it, something that you not only have never experienced but don’t ever expect to. We intellectually know that the Amazon is an important thing because it stores carbon and it’s home to many species, but I’ve been there. That’s a different thing entirely to be able to appreciate it on that level and care about it for the sheer beauty and magic and joy of being in a place that’s still so big and so wild. So that I think is the most important thing for the next generation.”Rob Pringle is a professor of ecology, biodiversity, and conservation at Princeton University. He’s fascinated by nearly all facets of ecology and conservation and his research in his lab addresses a correspondingly broad sweep of questions. His work on these questions is motivated by curiosity. The questions are united by a single goal: to understand how wild ecosystems work by studying their modular components and emergent properties.· https://pringle.princeton.edu· www.oneplanetpodcast.org · www.creativeprocess.info

01-14
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ROB PRINGLE

Rob Pringle is a professor of ecology, biodiversity, and conservation at Princeton University. He’s fascinated by nearly all facets of ecology and conservation and his research in his lab addresses a correspondingly broad sweep of questions. His work on these questions is motivated by curiosity. The questions are united by a single goal: to understand how wild ecosystems work by studying their modular components and emergent properties.· https://pringle.princeton.edu· www.oneplanetpodcast.org · www.creativeprocess.info

01-14
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(Highlights) IAN BURUMA

"I have a strong feeling that at the moment, especially in the United States, people are much more interested in the culture and backgrounds of minorities than they are in the cultures where those minorities originally came from. I think it’s a sign of people drawing inwards more and more. That goes for the Right Wing populists and White Supremacists just as much. They’re also drawing the wagons around what they see as their identity, and I think that’s exactly not the way to go…I can only emphasize that in terms of education is that everything should be fostered to open people’s minds. Open minds to the past, to other cultures and not to have minds closed by limiting ourselves more and more to the circumstances of our birth.”Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including A Tokyo Romance, The Churchill Complex,Their Promised Land, Year Zero, The China Lover, Murder in Amsterdam, Occidentalism and God’s Dust. He teaches at Bard College and is a columnist for Project Syndicate and contributor to The New Yorker,
The New York Times, and other publications. He was awarded the 2008 Erasmus Prize for making "an especially important contribution to European culture" and was voted one of the Top 100 Public Intellectuals
by the Foreign Policy magazine.
· www.bard.edu/faculty/details/?id=153· www.creativeprocess.info

01-11
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IAN BURUMA

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including A Tokyo Romance, The Churchill Complex,Their Promised Land, Year Zero, The China Lover, Murder in Amsterdam, Occidentalism and God’s Dust. He teaches at Bard College and is a columnist for Project Syndicate and contributor to The New Yorker, The New York Times, and other publications. He was awarded the 2008 Erasmus Prize for making "an especially important contribution to European culture" and was voted one of the Top 100 Public Intellectuals by the Foreign Policy magazine. · www.bard.edu/faculty/details/?id=153· www.creativeprocess.info

01-11
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(Highlights) RICHARD D. WOLFF

“You can criticize many things in the United States, but there are taboos and the number one taboo is that you cannot criticize Capitalism. That is equated with disloyalty…This story about Capitalism being wonderful. This story is fading. You can’t do that anymore. The Right Wing cannot rally its troops around Capitalism. That’s why it doesn’t do it anymore. It rallies the troops around being hateful towards immigrants. It rallies the troops around “fake elections”, around the right to buy a gun, around White Supremacists. Those issues can get some support, but “Let’s get together for Capitalism!” That is bad. They can’t do anything with that. They have to sneak the Capitalism in behind those other issues because otherwise, they have no mass political support.”Richard D. Wolff is Founder of Democracy at Work and host of the show Economic Update. Professor of Economics Emeritus, University of Massachusetts, Amherst where he taught economics from 1973 to 2008. He is currently a Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School University, New York City. Earlier he taught economics at Yale University (1967-1969) and at the City College of the City University of New York (1969-1973). In 1994, he was a Visiting Professor of Economics at the University of Paris (France), I (Sorbonne). Wolff was also regular lecturer at the Brecht Forum in New York City. He is the author of The Sickness is the System: When Capitalism Fails to Save Us from Pandemics or Itself.· www.rdwolff.com· www.democracyatwork.info· www.creativeprocess.info· www.oneplanetpodcast.org

01-01
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RICHARD D. WOLFF

Richard D. Wolff is Founder of Democracy at Work and host of the show Economic Update. Professor of Economics Emeritus, University of Massachusetts, Amherst where he taught economics from 1973 to 2008. He is currently a Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School University, New York City. Earlier he taught economics at Yale University (1967-1969) and at the City College of the City University of New York (1969-1973). In 1994, he was a Visiting Professor of Economics at the University of Paris (France), I (Sorbonne). Wolff was also regular lecturer at the Brecht Forum in New York City. He is the author of The Sickness is the System: When Capitalism Fails to Save Us from Pandemics or Itself.· www.rdwolff.com· www.democracyatwork.info · www.creativeprocess.info· www.oneplanetpodcast.org

01-01
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(Highlights) BRIAN WILCOX

“The kelp plant itself can grow to 30 meters easily, and sometimes 40 meters, so it’s a huge plant…When people look around the world today, seeing the news, making the world a better place is getting increasingly important. People have to pay attention to what they can do as individuals to make the world a better place. The world is not going to become a good place on its own. If there weren’t for thousands and millions of people, phenomenal sacrifices that people make. When you see what some people do and the risks they take. I have basically found my job for the remaining years that I have on the earth to try to make the world a better place.”Brian Wilcox is the chief engineer and co-founder of Marine BioEnergy, Inc.  Marine BioEnergy was founded to grow plants in the open ocean to provide carbon-neutral fuels so that eventually fossil fuel use can be eliminated. Previously, Brian spent 38 years at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory working on robots for planetary exploration and other extreme environments. At NASA, he was the Supervisor of the Robotic Vehicles Group for over 20 years, and Manager of the Space Robotics Technology Program for another nearly 15 years.· www.marinebiomass.com· www.oneplanetpodcast.org
· www.creativeprocess.info

12-26
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BRIAN WILCOX

Brian Wilcox is the chief engineer and co-founder of Marine BioEnergy, Inc.  Marine BioEnergy was founded to grow plants in the open ocean to provide carbon-neutral fuels so that eventually fossil fuel use can be eliminated. Previously, Brian spent 38 years at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory working on robots for planetary exploration and other extreme environments. At NASA, he was the Supervisor of the Robotic Vehicles Group for over 20 years, and Manager of the Space Robotics Technology Program for another nearly 15 years.· www.marinebiomass.com· www.oneplanetpodcast.org · www.creativeprocess.info

12-26
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(Highlights) GAIA VINCE

“The good thing about our species is that we create our own environment. What we’ve been doing so far is creating an environment where we’re much more successful. We live a lot longer, we’re much healthier than we have been in the past. There are many, many more of us, so we’re very successful as a species and that’s been at the expense of other ecosystems, but what’s happened is we are now dominating the planet to a dangerous degree, but we are also self-aware. We’re capable of understanding that.”Gaia Vince is a science writer and broadcaster interested in the interplay between humans and the planetary environment. She has held senior editorial posts at Nature and New Scientist, and her writing has featured in newspapers and magazines including the Guardian, The Times and Scientific American. She also writes and presents science programmes for radio and television. Her research takes her across the world: she has visited more than 60 countries, lived in three and is currently based in London. In 2015, she became the first woman to win the Royal Society Science Book of the Year Prize solo for her debut, Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made. She is author of Transcendence: How Humans Evolved Through Fire, Language, Beauty & Time.· www.oneplanetpodcast.org · www.creativeprocess.info

12-21
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GAIA VINCE

Gaia Vince is a science writer and broadcaster interested in the interplay between humans and the planetary environment. She has held senior editorial posts at Nature and New Scientist, and her writing has featured in newspapers and magazines including the Guardian, The Times and Scientific American. She also writes and presents science programmes for radio and television. Her research takes her across the world: she has visited more than 60 countries, lived in three and is currently based in London. In 2015, she became the first woman to win the Royal Society Science Book of the Year Prize solo for her debut, Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made. She is author of Transcendence: How Humans Evolved Through Fire, Language, Beauty & Time. · www.wanderinggaia.com· www.oneplanetpodcast.org · www.creativeprocess.info

12-21
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(Highlights) MARY EDNA FRASER & ORRIN H. PILKEY

"I think any time we are closer to the earth, we can feel the struggles of other human beings as well. I encourage young women to find whatever it is they are passionate about and invest their entire soul in it and go for it! Because you’ll be happy if you’re passionate about your work." –Mary Edna Fraser"Southern Africa, south of the Sahara, they’re expecting within this century 200 million climate refugees. Where are they going to go? Who wants those refugees. We have the same thing happening in Central America. Where are they going to go? All over the world, we’re seeing because of climate change we’re seeing vast changes affecting all aspects of society. It’s very worrisome and that’s something that we’ve not been able to face politically. We need to do that.” – Orrin H. PilkeyDuke University Professor Emeritus Orrin H. Pilkey is one of the rare academics who engages in public advocacy about science-related issues. His collaborator, Mary Edna Fraser, is an artist who highlights environmental concerns in large silk batiks and oils. They are the co-authors of A Celebration of the World’s Barrier Islands and Global Climate Change: A Primer. Their traveling exhibits, “Our Expanding Oceans” and “Shifting East Coast Barrier Islands” creatively merge science and art.· www.maryedna.com· www.deleteapathy.com· https://sites.nicholas.duke.edu/orrinpilkey
· www.creativeprocess.info· www.oneplanetpodcast.org

12-17
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MARY EDNA FRASER & ORRIN H. PILKEY

Duke University Professor Emeritus Orrin H. Pilkey is one of the rare academics who engages in public advocacy about science-related issues. His collaborator, Mary Edna Fraser, is an artist who highlights environmental concerns in large silk batiks and oils. They are the co-authors of A Celebration of the World’s Barrier Islands and Global Climate Change: A Primer. Their traveling exhibits, “Our Expanding Oceans” and “Shifting East Coast Barrier Islands” creatively merge science and art.· www.maryedna.com· www.deleteapathy.com· https://sites.nicholas.duke.edu/orrinpilkey · www.creativeprocess.info· www.oneplanetpodcast.org

12-17
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(Highlights) JANE MADGWICK

Wetlands naturally absorb twice the amount of carbon than all the world’s forests combined.“I think everybody at school learns about the water cycle. That rings a bell with everybody. Maybe this is a good hook to show the place of wetlands in capturing and purifying and the story of water. And then in turn how this links to what we’re seeing every year: droughts, floods, fires, heat waves which are devastating and life-threatening. I think this may be one of the easiest routes in educating people, connecting wetlands with water and the direct impact of that.”Jane Madgwick is an ecologist and author with 30 years of experience of working internationally on the science, policy and practice of wetlands and water management. Since 2004, she has been CEO of Wetlands International, leading a network of 20 offices operating in over 100 countries. Wetlands International works to mobilise the conservation and restoration of wetlands, connecting science, policies and practices for biodiversity, resilient communities and reduced climate risks.· www.wetlands.org · www.oneplanetpodcast.org · www.creativeprocess.info

12-14
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JANE MADGWICK

Jane Madgwick is an ecologist and author with 30 years of experience of working internationally on the science, policy and practice of wetlands and water management. Since 2004, she has been CEO of Wetlands International, leading a network of 20 offices operating in over 100 countries. Wetlands International works to mobilise the conservation and restoration of wetlands, connecting science, policies and practices for biodiversity, resilient communities and reduced climate risks.· www.wetlands.org · www.oneplanetpodcast.org · www.creativeprocess.infoPhoto by Pieter van Eijk

12-14
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