Discover60-Second Science
60-Second Science
Claim Ownership

60-Second Science

Author: Scientific American

Subscribed: 44,276Played: 970,135
Share

Description

Leading science journalists cover some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a deeper audio dive you can subscribe to Science Talk. To view all of our archived podcasts please go to www.scientificamerican.com/podcast
897 Episodes
Reverse
By dating the remnants of trees felled in Newfoundland, scientists have determined that the Norse people likely first set foot in the Americas in the year A.D. 1021.
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .
New research using a camera that can “see" sound” shows some elephants can produce high-pitched buzzing with their lips.
Nearly 200 years after his death, the German composer’s musical scratch was pieced together by machine—with a lot of human help.
Ewine van Dishoeck received the Kavli Prize in Astrophysics in 2018 for elucidating the life cycle of interstellar clouds and the formation of stars and planets. What other mysteries of space are left to be uncovered?
Here’s what we can learn about climate change and infrastructure from Denali National Park’s only road.
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .
The speed of these self-propelling droplets on a hot-oil surface seemed to defy physics until researchers broke out the super-slow-motion camera.
New research uses night vision to see how nocturnal bees navigate the dark.
Photoferrotrophs have been around for billions of years on Earth, and new research suggests that they have played an outsize roll in the natural capture of carbon dioxide.
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .
New research shows that the prehistoric giants were even cooler than we thought
The rodents’ personalities may help them to secure territory and avoid prey.
One researcher’s poorly timed attention lapse flipped a car—and pushed science forward.
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .
Gerd Binnig shared The Kavli Prize in Nanoscience in 2016 for inventing the atomic force microscope. What transformative impact has this invention had on nanoscience?
Researcher Matthew Austin has become a wildflower pollinator, sans the wings.
The greater sac-winged bat develops its own language in much the way we do.
Theresa and Donald Dardar lived their whole lives in coastal Louisiana. They knew the “big one” might come someday. It did, and now everything is uncertain.
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .
loading
Comments (30)

Ali dp

brilliant

Sep 16th
Reply

Rana Danesh

perfect podcast🥰

Sep 12th
Reply

ID21508591

This is a partisan piece of NPR crap.

Sep 10th
Reply

PlusCH3

#TIL While this is shorter and sired later than other podcasts that covered this paper, I actually found it to be the most interesting and fact filled.

Sep 3rd
Reply

PlusCH3

Nicely done

Aug 1st
Reply

lllll

trying to learn some random facts to pass the time

Mar 1st
Reply

Chad

For being a "science" podcast there is a lot of opinions and no transcripts or actual sources cited. Skip this one unless you want to be deceived with inaccurate supposed "science"

Nov 3rd
Reply

Ali Hosseini

When restaurants first shut down early in the pandemic, Americans raided grocery stores. They started cooking more at home—and, presumably, generating more leftovers. Those leftovers can be a convenient future meal—but they’ve got a dark side, too.  “There’s a tendency that if you put an item on a plate that’s a leftover, there’s a higher probability that you’re not going to fully consume that item. And so it’s probably going to go to waste.” Brian Roe, an applied economist at the Ohio State University. He and his colleagues recently studied leftovers and food waste by tracking the eating habits of 18 men and women in Baton Rouge, La. The participants tracked what they ate using an iPhone app. And during the weeklong study, the study subjects collectively piled 1,200 different foods on their plates.  After analyzing what got eaten, saved or thrown away, the researchers found that leftovers were more likely to be picked at and not fully eaten—a finding we can all probably identify with.  But they also observed that leftovers—perhaps due to being older and less fresh—directed diners’ attention to the other, more novel items on their plate, which brings up an interesting possible strategy to get people to eat their veggies.  “I guess if you have an item that you don’t normally eat as much of, and you’re trying to get people to eat their peas, perhaps surrounding it with leftovers is a way to make them focus on the newest item on the plate.” The findings are in the journal PLOS ONE. [Brian E. Roe et al., Selection, intake, and plate waste patterns of leftover food items among U.S. consumers: A pilot study] Overall, Roe says one bigger lesson emerged on how to avoid scraping food into the trash.  “For us, the real take-home here was: all else equal, choose a smaller meal, and you’re less likely to generate leftovers. And that’s a good thing because leftovers, all else equal, tend to be wasted more often.” Not that Roe doesn’t have aspirational Tupperware sitting around.  “I’m guilty of this myself: we have things left over from last Thanksgiving still sitting in our freezer. And I know people who’ve moved with frozen items before—without ever getting around to eating them.” —Christopher Intagliata

Sep 11th
Reply

mr shf

you can put transcripts in comment's part! it's so easy.

Mar 3rd
Reply

Mohamad Izadseta

Perfect

Dec 21st
Reply

Aut

By now it's almost common knowledge that spending time in nature is good for you. Areas with more trees tend to be less polluted, so spending time there allows you to breathe easier. Spending time outdoors has been linked with reduced blood pressure and stress, and seems to motivate people to exercise more.  “So it'll come as no surprise that there's research showing that spending time in nature is good. I mean, that's been known for millennia. There's dozens of papers showing that." University of Exeter Medical School researcher Mathew P. White. "We get this idea, patients are coming to us and they're saying, 'doctor, how long should I spend?' and the doctor is saying, 'I don't really know.'" So White and his team decided to find out by using data collected from nearly 20,000 people in England through the Monitor of Engagement with the Natural Environment Survey. And their answer? Two hours a week. People who spent at least that much time amid nature—either all at once or totaled over several shorter visits—were more likely to report good health and psychological well-being than those with no nature exposure.  Remarkably, the researchers found that less than two hours offered no significant benefits. So what's so special about two hours? "I have absolutely no idea. Really. We didn't have an a priori guess at what this would be, this threshold. It emerged. And I'd be lying if I said we predicted this. I don't know." Even more noteworthy, the two-hour benchmark applied to men and women, to older and younger folks, to people from different ethnic backgrounds, occupational groups, socioeconomic levels and so on. Even people with long-term illnesses or disabilities benefited from time spent in nature—as long as it was at least 120 minutes per week. The study is in the journal Scientific Reports. [Matthew P. White et al., Spending at least 120 minutes a week in nature is associated with good health and wellbeing] While the findings are based on a tremendous number of people, White cautions that it’s really just a correlation. Nobody knows why or how nature has this benefit or even if the findings will stand up to more rigorous investigation.  "I want to be really clear about this. This is very early stages. We're not saying everybody has to do 120. This is really to start the conversation, saying, what would a threshold look like? What research do we need to take this to the next step before doctors can have the true confidence to work with their patients? But it's certainly a starting point." —Jason G. Goldman

Aug 21st
Reply

Ross Oman

upg

Feb 20th
Reply

Behzad Dastjerdy

please add the transcript!

Feb 16th
Reply

高橋健二

aaq

Feb 13th
Reply

Nox

Wonderful!

Feb 10th
Reply

shahrzad mohamadi fard

Is it possible to attach episodes’ transcriptions?

Jan 3rd
Reply

Nancy Lapus

over by noon had his see g him no much h test l indeed o out was an ice way ko it we swath in I ok indeed each up luck 🔋🔌💱🛡️

Oct 3rd
Reply

Nancy Lapus

🦁🐍🦀🥀🍁🌼🦋👙❣️🙏💪👩‍👩‍👧🎅

Oct 3rd
Reply

Nancy Lapus

🦁🐍🦀🥀🍁🌼🦋👙❣️🙏💪👩‍👩‍👧🎅

Oct 3rd
Reply

Nancy Lapus

t83all LM02AO non7e exit9 hi tax+ gott7a see3 to o if I ha-d kil0ls ex-cited a(bout-8/face to get" a few0 thi+ngs done∆ arou°nd the ho¶use wit}h go les}s Edd\=y u mum=9's ea®t the H¶eath plug¥ es™say h u}h I le¢ft nic{e wa6s hi⅝m bec)6ause nug(get l n2 Gre0ek needs 3 t9o ki8nda wa2tch Kh@an l oth5er 7ti7ll litt0le ear_ly if dr9essy I list-#en ol inter!net ok91✓{¶{|¢×°§g

Oct 3rd
Reply
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store