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7am

Author: Schwartz Media

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A daily news show from the publisher of The Monthly and The Saturday Paper. Hear from the country’s best reporters, covering the news as it affects Australia. This is news with narrative, every weekday.
296 Episodes
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Ten days ago, Melbourne entered the strictest shutdown the country has seen so far, and one of the harshest lockdowns currently taking place in the world. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on the extraordinary powers a state of disaster bestows on the government, and how we got here.   Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton. Background reading: What led to Victoria’s extraordinary shutdown in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Two Australians have launched court cases in an attempt to radically overhaul the way our government and big corporations are responding to climate change. Today, lawyer Kieran Pender on the story of climate litigation in Australia and what’s at stake.   Guest: Lawyer and writer for The Saturday Paper Kieran Pender. Background reading: Suing for climate change in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
As calls for police reform and prison abolition grow across the world, a new campaign in Australia led by formerly incarcerated women is seeking to combat the stigma of criminalisation. Today, Tabitha Lean, one of the organisers of that campaign, on life after prison.    Guest: Tabitha Lean, a formerly incarcerated Gunditjmara woman. Background reading: Speaking out for criminalised women in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Recent Emmy nominee Sarah Snook and the guy from the 7-Eleven ads, Dave Lawson, solve The Saturday Paper’s quiz. What’s the best use for a Logie? What’s your middle name? And if you just repeat the question back to the quizmaster, will they answer it for you? Guests: Emmy nominee Sarah Snook and actor Dave Lawson In the paper: The Quiz  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
While most of the attention has been focused on Victoria’s handling of the latest coronavirus outbreak, behind the scenes the federal government has been sending mixed-messages on economic policy and state border closures. Today, Paul Bongiorno on whether Scott Morrison is accurately reading the mood of the electorate during this phase of the crisis.   Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
There are new signs that Covid-19 can cause a range of serious, long-term health problems. Today, we look at the evidence that the virus can cause neurological damage, and the scientific race to understand how it operates.  Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton. Background reading: Lost function: Long-term consequences of surviving coronavirus in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
As the Treasurer Josh Frydenburg praises Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan’s economic policies, a controversial recovery plan is gaining traction. In today’s episode, Mike Seccombe discusses the Treasurer’s economic inspirations, and whether Australia can spend its way out of the crisis.   Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe. Background reading: Could Frydenberg ease this crisis by printing money? in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Aged care has been one of the hardest hit sectors during this phase of the Covid pandemic, with residents and their carers making up a large proportion of those catching the virus. The sector is also being examined by a Royal Commission, following widespread allegations of mismanagement and poor care. Today, Rick Morton on the crisis in our aged care facilities, and why we should have seen it coming. Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Scott Morrison’s Prime Ministership has been dominated by a series of rolling crises, but what can we learn about the ideology that drives him from the way he’s governing at this moment? Today, Richard Cooke on how Scott Morrison is using the pandemic to fulfil his political objectives.   Guest: Writer for The Monthly Richard Cooke.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Kate McLennan and Kate McCartney from Get Krack!n solve The Saturday Paper’s quiz. Who would invite Hitler to open the Olympics? Does the existence of a Henry VIII suggest a Henry VII? What do you learn at private school? In the paper: ABC TV’s ‘Get Krack!n’ in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Throughout the Covid pandemic traditional political hostilities have been dialled back, with governments of all political persuasions trying to project a sense of national unity. But this week that unity started to fray. Today, Paul Bongiorno on the growing political stoush over the crisis in Victoria’s aged care system.  Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
With two-thirds of volunteers staying at home due to Covid and donations drying up, there are serious concerns about the viability of Australia’s charity sector. Experts are worried about the impact the funding drought will have on the provision of key services. Today, Mike Seccombe on the challenges charities are facing, and what we might lose if they collapse.   Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe. Background reading: The end of charity: Sector at risk of collapse in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On Monday the Prime Minister announced a revamp of the National Covid Coordination Commission, the body he tasked with leading Australia’s pandemic recovery. But what do we really know about Neville Power, the man in charge of the Commission? Today, Margaret Simons on Power’s background, and what the Commission is actually doing. Guest: Business writer for The Saturday Paper Margaret Simons. Background reading: Mysterious Mr Power, architect of our recovery in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Penny Wong warns that coronavirus could unravel the rules-based system on which the modern world is founded. The shadow foreign minister says we must guard against trends towards nationalism and xenophobia – and prepare for the next pandemic, which is climate change.   Guest: Shadow foreign minister Penny Wong.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
As face masks become compulsory, doctors and public health officials are working to find consensus on their efficacy. But in the rush to contain coronavirus, there is no time to wait for perfect science.   Guest: Health journalist Amy Coopes. For more information on today’s episode, visit 7ampodcast.com.au.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
As the government reveals the extent of the budget deficit, Scott Morrison has become increasingly short in answering questions. He no longer meets with his virtual party room, and some MPs say he doesn’t like being asked to explain what’s happening.   Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno. For more information on today’s episode, visit 7ampodcast.com.au.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The decision to pull subsidies from childcare has caused alarm in the sector - especially because it is the first place the government cut support. Now questions are being asked about the men-only committee that made the decision.   Guest: Writer for The Saturday Paper Gina Rushton. Background reading: Childcare centres at financial risk in The Saturday Paper The Saturday Paper The Monthly For more information on today’s episode, visit 7ampodcast.com.au.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
After a 10-year legal battle, the “palace letters” were finally released last week. In full, they show how Gough Whitlam’s relationship with the governor-general broke down - and how involved the Queen was through this collapse.   Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton. For more information on today’s episode, visit 7ampodcast.com.au  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In the middle of last month, Australia had its last chance to contain the coronavirus pandemic. One strain of the virus was all but defeated in the community. But then a second strain broke out.   Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton. For more information on today’s episode, visit 7ampodcast.com.au.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
As climate models predict even worse outcomes for the planet, some scientists believe the way to change what is happening is for people to “feel” the emotion of it. There is still time to halt the crisis, but we are at a fork in the road.   Guest: Climate scientist and writer Joëlle Gergis. Background reading Witnessing the unthinkable in The Monthly The Saturday Paper The Monthly For more information on today’s episode, visit 7ampodcast.com.au.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (19)

Tina Vrontas

After a ten year legal battle to get the letters, I wonder why they bothered. The letters are being now being "interpreted". The slant depends upon the reader and their political views. They have not shed any new light on the subject. HILARIOUS!!!

Jul 22nd
Reply

Tina Vrontas

Some of the opinions expressed about the Victorian Covid 19 debacle are quite lame. For what it's worth, my opinion is that arrogance sparked the 2nd outbreak. The Premier and his very poor decision making processes must shoulder all responsibility. Decisions taken on ideology rather than for the good of the whole community. The arrogance of the Victorian leadership - "jobs for mates" and the arrogance of some non english speaking communities where they pretend to not understand when it suits them. They have no problems accessing social welfare.... Information WAS provided in multiple languages. I watch quite a few on SBS.

Jul 21st
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Alex K.

On 23 June Gladys Berejilkian talked about washing hands well as basic pandemic management. I screamed at the TV "no, shutting the border is basic pandemic management". it took her 13 more days to get the same message and Patient Zero from Melbourne arrived in New South Wales on the 30th of June. NSW Govt is responsible for our outbreak.

Jul 15th
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Luke

So many ways to pick this story apart. Gangs almost always are racially oriented. When going after the Italian mafia, they focus in on Italians. When it's Asian gangs they target Asian suspects. Let's all act like something unique happened here and point the finger at islamaphobia. The cops played it pretty dirty, as usual. The man inside has repented his ways, as usual. Nothing special here.

Jul 15th
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Lawrence

The suggestion that Bilal Skaf was somehow the victim of racism is disgusting. There were victim statements which explicitly outlined the rapes including numerous racially charged taunts and threats. Read what actually happened to those poor girls (one of which was 14yo) and then tell me with a straight face that poor Bilal Skaf has been hard done by. What the NSW Police did to stop the violence was absolutely necessary. Quit apologizing for violent criminals.

Jul 15th
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Luke

This episode was so biased in favor of victimising a criminal. Part 2 better be good.

Jul 13th
Reply (2)

Alex K.

Comments from resident of tower are unreasonable. It's a public health measure, nothing more. Towers are infested with the virus, dozens of cases. The Premier is not targeting these towers out of spite or victimisation, I can assure you. Victoria Police uniform includes the police being armed, it's a violation of their procedure to remove them. Of course it's not pleasant for the residents, and things like medications should be prioritised. "No consideration for human life", she said, that's ridiculous.

Jul 7th
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Alex K.

the emaciation of the ABC and SBS is despicable

May 14th
Reply (1)

Hannah Derwent

this was excellent and your guest so incredibly articulate

Feb 26th
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Kirstie JM

Thanks for an informative year 7am, very sad to hear Elizabeth is moving on but wish her all the best!

Dec 23rd
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Petr Pavlík

I'm sorry to hear that Elizabeth is moving to a different role. Thanks for your fantastic work on the 7am.

Dec 19th
Reply

Julian Sinnema

Big fan of 7am. I use it as my morning alarm, it's lovely to wake up to every weekday morning. It is a top notch source of news. 👌

Dec 5th
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Judd Millner

What's with the background music? It's distracting.

Dec 5th
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Tate Bourke

Hated your coverage of James Todd. Who cares about him? What your coverage did was attempt to humanise a person who is a complete s*** stain on humanity. His story does not deserve to be told. I think your story might better have focused on Euradice's story and either ignored James or highlight what a s*** stain he was. otherwise, love the podcast

Oct 3rd
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Chanae Matthews

My favourite news source while at work, thanks!

Aug 29th
Reply

Sarah Louise

Loving this podcast. Thanks!

Jun 24th
Reply
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