Claim Ownership

Author:

Subscribed: 0Played: 0
Share

Description

 Episodes
Reverse
Almost a decade of conservative government in Australia has ended. Votes are still being counted, but it looks like the Liberal and National Party have suffered their worst result in decades. The Greens, independents and minor parties have had historic wins, and will wield significant power in the new parliament. But the government will be led by Anthony Albanese, Australia’s 31st Prime Minister – it’s something even he didn’t think was possible just a few years ago. So how did it all come together? How did Labor react on the night? And while they have won government, are there big lessons in this result that the party will have to take onboard? Today — we go inside the Labor party at the moment it won victory.  Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
It’s election day, but when will the results start coming through? When will we start to know who’s winning? And what should we all look out for, which seats should we pay attention to? To answer these questions, we decided to speak to election analyst, Ben Raue, about the most important races to pay attention to and how we should be watching results. We hope you enjoy Ben’s guide to watching the election and that it helps make sense of what is shaping up to be a remarkable election night. Guest: Election analyst for The Tally Room, Ben Raue. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
It’s all come down to this. On Saturday night, Australia will decide it’s next government and next Prime Minister. The final week of the campaign saw Scott Morrison, who is trying not to be a bulldozer, bulldoze a child during a media appearance at youth soccer training in Tasmania. And Labor released the costings on its policies, just two days out from the election. The party says it’s policies will only cost 7.4 billion dollars more than the Coalition’s, a figure that pales in comparison to the overall 220 billion dollar deficit. Today, to analyse all the latest events, we’re joined by: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton, Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno, and Election analyst from The Tally Room, Ben Raue. Guest: Chief Political Correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton, columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno, and election analyst from The Tally Room, Ben Raue. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
With just days to go until the election, our politicians are frantically trying to secure every last vote they can.  At this stage of the campaign, the Prime Minister and Opposition Leader can travel to three different states in a single day, visiting key seats and making announcements to win over undecided voters. Where are they going, what’s their pitch, and which campaign is more confident heading into election day?  Today, chief political correspondent at The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton takes us inside the whirlwind final days of the campaign trail.  Guest: Chief political correspondent at The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
What happens when the cause you’ve dedicated your life to, turns into something you can no longer support? That’s the question Fred Chaney, the former deputy leader of the Liberal Party, has had to confront this election. Now, he’s hoping people like his niece, who is running as an Independent in Western Australia, can teach the major parties a lesson. Today, former federal politician Fred Chaney on why politicians gave up on tackling our greatest challenges. Guest: Former deputy leader of the Liberal Party, Fred Chaney. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
On the weekend, the Coalition launched its campaign, just six days before the election. The centrepiece of the launch was a new housing policy, which it promises will help more young people to buy a home, by allowing them to take money out of their superannuation. But will the scheme really help new home buyers or is it too little, too late? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe on what the Coalition is offering voters at this election. Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
On election night, the Melbourne seat of Kooyong could be one of the most fiercely contested in the country. The Treasurer of Australia, Josh Frydenberg, is facing what he’s described as the fight of his political life. His opponent was virtually unknown to most Australians a few months ago, but now polls show she has a chance at victory.  So who is the woman taking on the Treasurer? Today, 7am producer Elle Marsh takes us inside the campaign of Doctor Monique Ryan. Guest: Producer for 7am , Elle Marsh. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
With just one week to go until election day the debate over the minimum wage has taken the spotlight. And the polls are showing some Coalition strongholds are at risk of falling.  So what can we glean about how Labor and the Coalition are gearing up for the final days of the campaign, and should we trust the polls this time around?  Today, to analyse all the latest events, we’re joined by: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton, Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno, and Election analyst from The Tally Room, Ben Raue. Guest: Chief Political Correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton, columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno, and election analyst from The Tally Room, Ben Raue. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
As Australia prepares to elect its 31st Prime Minister and next federal government, there’s a proportion of people under represented in that vote.  Indigenous enrolment remains lower than the rest of the population, particularly in remote areas, like parts of the Northern Territory.  A complaint lodged with the Human Rights Commission alleges that there is a pattern of indirect discrimination and voter suppression.  Today, in the second of this two part series, 7am producer Ruby Schwartz on a historic human rights complaint - and the man behind it.  Guest: Producer for 7am, Ruby Schwartz. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
When Australia heads to the polls in a couple of weeks, 1 in 5 Indigenous people who are eligible to vote won’t be enrolled and won’t be able to cast a ballot.  60 years after First Nations people won the right to vote in Australia, why is access to democracy still a challenge? Today, producer for 7am Ruby Schwartz travels to remote Australia to find out why some people are more enrolled than others. Guest: Producer for 7am, Ruby Schwartz. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
The latest leaders debate has been described as “messy” and a “joke” by observers.  There’s one more debate to go before the election — but it won’t be hosted by the public broadcaster, the ABC — despite the organisation’s best efforts. In fact, the ABC has been effectively sidelined, as the rocky relationship between the government and the national broadcaster continues to play out. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton, on the ABC’s doomed bid to host an election debate and what it says about the relationship between the Morrison government and the media.  Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
Sometimes the contest for a single seat can be about more than who wins. Hunter is just that; it’s a seat that spans some of Australia’s oldest coal mines, and the questions in Hunter have huge consequences for us all. How seriously we are taking the climate crisis, how quickly we can transition to renewable energy and whether workers in these industries will be looked after. Today, investigative journalist Marian Wilkinson on the race for Hunter, what the parties are promising people there and what that means for all of us. Guest: Investigative journalist, Marian Wilkinson. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
As we close in on election day, housing affordability has become a central issue of this campaign. First, Labor announced its solution, the Help to Buy scheme and then just a few days later, the Reserve Bank increased the cash rate from its historic low of 0.1% to 0.35%. People’s mortgages are going up and it could put upward pressure on rents. So, how are cost of living pressures factoring into the decision voters will make in just two weeks time? Today, to analyse all the latest events, we’re joined by: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton, Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno, and Election analyst from The Tally Room, Ben Raue. Guest: Chief Political Correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton, columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno, and election analyst from The Tally Room, Ben Raue. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
Adam Bandt sits down for a one-on-one interview with Ruby Jones. This election, issues the Greens have championed for years, like an integrity commission and reducing emissions, are now finding a lot of popular support. But the party finds itself at a crossroads. It’s been unable to increase the number of lower house MPs and senators it has at the federal level for over a decade. Adam Bandt, the party’s leader, has ambitions to change this. So, in his first federal election as leader, how has he shaped the party, is this a different kind of Greens campaign and would he really be able to work with a Labor party that views the Greens as toxic electorally? Guest: Leader of the Australian Greens and federal MP for Melbourne, Adam Bandt. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
The war in Ukraine has led to soul searching about how Russian oligarchs have built cosy relationships with institutions around the world. Lawyers and bankers in London have been warned by the British prime minister not to defend the wealth and reputations of Russian oligarchs who have ties to Vladimir Putin’s government. And one of those oligarchs actually has a connection to Australia as well. Last year Roman Abramovich launched legal action in NSW. Today, journalist for The Saturday Paper Kieran Pender on why a Russian oligarch launched a lawsuit in an Australian court.  Guest: Lawyer and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Kieran Pender. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
The Labor Party officially launched their campaign on Sunday, unveiling new policies and making their most comprehensive pitch to voters so far. But the policy offering remains slimmer than it was three years ago, which is part of what has been described as the party’s small target strategy. So what is Labor actually offering? And who are they targeting with these election promises? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe on the Labor Party’s policy platform and the demographic data that shaped it. Guest: National Correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
As we enter the final weeks of the election campaign there’s one group of people more stressed, more disillusioned than most. Teenagers, desperate to see change but unable to vote to get their voice heard.  Today, 7am producer Kara Jensen-Mackinnon on a day in the life of a teenager trying to make change happen before it’s too late. Guest: Producer for 7am, Kara Jensen-Mackinnon. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
Today, Anthony Albanese is set to end his isolation and return to the campaign trail after he tested positive for Covid-19 last week.  As he returns to campaigning in-person, the cost of living has become an even more pressing election issue. New inflation figures show prices are 5.1 per cent higher today than they were this time last year – which could mean interest rates are raised in the middle of an election campaign. And in the midst of this China has signed a deal with the Solomon islands, which could see a Chinese base built in the South-Pacific. Today, to analyse all the latest events, we’re joined by: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton, Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno, Election analyst from The Tally Room, Ben Raue Guests: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton, columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno and election analyst from The Tally Room, Ben Raue.
This election, one person is having more of a say than anyone else when it comes to the political advertising Australians are seeing everyday. That person is Clive Palmer. And he’s not only outspending the major political parties by a significant margin, he’s also got a huge personal say in the ads he’s putting onto billboards and TV screens. That’s because he writes them all himself.  Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton on the rise of Clive Palmer and what he is trying to get out of his election advertising blitz.  Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
In the Northern Territory, there’s a youth detention centre that has been subject to multiple reports, complaints, and a Royal Commission.  That commission recommended it be shut down, but children as young as 10 years old are still being held there, with reports of minors having been locked inside their cells for 23 hours a day. Today, journalist for The Saturday Paper, Esther Linder on the grandmother who is fighting for the closure of the Don Dale detention centre.  Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Esther Linder. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram
Comments (44)

Kyra Rose

An advertisement for Uber drivers? After all the discourse this podcast has aired about workers' rights and conditions, I'm, quite frankly, shocked and disgusted at such support of the company.

May 21st
Reply

Alex K.

You didn't touch on the fact that maybe these communities could show some responsibility in how they bring up their young people. Walker had attacked someone with an axe in the past and attacked Rolfe with scissors on the night of his death. Police have long shot dead combatants that attack them with weapons. Take Roni Levi on Bondi Beach some years ago, as an example. In general, I abhor police killings, but I feel Rolfe had a strong case.

Mar 16th
Reply

william tayor

FFS government capture needs to end.

Mar 8th
Reply

william tayor

I live on a pension for ptsd and have given up on treatment as there is no service for long term treatment also whats never mentioned is the lack.od bulk.billinh doctors as well. atm I am.inncrisis trying to find a gp just to get antidepressants as there are no gp in my town who will bulk bill and I cannot afford the ci payment. the primary health care system is neat collapse and unworkable. people.like.me end up in emergency wards with chronic untreated illness because we can't access primary health care.

Feb 23rd
Reply

Alex K.

Morrison didn't invite Channel 9 cameras into his home, he invited them into Kirribilli House

Feb 18th
Reply

rick sabbatini

great final episode! such an interesting concept of how we are selling our storytelling to people who see that stuff as merely a product.

Feb 16th
Reply

Sabeeshan Kulenthiran

Really wish the movies mentioned on this podcast were listed here. I was driving when listening to it 😅

Feb 12th
Reply

Fifty Six

thanks 8

Dec 7th
Reply

Alex K.

those interested in why The Morrison government is avoiding corruption commission I also recommend listening to the Politics With Michelle Grattan podcast, where in a recent episode she spoke with retired judge Stephen Charles. What he had to say was extremely interesting and perspicacious.

Oct 11th
Reply

Eddog

I really wish this podcast wasn’t called “the culture” I like Osman but he’s not an African American and I wish he’d chill out

Aug 27th
Reply

Alex K.

The proof is NOT in the pudding! "The proof of the pudding is in the eating", is the saying.

Jul 19th
Reply

Anthony Brown

Written and spoken by the Labor Party of Australia. Doesn't even pretend to present an unbiased view of the circumstances. When did Morrison actually say the words "I believe Porter is innocent".

Mar 11th
Reply

Anthony Brown

You lost me at invasion day. Stick to the news.

Feb 28th
Reply (6)

james Fury

It Would be great if 7am didn't host advertisements from company's like McDonald's.

Feb 25th
Reply

Alex K.

hey Ruby you forgot to ask Dr Hewson who he votes for these days. Coz is sure ain't his old mates!

Dec 14th
Reply

nicola dugar

Saying this as a sad lefty: Jim Chalmers will be the next Labor PM.

Dec 3rd
Reply

Alex K.

I know you recorded this in the 24 hours after the election and it's a bit easier now another 24 hours later, but it looks likely that Biden's win is going to be reasonably comfortable. probably more comfortable than Trump's win in 2016, and that Florida aside, the pollsters are quite accurate this time. Florida was also a outlier in the 2018 midterms where the Republicans did quite well but had a bad showing overall. the major reason for that is the huge pre-poll vote, mainly by Democrats who were concerned about attending in person on election day, I meant that the early boats ran towards republicans but as the mail in ballots were counted later, Biden caught up and won the key battleground states.

Nov 5th
Reply (1)

Pippa Buchanan

thank you so much for this reporting

Oct 21st
Reply

Tina Vrontas

After a ten year legal battle to get the letters, I wonder why they bothered. The letters are being now being "interpreted". The slant depends upon the reader and their political views. They have not shed any new light on the subject. HILARIOUS!!!

Jul 22nd
Reply

Tina Vrontas

Some of the opinions expressed about the Victorian Covid 19 debacle are quite lame. For what it's worth, my opinion is that arrogance sparked the 2nd outbreak. The Premier and his very poor decision making processes must shoulder all responsibility. Decisions taken on ideology rather than for the good of the whole community. The arrogance of the Victorian leadership - "jobs for mates" and the arrogance of some non english speaking communities where they pretend to not understand when it suits them. They have no problems accessing social welfare.... Information WAS provided in multiple languages. I watch quite a few on SBS.

Jul 21st
Reply
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store