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7am

Author: Schwartz Media

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A daily news show from the publisher of The Monthly and The Saturday Paper. Hear from the country’s best reporters, covering the news as it affects Australia. This is news with narrative, every weekday.
355 Episodes
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A week after her secret relationship with a politician being investigated over corruption was first revealed, NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian is still facing questions over what she knew. Today, MIke Seccombe on what the Premier’s connection to a disgraced MP means for her political future. Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe. Background reading: ‘Poor Gladys’ rings hollow after premier’s ICAC grilling in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
After more than 100 days of strict lockdown, Victorians finally have a new path out of restrictions. It signals a more gradual easing than the government originally hoped, after outbreaks amongst frontline workers led to a spike in case numbers Today, Osman Faruqi on the story behind the slower path out of lockdown and where the risk now lies.   Guest: Editor of 7am Osman Faruqi. Background reading: Where Victoria’s second-wave cases are still occurring in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
All the way from their home in Los Angeles, actors Harriet Dyer and Patrick Brammall provide more information than is entirely necessary as they stumble across the answers to this week’s quiz. We get an insight into safe work practices on film sets in the time of Covid-19, and a special bonus question about Cats. Guests: Harriet Dyer and Patrick Brammall  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
With the Queensland state election looming, the Prime Minister has hit the campaign trail. But just as he arrived it was revealed that the LNP Opposition leader had been referred to the election watchdog for alleged impropriety. Today, Paul Bongiorno on the growing political scandals around the country.   Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A reliance on imports has left Australia with dwindling supplies of some essential medicines and now experts are warning that manufacturing capabilities at home need to be boosted. Today, Margaret Simons on Australia’s pharmaceutical vulnerability.  Guest: Journalist for The Saturday Paper Margaret Simons. Background reading: Why Australia runs out of vital medicines in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Over the past few weeks an inquiry into Crown Resorts, Australia’s largest gambling company, has laid bare a culture of risk taking and threats. It’s also embroiled one of the company’s biggest shareholders. Today, Mike Seccombe on James Packer’s extraordinary evidence, and what’s at stake for Crown.   Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe. Background reading: James Packer’s testimony at the Crown inquiry in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Experts have accused the government of failing to properly fund the aged care sector in this year’s federal budget. Advocacy groups are also concerned about the lack of support for young people, women, the unemployed and migrants. Today, Rick Morton on the groups left behind by the Morrison government’s recovery plan.    Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton. Background reading: Budget 2020 does little for the vulnerable in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
For decades, students in Footscray in Melbourne’s West, have been taught in Vietnamese alongside English, in line with the suburb’s long-standing heritage. But now, the program is under threat. Today, André Dao on why we value some languages more than others, and what it says about where Australia sees its place in the world.  The audio of Professor Alan Crookshank in this story is from the Earshot series “Tongue Tied and Fluent.”   Guest: Contributor to The Monthly Andre Dao. Background reading: A minor language in The Monthly  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Actors Shari Sebbens and Gemma Bird Matheson take on the quiz this week. Gemma can tell you how many minutes there are in half a day, and Shari knows the name of Tara June Winch’s 2020 Miles Franklin award-winning novel. But neither of them have any idea where the inventor of the Rubik's Cube was born. Guests: Shari Sebbens and Gemma Bird Matheson  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In his budget reply speech last night Opposition leader Anthony Albanese outlined his response to the economic crisis and criticised the federal government for spending in the wrong places. Today, Paul Bongiorno on how the political battlelines between the major parties are being drawn.   Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Lidia Thorpe entered the Senate this week, becoming the first Aboriginal Senator representing Victoria. Today, she talks to Ruby Jones about rebuilding after the pandemic, and what we can learn from the communities that she represents.  Over the next few weeks 7am will be interviewing prominent Australians who have written about their vision for the country in The Saturday Paper.  Guest: Senator for Victoria, Lidia Thorpe. Background reading: After the virus: Fighting for our future in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Josh Frydenberg’s second budget is a world away from the surplus he was predicting last year. Now, in the middle of a pandemic, debt is on track to hit $1 trillion and the Treasurer is talking up a jobs-led recovery. Today, Karen Middleton on a budget of big numbers and heroic assumptions.    Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Jacqui Lambie fires up

Jacqui Lambie fires up

2020-10-0514:571

The future of Australia’s universities hangs in the balance, with radical reforms to funding and student fees due to be voted this week. The government has been negotiating furiously behind closed doors to pass its legislation through the Senate. Today, Rick Morton, on the surprising stance taken by Senator Jacqui Lambie.   Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton. Background reading: Jacqui Lambie’s stand on education in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Helen Garner is one of Australia’s most celebrated authors, and today on 7am she talks to host Ruby Jones about the diary she kept during lockdown in Melbourne and what she experienced during her months of isolation. Guest: Author and contributor to The Monthly Helen Garner. Background reading: The lockdown diaries in The Monthly  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In a truly collaborative effort, host of online cabaret “Choose Your Own Variety” Ali McGregor and comedian Claire Hooper are let down only by the self-confessed sports-shaped hole in their knowledge. Still, they know the chemical formula of table salt, they work out the cube root of 729, and via a circuitous route, through pop culture, they arrive at which vaccine was invented by Jonas Salk. Guests: Ali McGregor and Claire Hooper In the paper: A Little Night Music in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
As the Treasurer prepares the upcoming federal budget he’s facing pressure to spend big and keep the economy afloat. But can a government historically preoccupied with cutting spending invest more in economic stimulus? Today, Paul Bongiorno on the challenge facing Josh Frydenberg, and the country.   Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Throughout the pandemic, there’s been a vocal group of journalists who are adamant the risk of Covid-19 is being overblown. But what drives this kind of thinking, and is it changing anyone’s mind? Today, Richard Cooke on the Covid contrarians, and what they tell us about the state of the Australian media landscape. Guest: Writer for The Saturday Paper Richard Cooke. Background reading: The media’s Covid-19 contrarians in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The NSW Koala War

The NSW Koala War

2020-09-2917:20

When the NSW National Party threatened to break up the state’s Coalition over the issue of koalas many were mystified. But behind the political fireworks lies a story about a party being squeezed from both the right and the left. Today, Mike Seccombe on the Nationals fight for survival.   Guest: National Correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe. Background reading: NSW Nationals over a Barilaro in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Australia’s universities have been hit hard by the pandemic, with thousands of job losses. Now the federal government wants to change the way the sector is funded, and how much students will pay. Today, Rick Morton on the crisis facing our universities, and why we’re on the brink of destroying our national research capacity. Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton. Background reading: Coalition to cut $2 billion a year from university research in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The new virus hotels

The new virus hotels

2020-09-2714:54

Victoria’s second wave has been attributed to an outbreak of Covid-19 amongst private contractors working in hotel quarantine, and now government documents reveal more contractors at quarantine hotels have tested positive for the virus. Today, Osman Faruqi on Melbourne’s ‘hot hotels’ and the risks they might still pose.   Guest: Editor of 7am, Osman Faruqi.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (19)

Tina Vrontas

After a ten year legal battle to get the letters, I wonder why they bothered. The letters are being now being "interpreted". The slant depends upon the reader and their political views. They have not shed any new light on the subject. HILARIOUS!!!

Jul 22nd
Reply

Tina Vrontas

Some of the opinions expressed about the Victorian Covid 19 debacle are quite lame. For what it's worth, my opinion is that arrogance sparked the 2nd outbreak. The Premier and his very poor decision making processes must shoulder all responsibility. Decisions taken on ideology rather than for the good of the whole community. The arrogance of the Victorian leadership - "jobs for mates" and the arrogance of some non english speaking communities where they pretend to not understand when it suits them. They have no problems accessing social welfare.... Information WAS provided in multiple languages. I watch quite a few on SBS.

Jul 21st
Reply

Alex K.

On 23 June Gladys Berejilkian talked about washing hands well as basic pandemic management. I screamed at the TV "no, shutting the border is basic pandemic management". it took her 13 more days to get the same message and Patient Zero from Melbourne arrived in New South Wales on the 30th of June. NSW Govt is responsible for our outbreak.

Jul 15th
Reply

Luke

So many ways to pick this story apart. Gangs almost always are racially oriented. When going after the Italian mafia, they focus in on Italians. When it's Asian gangs they target Asian suspects. Let's all act like something unique happened here and point the finger at islamaphobia. The cops played it pretty dirty, as usual. The man inside has repented his ways, as usual. Nothing special here.

Jul 15th
Reply

Lawrence

The suggestion that Bilal Skaf was somehow the victim of racism is disgusting. There were victim statements which explicitly outlined the rapes including numerous racially charged taunts and threats. Read what actually happened to those poor girls (one of which was 14yo) and then tell me with a straight face that poor Bilal Skaf has been hard done by. What the NSW Police did to stop the violence was absolutely necessary. Quit apologizing for violent criminals.

Jul 15th
Reply

Luke

This episode was so biased in favor of victimising a criminal. Part 2 better be good.

Jul 13th
Reply (2)

Alex K.

Comments from resident of tower are unreasonable. It's a public health measure, nothing more. Towers are infested with the virus, dozens of cases. The Premier is not targeting these towers out of spite or victimisation, I can assure you. Victoria Police uniform includes the police being armed, it's a violation of their procedure to remove them. Of course it's not pleasant for the residents, and things like medications should be prioritised. "No consideration for human life", she said, that's ridiculous.

Jul 7th
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Alex K.

the emaciation of the ABC and SBS is despicable

May 14th
Reply (1)

Hannah Derwent

this was excellent and your guest so incredibly articulate

Feb 26th
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Kirstie JM

Thanks for an informative year 7am, very sad to hear Elizabeth is moving on but wish her all the best!

Dec 23rd
Reply

Petr Pavlík

I'm sorry to hear that Elizabeth is moving to a different role. Thanks for your fantastic work on the 7am.

Dec 19th
Reply

Julian Sinnema

Big fan of 7am. I use it as my morning alarm, it's lovely to wake up to every weekday morning. It is a top notch source of news. 👌

Dec 5th
Reply

Judd Millner

What's with the background music? It's distracting.

Dec 5th
Reply

Tate Bourke

Hated your coverage of James Todd. Who cares about him? What your coverage did was attempt to humanise a person who is a complete s*** stain on humanity. His story does not deserve to be told. I think your story might better have focused on Euradice's story and either ignored James or highlight what a s*** stain he was. otherwise, love the podcast

Oct 3rd
Reply

Chanae Matthews

My favourite news source while at work, thanks!

Aug 29th
Reply

Sarah Louise

Loving this podcast. Thanks!

Jun 24th
Reply
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