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7am

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A daily news show from the publisher of The Monthly and The Saturday Paper. Hear from the country’s best reporters, covering the news as it affects Australia. This is news with narrative, every weekday.
385 Episodes
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Rio Tinto’s destruction of the Juukan Gorge caves sparked a global backlash, and now a parliamentary inquiry is exploring what needs to change. Today, Mike Seccombe on how the system locks out traditional owners, and the cross-party alliance of federal politicians pushing for reform.   Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe. Background reading: The failures behind the destruction of the Juukan Gorge caves in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A landmark report has quantified the economic and social cost of Australia’s mental health crisis. It’s also pointed to poverty and unemployment as key factors behind why so many people are struggling with mental health. Today, Rick Morton how the government’s social policies are causing harm to our most vulnerable communities. Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton. Background reading: Big picture: Robo-debt, politics and poverty in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Enemy of the state

Enemy of the state

2020-11-2314:20

West Papuan separatists have been fighting for independence from Indonesia for decades. Now independence activists have been targeted by the Indonesian government for posting on social media. Today on 7am, Zach Szumer on the woman who fought back, and became an enemy of the state.    Guest: Writer for The Monthly Zach Szumer. Background reading: Enemy of the state in The Monthly  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Detailed accusations that Australian soldiers in Afghanistan committed war crimes have drawn widespread condemnation from around the world. But who is ultimately responsible for the actions of Australian armed forces? Today, Karen Middleton on the disturbing and shocking allegations involving Australia’s most elite military unit, and our collective shame.  Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The outgoing artistic directors of Sydney Festival and the Australian Ballet, Wesley Enoch and David McAllister, combine forces to battle against their impending irrelevance, by doing extremely well at the quiz. Whether it’s questions about WWII tanks or Greek mythology, these two pass with flying colours. They even ace the sports question. But like everyone else, they come undone with geography. Guests: Wesley Enoch and David McAllister In the paper: After the virus: Radical optimism for the arts in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The federal government has settled the largest class action in Australian history, over the unlawful robodebt program. Today, Paul Bongiorno on who was responsible and whether anyone in the government will be held accountable for this policy.   Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Mojtaba is 29 years old. He’s lived in Australia for nearly a decade, but last year he was placed into immigration detention. Since then he hasn’t been able to see his wife and young son and may never again. Today, journalist Abdul Hekmat on how Mojtaba’s life has been shaped by Australia’s immigration policies, and the way our system continues to punish the most vulnerable.    Guest: Journalist and contributor to The Saturday Paper Abdul Hekmat. Background reading: Hazara asylum seeker faces exile from his son in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Here come the vaccines

Here come the vaccines

2020-11-1714:541

A huge, global effort to try and find a vaccine for coronavirus is showing growing signs of success. A number of possible candidates are moving into the final stages of testing, and some are even hitting production lines. Today, Rick Morton on when Australians might see a coronavirus vaccine. Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton. Background reading: Progress on Covid-19 vaccines in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Recent scandals and allegations of workplace bullying have put the spotlight on the treatment of women in Parliament. Today, Karen Middleton on the unique power dynamic between politicians and the people who work for them.   Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton. Background reading: Exclusive: Government refuses to release staff bullying report in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp is under assault, with two former Prime Ministers, from opposite sides of politics, uniting in their criticism of the media company. Today, Mike Seccombe on whether the world’s biggest media empire might actually be under threat. Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, writer, actor, activist, and recently one of Who magazine’s sexiest people of 2020, Nakkiah Lui and her tv editor husband, Gabe Dowrick, tell us how many teeth an adult human should have, figure out which European nation owns the Dodecanese islands, and discuss the number of presidents of the United States who have died in office. Guests: Nakkiah Lui and Gabe Dowrick Background reading: Playwright Nakkiah Lui on radicalism and family in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Joe Biden’s victory in the United States has already had ramifications for Australian politics, particularly on the issue of climate change. Today, Paul Bongiorno on the political shockwaves rolling across the Pacific. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The world is struggling to contain the fallout of the coronavirus, but has the pandemic exposed something more fundamentally broken about our economic system? Today, Yanis Varoufakis on where things went wrong, and how to envisage a fairer world.   Guest: Economist and former finance minister for Greece, Yanis Varoufakis. Background reading: After the virus: How to design a post-capitalist world in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Who is Joe Biden?

Who is Joe Biden?

2020-11-1017:591

After one of the most tumultuous periods in recent US history, voters have chosen Joe Biden to try and reunite a divided country. Today, Jonathan Pearlman on Joe Biden’s life, his upcoming presidency, and what it means for important issues like climate change.   Guest: World editor for The Saturday Paper Jonathan Pearlman.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A new report collating the experiences of hundreds of frontline workers has revealed how criminal and judicial systems are failing victims of family violence. Today, Rick Morton on how we’re still letting down survivors, and what needs to change. This episode contains descriptions of family violence.   Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton. Background reading: Policing family violence in NSW in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Australia has managed to effectively suppress Covid-19, but with more international arrivals experts predict that outbreaks will continue. Today, Amy Coopes on the measures that will keep Australia safe from here on. Guest: Health journalist and writer for The Saturday Paper Amy Coopes.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Emily Barclay and Tom Ward like going to amusement parks. But Emily is too scared to go on any of the roller-coasters, so Tom has to do so on her behalf. Their approach to the quiz is much the same. Tom goes hurtling towards answers he clearly doesn’t know, while Emily chimes in from a safe distance. The daffodil is the national flower of which British country? What nationality was Hans Christian Andersen? And in what year were white Australian women given the right to vote? Guests: Emily Barclay and Tom Ward  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Trump’s last stand

Trump’s last stand

2020-11-0515:01

Protests have broken out across the US in response to Donald Trump’s attempts to cling to power. But as counting continues in key states, Joe Biden’s position is becoming stronger. Today, Oscar Schwartz on what a potential Biden presidency could look like, and whether Trump will succeed in hijacking the result.   Guest: Reporter for 7am Oscar Schwartz.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
After a full night of counting votes, the outcome of the US Presidential election still remains in doubt, with Donald Trump holding on to key states that delivered him victory in 2016. Today, Oscar Schwartz on what drove voters to each candidate, and what the results mean for a nation already exhausted by division.    Guest: Reporter for 7am, Oscar Schwartz.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
As voters in the US head to the polls, President Trump has warned that a close or uncertain result could spark chaos. Behind the scenes both parties have been locked in a battle over voting rights. Today, Rick Morton on the fight against voter suppression, and why, no matter who wins, the US is facing a fractured future. Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton. Background reading: Trump 2020: This is how you steal an election in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (22)

Alex K.

I know you recorded this in the 24 hours after the election and it's a bit easier now another 24 hours later, but it looks likely that Biden's win is going to be reasonably comfortable. probably more comfortable than Trump's win in 2016, and that Florida aside, the pollsters are quite accurate this time. Florida was also a outlier in the 2018 midterms where the Republicans did quite well but had a bad showing overall. the major reason for that is the huge pre-poll vote, mainly by Democrats who were concerned about attending in person on election day, I meant that the early boats ran towards republicans but as the mail in ballots were counted later, Biden caught up and won the key battleground states.

Nov 5th
Reply (1)

Pippa Buchanan

thank you so much for this reporting

Oct 21st
Reply

Tina Vrontas

After a ten year legal battle to get the letters, I wonder why they bothered. The letters are being now being "interpreted". The slant depends upon the reader and their political views. They have not shed any new light on the subject. HILARIOUS!!!

Jul 22nd
Reply

Tina Vrontas

Some of the opinions expressed about the Victorian Covid 19 debacle are quite lame. For what it's worth, my opinion is that arrogance sparked the 2nd outbreak. The Premier and his very poor decision making processes must shoulder all responsibility. Decisions taken on ideology rather than for the good of the whole community. The arrogance of the Victorian leadership - "jobs for mates" and the arrogance of some non english speaking communities where they pretend to not understand when it suits them. They have no problems accessing social welfare.... Information WAS provided in multiple languages. I watch quite a few on SBS.

Jul 21st
Reply

Alex K.

On 23 June Gladys Berejilkian talked about washing hands well as basic pandemic management. I screamed at the TV "no, shutting the border is basic pandemic management". it took her 13 more days to get the same message and Patient Zero from Melbourne arrived in New South Wales on the 30th of June. NSW Govt is responsible for our outbreak.

Jul 15th
Reply

Luke

So many ways to pick this story apart. Gangs almost always are racially oriented. When going after the Italian mafia, they focus in on Italians. When it's Asian gangs they target Asian suspects. Let's all act like something unique happened here and point the finger at islamaphobia. The cops played it pretty dirty, as usual. The man inside has repented his ways, as usual. Nothing special here.

Jul 15th
Reply

Lawrence

The suggestion that Bilal Skaf was somehow the victim of racism is disgusting. There were victim statements which explicitly outlined the rapes including numerous racially charged taunts and threats. Read what actually happened to those poor girls (one of which was 14yo) and then tell me with a straight face that poor Bilal Skaf has been hard done by. What the NSW Police did to stop the violence was absolutely necessary. Quit apologizing for violent criminals.

Jul 15th
Reply

Luke

This episode was so biased in favor of victimising a criminal. Part 2 better be good.

Jul 13th
Reply (2)

Alex K.

Comments from resident of tower are unreasonable. It's a public health measure, nothing more. Towers are infested with the virus, dozens of cases. The Premier is not targeting these towers out of spite or victimisation, I can assure you. Victoria Police uniform includes the police being armed, it's a violation of their procedure to remove them. Of course it's not pleasant for the residents, and things like medications should be prioritised. "No consideration for human life", she said, that's ridiculous.

Jul 7th
Reply

Alex K.

the emaciation of the ABC and SBS is despicable

May 14th
Reply (1)

Hannah Derwent

this was excellent and your guest so incredibly articulate

Feb 26th
Reply

Kirstie JM

Thanks for an informative year 7am, very sad to hear Elizabeth is moving on but wish her all the best!

Dec 23rd
Reply

Petr Pavlík

I'm sorry to hear that Elizabeth is moving to a different role. Thanks for your fantastic work on the 7am.

Dec 19th
Reply

Julian Sinnema

Big fan of 7am. I use it as my morning alarm, it's lovely to wake up to every weekday morning. It is a top notch source of news. 👌

Dec 5th
Reply

Judd Millner

What's with the background music? It's distracting.

Dec 5th
Reply

Tate Bourke

Hated your coverage of James Todd. Who cares about him? What your coverage did was attempt to humanise a person who is a complete s*** stain on humanity. His story does not deserve to be told. I think your story might better have focused on Euradice's story and either ignored James or highlight what a s*** stain he was. otherwise, love the podcast

Oct 3rd
Reply

Chanae Matthews

My favourite news source while at work, thanks!

Aug 29th
Reply

Sarah Louise

Loving this podcast. Thanks!

Jun 24th
Reply
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