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A daily news show from the publisher of The Monthly and The Saturday Paper. Hear from the country’s best reporters, covering the news as it affects Australia. This is news with narrative, every weekday.
519 Episodes
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Hip-hop is the biggest musical genre in the world right now, and one of the fastest growing locally, but in Australia it still feels like it hasn’t quite broken through and dominated the mainstream yet, in the way it has overseas - especially in the US and UK.  Acts like the Hilltop Hoods and Bliss n Eso helped popularise Australian hip-hop in the mid-2000s, but while they were achieving commercial success, a much grittier and raw kind of hip-hop was coming out of housing commission estates in Sydney and Melbourne. Known as gutter rap, or lad rap, this underground subgenre never saw much airplay and didn’t sell heaps of records, but it influenced a generation of artists redefining hip-hop in Australia today. Writer, journalist and contributor to The Saturday Paper and The Monthly, Mahmood Fazal, joins The Culture to discuss the history of Australia’s underground hip-hop scene and how it feeds into the music being made today. Guest: Writer, journalist and contributor The Saturday Paper and The Monthly, Mahmood Fazal  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
This week, Scott Morrison announced Australia’s involvement in a massive organised crime sting coordinated by the FBI. He pushed for greater security powers, but some observers believe what he really wants is a distraction from bad news and poor polling.   Guest: Contributing editor for The Monthly Rachel Withers.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
After 20 years of war, Australia gave three days’ notice before closing its embassy in Kabul. The dramatic end expresses how unsafe Afghanistan still is and how little the conflict achieved. But the decision also leaves hundreds of local staff vulnerable to retaliation by the Taliban.    Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A further outbreak of Covid-19 in Victorian aged-care homes was not just a possibility: it was almost a given. Even before a vaccine was available, the federal government ended the support payment intended to stop casual staff working across multiple sites. That is exactly how the virus spread.   Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Christian Porter’s decision to settle his defamation suit against the ABC is the end of one battle. But the former attorney-general, accused of a historic rape he strenuously denies, is still fighting on at least two other fronts. Mike Seccombe on how the so-called ‘Defamation trial of the century’ ended - and what happens next.   Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Australian writer Yang Hengjun has been detained by the Chinese government since 2019. He’s been charged with espionage offences, but the exact nature of what he’s accused of has never been revealed. He’s now awaiting the verdict of a secret trial held a few weeks ago, with the death penalty one possibility.  Linda Jaivin is a former China correspondent and the author of ‘The Shortest History of China’. Today, she unpacks the mysterious case of Yang Hengjun and what his treatment says about the Chinese government's approach to human rights.   Guest: Writer Linda Jaivin.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Olivia Rodrigo’s hit single ‘driver’s license’ is undeniably the biggest song of 2021 so far. Now the actor turned singer-songwriter has released her debut album ‘Sour’, which has broken streaming and chart records. But who is Olivia Rodrigo and why has a teenage girl’s break-up album resonated with so many people of all ages? This week on The Culture we explore what her enormous success says about the way pop stars are manufactured in this current era, with music writer and critic for The Saturday Paper Shaad D’Souza.   Guest: Music critic for The Saturday Paper, Shaad D’Souza.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Today, Sarah Krasnostein, the best-selling author of ‘The Trauma Cleaner’, reads her essay from the latest issue of The Monthly.  It’s called ‘The most hated man’ and it explores the sentencing of Richard Pusey, who was convicted of outraging public decency after he filmed the horrific aftermath of a car crash that killed four police officers.   Guest: Writer for The Saturday Paper Sarah Krasnostein. Background reading: The most hated man in The Monthly  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
For the past week the federal government has been locked in a tussle with Victoria over who is responsible for financially supporting those suffering the economic consequences of another lockdown. Scott Morrison and his ministers have tried to shift the responsibility onto their state counterparts, but grudgingly gave ground on Thursday, acknowledging they did have a role to play. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the fresh political challenges facing the federal government. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Yesterday, Victorians were told the state’s seven day ‘circuit breaker’ lockdown would be extended for another week, as health authorities race to contain the latest Covid-19 outbreak.  It’s the fourth lockdown in the state since the start of the pandemic, and now questions are being asked about why Victoria in particular seems so susceptible to the spread of the virus.  Today, health columnist at The Saturday Paper Dr Melanie Cheng on what went wrong this time and what it will take to control this outbreak.   Guest: Health columnist for The Saturday Paper Dr Melanie Cheng.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Last month, under the cover of the federal budget, the Coalition government rushed through new laws legalising the indefinite detention of refugees. Australia’s embrace of indefinite detention puts us at odds with international law, and it’s led to condemnation from human rights groups. Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on how Australia got to this point, and what it means for those seeking safety in our country.   Guest: National Correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe. Background reading: Australian government legalises ‘a crime against humanity’ in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
As Covid-19 case numbers in Victoria continue to rise, attention has turned to the slow pace of the vaccine rollout, and the question of whether or not more vaccinations could have stopped this outbreak. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on where the rollout went wrong and what the consequences have been. Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
For years, advocates against sexual assault have been pushing for law reform, particularly on the issue of consent.  Now - they’ve had a win, with the NSW Attorney General announcing sweeping changes, which go even further than what was recommended by an independent inquiry. Today, writer for The Saturday Paper Bri Lee on what the changes mean, and the politician leading the charge.  Guest: Writer for The Saturday Paper Bri Lee.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Whether it’s podcasts like ‘Serial’ or ‘The Teacher’s Pet’, Netflix documentaries like ‘Making a Murderer’ or ‘Tiger King’, true crime is absolutely dominant.  But what does our obsession with these stories say about us, and our perception of the world we live in? And with institutions like the police and the media under increasing scrutiny from the public, is it time for a genre like true crime to reinvent itself? This week on The Culture we discuss all of that and more with Sarah Krasnostein, the best-selling author of ‘The Trauma Cleaner’, criminal law expert, and The Saturday Paper’s TV critic.   Guest: Sarah Krasnostein. TV critic for The Saturday Paper.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Victoria has been plunged back into lockdown, the state’s fourth since the start of the pandemic. But this time there’s one big difference: vaccines that were supposed to help keep us safe and avoid outbreaks like this are now available, but in Australia take up has been slow. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on how Victoria entered lockdown and who shoulders the blame. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The federal budget promised $3.2 billion dollars to be spent on policies that improve the lives of Australian women.  But, despite that pledge, a critical front line service that supports women being discriminated against at work has lost much of its funding, and now faces closure.  Today, Royce Kurmelovs on the future of the Working Women’s Centres.    Guest: Writer for The Saturday Paper Royce Kurmelovs.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
It’s been two years since former Opposition Leader Bill Shorten lost the federal election, and then the Labor leadership. Now, as the major parties gear up for an impending federal election, which could be held this year, questions are being asked about whether Shorten’s replacement Anthony Albanese is capable of securing Labor victory. Today, writer for The Saturday Paper Chris Wallace on Labor’s election chances, and what they’ve learnt from the last two years. Guest: Writer for The Saturday Paper Chris Wallace. Background reading: Labor’s election chances in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The Morrison government is contemplating new laws which could see charities held responsible for minor legal breaches by their members and supporters.  The sector says the changes are an attempt to stifle protest, while lawyers are warning they could be unconstitutional.  Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on why the government is targeting charities, and what the changes could mean.    Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Australia’s rollout of the Covid-19 vaccine has been stymied by a combination of different factors including supply, distribution and vaccine hesitancy amongst the public. A recent survey found that nearly one in three Australians aren’t willing to get vaccinated because they’re unsure about the risks or don’t think it’s necessary. Today, health columnist for The Saturday Paper Dr Melanie Cheng, on where Australia went wrong with its vaccine rollout and what the federal government needs to do to avoid a third wave.   Guest: Health columnist for The Saturday Paper Dr Melanie Cheng.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The Culture is a brand new weekly show from the team behind 7am. Every week join host Osman Faruqi and special guests as they go deep on film, music, TV, streaming, books and art. The first episode drops May 28. Follow The Culture now!  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (33)

Anthony Brown

Written and spoken by the Labor Party of Australia. Doesn't even pretend to present an unbiased view of the circumstances. When did Morrison actually say the words "I believe Porter is innocent".

Mar 11th
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Anthony Brown

You lost me at invasion day. Stick to the news.

Feb 28th
Reply (6)

james Fury

It Would be great if 7am didn't host advertisements from company's like McDonald's.

Feb 25th
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Alex K.

hey Ruby you forgot to ask Dr Hewson who he votes for these days. Coz is sure ain't his old mates!

Dec 14th
Reply

nicola dugar

Saying this as a sad lefty: Jim Chalmers will be the next Labor PM.

Dec 3rd
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Alex K.

I know you recorded this in the 24 hours after the election and it's a bit easier now another 24 hours later, but it looks likely that Biden's win is going to be reasonably comfortable. probably more comfortable than Trump's win in 2016, and that Florida aside, the pollsters are quite accurate this time. Florida was also a outlier in the 2018 midterms where the Republicans did quite well but had a bad showing overall. the major reason for that is the huge pre-poll vote, mainly by Democrats who were concerned about attending in person on election day, I meant that the early boats ran towards republicans but as the mail in ballots were counted later, Biden caught up and won the key battleground states.

Nov 5th
Reply (1)

Pippa Buchanan

thank you so much for this reporting

Oct 21st
Reply

Tina Vrontas

After a ten year legal battle to get the letters, I wonder why they bothered. The letters are being now being "interpreted". The slant depends upon the reader and their political views. They have not shed any new light on the subject. HILARIOUS!!!

Jul 22nd
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Tina Vrontas

Some of the opinions expressed about the Victorian Covid 19 debacle are quite lame. For what it's worth, my opinion is that arrogance sparked the 2nd outbreak. The Premier and his very poor decision making processes must shoulder all responsibility. Decisions taken on ideology rather than for the good of the whole community. The arrogance of the Victorian leadership - "jobs for mates" and the arrogance of some non english speaking communities where they pretend to not understand when it suits them. They have no problems accessing social welfare.... Information WAS provided in multiple languages. I watch quite a few on SBS.

Jul 21st
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Alex K.

On 23 June Gladys Berejilkian talked about washing hands well as basic pandemic management. I screamed at the TV "no, shutting the border is basic pandemic management". it took her 13 more days to get the same message and Patient Zero from Melbourne arrived in New South Wales on the 30th of June. NSW Govt is responsible for our outbreak.

Jul 15th
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Luke

So many ways to pick this story apart. Gangs almost always are racially oriented. When going after the Italian mafia, they focus in on Italians. When it's Asian gangs they target Asian suspects. Let's all act like something unique happened here and point the finger at islamaphobia. The cops played it pretty dirty, as usual. The man inside has repented his ways, as usual. Nothing special here.

Jul 15th
Reply

Lawrence

The suggestion that Bilal Skaf was somehow the victim of racism is disgusting. There were victim statements which explicitly outlined the rapes including numerous racially charged taunts and threats. Read what actually happened to those poor girls (one of which was 14yo) and then tell me with a straight face that poor Bilal Skaf has been hard done by. What the NSW Police did to stop the violence was absolutely necessary. Quit apologizing for violent criminals.

Jul 15th
Reply

Luke

This episode was so biased in favor of victimising a criminal. Part 2 better be good.

Jul 13th
Reply (2)

Alex K.

Comments from resident of tower are unreasonable. It's a public health measure, nothing more. Towers are infested with the virus, dozens of cases. The Premier is not targeting these towers out of spite or victimisation, I can assure you. Victoria Police uniform includes the police being armed, it's a violation of their procedure to remove them. Of course it's not pleasant for the residents, and things like medications should be prioritised. "No consideration for human life", she said, that's ridiculous.

Jul 7th
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Alex K.

the emaciation of the ABC and SBS is despicable

May 14th
Reply (1)

Hannah Derwent

this was excellent and your guest so incredibly articulate

Feb 26th
Reply

Kirstie JM

Thanks for an informative year 7am, very sad to hear Elizabeth is moving on but wish her all the best!

Dec 23rd
Reply

Petr Pavlík

I'm sorry to hear that Elizabeth is moving to a different role. Thanks for your fantastic work on the 7am.

Dec 19th
Reply

Julian Sinnema

Big fan of 7am. I use it as my morning alarm, it's lovely to wake up to every weekday morning. It is a top notch source of news. 👌

Dec 5th
Reply

Judd Millner

What's with the background music? It's distracting.

Dec 5th
Reply
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