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7am

Author: Schwartz Media

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A daily news show from the publisher of The Monthly and The Saturday Paper. Hear from the country’s best reporters, covering the news as it affects Australia. This is news with narrative, every weekday.
411 Episodes
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As Joe Biden takes the reins in the US, the legacy of Donald Trump continues to cast a shadow across the world. Today, Richard Cooke on how the ideas and policies that came to define Trump found a welcome home in Australia.   Guest: Writer for The Monthly and The Saturday Paper Richard Cooke.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
After five years on Manus Island, Imran Mohammad was resettled in Chicago. He says arriving in America was one of the happiest days in his life. But the coronavirus shutdown has brought back memories of detention and isolation. Guest: Writer and Rohingya refugee Imran Mohammad. Background reading: Resettled refugees in Covid-19 lockdown in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
From thunderstorm asthma to the increasing prevalence of infectious disease, a warming planet is already making us more sick. In the final part of this series, we investigate how climate change puts us more at risk of disease. Today, Climate change will kill you, part three: sickness.  Guest: Contributing editor to The Monthly, Paddy Manning.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Australian author Heather Morris has made millions selling books about the Holocaust. But the people she writes about are in many ways unrecognisable, to their families and the historical record. Investigative journalist Christine Kenneally on the dangers of falsifying history. Guest: Author and investigative journalist Christine Kenneally. Background reading: The fabulist of Auschwitz in The Monthly  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In 2011 the Queensland town of Grantham was inundated with rain, causing flash flooding. It had a devastating impact on the town’s residents. But events like this are predicted to become more common, as the planet warms leading to more extreme weather events. Today, Climate change will kill you part two: flood. Guest: Contributing editor to The Monthly, Paddy Manning.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
For decades, students in Footscray in Melbourne’s West, have been taught in Vietnamese alongside English, in line with the suburb’s long-standing heritage. But now, the program is under threat. Today, André Dao on why we value some languages more than others, and what it says about where Australia sees its place in the world. The audio of Professor Alan Crookshank in this story is from the Earshot series “Tongue Tied and Fluent.” Guest: Contributor to The Monthly Andre Dao. Background reading: A minor language in The Monthly  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
From bushfires and heat, to floods, and the increasing severity of disease, Australians are already feeling the impacts of a warming planet. In this new series, journalist Paddy Manning investigates the link between climate change and human health, and tells the stories of those who have become some of the first casualties of the climate crisis. Today’s episode is part one: heat.  Guest: Contributing editor to The Monthly, Paddy Manning.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Four times as many questions plus two times as many guests equals more laughs than it’s possible to quantify. In this final episode of The Saturday Quiz, two teams of returning guests - Zoë Coombs Marr and Kate Jinx, and Sarah Snook and Dave Lawson - go up against each other in the ultimate battle of general knowledge. How does Dave’s expert category of “colours” fare against Zoë’s encyclopedic mastery of Xena: Warrior Princess? And what is better quiz preparation: Staying up late on a Sunday night in a different time zone, like Sarah? Or singing Christmas carols in the car on a long drive, like Kate? Guests: Zoë Coombs Marr, Kate Jinx, Sarah Snook and Dave Lawson In the paper: Zoë Coombs Marr and her stand-in stand-up Dave in The Saturday Paper Sarah Snook talks Noël Coward and HBO in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Twelve months ago the eastern half of the country was blanketed in smoke and our Prime Minister was nowhere to be seen. Since then the pandemic has seen a big bounce in Scott Morrison’s approval ratings. But with an election predicted for next year, will it be enough? Today, Paul Bongiorno on how federal politics played out in 2020, and what’s coming next.   Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The federal government has proposed new laws that would give federal police the power to spy on Australian citizens. But the decision contradicts the government’s own review into national intelligence. Today, Karen Middleton on the controversial expansion of national security laws.   Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton. Background reading: AFP’s new power to spy on Australians in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The Royal Commission report into the Christchurch terrorist attacks led to an apology from the New Zealand government. But in Australia, there’s been an unwillingness to grapple with how the shooter was steeped in a culture of far-right extremism. Today, Shakira Hussein on Australia’s responsibility for the Christchurch massacre.   Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper Shakira Hussein. Background reading: Christchurch massacre: an Australian crime in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 The Liberal party has historically been handbrake on serious climate action, but in NSW one minister is pushing through ambitious environmental policy. Today, Mike Seccombe talks to Matt Kean, the Liberal minister forcing action on climate change and uniting the Nationals and the Greens.   Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe. Background reading: The Liberal minister forcing action on climate change in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Scandal after scandal has battered the authority of the government and diminished the trust the public has in our democratic institutions. Today, former leader of the federal Liberal Party John Hewson on how rorts, mates and marketing took over politics, and how we can take it back.   Guest: Former Liberal Party leader and contributor to The Saturday Paper John Hewson. Background reading: How rorts, mates and marketing took over politics in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The two guests joining John on this season’s penultimate episode are show business royalty. Mitchell Butel is an actor, singer and the artistic director of the State Theatre Company of South Australia, and Nancye Hayes AM is currently starring in Mitchell’s production of the play Ripcord to socially-distanced packed houses. Nancye was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia in 2014 for significant service to the performing arts, particularly musical theatre - and the Hayes theatre in Sydney is named in her honour. Together they go a long way towards answering every single question, including: Which American jazz singer was nicknamed ‘Lady Day’, what a katana is, and whether or not Dunedin is North or South of Hobart. Guests: Nancye Hayes AM and Mitchell Butel In the paper: Stage doyenne Nancye Hayes in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Just as parliament was wrapping up for the year, the government introduced radical and controversial proposed changes to worker’s rights. The new legislation looks set to dominate the political agenda in the new year. Today, Paul Bongiorno on how the political battlelines are being drawn.   Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The passage of the medevac legislation last year allowed sick refugees in offshore detention to travel to Australia. The legislation was bitterly opposed by the federal government. Now those refugees say they’re being punished as a result. Today, Karen Middleton on what happens when a government is forced to implement a law it opposed. Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton. Background reading: Medevac refugees: we face special punishment in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
After years of careful manoeuvring, the Coalition government is laying the groundwork to make radical changes to the National Disability Insurance Scheme. The revised system could make it harder for people to get the support they need. Today, Rick Morton on the Coalition’s bid to reshape the NDIS.   Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton. Background reading: Exclusive: The seven-year plot to undermine the NDIS in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
This year we’ve seen relations between Australia and China plummet. But the story of Australia’s increasing friction with China goes back much further than the recent storm over a tweet. Today, Jonathan Pearlman on how serious the current situation is, and whether there’s a solution to the tension.   Guest: World editor for The Saturday Paper Jonathan Pearlman. Background reading: China–Australia ties worsen over Zhao tweet in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
New Zealand’s rapid response to Covid-19 and the political success of Jacinda Ardern has seen the world start to pay more attention to our neighbour’s political culture. Today, Laura Tingle on what Australia can learn from New Zealand.   Guest: Contributor to the Quarterly Essay Laura Tingle.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Artists Amrita Hepi and Jason Phu do extremely well at the quiz, even though the one question in Arita’s expert category nearly trips her up. We never find out what Jason’s expert category might be, but he does know what colour Mickey Mouse’s shoes are and which part of the body tinnitus affects. He also thinks Nicholas Nickelby sounds like the name of an annoying person. Guests: Artist and dancer Amrita Hepi and artist Jason Phu In the paper: The perpetual motion of choreographer Amrita Hepi in The Saturday Paper Cartoon in The Saturday Paper  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (24)

Alex K.

hey Ruby you forgot to ask Dr Hewson who he votes for these days. Coz is sure ain't his old mates!

Dec 14th
Reply

nicola dugar

Saying this as a sad lefty: Jim Chalmers will be the next Labor PM.

Dec 3rd
Reply

Alex K.

I know you recorded this in the 24 hours after the election and it's a bit easier now another 24 hours later, but it looks likely that Biden's win is going to be reasonably comfortable. probably more comfortable than Trump's win in 2016, and that Florida aside, the pollsters are quite accurate this time. Florida was also a outlier in the 2018 midterms where the Republicans did quite well but had a bad showing overall. the major reason for that is the huge pre-poll vote, mainly by Democrats who were concerned about attending in person on election day, I meant that the early boats ran towards republicans but as the mail in ballots were counted later, Biden caught up and won the key battleground states.

Nov 5th
Reply (1)

Pippa Buchanan

thank you so much for this reporting

Oct 21st
Reply

Tina Vrontas

After a ten year legal battle to get the letters, I wonder why they bothered. The letters are being now being "interpreted". The slant depends upon the reader and their political views. They have not shed any new light on the subject. HILARIOUS!!!

Jul 22nd
Reply

Tina Vrontas

Some of the opinions expressed about the Victorian Covid 19 debacle are quite lame. For what it's worth, my opinion is that arrogance sparked the 2nd outbreak. The Premier and his very poor decision making processes must shoulder all responsibility. Decisions taken on ideology rather than for the good of the whole community. The arrogance of the Victorian leadership - "jobs for mates" and the arrogance of some non english speaking communities where they pretend to not understand when it suits them. They have no problems accessing social welfare.... Information WAS provided in multiple languages. I watch quite a few on SBS.

Jul 21st
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Alex K.

On 23 June Gladys Berejilkian talked about washing hands well as basic pandemic management. I screamed at the TV "no, shutting the border is basic pandemic management". it took her 13 more days to get the same message and Patient Zero from Melbourne arrived in New South Wales on the 30th of June. NSW Govt is responsible for our outbreak.

Jul 15th
Reply

Luke

So many ways to pick this story apart. Gangs almost always are racially oriented. When going after the Italian mafia, they focus in on Italians. When it's Asian gangs they target Asian suspects. Let's all act like something unique happened here and point the finger at islamaphobia. The cops played it pretty dirty, as usual. The man inside has repented his ways, as usual. Nothing special here.

Jul 15th
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Lawrence

The suggestion that Bilal Skaf was somehow the victim of racism is disgusting. There were victim statements which explicitly outlined the rapes including numerous racially charged taunts and threats. Read what actually happened to those poor girls (one of which was 14yo) and then tell me with a straight face that poor Bilal Skaf has been hard done by. What the NSW Police did to stop the violence was absolutely necessary. Quit apologizing for violent criminals.

Jul 15th
Reply

Luke

This episode was so biased in favor of victimising a criminal. Part 2 better be good.

Jul 13th
Reply (2)

Alex K.

Comments from resident of tower are unreasonable. It's a public health measure, nothing more. Towers are infested with the virus, dozens of cases. The Premier is not targeting these towers out of spite or victimisation, I can assure you. Victoria Police uniform includes the police being armed, it's a violation of their procedure to remove them. Of course it's not pleasant for the residents, and things like medications should be prioritised. "No consideration for human life", she said, that's ridiculous.

Jul 7th
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Alex K.

the emaciation of the ABC and SBS is despicable

May 14th
Reply (1)

Hannah Derwent

this was excellent and your guest so incredibly articulate

Feb 26th
Reply

Kirstie JM

Thanks for an informative year 7am, very sad to hear Elizabeth is moving on but wish her all the best!

Dec 23rd
Reply

Petr Pavlík

I'm sorry to hear that Elizabeth is moving to a different role. Thanks for your fantastic work on the 7am.

Dec 19th
Reply

Julian Sinnema

Big fan of 7am. I use it as my morning alarm, it's lovely to wake up to every weekday morning. It is a top notch source of news. 👌

Dec 5th
Reply

Judd Millner

What's with the background music? It's distracting.

Dec 5th
Reply

Tate Bourke

Hated your coverage of James Todd. Who cares about him? What your coverage did was attempt to humanise a person who is a complete s*** stain on humanity. His story does not deserve to be told. I think your story might better have focused on Euradice's story and either ignored James or highlight what a s*** stain he was. otherwise, love the podcast

Oct 3rd
Reply

Chanae Matthews

My favourite news source while at work, thanks!

Aug 29th
Reply

Sarah Louise

Loving this podcast. Thanks!

Jun 24th
Reply
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