DiscoverActon Line
Acton Line
Claim Ownership

Acton Line

Author: Acton Institute

Subscribed: 237Played: 6,450
Share

Description

Dedicated to the promotion of a free and virtuous society, Acton Line brings together writers, economists, religious leaders, and more to bridge the gap between good intentions and sound economics. 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

270 Episodes
Reverse
To listen to economic nationalists, national conservatives and certain politicians, you would believe that we’re in a period of mass deindustrialization. Employment in American manufacturing has been declining since the early 1980s. And manufacturing’s share of the economy has been declining since 1970. These trends, they argue, pose not just social and economic challenges to the country, but national security challenges, as well.The response from some political leaders in Washington is arguments for increased economic protectionism, tariffs, and subsidies to shore up the American manufacturing sector and the support people who work in it.But is deindustrialization really happening?In this episode, we speak with Scott Lincicome, senior fellow in economic studies at the Cato Institute, about his new paper: “Manufactured Crisis: ‘Deindustrialization,’ Free Markets, and National Security.” In it, Lincicome argues that the data paint a picture of the American economy and manufacturing base that is strong and resilient, even as it and the larger economy undergo disruptions, the consequences of which are in most cases beneficial, and in other cases better addressed by policy choices other than protectionism.Scott Lincicome - Cato InstituteManufactured Crisis: “Deindustrialization,” Free Markets, and National Security - Scott LincicomeBusting the ‘Deindustrialization’ Myth - Scott LincicomeTariffs (That Biden Won’t Remove) Threaten the U.S. Manufacturing Recovery (That Biden Wants) - Scott LincicomeScott Lincicome on how free trade benefits everyone - Acton LineScott Lincicome on how free traders crippled the free trade consensus - Acton Lecture SeriesSubscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On February 17, 2021, conservative radio broadcaster Rush Limbaugh passed away at the age of 70.From his humble origins as a rock music DJ in Cape Girardeau, MO, Rush rose to become one of the most recognizable names and voices in radio history, media history and of the modern American political scene.Enabled by the repeal of the Fairness Doctrine in 1987, The Rush Limbaugh Show went national in 1988, bringing Rush and his “Excellence in Broadcasting” network to radios from coast to coast. At its peak, the program was heard on over 600 radio stations and attracted more than 20 million listeners a week.A cheerleader for conservative causes, Rush was no stranger to controversy. Indeed, in many ways he courted it by, in his own words, illustrating absurdity by being absurd. In doing so, he inspired derision from his opponents as well as the loyalty of his listening audience.What is the significance of Rush Limbaugh to American conservatism and what influence did he have our modern political culture?In this episode, we talk with Matthew Continetti, a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, about Rush’s legacy and his place in conservative history and conservative politics.Matthew Continetti - American Enterprise InstituteRush Limbaugh, RIP: 6 quotations on socialism, the Founding Fathers, and life - Rev. Ben JohnsonRush Limbaugh on clergy who accept socialism - Rev. Ben JohnsonRise of the national conservatives with Matthew Continetti - Acton LineRegister for Business Matters 2021Subscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Since the COVID-19 pandemic hit, and governments across the country ordered most businesses closed, people have increasingly turned to online services like Amazon to meet their needs. As a result, Amazon’s sales soared as the company reported a 37% increase in revenue in the third quarter of 2020, with total revenues north of $96 billion. This, in turn, has led to some increased scrutiny on people like outgoing Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, whose personal net worth increased by at least $28 billion since the onset of the pandemic.Voices like former Clinton administration labor secretary Robert Reich have pointed to this growth in personal wealth, complaining that despite this massive increase in their personal wealth, they have refused to provide paid sick leave, raises, hazard pay, and more to their employees, who are all suffering real hardships.But is this an accurate picture of what is happening?In this episode, we speak with David Hebert, director of the Center for Markets, Ethics and Entrepreneurship and chair of the economics department at Aquinas College in Grand Rapids. Hebert argues that people like Reich misunderstand, purposefully or not, what this “accumulation of wealth” means to both Bezos personally and to a company like Amazon, and how it has been a benefit to consumers and workers alike.David Hebert - Aquinas CollegeCOVID-19 pandemic economics - Acton LineCOVID-19 and crony capitalism - Noah GouldRegister for Business Matters 2021Subscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
As we look around the country and the world, we see towering barriers are holding millions of people back, and institutions that should help everyone rise that are not doing the job. We see crumbling communities and one-size fits all education. Businesses rig the economy. Public policy stifles opportunity and emboldens the extremes. As a result, this country is quickly heading toward a two-tiered society.People are looking for a better way.In the new book, “Believe in People: Bottom-Up Solutions for the Top-Down World,” authors Brian Hooks and Charles Koch contend that today’s challenges call for nothing short of a paradigm shift – away from a top-down approach that sees people as problems to be managed, toward bottom-up solutions that empower everyone to realize their potential and foster a more inclusive society.Such a shift starts by asking: What would it mean to truly believe in people?In this episode, we speak with Brian Hooks, CEO of Stand Together and co-author of “Believe in People.” In the book, Hooks and Koch maintain that the only way to solve the really big problems – from poverty and addiction to harmful business practices and destructive public policy – is for each and every one of us to find and take action in our unique role as part of the solution.Brian Hooks - Stand TogetherBelieve in People - Charles Koch & Brian HooksRegister for Business Matters 2021Subscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Over the course of two weeks in January 2021, the stock price for GameStop – the brick-and-mortar video game retailer – rose by a shocking 1,500 percent. Suddenly, a handful of hedge funds who had shorted GameStop’s stock, betting that the stock price would go down, found themselves the victim of what’s called a short squeeze.What made this wild ride on Wall Street different is that the short squeeze was organized and coordinated by retail traders, primarily on online chat forms like Reddit and Discord, and executed on retail, commission-free investing apps like RobinHood. What actually happened in the GameStop short squeeze? Are there are identifiable heroes and villains in this story? In what way is this a financial manifestation of our populist political moment? And, how particularly should Christians think about this market rollercoaster?In this episode, we talk with David Bahnsen – the founder, managing partner, and chief investment officer of The Bahnsen Group – to simply and clearly explain the GameStop story, and what is likely to come of it.David Bahnsen - The Bahnsen GroupDividend Cafe - The Bahnsen GroupCapital Record Podcast - David BahnsenSirico & Bahnsen: Liberty & Morality in the Midst of Crisis - Acton InstituteSubscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The question of how to reconcile our faith and our work is a permanent challenge after the fall into sin. In the Hebrew scriptures we read that God judges Adam: “Cursed is the ground because of you; through painful toil you will eat food from it all the days of your life.” Recent years have seen a reinvigorated discussion, and even a broad movement, focused on the intersection of faith and work in the modern world. What does our worship have to do with our work? And what might our work have to do with our worship? Today, Acton senior research fellow Jordan Ballor talks with the coauthors of a new book focused on these questions. Matthew Kaemingk is assistant professor of Christian ethics at Fuller Theological Seminary and Cory Willson is Jake and Betsy Tuls Associate Professor of Missiology and Missional Ministry at Calvin Theological Seminary, and together they are the authors of Work and Worship: Reconnecting Our Labor and Liturgy.Matthew Kaemingk - Fuller Theological SeminaryCory Willson - Calvin Theological SeminaryWork and Worship - Matthew Kaemingk & Cory WillsonGet Your Hands Dirty: Essays on Christian Social Thought (and Action) - Jordan BallorWork: The Meaning of Your Life - Lester DeKosterFaithful in All God's House - Gerard BerghoefMatthew Kaemingk and Cory B. Willson on Work and Worship - Calvin Institute of Christian WorshipWisdom and Work: Perspectives on Human Labor from Ecclesiastes - J. Daryl CharlesSubscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Over the past several years, American institutions have faced challenges that have placed an enormous amount of stress and strain on them. Some of those challenges have been emergent phenomenon, while other challenges have been intentionally inflicted by political actors. In addition to the institutions themselves faltering for their own internal reasons, and in some senses being fed by that faltering, the American people have lost confidence in the legitimacy of government, business, media, and more. The downstream effects of this institutional crisis and loss of confidence have been higher than usual embraces of conspiracy theories and other forms of unreality. The January 6th riot at the United States Capitol was a striking and vivid example of the consequences of these problems.In this episode, Yuval Levin, director of social, cultural, and constitutional studies at the American Enterprise Institute and the editor of National Affairs, explains these institutional crises, the failures of political leadership in this populist age, the growing embrace of forms of unreality, and what can be done about it.Yuval Levin - American Enterprise InstituteNational AffairsFailures of Leadership in a Populist Age - Yuval Levin (National Review)Trump's rebellion against reality - Yuval Levin (The Dispatch)The four cultural crises revealed by the D.C. riots - Rev. Ben Johnson (Acton Institute)Yuval Levin on why trust in institutions is declining - Acton LineYuval Levin on the search for solidarity in the age of Trump - Acton Lecture SeriesSubscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, we’re bringing you another conversation from our recent Poverty Cure Summit.The Poverty Cure Summit provided an opportunity for participants to listen to scholars, human service providers, and practitioners address the most critical issues we face today which can either exacerbate or alleviate poverty. These speakers discussed the legal, economic, social, and technological issues pertaining to both domestic and global poverty. Rooted in foundational principles of anthropology, politics, natural law, and economics, participants had the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the root causes of poverty and identify practical means to reduce it and promote human flourishing.In this conversation, moderator Scot Bertram talks with Anne Rathbone Bradley, the George and Sally Mayer Fellow for Economic Education and the academic director at The Fund for American Studies, and Iain Murray, vice president for strategy and senior fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute and author of the recent book, “The Socialist Temptation.” They discuss the reasons why socialism is not an effective method for reducing poverty and helping the poor regain their dignity. Highlighting the inconsistencies in thought that prevent it from ever working in practice, the panel addresses why socialism seems to be an attractive option to some young Americans and how economic freedom can point the way toward a more prosperous country for all.Anne Rathbone Bradley - The Fund for American StudiesIain Murray - Competitive Enterprise InstituteScot Bertram - Hillsdale CollegeThe Socialist Temptation - Iain MurrayAnne Rathbone Bradley on eliminating poverty through economic freedom - Acton LineAnne Rathbone Bradley on why Christians must support economic freedom - Acton Lecture SeriesThe socialist temptation with Iain Murray - Acton LinePoverty Cure SummitSubscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Today’s episode is a rebroadcast that originally aired in March of 2019, but holds incredible relevance to conversations we’re still having today.This conversation with Tim Carney, editor at the Washington Examiner and a visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, explores the subject matter of his 2019 book, “Alienated America: Why Some Places Thrive While Others Collapse." To the extent that the "American Dream" is fading away in parts of the country, the problem isn't pure economics. Nor is it a case of stubborn old white men falling behind because they refuse embrace progress. Carney argues that the root cause of our problems – crumbling families, despair, and political dysfunction – is the erosion of community and local, civil institutions, most especially church. The result of a secularizing country is a plague of alienation for the working class, as people struggle to build families and improve their lives without the support structure they need.Alienated America: Why Some Places Thrive While Others Collapse - Tim CarneyVideo: Tim Carney On The Threat To Liberty From Big BusinessMore churches, more flourishing: The secret to success in middle America - Joseph SundeLyman Stone on the decline of religiosity in the United States - Acton LineSubscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
It’s been a challenging year.A global pandemic, violent unrest in the streets of major American cities, and a divisive presidential election have all challenged us in different ways, testing the strength of civil society and institutions at both the local and national levelThroughout the year, Acton’s president and co-founder, Rev. Robert Sirico, has offered commentary on these events as they unfolded.Now, at the end of the year, Rev. Sirico reflects on the year as it comes to a close, to see how we handled the unique trials we encountered in our public life in 2020, and how the principles articulated by the Acton Institute guided us through these trying times and will continue to provide a mechanism for gaining understanding and perspective on our world in 2021.Rev. Robert Sirico's COVID-19 commentariesRev. Robert Sirico on the Grand Rapids riots See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Social capital – the capacity of people to cooperate towards common aims – is an indispensable element of a free and prosperous society yet many studies demonstrate that it has been steadily eroded in recent decades.Social pathologies such as the breakdown of the family, addiction, and deaths of despair are strongly correlated with weakening social ties and norms. The decline in social capital has had devastating real world consequences.In this episode, Acton’s Dan Hugger talks with Maryann and Barry Keating, authors of the new book Rebuilding Social Capital, about the idea of social capital, its erosion, how economics and Catholic Social Teaching help to clarify the concept, and what their new research suggests is the path forward to rebuilding social capital.Rebuilding Social Capital at Acton Book Shop - Maryann & Barry KeatingExcerpt from Rebuilding Social Capital - Maryann & Barry KeatingCentesimus annus Gaudium et Spes Mater et Magistra‘Values of Americans: A Study of Ethics and Character, Harris Interactive Report Produces by Boy Scouts of America Youth and Family Research Center’‘4-H Experiences Contributing to Leadership and Personal Development of 4-H Alumni’‘From Mutual Aid to Welfare State: How Fraternal Societies Fought Poverty and Taught Character’ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
This week we’re bringing you another conversation from our recent Poverty Cure Summit.The Poverty Cure Summit provided an opportunity for participants to listen to scholars, human service providers, and practitioners address the most critical issues we face today which can either exacerbate or alleviate poverty. These speakers discussed the legal, economic, social, and technological issues pertaining to both domestic and global poverty. Rooted in foundational principles of anthropology, politics, natural law, and economics, participants had the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the root causes of poverty and identify practical means to reduce it and promote human flourishing.In this conversation, moderator Al Kresta talks with Baroness Philippa Stroud, CEO of the Legatum Institute, and Anne Rathbone Bradley, the George and Sally Mayer Fellow for Economic Education and the academic director at The Fund for American Studies, about poverty and the COVID-19 pandemic. For decades, the number of individuals living in extreme poverty across the globe has fallen. Yet last month, the World Bank reported that COVID-19 could add approximately 100 million people to the ranks of those in extreme poverty by the end of 2020. The panelists examine how the pandemic has impacted poverty reduction efforts and how the marketplace has responded to the pandemic.Baroness Philippa Stroud - Legatum InstituteAnne Bradley - The Fund for American StudiesPoverty Cure Summit - Access now on-demand for only $19How to rebuild the economy after COVID-19 - Richard TurnbullA free-market agenda for rebuilding from the coronavirus - Henrik RasmussenSubscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On December 2nd, 2020, the economist Walter E. Williams passed away at the age of 84.Williams worked his way out of grinding poverty in the Philadelphia housing projects to chair George Mason University’s economics department. Over his career he authored 10 books and more than 150 other publications, and become one of the most recognized commentators on our American public life of the last four decades. Williams spread his message of racial equality, the dignity of work, and the morality of capitalism through his syndicated newspaper column, PBS documentaries, and frequent radio and TV appearances.In this episode, we feature a conversation with Dr. Williams from 2014 for the Acton Institute’s podcast, then called Radio Free Acton. Host Paul Edwards discusses with Williams the significance of Frederic Bastiat’s classic publication The Law, and the insights into modern America that come from reading that classic defense of limited government, authentic justice and human freedom. At that time, Williams had just penned a new introduction to The Law, which he said “created order in my thinking about liberty and just human conduct.”Walter Williams, RIP - Rev. Ben JohnsonTen quotes from economist Walter E. Williams - Sarah StanleyOn liberty's moral superiority (Walter Williams interview in Religion & Liberty)Subscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Common Grace is both a theological doctrine within the reformed tradition and the title of a truly monumental book discussing the doctrine by the theologian and statesmen Abraham Kuyper. It is grace from God that is common to all of mankind distinct from both the special grace by which God redeems, sanctifies, and glorifies his people as well as the gift of creation itself.Kuyper puts it this way, “Common grace issues from God, and from God come all the means that we humans must apply to oppose sin and its consequences in curse and misery.”But it is God himself who leads us to find the means and instructs us how to use them. And it is precisely the latter that is forgotten. The human inventor of the electric light and electric motor is extolled, but God, who led Edison to discover it, is passed over.Today, Acton’s Dan Hugger talks with Jordan Ballor, senior research fellow and director of publishing at the Acton Institute and General Editor of the twelve volume Abraham Kuyper: Collected Works in Public Theology, about Kuyper’s exploration of the doctrine in his monumental work Common Grace. The third and final volume of this work, jointly published by Lexham Press and the Acton Institute, has recently been published in English translation.Jordan J. Ballor, PhD at Acton InstituteCommon Grace: God's Gifts for a Fallen World, Volume 3The Abraham Kuyper CollectionSubscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
For this week’s episode, we’re bringing you a conversation that was a part of Acton’s recent Poverty Cure Summit.The Poverty Cure Summit provided an opportunity for participants to listen to scholars, human service providers, and practitioners address the most critical issues we face today which can either exacerbate or alleviate poverty. These speakers discussed the legal, economic, social, and technological issues pertaining to both domestic and global poverty. Rooted in foundational principles of anthropology, politics, natural law, and economics, participants had the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the root causes of poverty and identify practical means to reduce it and promote human flourishing.In this conversation, Acton’s Michael Matheson Miller spoke with Ismael Hernandez (executive director of The Freedom & Virtue Institute) and Peter Greer (president & CEO of HOPE International) to examine the challenge of poverty in the US and internationally, and the most effective ways to think about poverty in light of the transcendent dignity of the human person. Poverty Cure SummitIsmael Hernandez - The Freedom & Virtue InstitutePeter Greer - HOPE InternationalSubscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In 1958, in the wake of the Soviet Union launching Sputnik 1 – the world’s first artificial satellite – into space, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the National Aeronautics and Space Act into law. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, or NASA, was born. And the space race was underway.In the following decades, the world would see the first man in space, the first spacewalk, and astronauts landing on the surface of the moon. Across eight different programs, the United States would fly 239 space missions, with 135 of those representing the space shuttle program.On August 31, 2011, the United States’ shuttle program was officially ended, and the United States government was out of the business of space exploration and travel.Today, private companies like Elon Musk’s SpaceX, Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic and Jeff Bezos’s Blue Origin are leading the way into the final frontier. Elon Musk has announced his plan is to have 1 million people living in a colony on Mars by the year 2050. As a new space race to settle on Mars and, perhaps, beyond takes flight, significant ethical questions remain unclear and unanswered. Today, we talk with Joel Sercel, an entrepreneur and space technologist, who argues that we need to start building international consensus on questions surrounding bioethics, property rights, laws governing space travel and space settlements, and stewardship of God’s creation outside of the Earth’s atmosphere.Subscribe to Acton Institute Events podcastTransAstra CorpWould Kuyper go to Mars? - Dylan PahmanThe frontier spirit of ‘The Martian’ - Dylan PahmanThe stewardship of space - Jordan BallorThe new space capitalists - Jordan BallorThe cultural mandate and the final frontier - Dylan Pahman See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In the wake of George Floyd’s death in May of 2020, people took to social media to advocate for causes stemming from that horrible incident. Ranging from simply expressing “Black Lives Matter” to posting a black square on Instagram on a designated day and everything in between, an expectation that everyone must make a statement seemed to emerge. It was an expectation that was extended beyond individuals, as major corporations and sports teams were also expected to make a statement of solidarity. Those that didn’t, or who didn’t act quickly enough, were pilloried online.The age of woke capitalism is upon us.This woke capitalism can take other forms besides expressions of solidarity with social causes, such as Nike recalling Betsy Ross flag-themed shoes after activists raged that the flag represents slavery or the increasing frequency of anti-racism training sessions as work requirements.But, as Acton’s director of research Sam Gregg argues, woke capitalism is inherently in conflict with the nature and the ends of business.What is causing the rise of woke capitalism? What’s the impact that it is having on the world of business and on society as a whole? And what can be done about it? Sam Gregg joins us to discuss. Dr. Sam Gregg at the Acton InstituteHow Woke Capitalism Corrupts Business - Sam GreggWhen the Market Meets Morality - William McGurn6 quotes: Milton Friedman on woke capitalism, racism, and equality - Rev. Ben Johnson‘Woke’ NBA kowtows to Chinese communists - Dan HuggerThe social responsibility of Chick-fil-A is to make delicious sandwiches - Dylan Pahman See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The United States is consumed with questions regarding race, the legacy of slavery, and the nature of social justice. Where are people of faith to turn?For most of the last two thousand years Christians have believed that God deals with nations as nations and enters into closer relations with societies that claim him as Lord. This belief in the national covenant, only recently out of fashion, is where Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and Martin Luther King, Jr. turned when faced with such questions in their own time.In this episode Acton’s Dan Hugger talks with Gerald McDermott, the editor of the new book Race and Covenant: Recovering the Religious Roots for American Reconciliation, about the idea of national covenant in scripture, history, and contemporary American society and how a revitalization of this idea could help lead to racial reconciliation.Race and Covenant: Recovering the Religious Roots for American Reconciliation - Gerald McDermottExcerpt from Race and Covenant - Gerald McDermottMisunderstanding Race and the Bible - Gerald McDermottRace and Redemption - Gerald McDermottWanted: Pastors with Courage - Gerald McDermott See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On October 14, 2020, the New York Post published an expose on former Vice President and current Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden’s son, Hunter Biden, headlined, “Smoking-gun email reveals how Hunter Biden introduced Ukrainian businessman to VP dad.”Shortly after the article’s publication, the ability to share the link to the story was limited and, in some cases, prohibited by Facebook and Twitter, with those social media companies alleging that the content was unreliable, unverified, or was prohibited for containing hacked information. This incident has provoked the latest round of calls for reform or repeal of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996.The U.S. Senate has subpoenaed Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to appear before a hearing to examine the New York Post incident. Senator Ken Buck, R-Colo., said “condemnation is not enough. It’s time to reform Section 230.” Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, called Section 230 “a gift” and “a subsidy from the taxpayers to big tech.” And Sen. Josh Hawley, R.-Mo., has introduced legislation that would allow Americans to file lawsuits against “big tech” companies who breach good faith user agreements by censoring political speech or suppressing content.What is Section 230? What does it actually say? What role did it play in creating the modern internet? And what would happen if it were changed or repealed?In this episode Scott Lincicome, an international trade attorney and a Senior Fellow in Economic Studies at the Cato Institute, discusses the issues surrounding Section 230.Scott Lincicome - Cato InstituteCapitolism newsletter at The Dispatch - Scott Lincicome (paywall)47 U.S. Code § 230Fine, Let's Talk About Section 230 - Scott Lincicome (paywall)Defending the Indispensable - Matthew FeenyIs social media the source of our social problems? - Dan HuggerSocial media censorship: Regulation or innovation? - Ed MorrowReligion & Liberty Vol. 30 No. 1 on social media - Acton InstituteShould social media companies be treated like publishers and broadcasters? - Hunter BakerUsing social media for good with Daniel Darling - Acton Line See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In his article in the June 2020 issue of the Journal of Institutional Economics, Dr. P.J. Hill, who served as the George F. Bennett Professor of Economics at Wheaton College until his retirement in 2011, begins by saying, “in any discussion of the beginning of modern economic growth, the concept of the rule of law plays a crucial role," and that, "the lack of such an order is the fundamental cause of the failure of nations."But where did the foundations of the rule of law come from?  Hill argues that the current theories about the origin of the rule of law, while useful, are also incomplete. According to Hill, the Jewish and Christian concept of all human beings being created in God’s image is an important, but often overlooked, contributor to the rule of law in Western civilization.Today, Acton’s Dan Churchwell is joined by Dr. P.J. Hill to discuss his research article, “The religious origins of the rule of law,” the way beliefs affect institutions in general, and how the beliefs of the Christian and Jewish faith traditions in particular were crucial to the establishment of the rule of law. Dr. P.J. Hill at Wheaton CollegeThe religious origins of the rule of law - P.J. HillP.J. Hill on the social power of markets - Joseph Sunde See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
loading
Comments (1)

Tony

RIP

Dec 9th
Reply
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store