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Art of the Score

Author: Andrew Pogson, Nicholas Buc and Dan Golding

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Art of the Score is the podcast that explores, demystifies and celebrates some of the greatest soundtracks of all time from the world of film, TV and video games. In each episode we’ll be joined by Andrew Pogson, Dan Golding and Nicholas Buc as we check out a soundtrack we love and break down its main themes, explore what makes the score tick and hopefully impart our love of the world of soundtracks.
33 Episodes
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Episode 33: Arrival

Episode 33: Arrival

2020-12-2301:28:39

It’s finally time for Episode 33, and Art of the Score’s analysis of one of the landmark composers of the last decade: Jóhann Jóhannsson. We sit down with special guest, synth (and tape loop) expert Seja Vogel, and Jóhannsson’s soundtrack for Denis Villeneuve’s masterpiece sci fi film, Arrival. Join us for heptapods, looping seals (?), and the only true universal language: film music. Episode notes: 4:41 – Arrival arrives, and Jóhannsson thrives 12:47 – Around the Clock News 15:43 – Arriving in Montana 21:49 – Seja breaks down the Arrival sound 30:05 – Looping with Seja 34:45 – First Encounter 39:12 – Sapir-Whorf 43:00 – Hazmat 49:42 – Heptapod B 58:56 – Non-Zero-Sum Game 1:02:21 – Deciphering 1:06:26 – One of Twelve 1:12:22 – Rise, and Max Richter’s On The Nature of Daylight We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
Episode 32: The Mummy

Episode 32: The Mummy

2020-08-3101:58:20

It’s Episode 32, and we come back to you from the city of the lockdown with the crown jewel of 1990s action adventure: Jerry Goldsmith’s wonderful score for The Mummy. Goldsmith has for some time been one of Art of the Score’s most requested composers, so join us as we journey to 1920s Egypt and scheme among the pyramids with Brendan Fraser, Rachel Weisz, and that incredible music. Episode notes: 5:05 – That’s Goldsmith, Jerry! Goldsmith! 8:04 – Podcast recommendation: The Goldsmith Odyssey 10:04 – The Universal history of the Mummy 19:03 – Hamunaptra theme 24:18 – A brief introduction to the film’s other themes 26:58 – Hamun it up 32:40 – Hamajor Hamontage 36:58 – Jerry’s percussion 39:11 – Imhotep’s motif 44:21 – Nick comes clean about his bullying ways 47:01 – The love theme 52:20 – Luteish love and handy hand percussion 56:41 – The power of French Horns propels you 1:00:06 – A romantic finale 1:05:12 – Rick’s theme 1:12:27 – Here come the baddies 1:15:47 – The Mummy Strut 1:18:47 – A sourcey rag 1:22:14 – The Musicians of the Nile 1:27:26 – Hollywood’s sound of Egypt 1:34:44 – Do camels have scales? 1:38:21 – The key is octatonic 1:46:13 – Frightening mummy 1:53:52 – Imhotep’s death (or, that’s a wrap folks!) We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
It’s Episode 31, and we’re swooping into the new year with one of the most widely loved family films – as well as the film score buff’s film score – in How To Train Your Dragon. John Powell’s soundtrack has been one of Art of the Score’s most-requested episodes over the years, so join us as we get under the hood of this contemporary classic and pick apart its many main melodies and old-fashioned sound. Episode notes: 5:56 – How To Train Your Dreamworks 8:41 – The John Powell Up 12:31 – Nick leaves his wife for John Powell 14:43 – The Friendship theme 16:38 – Toothless’s theme 19:56 – Bagging Bagpipes 25:27 – Hammering Dulcimer 32:43 – Tin whistle and bodhran 35:26 – Let’s b (theme) friends 39:42 – Powell-chords 45:16 – Toothless in three 49:10 – Toothless Face/Off 51:05 – The Band with a Dragon Tattoo 54:17 – The Berk theme 59:47 – A point of pronunciation 1:02:56 – Father and Son 1:09:08 – The cavalry arrives 1:12:33 – The Viking theme 1:18:31 – How To Write A Dragon Melody 1:24:21 – Dragon scales 1:26:39 – Astrid’s theme 1:35:56 – The Evolution of Powell’s style 1:38:38 – Battle theme 1:44:10 – Telling the Tail 1:49:53 – John Powell’s best score? We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
It’s Episode 30, and we at Art of the Score are finally tackling two genres we’ve so far overlooked – animation and the musical, combined in the form of the great Disney revival musical, The Little Mermaid. Join us as we celebrate the 30th anniversary of this wonderful film and explore the cabaret roots of Ursula, the perfect pop song for Ariel, and the debatable reggae of Under The Sea in Alan Menken’s joyous and groundbreaking score. Episode notes: 4:10 – The Art of the Mailbag? 5:12 – The Disney Dark Ages 8:15 – Alan Menken: the secret to Disney’s revival 12:52 – Ariel’s theme: Part of Your World 15:33 – “I want” 19:26 – Ariel’s verse 25:01 – Ariel’s verse (Hoarders edition) 28:41 – Creative voicing 32:47 – A pre-chorus? 35:33 – Recorders on the beach 38:44 – Ariel’s musical maturity 42:17 – Ursula’s theme: Poor Unfortunate Souls 45:03 – Craberet 50:40 – Fortunate Souls 54:35 – Poggo’s Unfortunate Lyrics 56:44 – Scheming eels 1:00:49 – Prince Eric’s Roadshow 1:06:02 – Eric’s Organ Announcement 1:09:48 – Triton’s Fanfare 1:13:04 – Triton’s Minor Fanfare 1:15:53 – Scuttle’s scuttlebutt 1:24:11 – Mickey Mouse-ing 1:34:26 – Le Chef, and Nick’s waltzing tangent 1:42:04 – Andrew’s Chef genocide tangent 1:44:51 – Under the C 1:49:45 – Dan’s reggae tangent 1:59:37 – Fathoms Below and the opening song We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
Episode 29 marks Art of the Score’s first ever live episode, recorded in August at the Melbourne International Film Festival. Exploring the film music of Nick Cave and Warren Ellis (The Proposition, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, and The Road), the live talk also preluded a concert later that week where the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra played Cave and Ellis’s music as arranged by our very own Nicholas Buc. Join us for a very special live episode as we try and find out what makes the film music of Cave and Ellis so good. Episode notes: 0:54 – A very special live episode 5:27 – The Nick Cave and Warren Ellis sound 6:26 – Alice Wading 7:58 – A band process for film music 10:34 – The Proposition 12:41 – The meat pie western 14:05 – The drone, the voice, the piano 18:05 – Nick’s singing (The Rider) 21:11 – Martha’s Dream 22:55 – The Cave Waltz 26:38 – The Rider Song 29:20 – The Assassination of Jesse James 31:26 – The celeste 35:14 – A Rather Lovely Thing 37:17 – An arresting chord progression 39:45 – The Assassination lullaby 41:54 – Song for Bob 45:14 – The Road 49:35 – The Mother 52:09 – The Far Road 54:49 – The House 58:07 – The ray of hope 59:49 – The Ellis Cave DNA We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
In Episode 28, we conclude our time with The Empire Strikes Back, and our exploration of perhaps the best Star Wars film and score ever made. In this episode, we make our way through some remaining themes and motifs, as well as the major action setpieces of the film, and ask the biggest question of all: is this the best film score ever written? Episode notes: 2:41 – The Days of Han and Leia 6:37 – Tchaikovsky’s Star Wars 11:51 – Han’s Soli 14:21 – Williams’ melodic patterns 15:27 – A polite argument (for strings) 20:14 – Melodus interruptus 24:22 – Bespin Cellos 25:51 – I love cue (I know) 30:48 – Resolving Solo and the Princess 36:32 – Bassoon Fett 43:36 – The droids dance 52:43 – The droids return in Solo 54:18 – Hyperspace strings 58:28 – Empire’s action ostinati 1:05:24 – Lando’s palace, where all your dreams come true 1:07:42 – A choir in the clouds 1:11:34 – The magic tree 1:15:10 – The synth side of the force 1:17:52 – John Williams’ best action cue, ever? 1:25:08 – The space tritone 1:28:31 – Looping the woodwinds 1:29:43 – The battle in the snow 1:34:29 – The Carbonite Procession, and John Williams’ greatest finale ever? 1:40:32 – The end credits 1:45:43 – The greatest score ever written? We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
In Episode 26, we return to the world of Blade Runner for the 1982 film’s long-belated sequel. Directed by Denis Villeneuve, and with a soundtrack by Benjamin Wallfisch and Hans Zimmer, Blade Runner 2049 has a different sound and a different set of thematic ideas. But how does the music work, and what is all this interlinked stuff about, anyway? To help us answer those questions – and more – we’re once again joined by the brilliant synth expert Seja Vogel (whose fantastic podcast, where she interviews musicians, you should check out here: http://sejamusic.com). Episode notes: 5:01 – How the sequel came to be 8:06 – Jóhann Jóhannsson, and what could’ve been 12:43 – Benjamin Wallfisch and Hans Zimmer 16:52 – The opening title card (the Memory theme) 19:25 – Or is it the Puzzle theme? 21:24 – The 2049 Melody (the Soul theme) 27:36 – Sapper Morton’s musical secret 35:08 – Voices in the furnace 38:30 – Sound design 40:48 – The rebel’s fan fair 45:44 – The return of the opening chords 49:18 – Synth talk with Seja 52:32 – Seja talks us through her reconstruction of 2049’s opening cue 1:03:11 – The final product 1:08:26 – Joi’s theme 1:12:56 – Wallace’s throat singing 1:25:05 – Flight to the LAPD 1:29:03 – Sea Wall 1:36:18 – Tears In (The) Rain 1:41:15 – The Mesa Melody 1:46:09 – The scoreless moments 1:49:10 – D for Diegetic 1:52:44 – Punching with Presley 1:55:48 – One For My Baby, and One For The Replicant 2:02:40 – Peter and the Wallace 2:11:13 – Final thoughts We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
Episode 25: Blade Runner

Episode 25: Blade Runner

2019-02-2501:52:391

In Episode 25, we’ve seen things you wouldn’t believe. A guest synth expert to tell us all about the great Yamaha CS-80’s attack and delay, and the shoulders of its Orion filter envelopes. We’ve watched Vangelis glitter in the dark, near Wagner’s Tannhäuser Overture. All these moments will be recorded in time, on podcast recording equipment, and released online, like tears in rain. Episode notes: 3:20 – A special Art of the Score guest 4:57 – A history of Blade Running 12:21 – The Vangelis sound 16:34 – Sound design versus music 20:37 – The Blade Runner main theme 26:48 – Synth talk with Seja: the Yamaha CS-80 31:52 – Aftertouch 35:32 – Oscillators and ring modulators 40:22 – The pitch ribbon 43:20 – Seja recreates the Blade Runner theme 52:44 – Pronunciation fun with Dan 55:02 – Tears In Rain 56:51 – Blade Runner and the film noir sound, from Double Indemnity to L.A. Noire 1:10:33 – The Blade Runner Blues 1:14:34 – Rachel’s theme 1:19:15 – The Love theme 1:23:49 – The ‘ethnic’ influences on the score – Blush Response 1:26:22 – Tales of the Future 1:31:10 – Damask Rose 1:36:15 – One More Kiss Dear and Blade Runner’s world of jazz 1:40:11 – The End Titles We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
In Episode 24 we end our journey through Harry’s third year at Hogwarts with a deep listen to the unparalleled variety in John Williams’ score for Prisoner of Azkaban. We breakdown bebop, compare Italian waltzes, play with fugues, minimalism, swing, and some of the most dangerous flute music you’ve ever heard. Mischief most definitely managed. Episode notes: 2:51 – Aunt Marge’s waltz 12:20 – The jazz bus 14:31 – A short ride in a magical machine 17:28 – Bebop patronum 24:48 – A stretchy middle eight 29:51 – A fugue for quidditch 35:07 – Willow whomps 40:10 – A danger to birds and flute players 45:23 – Snowfights and woodwind bites 48:02 – Swing, swing, boggart 54:05 – Carried on the voices 57:50 – Book cranks and classic horror 1:01:28 – Sirius Black to the future 1:10:12 – Watch me if you can 1:14:51 – The John Williams greatest hits album We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
In Episode 23 we return to the wizarding world with the first of a two part listen to Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. Far from resting on prior achievements, the final John Williams Potter score knocks it out of the park, giving us everything from medieval music to waltzes, bebop jazz, and some of the most majestic flight music ever written. Join us, as we solemnly swear we are up to no good and journey with Harry and co for their third year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Episode notes: 2:32 – Dan makes a big claim 6:35 – Some Azkaban homework 14:45 – Hedwig’s theme goes on holiday 16:23 – Something wicked this way hums 27:50 – Crumhorn, Sackbut, and Azkaban’s medieval sound 30:51 – Meeting Buckbeak 33:04 – Searching for the Fat Lady 35:33 – Some sleeping celeste 39:09 – The renaissance fair 46:49 – A Window to the Past 1:00:00 – Some serious Sirius 1:04:13 – Pettigrew’s motif 1:07:12 – Buckbeak’s brilliant flight 1:13:15 – Buckbeak’s equally brilliant second flight 1:17:26 – The Dementor’s dialectic. Thesis: aleatoric horror 1:21:39 – Antithesis: the angelic Patronus 1:23:06 – Synthesis: the Dementors converge We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
In Episode 22 we travel to the distant Hyborian era with Basil Poledouris’ muscular score for 1982’s Conan the Barbarian. As the gold standard for high fantasy prior to Howard Shore’s Lord of the Rings epics, Poledouris’ lush and orchestral score creates entire musical worlds and carries much of the emotion in this sparsely-dialogued film. Join us as we take a journey with the Riders of Doom and listen to this fantastic work of musical fantasy. Episode notes: 5:35 – The secrets to Conan’s success 9:22 – John Milius’s machismo 13:38 – Basil Poledouris’ score 19:54 – Conan’s canon – what era does the music come from? 22:45 – Anvil of Crom: the Hyborian rhythm and Nick’s rave remake 30:20 – Twenty-four French Horns and Total Recall’s Barbaric Recall 38:28 – Conan’s theme 48:10 – Double reeds and the passing of time 58:21 – The love theme, and saying more than Arnold through music 1:10:00 – The Riders of Doom theme 1:14:55 – O Fortuna’s influence on Conan (and film music generally) 1:19:34 – Conan’s Battle on the Ice 1:21:44 – The Wheel of Fifths 1:24:51 – Doom’s Dies Irae 1:38:16 – The Wheel of Pain’s ostinato 1:43:06 – Waltzing through theology 1:47:42 – The villain’s music for the hero’s journey – in the kitchen 1:49:28 – Waltzing through an orgy 1:57:07 – The Pit Fights and the Mountain of Power, via 1950s sword and sandal epics 2:03:49 – Conan’s Firebird finale We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
Episode 21: Journey

Episode 21: Journey

2018-10-0502:24:591

In Episode 21 we finally make good on our long-held promise to explore the world of videogame music, with Austin Wintory’s beautiful score for thatgamecompany’s Journey. Crucial to the experience of Journey, Wintory’s music was recognized with a Grammy nomination and is widely held to be one of the greatest videogame scores of all time. Join us as we take a videogame diversion and analyse this gorgeous soundtrack. Episode notes: 5:20 – How does videogame music differ from film or television? 8:50 – Dan’s complicated menu music 10:05 – thatgamecompany’s journey to Journey, and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi’s ‘flow’ 16:12 – The rise of independent videogame development and aesthetics 18:20 – Nascence and Wintory’s main Journey theme 21:50 – Tina Guo’s cello, Amy Tatum’s flute, and Charissa Barger’s harp 26:30 – Solo cello in Tan Dun’s Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, and Hans Zimmer’s The Last Samurai 31:20 – Journey’s central weenie 33:45 – The Call, the sonic palate cleanser 38:10 – The Mountain 41:33 – Sound design and music in Journey 44:02 – The First Confluence and the absence of a downbeat 48:48 – The Bridge and the Second Confluence 51:50 – The first encounter and Journey’s dance 55:30 – ‘I was born for this’ 58:05 – The Desert’s Threshold and the musical interactivity of Journey 1:04:10 – The melancholy beauty of the machines 1:10:25 – The Descent, and Nick’s musical snowboarding adventures 1:20:16 – The Belly of the Whale’s Serpent 1:26:08 – The gaze of the sentinals 1:28:18 – Journey’s achingly beautiful string writing and Arvo Pärt’s Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten 1:34:40 – Atonement and the giant structure 1:38:56 – Journey’s Buddhist links 1:47:03 – The ascent to the peak (‘The Crossing’) 1:55:12 – The nadir 2:01:10 – Apotheosis and the hero realised 2:12:24 – The return to Tina Guo’s solo cello 2:18:28 – What does Journey mean? Is it a metaphor? 2:21:22 – The Return? Finally, if listeners are unfamiliar with Journey, we highly recommend checking out this video recording of a playthrough of the game from start to finish: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bkL94nKSd2M We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
In Episode 20 we conclude our three-part retrospective of the music of Bond, James Bond. Having already covered the pioneering Bond sound of John Barry and the funk of the Moore era, in our final episode we make it through the emergence of David Arnold as the Bond musical heir apparent, and Thomas Newman’s recent work. Join us as we finally answer the question to end all questions: which is the greatest Bond score of all time, and which is the greatest song? Episode notes: 3:45 – Arnold, David Arnold 7:04 – Tomorrow Never Plays the Fanfare 11:25 – The fanboy composer? 13:05 – Surrender’s presence in the score 19:23 – Arnold’s neo-Barry romance writing 23:48 – The World Is Sort Of Enough 28:00 – Arnold’s muscular action writing – the submarine escape 33:48 – Score Another Way (electronically) in Die Another Day 40:04 – Bond joins the choir 44:25 – Blond, James Blond 50:18 – Parkour percussion 54:10 – You Know My Chord Progression 59:20 – Vesper’s Theme 1:01:28 – Quantum of Solace 1:05:08 – Watery woodwinds at the opera 1:07:40 – DC3s, tempo, chromaticism, and the peak of Arnold’s action music 1:10:48 – Thomas Newman, Bond’s new man 1:12:35 – M’s retiring brass statements 1:16:50 – Bond on a boat 1:19:47 – Severine and Newman’s romantic strings 1:26:45 – A Spectre haunts 007 1:30:10 – The Writing’s On The Train 1:32:08 – At the end: our favourite score, and our favourite song We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
In Episode 19 we continue our ambitious attempt to analyse every James Bond score ever. Having covered the Connery classics in Episode 18, we’re now onto the 1970s, 1980s, and even the early 1990s, covering Moore, Dalton, and a little bit of Brosnan as James Bond goes from funk to disco to acid jazz and even a little early hip-hop. Join us as we look at some of the kitschiest Bond music out there – and, some of the all-time greats. Episode notes: 3:38 – Roger Moore’s more George (Aston) Martin Bond music 9:11 – The 1970s funk boat chase 12:45 – Nick has a problem with The Man With the Golden Gun’s parallel motion 16:43 – The Spy Who Wrote A Fantastic Opening Song 18:10 – James ‘Disco Stu’ Bond 24:30 – The singing pyramids 28:33 – The Space Who Loved Me 32:45 – Bossa, James Bossa 35:38 – Bill Conti’s For Your Funk Only 43:40 – John Barry’s finale: Octopussy, A View To A Kill, and The Living Daylights 49:12 – Dalton’s daylight drum machine 54:50 – Michael Kamen’s License to Trill 1:01:04 – Bond’s power ballad romance 1:04:50 – Serra’s synth sound for Goldeneye and the sonic reinvention of James Bond 1:13:34 – Acid James 1:17:40 – Escaping the Archives 1:19:04 – Goldeneye’s Tank Chase and John Altman’s replacement music We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
In Episode 18 we begin one of our most ambitious musical projects yet – the music of the James Bond franchise. Over the next three episodes, we’ll be looking at the sounds of Bond, James Bond, across 50 years, 24 films, and a great many composers, theme songs, and one-liners. In this first episode, we’re covering everything from the birth of the cinematic Bond to the end of the Sean Connery era, with a particular focus on how John Barry created that classic – and timeless – Bond sound. Episode notes: 4:45 – Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass make an unscheduled appearance 6:35 – The evolution of the Bond franchise and its importance in film history 10:23 – “The best Bond film is the next Bond film” 12:40 – The birth of the Bond theme, with Monty Norman’s sitar 15:30 – John Barry’s swinging ‘60s style 22:23 – Monty Norman’s Dr. No score 24:10 – ‘Three Blind Mice’ and Norman’s Jamaican grooves 26:30 – Bond and orchestra swat a bug 31:12 – Lionel Bart’s ‘From Russia With Love’, the first title song 38:15 – John Barry’s 007 theme 42:11 – John Barry’s idiosyncratic action cues and quotations of the main theme 45:47 – James Bond’s travelogue music 51:13 – Goldfinger’s swinging ‘Into Miami’ 55:55 – ‘Alpine Drive’ and ‘The Raid on Fort Knox’ 1:00:34 – Thunderball’s alternate themes 1:07:14 – Barry’s underwater fight scenes 1:10:05 – The brass-fanfared evil lair 1:13:08 – You Only Live Twice’s slow-moving villainous space capsule 1:20:48 – Nancy Sinatra’s ‘You Only Live Twice’ 1:23:05 – The ‘Japanese’ music in You Only Live Twice 1:27:43 – On Her Majesty’s Australian Service 1:31:09 – ‘We Have All The Time In The World’ 1:35:04 – “This never happened to the other synth” 1:41:00 – The horny saxophone 1:43:11 – Diamonds Are Forever 1:46:33 – The creepy saxophone We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
Episode 17: Gladiator

Episode 17: Gladiator

2018-06-0401:48:172

In the year 2000, the sword-and-sandal epic was revived, with Russell Crowe trebucheted to international stardom as the star of Ridley Scott’s hugely successful film, Gladiator. But fame was also found for Hans Zimmer, today the biggest music man in Hollywood, but who along with Australian composer and singer Lisa Gerrard wrote some of the most influential film music in decades for Gladiator. In Episode 17, we take a look at what makes Zimmer’s sound so pervasive, how Lisa Gerrard’s voice intensifies the film’s emotions, and just where all that strength and honour comes from. Episode notes: 3:02 – Gladiator as the breakthrough Hans Zimmer score 5:09 – Some background on the significance of Gladiator, sword and sandal films, epics, and peplum 14:24 – Hans Zimmer style and the 1990s action film 21:00 – Hans Zimmer and the synth 23:52 – The unusual instrumentation of Gladiator 25:25 – A duduk demonstration 27:10 – The themes of Gladiator – Commodus’ theme 33:15 – The power of Lisa Gerrard’s voice 39:48 – Maximus’ hymn 43:00 – Maximus’ polyrhythms 45:32 – Zimmer’s Vangelis’ moment 48:01 – Once Upon a Time in Ancient Rome 53:11 – The Earth theme – Gladiator’s musical soul 1:00:56 – Lucilla’s theme 1:05:17 – The Gladiator waltz 1:08:15 – A Holst heist? 1:12:34 – Gladiatorial piracy 1:16:41 – The death of an emperor (or, Mozart’s Da Vinci Code) 1:21:02 – To Zuccabar 1:24:00 – Gladiator’s establishing music (and a surprise) 1:29:21 – Zimmer’s answering horns 1:31:43 – The Might of Wagner 1:39:18 – The Hans Zimmer Olympics 1:41:27 – Gladiator’s finale: Now We Are Free We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
In Episode 16, we finish our look at Williams’ seventh entry into the Star Wars universe by looking at what’s returned and what hasn’t. We take apart the reoccurring Star Wars themes and how they’re used in The Force Awakens, and make a number of bold and possibly a little reckless predictions for The Last Jedi (then unreleased).   Episode notes:   3:01 – Yes, this was recorded before The Last Jedi was released, and we’re sorry 4:04 – What were our reactions to The Force Awakens’ music when it was released? 9:50 – Ice Landing and the Rebel Fanfare 12:48 – Han Solo and the Princess in The Force Awakens 20:06 – Scherzo for X-Wings and the undanceable dance 26:02 – The Force Theme Awakens 30:00 – The Homestead Burns Again 36:20 – The sonic signature of The Force Awakens 37:30 – Williams’ emotional mood shifts and the journey to Luke Skywalker 39:54 – The brief return of Darth Vader 41:35 – Nick promises to walk out of The Last Jedi in disgust (Narrator: he did not) 48:54 – Andrew embarrasses himself with some music-inspired Last Jedi predictions 52:15 – The Skywalker map and the tritone 56:12 – Snoke’s supreme choir – and Andrew embarrasses himself again 1:04:29 – The death scenes of The Force Awakens and John Williams’ string lament’s across episodes 1:19:50 – Finn’s Phantom Confession 1:21:09 – Maz Kanata’s Jabba Flow 1:24:03 – Dan hopes for some more zany Williams jazz (Narrator: he got it)   We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
In Episode 15, we return to the galaxy far, far away and take a look at how the musical landscape of Star Wars changed between the almost 40 years between A New Hope and The Force Awakens. In the first of a two part episode we look at Rey’s Theme, Kylo Ren’s motifs, and The March (or is that the fugue?) of the Resistance. Recorded last year in eager anticipation of The Last Jedi, we’re finally getting this episode to you just in time for its release on Blu-Rey (see what we did there?), so sit back and enjoy our return to perhaps John Williams’ greatest musical franchise. Episode notes: 0:00 – A disclaimer (and possibly an apology!) 5:15 – Dan is writing a book about Star Wars 7:51 – The weight of expectation for The Force Awakens 10:00 – The legacy film 16:30 – The return of little-known composer John Williams 17:35 – Rey’s theme 22:40 – Rey’s riff 26:32 – Rey eats her lunch, on solo flute 30:41 – Rey’s abduction 33:11 – Rey’s impassioned bridge 36:15 – Comparison to other John Williams work: Potter and The Terminal 44:35 – Williams bringing Rey and The Force together in the end credits 46:40 – Rey’s theme – the dance remix 49:10 – Musically, Rey is a Jawa 50:33 – Kylo Ren’s theme 55:50 – The Kylo Ren B motif – the call of the dark side 1:00:00 – Ren and the Imperial March 1:01:45 – The March of the Resistance 1:04:51 – The March or the Fugue? 1:10:00 – Poe’s theme 1:16:39 – Finn’s rhythmic motif 1:19:00 – The mixed-meter Falcon theme 1:28:10 – John Williams as the bloodline of Star Wars 1:29:34 - …and more to come in Part Two! We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
Episode 14: Stranger Things

Episode 14: Stranger Things

2018-01-1101:51:435

After a short break, Art of the Score enters the new year with a trip to the Upside Down to take a close listen to Stranger Things. With the help of synth expert, musician, and podcaster Seja Vogel, we pull apart this wonderfully analogue score, its influences, and how it all works over the course of Season One of the Netflix hit. Episode notes: 2:35 – Welcome to special guest Seja Vogel. Find Seja’s podcast, ‘Hear Sej’ here (https://itunes.apple.com/bw/podcast/hearsej/id1168366353?mt=2), and her amazing Etsy store for felt synth models here (https://www.etsy.com/shop/pulsewidth). 5:20 – Into the nostalgic world of Stranger Things 8:41 – The ‘nostalgia film’ and Fredric Jameson 10:30 – Michael Stein and Kyle Dixon and their analogue synth band S U R V I V E 13:24 – ‘Dirge’, the track that formed the Stranger Things sound 15:05 – The influences and musical tools of S U R V I V E 19:00 – How the music works in Stranger Things – a scene comparison with Williams’ E.T. 25:14 – The main title – is it E minor or C major? 28:51 – Seja breaks down the synths involved 31:47 – Seja’s meticulous reconstruction of the Main Title 34:00 – Square waves and pulse waves, filter sweeps and resonance 44:33 – ‘Kids’ and keying between worlds 51:55 – Nancy and Barb 55:06 – Eleven’s theme and its development throughout season one 1:05:45 – Lay-Z-Boy couch theme 1:10:20 – The Upside Down 1:13:55 – The Demogorgon 1:18:11 – Searching the woods 1:20:42 – The government evildoers in portamento bass 1:26:37 – ‘This isn’t you’ 1:32:01 – Linking sound with image – was Stranger Things written to footage? 1:35:45 – How each kiss is scored 1:40:04 – Pop music in Stranger Things: The Clash – Should I Stay or Should I Go? 1:44:02 – Stranger Things’ secret pop: We Can Be Heroes We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.
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Comments (6)

Meaghan Jones

Really delightful - these guys are knowledgeable and obviously have a ton of fun while breaking down some awesome pieces of music. Looking forward to more soon!

Jul 6th
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mohammad tm

great and specific

Jan 9th
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mohammad tm

great episode

Aug 30th
Reply (2)

Ian Goh

please do an episode on tv show, the flash!

Jan 27th
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