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Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health (ACAMH)

Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health (ACAMH)

Author: The Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health

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We focus on bridging the gap between rigorous research and best practice relating to children's mental health. We hold a body of knowledge and act as information hub for sharing best practice to benefit all of those who work with children. Visit our website (https://www.acamh.org/) for a host of free evidence-based mental health resources.
285 Episodes
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DOI: 10.13056/acamh.28954 In this Papers Podcast, Dr. Matti Cervin discusses his JCPP paper ‘Efficacy and acceptability of cognitive-behavioral therapy and serotonin reuptake inhibitors for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: a network meta-analysis’ (https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13934). Matti is the lead author of the paper. There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: The importance of examining efficacy and acceptability of cognitive-behavioural therapy and serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the context of the pediatric population. The two domains of treatments that have an evidence base for paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) – cognitive-behavioural therapy and medication. The difference between different forms of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) delivery – traditional in-person, remote CBT, and internet-delivered CBT. Difference between in-person CBT and internet-delivered CBT. Implications for policymakers and child and adolescent mental health professionals. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances. #ListenLearnLike
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.27597 In this Papers Podcast, Maria Palma and Associate Professor Alice Goisis discuss their co-authored JCPP paper ‘Medically assisted reproduction and mental health in adolescence: evidence from the UK Millennium Cohort Study’ (https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13877). There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: What the UK Millennium Cohort Study is. The differences in parental reports on adolescent mental health between MAR (medically assisted reproduction) adolescents and naturally conceived adolescents. The differences between adolescent self-reports and parental reports on adolescent mental health. The association between MAR conception and mental health outcomes in adolescents. Implications for clinical practice and researchers. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances. #ListenLearnLike
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.27603 In this In Conversation podcast, Dr. Seonaid Anderson is joined by Professor Chris Hollis, who is leading a research team working on a research project about ADHD medication and Tics. The focus of this podcast is on this research project, called The SATURN Trial. The full name of the trial is the ‘Stimulant Medication for ADHD and Tics – Understanding Response versus Non-stimulants (SATURN): a randomised trial of the clinical and cost-effectiveness of methylphenidate versus Guanfacine for ADHD in children and young people with a co-existing tic disorder’. Discussion points include: Definition of Tics and ADHD. Potential challenges of differentiating between tics from a Tic Disorder, such as Tourette Syndrome, from other movements from conditions such as chorea dystonia myoclonus. Differentiating between stimming movements and tics. The reason behind The SATURN Trial and how it is funded. The effectiveness of non-stimulant medication in treating the symptoms of ADHD. Co-morbidity and Tic Disorders. Impact of the ongoing shortage of ADHD medication on patients. Why people should be encouraged to get involved in this research and the clinical implications from this research. This episode is part of The Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health’s series on Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders. The series explores the evidence-based research on Tourette Syndrome, and other Tic Disorders, as well as the education, treatments, and research in this area. #ListenLearnLike
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.28495 In this Papers Podcast, Dr. John Weisz discusses his JCPP paper ‘Research Review: The internalizing paradox – youth anxiety and depression symptoms, psychotherapy outcomes, and implications for research and practice’ (https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13820). There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: An explanation of what the internalizing paradox is. The five different possible explanations for the internalizing paradox. The differential comorbidities between anxiety disorders and depressive disorders. Insight into ‘variegated nature of polythetic conditions’. A definition of differential progress in the search for mechanisms of change. How differential complexity of evidence-based psychotherapy protocols relate to the internalizing paradox. The clinician’s challenge. How the different perspectives suggest different treatment strategies and insight into these strategies. The limitations of current research and the possible avenues for future work. Implications for clinicians and how this research impacts interventions. Messages for parents and carers and the importance of parents/carers partnering with clinicians with regards to interventions. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances. #ListenLearnLike
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.27714 In this Papers Podcast, Assistant Professor Jacqueline Samson and Associate Professor Martin Teicher discuss their co-authored JCPP paper ‘Practitioner Review: Neurobiological consequences of childhood maltreatment – clinical and therapeutic implications for practitioners’ (https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13883). Jacqueline and Martin are the lead authors of the paper. There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: How childhood maltreatment alters threat detection and the impact of childhood maltreatment on the area and integrity of white matter tracts. What happens in terms of hippocampal and subfield activation. Definition and insight into the concept of latent vulnerability and ecophenotypes, and the impact of maltreatment. The problematic behavioural presentations that you would expect to see in individuals exposed to childhood maltreatment. Evidence-based tools for treatment and how knowledge about alterations in brain functioning changes the clinical approach to treatment. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances. #ListenLearnLike
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.27589 In this Papers Podcast, Cameron Hecht discusses his JCPP Advances paper ‘When do the effects of single-session interventions persist? Testing the mindset + supportive context hypothesis in a longitudinal randomized trial’ (https://doi.org/10.1002/jcv2.12191). Cameron is the lead author of the paper. There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: Definition of single-session interventions and how these types of interventions work. Insight into the ‘synergistic mindsets intervention’ and the ‘mindset + supportive context hypothesis’. The impact of supportive messaging on the effects of the intervention and the implication of this. Implications for researchers, and parents, carers, and teachers. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances. #ListenLearnLike
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26241 In this ‘RESHAPE Study’ series episode, Professor Tamsin Newlove-Delgado, Franki Mathews, and Dr. Kate Allen provide insight into the findings from the RESHAPE study with regards to how young people sought support for their mental health and accessed services during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. The ‘RESHAPE Study’ series is a new mini-in conversation series that will explore the RESHAPE study and the impact of its findings for parents, teachers, policymakers, and mental health professionals. Discussion points include: Patterns of service contact during COVID and how these findings can inform service provision. Insight into the qualitive interviews with parents and young people about their experiences with help-seeking and service access during COVID. The experiences of commissioners of child mental health services with regards to commissioning services and the challenges they faced. Main implications from the study for meeting children and young people’s needs. RESHAPE or ‘REflecting on the impactS of covid-19 on cHildren And young People in England: exploring experiences of lockdown, service access and education’ is a large study looking at how life changed for children, young people, and parents during the lockdown and how this may have affected them. This is a follow-on study from the National Study of Health and Wellbeing: Children and Young people and is a joint effort between the University of Exeter, the University of Cambridge, King’s College London and the NHS.
In this In Conversation podcast, Dr. Seonaid Anderson is joined by Dr. Maddie Groom to discuss a current research project focusing on Tics and Tourette Syndrome called INTEND. INTEND stands for ImproviNg Tic Services in EnglaND. Discussion points include: The ideas behind the project and how the project is funded. Insight into what Tics are, and their impact. How health care professionals are involved with the INTEND project and how they can get involved. The importance of a recommended service model and the impact of there being no NICE guidelines in the UK for Tic Disorders and Tourette Syndrome. This episode is part of The Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health’s series on Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders. The series explores the evidence-based research on Tourette Syndrome, and other Tic Disorders, as well as the education, treatments, and the influences of the pandemic and social media. #ListenLearnLike DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26823
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26814 In this Papers Podcast, Professor Jonathan Green discusses his CAMH journal Debate paper ‘Debate: Neurodiversity, autism and healthcare’ (https://doi.org/10.1111/camh.12663). This podcast coincides with World Autism Acceptance Week. Discussion points include: The current experience of CAMH professionals working in the field of neurodiversity. The evolution of the autism concept and where we are currently in our understanding. The different realities of autism (as a clinical concept, an administrative term, and as a self-identification) and whether these different realities can co-exist. The risk of fragmentation and loss of a common language and why it matters to have a common language. Insight into an evidence-based framework for Autism. Autism as emergent and transactional and the impact for CAMH professionals. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26383 In this Papers Podcast, Dr. Jiedi Lei discusses her JCPP paper ‘Understanding the relationship between social camouflaging in autism and safety behaviours in social anxiety in autistic and non-autistic adolescents’ (https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13884). Jiedi is the first author of the paper. There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: The definition of ‘social camouflaging’ and ‘masking’, how it typically manifests, and how it relates to social anxiety in autistic adolescents. Safety behaviours in social anxiety in autistic and non-autistic adolescents. How participants were recruited and engaged using cartoon-like stop-motion videos. Gender differences that emerged. Implications of the findings for CAMH professionals and how the findings could inform assessment and treatment of social anxiety disorder for autistic adolescents. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26760 In this Papers Podcast, Dr. Susanne Schweizer discusses her JCPP Advances paper ‘The relationship between cognitive and affective control and adolescent mental health’ (https://doi.org/10.1002/jcv2.12204). Susanne is the lead author of the paper. There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: Definition of cognitive and affective control and the importance of cognitive and affective control. The association between depressive symptoms and cognitive and affective control. The implications of the study for interventions for adolescent mental health. The implications for future research and for parents, carers and teachers. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26254 In this Papers Podcast, Dr. Karen Mansfield discusses her JCPP Advances Editorial Perspective ‘Missing the context: The challenge of social inequalities to school‐based mental health interventions’ (https://doi.org/10.1002/jcv2.12165). Karen’s work aims to apply solid research to understand, promote, and protect the health and wellbeing of children and adolescents, with a particular interest in the promotion of equity, inclusion, engagement, and agency. Discussion points include: The link between social economic adversity and children’s mental health. Scepticism around the impact and effectiveness of school-based intervention programmes. Potential issues of a ‘one size fits all’ approach and a ‘selective approach’. What to consider when designing interventions that both improve wellbeing and reduce inequalities. The challenges around measuring effectiveness. Potential policy shifts to consider and practical ways to improve children’s wellbeing in schools. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26268 In this Papers Podcast, Professor Sooyeon (Aly) Suh discusses her co-authored JCPP paper ‘Validation of the Parental Understanding and Misperceptions about BAby’s Sleep Questionnaire using auto-videosomnography’ (https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13797). There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include. How prevalent paediatric sleep disorders are and how these sleep problems impact children. The association between parental cognition and children’s sleep. How the questionnaire was developed and the cultural differences in sleep patterns. The importance of re-examining parental beliefs and attitudes about their child’s sleep. Implications of the findings for researchers & how the findings might be translated into practice to support CAMH professionals and clinicians. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26603 In this Papers Podcast, Dr. Si-Jing Chen discusses her JCPP paper ‘Subtyping at-risk adolescents for predicting response toward insomnia prevention program’ (https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13904). Si-Jing is the first author of the paper. There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: Insomnia prevalence and impact in adolescences. Insight into the brief cognitive-behavioural prevention insomnia programme. Why the cognitive-behavioural sleep intervention was predominantly more effective for anxiety than depression. Implications of findings for CAMH professionals, and how the findings can be translated into practice. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26601 In this Papers Podcast, Dr. Christina Stadler discuss her co-authored JCPP paper ‘START NOW: a cognitive behavioral skills training for adolescent girls with conduct or oppositional defiant disorder – a randomized clinical trial’ (https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13896). There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: Why the researchers decided to undertake the intervention (START NOW) in youth welfare institutions. Insight into START NOW, a cognitive-behavioural, dialectical behaviour therapy-oriented skills training program. The methodological challenges in undertaking this randomized control trial. Implications for practitioners, and messages for parents and carers. Potential areas of further investigation with regards to the START NOW intervention. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26554 ‘Colouring the Mind: Racism and Mental Health’ is a new In Conversation mini-series that will explore how racism affects mental health, with a particular focus on racism in the mental health system and racism in the mental health concept. In this episode, Malaika Okundi and Jessica O’Logbon focus on racism in the mental health system and discuss what the mental health system is, how people of colour are treated in the mental health system, and where we can go from here. Discussion points include: Definition of the mental health system with a focus on the UK mental health system. Formal and informal mental health systems. How people of colour are treated differently by the mental health system. The biases that exist for people of colour within the mental health system. Distrust in the mental health system and how history impacts people’ s perspectives of the system. The importance of cultural competency training and lived experience advising. Please note that what Malaika and Jess share in this series is derived from their work, as well as from research and literature surrounding these topics. Whilst they are not experts on racism or mental health, personal experience does play a role in their discussions.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26537 TRIGGER WARNING: Please be aware that this podcast explores themes around the topic of self-harm.  If you or a person you know is struggling with their mental health, please seek support by accessing the helplines and resources provided by the NHS website. For those outside the UK please use an internet search to find an organisation that can offer direct support. In this ‘Insights from the OxWell Student Survey’ episode, Dr. Galit Geulayov and Dr. Rohan Borschmann comment on the findings from the OxWell survey regarding self-harm behaviours as well as informal and formal support for adolescents who self-harm. The ‘Insights from the OxWell Student Survey‘ series is a new mini-in conversation series that will explore the OxWell study and the impact of its findings for parents, teachers, policymakers and mental health professionals. Discussion points include: What was measured in relation to self-harm in the OxWell student survey. Self-harm and loneliness. Gender and age differences in self-harm behaviours. Types of support accessed by adolescents following self-harm. Informal and formal support for adolescents who self-harm. Potential implications of the findings and plans for the next OxWell waves regarding self-harm behaviours in adolescents. OxWell is a large-scale student survey designed to measure the wellbeing of children and young people. It looks at mental wellbeing, anxiety, indicators of vulnerability such as bullying and loneliness, school experience, access to services, safety online and many more areas. It is a joint effort between schools, young people, the NHS, local authorities and the OxWell research team at the University of Oxford’s Department of Psychiatry.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26496 In this In Conversation podcast, we are joined by Dr. Emma Willmott and Dr. Tom Jewell, from the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust and King’s College London, to discuss their recently published scoping review on psychological interventions for Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID). Discussion points include: The main aims of the review into psychological interventions for ARFID. How many studies were identified and the main findings. Different intervention modalities for ARFID. The lack of consistency when measuring change in patients with ARFID and how best to measure recovery for patients with ARFID. Recommendations on next steps to advance knowledge of ARFID and effective treatments. Advice and resources for non-specialist eating disorder clinicians. This is the second episode of a two-part series on ARFID with Dr. Emma Willmott and Dr. Tom Jewell. Episode one can be found here: ‘Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID): Prevalence and Implications’.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26498 In this In Conversation podcast, we are joined by Dr. Emma Willmott and Dr. Tom Jewell, from the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust and King’s College London, to discuss Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID). Discussion points include: An overview of ARFID and what underlies the dietary restriction in ARFID. Similarities and differences in how ARFID may present and people’s experiences of ARFID. Prevalence of ARFID and how it differs from Anorexia Nervosa. Difference between ARFID and picky or fussy eating. The co-morbidity between Autism and ARFID. This is the first episode of a two-part series on ARFID with Dr. Emma Willmott and Dr. Tom Jewell. Episode two can be found here: ‘Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID): Psychological Interventions and Outcomes’.
DOI: 10.13056/acamh.26371 In this Papers Podcast, Professor Kerstin von Plessen discusses her co-authored JCPP Advances paper ‘Performing well but not appreciating it – A trait feature of anorexia nervosa’ (https://doi.org/10.1002/jcv2.12194). There is an overview of the paper, methodology, key findings, and implications for practice. Discussion points include: What is currently known about the relationship between perfectionism and anorexia nervosa. Insight into a novel behavioural method for measuring perfectionism and why it is important to look beyond self-evaluation reports. What makes self-evaluation reports limited in comparison to the novel behavioural method. The implications of participants, who have recovered from anorexia nervosa, having evaluated their performances significantly more negatively than their respective controls. Implications of findings from clinicians and child and adolescent mental health (CAMH) professionals. In this series, we speak to authors of papers published in one of ACAMH’s three journals. These are The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP); The Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) journal; and JCPP Advances.
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Robert Hale

The mental health impact of COVID-19 school closures has been profound, with students facing increased stress, anxiety, and isolation. The abrupt shift to online learning disrupted routines and social interactions crucial for emotional well-being. According to recent studies, rates of depression and anxiety among students have surged during the pandemic. The closure of schools has deprived many students of vital support systems, exacerbating mental health challenges. Amidst these struggles, accessing necessary resources like mental health services is essential. Websites like https://canadianinsulin.com/ provide valuable information and support for managing mental health during these uncertain times.

May 16th
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