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Atlantic Gospel Chapel Messages

Author: Atlantic Gospel Chapel

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Messages from our Sunday morning service.
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In this session, we continue our look at the Apostolic Fathers, the earliest writings of the early church outside scripture.  Some of these authors likely knew at least some of the Lord's Apostles.  As we see in our continued review of 1 Clement, this letter from the church in Rome to the church in Corinth makes mention of the travels and writings of Paul as well as of Peter.  Ignatius was an acquaintance of Polycarp, who himself was a disciple of the Apostle John. Thank you for listening.  May the Lord bless you as you study early church history with us.
Who are the Apostolic Fathers?  More accurately, what are the Apostolic Fathers?  The Apostolic Fathers is a collection of the earliest surviving Christian writings outside the New Testament.  Written in the period roughly from AD 95 to 140, these writings were created in the first generation after the Apostles While not part of the Canon of Scripture, these writings provide an insight into the early church as it moved out of the Age of the Apostles.  The best of these show a firm belief in the doctrines of Scripture as taught by the Apostles. Thank you for listening.  May you be blessed as we continue our progression through early church history.
Scripture reveals many things about the character and nature of God.  Among these, He is described as the creator, the sustainer and the restorer.  God is still active in the world today, creating new life, seen in every child's birth.  As the sustainer of his creation, Colossians tells us, "He is before all things, and in Him all things hold together. (1:17)"  And God is still active in restoring a fallen world to Himself through the work of Christ. In this last element, restoration, the Lord uses the Church, for the Church is God's work in the world to preach the Gospel; to reach lost souls in the twin ministries of restoration and reconciliation. In Acts 2, we witnessed the birth and explosive growth of the Church on Pentecost.  Now, as we close out this chapter, we see a model of what the Church is called to be.  This is seen in terms of its Spiritual Duties Spiritual Character Spiritual Impact In the time of COVID, when many churches are forced to shut down, or move to other means of meeting, this passage becomes even more relevant than ever in recent history. Thank you for listening to today's lesson.  May you be blessed through the teaching of God's Word.
Hebrews 11 is often known as the Hall of Faith, or the Roll Call of the Faithful.  Many of the notable characters of scripture are recorded, Enoch, Abraham, Moses, etc.  In addition to these, Hebrews 11 closes with many who are unnamed.  Yet, through the descriptions given, we see the writer of Hebrew had, or may have had specific characters in mind.  For instance, when referring to those sawn in two, he may have been thinking of the prophet Isaiah.  In this weeks lesson, we look at six examples in Old Testament Scripture whom the writer of Hebrews may have had in mind as he penned his letter to the church. Thank you for listening to this week's lesson.  May you be blessed and encouraged as we consider these Unnamed Heroes of the Faith.
Peter has finished his first sermon on the day of Pentecost.  To the Jews gathered in Jerusalem, he laid out before them the truth regarding Jesus Christ.  First, that in Jesus Christ they were witnesses to fulfilled prophecy.  Second, even though He was the fulfillment of the Messianic prophecies, they killed Him.  Finally, all this was according to the predetermined will of God, but they bore the guilt of handing Him over to sinful men to be executed; but vindicated by the Father through the resurrection. Now faced with this reality, the Jews are cut to the core.  Realizing their sin, they asked the key question, "What must we do?"  This is the question posed to all humanity.  In the face of our sin, and in the presence of a Holy God, what must we do? As you listen to today's lesson, may you be blessed through the teaching of God's Holy Word.  May you know and experience the grace of God that comes through faith in Jesus Christ. Thank you for listening.
As we continue through Peter's first sermon, we move from the the cross as fulfillment of prophecy to God's sovereign plan. The Jews, especially at the time of Christ, were a people with high messianic hopes, but no Messiah.  Put as Peter preaches his first sermon, he makes it clear that Jesus Christ was indeed the long awaited for Messiah; and the Jews put him to death. But counter to the Jewish beliefs regarding Messiah, Peter makes it clear, it was God's predetermined, sovereign will that Messiah would suffer and die at the hands of sinful men.  And herein lies the apparent paradox; man's responsibility in the context of God's sovereign will.  This apparent problem is at the core of many theological debates.  If this is God's plan, then how can man be held responsible for our actions? Thank you for listening to today's lesson.  May God bless you through His Word.
Preaching has always occupied a central role in the church.  It is the God ordained method of building His church.  During Jesus' earthly ministry, His mission was to preach the Gospel (Mark 1).  And the first event in church history is Peter's preaching of his first sermon. With the Jews gathered in Jerusalem for Pentecost, Peter addresses the crowd.  First, he addresses the mockers whose claims the apostles were drunk as preposterous.  He then moves to the fact that God is revealing His plan.  And so, Peter looks to prophecy, specifically Joel's prophecy that in the last days, God would pour out His Spirit upon mankind. Thank you for listening to today's lesson.  My the Lord bless you as you consider with us God's plan revealed in the person and work of Jesus Christ.
During Jesus' ministry on earth, He taught His disciples that they would face persecution for His name (Mark 10:29-30; Matthew 5:10).  The fact is that persecution is a fact of Christianity.  From the very foundation of the church, this persecution has taken many forms and come from many sources. In today's session, we look at the persecution beginning with the Jewish persecution, but as recorded in the book of Acts, as well as the persecution that continued and is recorded in history outside the pages of Scripture.  We then move on to the persecution under the Roman empire. And as grim as this topic is to consider, we also consider the fruit of persecution.  It is often said that the blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church.  Persecution led to the spread of the Gospel throughout the Roman Empire and beyond. Thank you for listening to today's lesson.
Hebrews 11 is often referred to as the Roll Call of the Faithful, or the Hall of Faith.  The writer names many Old Testament saints who are examples of faithfulness.  But the writer also leaves some unnamed, although their stories are well known. In referring to the faithful who "shut the mouths of lions," and "quenched the power of fire," we know references to Daniel and Shadrach, Meschach and Abednego.  These four men stood for their faith against Nebuchadnezzar, the head of the powerful Babylonian Empire. This kind of faith does not grow in a vacuum.  What influenced them?  How could they stand so boldly for their God? Today's lesson examines their lives before the Babylonian captivity and the influences in their lives that resulted in such bold faith. Thank you for listening to today's lesson.  May you be blessed through the teaching of God's Word.
As Alexander the Great conquered the Mediterranean world and into the regions of modern day Iraq, Iran and India, he brought with him.  In today's session, we see how Greek culture influenced the culture and language of Judea.  By the time the church enters the scene, the primary translation of the Scriptures is the Septuagint; the Greek translation of the Old Testament. We finish our session with an introduction into the Apostolic Age. Thank you for listening.
The church was born into a specific period in history, to a specific culture, location, language, etc.  In last week's session we looked at the impact of the Greek and Roman worlds on the birth of the church. This week, we begin to look at the Jewish world, from the Babylonian Exile to the Roman occupation.  We will see the rise of such figures as the Herods in Palestine and how their reign paved the way for the Roman occupation of Palestine. Thank you for listening to today's lesson. 
In the opening chapter of the book of Acts, the Lord instructed the Apostles to remain in Jerusalem and to wait for what the Lord had promised, the baptism of the Holy Spirit (Acts 1:5).  Now, gathered together in one place, the promise is fulfilled.  Just as Jesus was crucified publicly, the outpouring of the Holy Spirit came in a dramatic, public fashion.  The result was a turning point in world history with the birth of the Church.  And the sames Spirit that was at work on the day of Pentecost, is the same Spirit at work in the church today. Thank you for listening to today's lesson.  May you be blessed through the teaching of God's Word.
"When the fullness of time came, God sent forth His Son, born of a woman, born under the Law, so that He might redeem those who were under the Law, that we might receive the adoption as sons." (Galatians 4:4-5) Jesus Christ came into the world at a particular point in history, to a particular place in the world and born into a particular culture.  But none of this happened by chance but God sovereignly ordaining the time and place of His appearing.  Not only this, but the circumstances into which the Lord was born ensured that the Church would be born into circumstances that would help promote the spread of the Gospel. Join us for the second lesson in early church history as we study the historical background of the church.  We will see how history prior to the appearing of Jesus Christ was truly preparation for His appearing.  And in doing so, we begin to see how history after His first coming paves the way for the diffusion of His Spirit throughout the world. Thank you for listening to today's lesson.  May the Lord bless you as you take this journey with us through the history of Jesus' Church.
Waiting is one of the hardest things to do.  We often sense that answers to our prayers are delayed, or that God isn't answering these prayers.  We are tempted to believe that God is not working during these times when we must wait.  But nothing is farther from the truth. In the opening verses of the Book of Acts, Jesus bid farewell to the Apostles.  Before ascending into heaven before their eyes, "He commanded them not to leave Jerusalem, but to wait for what the Father had promised" (Acts 1:4 NASB).  This was the promised Holy Spirit who would empower the apostles for the ministry for which the Lord had prepared them. It was during this time of waiting that the Lord continued to prepare the apostles for what lie ahead.  And it is during this time that we see an example of what the church is to be. Thank you for listening as we continue this study through the book of Acts.  May you be blessed through God's Word.
Mention the topic of church history and you will likely hear the sound of eyes rolling.  History, in general, has the reputation of being dry, boring and generally unimportant.  And while history may be presented in this manner, we must never neglect the importance to our modern lives, especially when it comes to church history. This is the first lesson in a series of lessons presented by Alex Kremer from Atlantic Gospel Chapel in which we will examine a variety of topics related to early church history.  In today's lesson, we ask the question, "Why should we study church history?"  We will see at least six reasons for a study of this type: The promise that Jesus will build His church The Scriptural precedence for knowing our history Learn from past mistakes; and correct current heresies Expand our horizons To be inspired by the reminders of what God is doing in His world The wealth of resources for spiritual nourishment It is our prayer that you will be encouraged, challenged and strengthened through this study of Church history in the coming weeks and months. Thank you for listening.
In the opening verses of the book of Acts, the apostles spend 40 days with the risen Lord.  During that time, He taught them the things concerning Himself, and "the things concerning the kingdom of God." (Acts 1:3)  Surely the disciples would have been encouraged to be in the presence of the resurrected Christ.  They likely would have been eager to go out into the world to spread the Gospel of Jesus Christ. But instead of telling them to go out into the world, the Lord told them to wait in Jerusalem for what the Father had promised.  In order for them to succeed in their new mission to spread the Gospel, they required the power of the Holy Spirit working in and through them.  This is the same Holy Spirit which indwells and empowers every believer in the Lord Jesus. Thank you listening to today's lesson.  May you be blessed through God's Word.
The Book of Acts and the Gospel of Luke are, in essence, are two parts of the same book.  Acts continues where Luke's Gospel leaves off.  And so we interpret the Book of Acts in the context of what Christ has done.  As such, the Book of Acts then becomes a bridge connecting what Jesus has done to what Christ is doing in His church today. As we begin our study into the book of Acts, we begin by examining the work of Christ in the Gospels.  We see that Jesus is building His church through the proclamation of the Gospel.  And while the work is finished through the blood of Christ, there is still work to be done through applying the work of the Cross through preaching the Gospel. Thank you for listening to today's lesson.
We make choices every day.  Some choices are insignificant, such as what to eat, or what to wear, etc.  Other choices are more significant, sch as education, marriage and family.  And some choices have impacts that echo into eternity. In today's lesson we look at two people who made choices based upon their faith in God.  We consider the choices made by Moses, as well as those made by Moses' mother.  In the end, we find that while none of us will hold up a staff to part the sea, or come down from the mountain carrying tablets of stones, we can all be like Moses' mother. Thank you for listening to today's lesson.  May you be blessed as we study God's Word together.
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