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Audiogyan

Audiogyan

Author: Audiogyan

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A podcast for people interested in Art, Design and Philosophy.
Audiogyan is an attempt to audio document knowledge, ideas and thoughts of people who have devoted their life in the field of performing arts, design or philosophy. It is a genuine attempt document and create a pool of content which can be useful for future generations to come. The podcast is mainly for Indian audience and interviews are also of Indian people.
152 Episodes
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Today I have Chirodeep Chaudhuri with us on Audiogyan. In the last 2 decades he has worn multiple hats, from being an author, a journalist to being a photographer. Chirodeep’s work largely documents the urban landscape and he has often been referred to as the “chronicler of Bombay”. During his career he has produced diverse documents of his home city in a range of projects documenting its architectural and social landscape. I stumbled upon him and his work first at Join Paperplanes session In Mumbai. We will try and document Chirodeep’s philosophy and importance of having story behind every photograph.
dina Amin is an Industrial designer and stop motion animator.She likes to work at the intersection of various disciplines. After discovering her love for stop motion, dina founded “Tinker Studio”, where she produces stop motion videos for diverse clients and companies around the world.Questions What constitutes garbage is highly subjective, with some individuals or societies tending to discard things that others find useful or restorable. How do you define trash? Do you consider your work as an act of Upcycling? How and why; either ways What made you connect Stop motion and disassembling things to be an interesting exploration? What is the process like and what do you do exactly? Is there any conscious effort of showing environmentally correct use of objects which people then tend to discard; there by showcasing it value? Or is it still a fun exercise? Or do you try and illustrate a story by deconstructing & humanising objects and narrating the object's point of view? How did it all land up in getting real work? If you can share any interesting case study or collaborations? Fun question: You have problem with capital D. How do you deal with autocorrect and grammar fixes done by technology?
We are recording this backstage of Kyoorius Designyatra 2019 Today I have Anthony Burrill with us on Audiogyan. He is a Graphic artist, print-maker and designer known for his persuasive, up-beat style of communication. Anthony is perhaps best known for his typographic, text-based compositions, including the now-famous “Work Hard and Be Nice to People” poster, which has become a mantra for the design community and beyond. He has a beautiful website which showcases his work, bio and process of him creating really iconic posters and more. He now lives and works in Kent. There are plenty of his interviews, videos and talks about his process of creating artwork and his experimentation online. What I would try and do today is ask few questions about the thought behind his messages and not the medium. Although medium is the message, but let's find out.  Thank you Anthony for giving your time and it’s a real honour to have you on Audiogyan. Topic Messages from with Anthony Burrill. Questions Can you start by telling us, who is a print-maker? What does he or she do? A brief history / background about it? You have produced some iconic lines through your work. How do you arrive on these lines? If you can illustrate with any one example? “I like it. What is it?” Or may be "Tomorrow” - Just one word poster? What does it mean? Why do you think your work is appreciated so much? Is it the medium, means or the message? How do you see all these aspects? Your work, at least what I have seen online happens to be at the cusp of “art for art's sake” and “didactic artwork” - How would you respond to that? What is it's nature? I understand analog creations has warmth in it. But do you ever feel that it restricts creativity or pushing the boundaries since a lot has been experimented before digital came in. Or is it a conscious effort to create space in this noisy world, for you work?
Episode 5 of 5 featuring Aditya Mehta. Aditya is the Founder of Art&Found – a curated platform for invite-only artists to sell their work.This is a 5 part series with Bharat Flooring and tiles and Audiogyan. In the coming weeks we will be talking with various artists, heritage conservationist, brand creators, illustrators and architects associated with Bharat Flooring & Tiles.Those who don’t know what is Bharat Flooring & Tiles, (btw, we will be calling it BFT throughout the series). It’s a company formed in 1922 which is leader in quality cement  flooring and has been primarily making customised, handmade cement tiles. The timeless elegance and durability of these tiles make them works of art and an invaluable part of the country’s architectural heritage. It started as part of the Swadeshi movement and with over 90 years of reputation, BFT is now the most preferred choice of interior designers and architects across India, You can find relevant links in the show notes about BFT.Aditya Mehta is the Founder of Art&Found – a curated platform for invite-only artists to sell their work. He comes from advertising background but found his passion in curating and selling artwork made by Indian artists. Today we are going to speak about ‘Virtuoso’ collection with artists like Aniruddh Mehta, Shweta Malhotra, Suzanne Dias and Pratap Chalke which emerged out of collaboration between Art&Found and Bharat Flooring tiles. We will also speak about how different types of digital artworks exploring different materials and medium.https://www.bharatfloorings.com/QuestionsAM: What does Art&Found do?FV: What are different collections you have and how did Art&Found help in shaping them? What new things are born out of this collaboration?AM: What are the constraints while designing since the final output is a tile?FV: How have your artists responded to this? What is their feedback and learning from it?AM & FV: Can you share the over all process from brief to actual deliverable tiles for a client? Would like to know the actual flow of how a vector or a .AI files is given to BFT artisans etc…AM: The overall engagement seems like a win-win situation. Can you tell us who all are empowered through this and at what levels? BFT, Client & the Artist. How Art&Found enables this?FV: What have been you learnings w.r.t market for this and what is next?
Episode 4 of 5 featuring Alisha Sadikot. She is the founder of Inheritage ProjectThis is a 5 part series with Bharat Flooring and tiles and Audiogyan. In the coming weeks we will be talking with various artists, heritage conservationist, brand creators, illustrators and architects associated with Bharat Flooring & Tiles.Those who don’t know what is Bharat Flooring & Tiles, (btw, we will be calling it BFT throughout the series). It’s a company formed in 1922 which is leader in quality cement  flooring and has been primarily making customised, handmade cement tiles. The timeless elegance and durability of these tiles make them works of art and an invaluable part of the country’s architectural heritage. It started as part of the Swadeshi movement and with over 90 years of reputation, BFT is now the most preferred choice of interior designers and architects across India, You can find relevant links in the show notes about BFT.Alisha Sadikot is an independent museums and heritage learning professional instigating critical and creative public engagement with urban histories, art, museum collections and heritage spaces in Mumbai. Her practice, through the Inheritage Project (founded 2011), focuses on educational, family, specialist and other groups from the city.https://www.bharatfloorings.com/QuestionsAS: How do you define urban history? What are the various parameters constitute “Urban”?AS: How and why is History important? How does it help to reflect back on what are we doing?AS: Do you have any subtext while doing these walks? Do you feel it’s need? What are your thoughts about it?FV: What has been BFT contribution in creating heritage structures. In one of you article online, I read that it was also a preferred choice for Maharajas. Can you share some insight into that?AS: In one of your articles online you mentioned - “No two walks are the same, even though the route could be.” Can you please elaborate?AS & FV: In your walks, you must be having a lot of buildings and spaces from South Mumbai. Can you tell us any peculiar things about the floorings? - Since we are doing this with BFT, i have this genuine plug to know, what is the contribution of BFT in these century old buildings of Mumbai?AS: Is there any template or pattern which has emerged out of your practice which can be used by others to start these kind of tours in their cities and villages. I am sure Kochi, Varanasi and many other cities will have great history and mythology? Does Mumbai have any mythology?
Episode 3 of 5 featuring Sanghamitra Chatterjee. Sanghamitra is the co-founder of Past Perfect Heritage Management, which is an archiving and research agency based out of Mumbai and specialises in institutional and family archiving. This is a 5 part series with Bharat Flooring and tiles and Audiogyan. In the coming weeks we will be talking with various artists, heritage conservationist, brand creators, illustrators and architects associated with Bharat Flooring & Tiles.Those who don’t know what is Bharat Flooring & Tiles, (btw, we will be calling it BFT throughout the series). It’s a company formed in 1922 which is leader in quality cement  flooring and has been primarily making customised, handmade cement tiles. The timeless elegance and durability of these tiles make them works of art and an invaluable part of the country’s architectural heritage. It started as part of the Swadeshi movement and with over 90 years of reputation, BFT is now the most preferred choice of interior designers and architects across India, You can find relevant links in the show notes about BFT.https://www.bharatfloorings.com/QuestionsSC: What is archiving? Why is it important? How does it help corporate and families? Does archiving help us to reflect back?SC: What are the different types of archiving? Especially where the world is moving more towards Cloud.FV: What made you think that BFT’s work need to be archived?SC: Can you share, what was the process like, what were the challenges and how did you manage to document and archive BFT’s heritage? What all got archived?FV: How far and deep you had to dig to document?SC: What have been your top 3 learnings in your overall journey of archiving BFT or other clients.SC: Can you share any interesting anecdote while digging archives?SC: Is there selective bias while archiving? If yes how do you deal with it?FV: Can you share your perspective now after you have documented and hopefully reflected back and re-lived some great work done by BFT. From Pivoting to manufacturing riding wheels during the Second World war till date…?SC: What next with respect to BFT and your over all archiving journey?
Episode 2 of 5 featuring Saurav Roy. He is the design director for Idea Spice DesignThis is a 5 part series with Bharat Flooring and tiles and Audiogyan. In the coming weeks we will be talking with various artists, heritage conservationist, brand creators, illustrators and architects associated with Bharat Flooring & Tiles.Those who don’t know what is Bharat Flooring & Tiles, (btw, we will be calling it BFT throughout the series). It’s a company formed in 1922 which is leader in quality cement  flooring and has been primarily making customised, handmade cement tiles. The timeless elegance and durability of these tiles make them works of art and an invaluable part of the country’s architectural heritage. It started as part of the Swadeshi movement and with over 90 years of reputation, BFT is now the most preferred choice of interior designers and architects across India, You can find relevant links in the show notes about BFT.Today I have Saurav Roy with us on Audiogyan. Roy graduate of National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad. He is the design director for Idea Spice Design - an international design consultancy based out of Dubai and Mumbai. Ideaspice is primarily focused on business design and placemaking, Roy has been working with entrepreneurs and retail center developers for the past 17 years. He is also the co-founder of knotandtuft - a design platform that brings designers together to create handmade carpets. He is also the co-founder of halffry - a monthly platform that brings creators from various fields to talk about their process and their passion.  Today we are here to discuss how brands are made but more importantly how did IdeaSpice Design Studio re-created this 100+ year old brand Bharat Flooring & Tiles.https://www.bharatfloorings.com/QuestionsSR: After 17 years of brand building, how do you define an intangible thing called “brand”? What all parameters do you engage while dealing or building a brand with any client? Market share vs Loyalty? After sales vs Honesty and more…? We can start by tell us this and setting some context to the over all conversation. SR: How do you differentiate between branding and giving just a face lift? SR: I am sure it must have been relatively easy to make a brand 20 yeas back. What has changed in the last 15-20 years w.r.t brand building? How do you make your client’s brand heard in this noisy world of today? FV: What made you engage with Ideaspice? How did it all began? What was your brief like given to Saurav? SR: Can you share what was the process of brand building for BFT, a company which has been established in 1922. How did it all come about? SR: The new brand looks vintage yet very contemporary. What do you think - What characteristics make it look like that? FV: What made you lock on this variation? I am sure there must have been multiple iterations. SR: What was the process of sharing the brand guidelines? BFT has multiple sub brands like, Heritage, Terrazzo and more... SR: What all departments / verticals you plunged into to find the nuances of this old company / factory. And then what were the steps so that the new brand seeps into the entire ecosystem and each employee feels a part of the new brand? FV & SR: What learning would you like to share since we hardly get a chance to hear, client and agency talk face to face. How much brands should indulge in the creative freedom of agency and how much agency should keep upping about the over all progress to maintain excitement yet pacifying with trust.  FV: Can you live with the new brand for next 100 years? 🙂 SR: What would you change if given a second chance? 🙂
Episode 1 of 5 featuring Firdaus Variava. This is a 5 part series with Bharat Flooring and tiles and Audiogyan. In the coming weeks we will be talking with various artists, heritage conservationist, brand creators, illustrators and architects associated with Bharat Flooring & Tiles.Those who don’t know what is Bharat Flooring & Tiles, (btw, we will be calling it BFT throughout the series). It’s a company formed in 1922 which is leader in quality cement  flooring and has been primarily making customised, handmade cement tiles. The timeless elegance and durability of these tiles make them works of art and an invaluable part of the country’s architectural heritage. It started as part of the Swadeshi movement and with over 90 years of reputation, BFT is now the most preferred choice of interior designers and architects across India, You can find relevant links in the show notes about BFT.https://www.bharatfloorings.com/Today I have Firdaus Variava, Vice Chairman of BFT with us on Audiogyan. He has worked in diverse fields such as telecom, trading, and market research prior to joining Bharat Floorings. Firdaus is responsible for the sales team and for all activities related to marketing. In addition, he is responsible for creation of new products to cater to specific market segments and needs and for strategic planning. You can expect him to be partly host and partly guest in upcoming episode of this series.But today he is our main guest. We will be discussing history of BFT and importance of hand made tiles.QuestionsCan you start by sharing the brief history of BFT? How did it start and what were the ups and down during second world war? I was reading about how Pherozeshah Sidhwa and his nephew Rustom Sidhwa was approached by Jamshed Nusserwanji Mehta, to start an enterprise to boost India’s economic freedom that time?It seems Pherozesha was very particular about quality that he dumped the first batch of White and black tiles worth 50,000 (in 1922) into the ocean because he didn’t like the output. Can you share his vision and how he and his team saw it through. Some other notable names in building the brand?Handmade cement tiles are unique and are expected to have slight imperfections which gives them their inherent depth and character. Can you set the context by telling us, what is so unique and valuable about handmade tiles generally? I believe it also lend it’s nature to Wabi Sabi form. Can you tell us more about it?How are tiles made at Bharat Flooring? Back when you guys started, you had 10 colours. Today BFT has more than 28 colours. Why and what was the journey like? What is the process of introducing colours? How do you decide which colour will work for your expected TG?You have been working with few contemporary artists to bring variety in your catalogue. What is the thought behind that?Which characteristic of BFT transpires across which makes it cater to such a wide range of clientele? Age old buildings like, The Bombay Central Station, Reserve Bank of India, Mantralaya, Breach Candy hospital, Santa Cruz Airport, Express Towers, Air India and LIC buildings, as well as the Bombay Gymkhana Club to new age places like, Smoke House Deli, Socials and more…?What are few design or branding guidelines which you are adhering to, to keep it Indian yet contemporary?
Today I have Tej Chauhan with us Audiogyan. Tej is known for emotive industrial design. He believes that every object has the potential to elicit joy through form, colour and texture, regardless of brand position or production budget. He combines his unique visual approach with production efficiency to create products that resonate with broad audiences and deliver true value and differentiation for brands. He is based in London. We will try and document his thoughts on form, material and technology. Questions Why do you think an unconscious objects need emotive form? Which is the most versatile material you have dealt with so far? Why? Can material itself be emotive? If you can share any examples? Does it mean that if form, colour and texture are dealt well, it’s a great industrial product? Are there any more parameters which you have learnt over time or thought about it? With new age tech, are there any new dimensions being added? Today, how do you perceive technology that enables you to make these beautiful expressive objects? Because just at the beginning of Industrial revolution, objects were flat with straight lines and simple shapes due to it’s constraints. What has changed now that has helped you making product which bring joy to consumers and what do you think the future is going to be like? In one of your interviews you mentioned, one of your inspirations is Stanley Kubrick. Why? Does any aspect of him reflect in your work? If yea, how? :) We are recording this backstage of Kyoorius Designyatra 2019
Anupama Hoskere with us on Audiogyan. She is the founder of Dhaatu, a non-profit organization that seeks to introduce our children our traditional wisdom and tales through puppetry. She did her Engineering from BMS College of Engineering, Bangalore with a Master’s degree from California State Univ, Long Beach. She is also a performing Bharathanatyam artist and currently a member of the Karnataka Sangeeta Nrutya Academy. Anupama scripts, creates the puppets and directs her puppet shows. And today we are here to know more about it. TopicPuppetry’s landscape in Bangalore with Anupama Hoskere QuestionsDhaatu has been organising puppet festivals since 2009. Bangalore had not witnessed a puppet festival for 21 years before that. Can you start by painting us a panoramic landscape of Puppetry as an art form in Bangalore? How was is it even before you started Panchalikas till how is it today? On the similar lines - You have taught and presented your puppetry work in France, Belgium, China and also in many parts of India - What are your observations in various places. What is the state of it? Is there any pattern which you discovered w.r.t type of puppets (string, rod etc…), government support for this art form, type of stories being told, innovation due to technology or any other insights? I know we can’t and we shouldn’t compare art forms. But just for understanding, what are the advantage of Puppetry in comparison with Human theatre? I did one episode with Dadi Padumjee and he said, “puppets make the messenger  opaque; there by purely focussing on the message without any prejudices about the actor” - On the same lines, what has been your observations. If I am not wrong, your effort is more towards educating children this wonderful art form. What are the efforts Dhaatu has taken to make it relevant to younger generation w.r.t Story, Music, Styles of puppets, dialogues and more…? Every art form which has begun in India or has originated in India starts off with mythological stories of Ramayana and Mahabharata. From Dadasaheb Phalke’s Kaliya Mardan to Girish Karnad’s Yayati. Even you have performed stories of physically challenged child and a single mother in Ashtavakra and many more. Why Puppetry being such a ancient and old art form of India telling the same stories of values and morals in this day and age? With Puppetry, what worries you every night when you go to bed and what gives you hope to face the new day with enthusiasm?
IntroductionToday I have Saptarshi Prakash with us on Audiogyan. He is a Designer | Traveller | Speaker | Teacher | Engineer | Manager. QuestionsCan we start by just listing few cool, subtle yet noticeable occurrences of motion design used in interfaces? Also if you can list some analog world instances which have inspired online world? This could be either your work or generic like the Breathe app of Apple Watch. This will help set the context. What is the importance of Physics in making motion for interface. To my knowledge, angry birds is one such game which illustrates importance of physics. Similarly is there any app or digital product which uses Motion effectively? What all elements have been used for motion? For eg: accelerometer sensor and what all is not used so far or can be used effectively. Motion has been long used in Games. In fact game’s progress and genre is defined by it’s speed and movement. Is motion used in interface design fundamentally different? Can you share any insights about what is so different about motion used in games as opposed to UI. Also if you can give us some examples of how different speed settings evoke different actions and so on… I am afraid you have to use well known examples due to the audio medium :) What all things are achieved through motion - for eg: Delight, Feedback etc... Why is motion becoming so critical in today’s time? If you can share any particular case study from Swiggy which has improved business or user experience? I have done a lot of interviews with animators and the insight which I got it, movement is sign of life. What are your thoughts around it?
Audiogyan is DesignUp’s podcast partner. It’s one of a kind Design-in-Tech conference happening on 15th and 16th Nov 2019 in Bangalore. Visit https://designup.io/blr2019/ for more details. Today I have Sidharth Rao with us on Audiogyan. Other than being an agency CEO, he's an angel investor and serial entrepreneur. You can find a lot about how to be an entrepreneur and what mistakes big CEOs made and more in his recently launched a book called “How I almost blew it”. We will be speaking about that in the later part of the episode but more importantly we will also try and explore where do award winning ideas come from and how critical it is for the founder to be creatively minded than just a business man?QuestionsYou have been creating award winning campaigns ideas since 2003 with Chidiya Udi which you did for MakeMyTrip. What according to you is an “idea"? How has that definition evolved in last 20 years? Is it just a kick to do something out of the box or genuinely looking for a gap and mitigate with not-so-traditional fixes? It is said that ideas are cheap. We also find that lot of entrepreneurs say, idea is 1%, execution is 99%. What is your take on that? Winning Abbys, afaqs and other Indian advertising awards is one and winning Cannes is something else. What new got added or updated in your creative thinking to make it to the international level advertising awards? How have your ideas and ways to communicate changed due to digital penetration in India? From making Viral videos for MMT and Rediff to Swiggy's, Voice of Hunger? What is transpiring across through this evolution? When Webchutney was young and rebellious, I remember you carried a tag line “did it!” Where you openly declared that we just did it. What will this Sid say now? I am pointing to the young but relatively mature Webchutney? Is it always necessary to be young in the advertising world? Only young people get ideas? How critical is for a founder / CEO / entrepreneur to be creative than just being a business man and spotting growth opportunities? Is it an inherent quality or one has to keep him or herself re-inventing for growth? This stems from your chapter with Kunal Shah. Sometimes it’s best to get a CEO than force fitting the founder to be the CEO. You also often said that I am more of a founder than CEO. Has that opinion changed? Can you share any examples which you stumbled upon while doing research for your book, where the company stood out differently than just doing pure business or service, since the founders were creative and had more to offer? Of course in the Indian context What made you publish this book? I am sure it’s not sharing experience. There is something more to it like answering back few unanswered or stupid questions which were thrown at you or may be more… What say?
Each frame, each moment, we record the world around us through our senses. We experience the warmth of light through a window, the dashing of elevator doors in our hallway, the texture of a handrail, the aroma of something cooking in the kitchen. In P.L.Deshpande’s words, When we hear the word Thalipeeth, we not only just remember a peculiar maharashtrian dish made by Grandmom but we also remember her bangles clinging while Doughing the flour, freshly made white butter, the kitchen where we sat and ate it and countless other memories. These senses create the full experience of the spaces we inhabit. Rohan Shivkumar has been trying to capture these moments, cacophonies, their contradictions, paradoxes and more through his architectural films. Today I have Rohan Shivkumar with us on Audiogyan. Rohan is an architect, urban designer and filmmaker practicing in Mumbai. He is the Dean of Research and Academic Development at the Kamla Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute for Architecture and Environmental Studies. His work ranges from architecture, urban research and consultancy projects to works in film and visual art. He is interested in issues concerning housing, public space and in exploring the many ways of reading and representing the city. Today, we will try and document, what does it take to create space or a moments in time on a film You have made 2 films so far, “Nostalgia of the Future” & “Lovely Villa”. I recently watched both of them at Frame Conclave in Goa. Very nice indeed. In both of your films you are trying to show connections and also dissociation between the matter (which is architecture) and soul (which are memories and intangible feelings associated). Can you start by briefly telling us what are these films and what made you do these films?   Something within you (as an architect) is not able to manifest in the form of architecture. Probably that could be the reason you made these films? Is there a common or individual subtext you are trying to communicate through these 2 films? What is that subtext? Filmmaking is a much younger art form than architecture. We daily walk pass the same building but hardly pay attention to the details or art deco of it. But when a film captures that and presents it, it feels great. Is it failure of the architect to show us those beauty spots or victory of film making as an art form? Is invisible architecture great architecture? What is the biggest challenge to encapsulate the micro and and macro of architecture on the film? This is in context of Correa’s vision for "a mirror of the nation, in miniature” - If you at all tried to portray that in you film, what was the process like? Both of your films have long takes with steady shots. Without much camera panning and moving. Is this standard for more or less architecture films? You have intentionally taken this route? What are your thoughts and learning? Lastly, I would like to conclude by asking, what is Project Cinema City? Can you tell us more about it? What we do as regular citizens?
Today I have Sarover Zaidi with us on Audiogyan. She is a philosopher and social anthropologist. Sarovar has worked extensively on the religious architecture of the Jews, Muslims and Christians in the port cities of Bombay and Kochi. She has previously worked in rural public health, across India,  Has huge body of work in collecting Islamic & Hindu iconography across South East Asia. She currently teaches at School of Planning and Architecture, Delhi, and Jindal School of Art & Architecture, Sonipat. And today we are here to explore the world of colours and what do they mean in individual contexts. Thank you Sarovar for giving your time and it’s a real honour to have you on Audiogyan. Welcome to the show. How do colours become part of our culture? Can you share some examples from your study? How do communities establish their colour? How is it carried forward by generations? What is possibly Mumbai’s colour? How did you arrive at it? If you can share any case study? Why is Lal Qila, Lal? Is it just using local resources while it was built or has some reasons for it being Lal? How deep is the connection between modern take on "psychology of colours" with actual traditions in India?
I am so honoured and privilege to listen to great master without any microphones in his house in Panvel, Mumbai. I am keeping his introduction short for those who don’t know him. He is a Rudra Veena Player. A sangeet natak academy award winner in 2012 and a 20th generation of Dagar lineage, referring to Swami Haridas Dagaur of the 13th century I would like to start by asking the most fundamental question which you answered in one of your interview online - "A beenkar must never be in a hurry" - Can you please explain this thought. Is it possible in today’s time to play traditional Dhrupad and still make it appealing to attract more listeners? How do you ensure that the purity is maintained and yet it engages new age audience? In one of your interview you mentioned, "there are no elders left to criticise the nonsense we play” - How do you ensure the quality is maintained? In today’s noisy day and age, people really don’t have reference point to understand what is good and what is great. How do you maintain integrity? I would like to mention one quote from you interview published in Darbar.org - “Learning is not just the technique. It has to be a way of life” - Can you tell us what do you mean by this? In one more reference to you interviews online, you said, “We cannot compromise with the instrument’s rituals even if we die of hunger” - Where does this passion come from?
Today I have Meetu Akali with us on Audiogyan. She is the founder of Studio Momo, an environmentally conscious Architecture & Interior design firm, specialising in luxury villas and the restoration of Indo-Portuguese homes of Goa. Studio Momo is based in Goa. Meetu is an architects who lived and studied in Oxford before moving to Goa.Can you tell a bit about your experience at Oxford and how did your education helped in navigating you profession? What are the unique characteristics of Goan architecture and interior? Which all things have shaped it’s look, form and feel apart from Indo-Portuguese influence? What was the character to it’s architectural landscape before the colonial period? Studio Momo is inspired by Wabi Sabi Philosophy. Is it because Goa is a sea destination where time wears out things quickly? Was Wabi Sabi a conscious effort because you like it or was it a discovery as the destination demands it? You have few eco-products. Can you tell us more about it? Why these products and how do you use it in your sites? Your thoughts on going eco friendly especially in Goa. Can you share any particular case study and your learnings from any of your site. For eg: Villa Chorao. A simple but powerful learning which has changed your perspective towards interior design or architecture Studio Momo does both architecture and interior design (I understand, not necessarily for all the sites all the time). But if I can put is crudely as Apple - where you do both hardware and software. Apple certainly has advantage. What are your advantage areas of doing both?
Mohi Baha'ud-din Dagar is a Rudra Veena Player. A sangeet natak academy award winner in 2012 and a 20th generation of Dagar lineage, referring to Swami Haridas Dagur of the 13th century.Just to set context, there are almost 11 types of Veena. It is said that Rudra Veena is king of Instruments and all string instruments are shaped from it. Can you share any of it’s mythological and historical aspect? I was going through your website which mentions, stage and mic requirements for a small baithak to a large concert. Can you tell demands of this instrument and why? Asad Ali Khan once said, "Kalakar isse nahi bajata, ye kalakar se bajwata hai” - Can you tell us what is so rahasyamay about this Rudra Veena? Can you tell us challenges of making and playing a Veena. It takes 6 to 7 months to make a Veena. It has challenges since it’s made as per the size of there person. Also it’s tuning before playing is a big task in itself. In fact in one of your interviews, you have said, Veena is a like and elephant. What is so intense about it? What is that silence playing even after plucking of the strings have stopped? It is very peculiar to string instruments as oppose to percussion or wind instruments. Rudra Veena has been with us since Rigveda and Samaveda, or lets call it Satya-yuga. What is the long term future of Veena (Rudra) in Kali-yuga ?
Ravi Poovaiah, Professor, at IDC, IIT Mumbai. His current pedagogy as well as research and design interests are in fields related to Interaction Design, New Media Design, Visual Design and Product Design. Most of the things about him are documented on IIT IDC website. Ravi sir is one of the most loved professor at IDC and I got a chance to interact with him during a 3 day workshop at IIT. Product Expo. Many years ago. Although he has a huge body of work in almost all aspects of Visual and communication design, I was very impressed with one of his projects called Trinetra; a collection of Indian glyphs and icons. I call it a Indian Noun project. So this Audiogyan tries and document some aspects about Communication design but more importantly and a personal curiosity of how are signages designed? Especially in India.What is a signage system? What is the importance of a well designed Signage system? What is the state of Signages in India? Where do we stand if we compare with other countries? What are the challenges while designing a Signage system for India? Language, material, Population, position w.r.t space etc... What are peculiar things to be understood while designing signage system for India? Can you tell us what is Trinetra project / tool about? What your thoughts on the future of Signage system in India? How can corporates or independent designers contribute to Signages in India?
Kimya is a type designer from Mumbai with a passionate interest in Indic type design. Kimya interned with Linotype GmbH, Germany, in their font design department in 2010. Over the next several years she worked as a freelance designer for numerous type foundries catering to their multi-script requirements. Since 2015 she’s been a partner at Mota Italic focusing on Indic and Latin designs for retail and custom corporate projects.How has new technology and new software along with OpenType features, changing the face of Type design for Indian scripts? What has now become possible due to advancing technology? You engage yourself in educating about type design. What are your observations about it? You have been promoting and teaching importance of Indian typefaces, why? What value you see in it? How do you see things changing if type Design or taught in school and other primary educations institutes?We all know about the famous Oscar blunder due to bad typography. It’s not end of the world when it comes to Oscar, but its life and death when it comes to medicine and other important areas. Do you think better fonts can make a difference or it’s just better typography? What are your thoughts and long term vision w.r.t spreading awareness about Indian Typefaces? How you and Mota are working towards it? You have been working on 3D type faces recently. Can you tell us more about it?
Today I have Denzil Smith us on Audiogyan. Denzil is an Indian film and stage actor, producer and is known for his stage and screen roles as a character actor. He has a long-standing association with both Motley Productions and PrimeTime Theatre. He has a huge body of work from working in Bollywood films, to theatre, from television to being a voice artist and more. Today we are here to discover his a relatively less know side which is love for music, especially Jazz. He has been host for jazz festivals, concerts at NCPA, Bluefrog and more…I am a Hindustani classical listener and I see a lot of similarities between Jazz and Hindustani Classical - which has to do with concepts of solo expression and the links between composition and improvisation. So I want to ask how would you define Jazz? What all components constitute Jazz? What according to you could be the reason why Jazz was so quickly adapted by Indians? Did it have anything to do with social position of Indian in 1920’s or just because talented people like Leon Abbey, Chic Chocolate and others who influenced other people at that time?Can you tell us something about Bombay Jazz Club?Who are few of the all-time-top Jazz Indian artists whose music is available online to buy or stream? The era from the 1930s to the 1950s is often called as the golden age of jazz in India. Did Jazz play any role in freedom struggle of India?What is the future of Jazz in India?
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Comments (16)

mukunda raju

nice pod cast

Aug 20th
Reply

surendhar svs

more architecture talks would be nice

May 27th
Reply

Shiva Lakshmanan

This is my first time in audiogyan. As an architect, I love the topics covered. Also, this is the first podcast where the anchor is an "active" listener. Keep up the good work.

May 21st
Reply

Apoorv

I think you should record the intro again if you mess up so much.

May 3rd
Reply (1)

Vinay Mantri

I really appreciate your episodes. Good job!

Feb 4th
Reply

dhananjai pande

can't wait for the next episode. really insightful conversation and I am really looking forward for the books.

Jan 23rd
Reply

Siddharth Sawant

Great effort. Some suggestions - Let the guests speak freely. avoid interrupting them - Ask open ended questions i.e. less of yes/no questions - Do not lead. let the guests speak their mind. it may or may not align with your previously held beliefs. - Do not try and corroborate ideas across different interviews. difference of opinions between guests is what let's us see the world from multiple viewpoints. - Have a strategy for the conversation. what do you want the listeners to get out of the podcast? e.g. are you introducing them to the guest or are you introducing the field that they work in? - Please invest in better recording equipment, also some investment in sound processing software. I greatly appreciate the hardwork that went into creating this unique podcast. keep it up. best wishes :)

Nov 15th
Reply (1)

Pratik keni

khup sundar 😊 fakt madhe madhe english bolaycha kami kela tr bara hoil

Oct 29th
Reply (1)

suhrid sukumar

Just try to interrupt the speakers a little less.. With your umms.. And aahh.. And okss..

Oct 24th
Reply (1)

Dhruva Rathod

Was waiting for Podcasts in Indian context and Indian design community.Good to see that

Jul 28th
Reply

samrat hazari

waoooww really appreciate your time and effort s thank you

Dec 19th
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Deepak Teji

nice

Sep 18th
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