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Author: Allan Jude

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Created by three guys who love BSD, we cover the latest news and have an extensive series of tutorials, as well as interviews with various people from all areas of the BSD community. It also serves as a platform for support and questions. We love and advocate FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, DragonFlyBSD and TrueOS. Our show aims to be helpful and informative for new users that want to learn about them, but still be entertaining for the people who are already pros.
The show airs on Wednesdays at 2:00PM (US Eastern time) and the edited version is usually up the following day.
153 Episodes
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Follow-up about FreeBSD jail advantages, Install Prometheus, Node Exporter and Grafana, Calibrate your touch-screen on OpenBSD, OPNsense 21.1 Marvelous Meerkat Released, NomadBSD 1.4-RC1, Lets all shed a Tear for 386, find mostly doesn't need xargs today on modern Unixes, OpenBSD KDE Status Report, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines Follow-up about FreeBSD jail advantages (https://rubenerd.com/follow-up-about-freebsd-jail-advantages/) I’ll admit I ran a lot of justifications together into a single paragraph because I wanted to get to configuring the jails themselves. They’re also, by and large, not specific to FreeBSD’s flavour of containerisation, though I still think it’s easily the most elegant implementation. Sometimes the simplest solution really is the best one. History of FreeBSD part 4: TCP/IP (https://klarasystems.com/articles/history-of-freebsd-part-4-bsd-and-tcp-ip/) How TCP/IP evolved and BSDs special contribution to the history of the Internet *** FreeBSD: Install Prometheus, Node Exporter and Grafana (https://blog.andreev.it/?p=5289) FreeBSD comes out of the box with three great tools for monitoring. If you need more info about how these tools work, please read the official documentation. I’ll explain the installation only and creating a simple dashboard. News Roundup Calibrate your touch-screen on OpenBSD (https://www.tumfatig.net/20210122/calibrate-your-touch-screen-on-openbsd/) I didn’t expected it but my refurbished T460s came with a touch-screen. It is recognized by default on OpenBSD and not well calibrated as-is. But that’s really simple to solve. Lets all shed a Tear for 386 (https://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-announce/2021-January/002006.html) FreeBSD is designating i386 as a Tier 2 architecture starting with FreeBSD 13.0. The Project will continue to provide release images, binary updates, and pre-built packages for the 13.x branch. However, i386-specific issues (including SAs) may not be addressed in 13.x. The i386 platform will remain Tier 1 on FreeBSD 11.x and 12.x. OPNsense 21.1 Marvelous Meerkat Released (https://opnsense.org/opnsense-21-1-marvelous-meerkat-released/) For more than 6 years, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, HardenedBSD security, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing. NomadBSD 1.4-RC1 (https://nomadbsd.org/index.html#1.4-RC1) We are pleased to present the first release candidate of NomadBSD 1.4. find mostly doesn't need xargs today on modern Unixes (https://utcc.utoronto.ca/~cks/space/blog/unix/FindWithoutXargsToday) I've been using Unix for long enough that 'find | xargs' is a reflex. When I started and for a long time afterward, xargs was your only choice for efficiently executing a command over a bunch of find results. OpenBSD KDE Status Report (https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20210124113220) OpenBSD has managed to drop KDE3 and KDE4 in the 6.8 -> 6.9 release cycle. That makes me very happy because it was a big piece of work and long discussions. This of course brings questions: Kde Plasma 5 package missing. After half a year of work, I managed to successfully update the Qt5 stack to the last LTS version 5.15.2. On the whole, the most work was updating QtWebengine. What a monster! With my CPU power at home, I can build it 1-2 times a day which makes testing a little bit annoying and time intensive. Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Karl - Firefox webcam audio solution (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/391/feedback/Karl%20-%20Firefox%20webcam%20audio%20solution.md) Michal - openzfs (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/391/feedback/Michal%20-%20openzfs.md) Dave - bufferbloat (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/391/feedback/Dave%20-%20bufferbloat.md) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***
Did Linux kill Commercial Unix, three node GlusterFS setup on FreeBSD, OpenBSD on the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Nano (1st Gen), NetBSD on EdgeRouter Lite, TLS Mastery first draft done NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines Did Linux Kill Commercial Unix? (https://www.howtogeek.com/440147/did-linux-kill-commercial-unix/) Sales of commercial Unix have fallen off a cliff. There has to be something behind this dramatic decline. Has Linux killed its ancestor by becoming a perfectly viable replacement, like an operating system version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers? Wireguard: Simple and Secure VPN in FreeBSD (https://klarasystems.com/articles/simple-and-secure-vpn-in-freebsd/) A great article by Tom Jones about setting up Wireguard on FreeBSD *** Setup a Three Node Replicated GlusterFS Cluster on FreeBSD (http://www.unibia.com/unibianet/freebsd/setup-three-node-replicated-glusterfs-cluster-freebsd) GlusterFS (GFS) is the open source equivalent to Microsoft's Distributed Filesystem (DFS). It's a service that replicates the contents of a filesystem in real time from one server to another. Clients connect to any server and changes made to a file will replicate automatically. It's similar to something like rsync or syncthing, but much more automatic and transparent. A FreeBSD port has been available since v3.4, and (as of this post) is currently at version 8.0 with 9.0 being released soon. News Roundup OpenBSD on the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Nano (1st Gen) (https://jcs.org/2021/01/27/x1nano) Lenovo has finally made a smaller version of its X1 Carbon, something I’ve been looking forward to for years. NetBSD on the EdgeRouter Lite (https://www.cambus.net/netbsd-on-the-edgerouter-lite/) NetBSD-current now has pre-built octeon bootable images (which will appear in NetBSD 10.0) for the evbmips port, so I decided to finally give it a try. I've been happily running OpenBSD/octeon on my EdgeRouter Lite for a few years now, and have previously published some notes including more detail about the CPU. “TLS Mastery” first draft done! (https://mwl.io/archives/9938) Beastie Bits A Thread on a FreeBSD Desktop for PineBook Pro (https://forums.freebsd.org/threads/freebsd-desktop-for-pinebook-pro.78269/) FOSSASIA Conference - March 2021(Virtual) (https://eventyay.com/e/fa96ae2c) WireGuard for pfSense Software (https://www.netgate.com/blog/wireguard-for-pfsense-software.html) NetBSD logo to going Moon (https://mail-index.netbsd.org/netbsd-advocacy/2021/02/07/msg000849.html) *** ###Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. ### Producer's Note > Hey everybody, it’s JT here. After our AMA episode where I mentioned I was looking for older BSD Retail Copies, I was contacted by Andrew who hooked me up with a bunch of OpenBSD disks from the 4.x era. So shout out to him, and since that worked so well, I figured I'd give it another shot and ask that if anyone has any old Unixes that will run on an 8088, 8086, or 286 and you're willing to send me copies of the disks. I've recently dug out an old 286 system and I’d love to get a Unix OS on it. I know of Minix, Xenix and Microport, but I haven’t been able to find many versions of them. I've found Microport 1.3.3, and SCO Xenix... but that's about it. Let me know if you happen to have any other versions, or know where I can get them. Feedback/Questions Christian - ZFS replication and verification (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/390/feedback/Christian%20-%20ZFS%20replication%20and%20verification) Iain - progress (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/390/feedback/Iain%20-%20progress) Paul - APU2 device (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/390/feedback/Paul%20-%20APU2%20device) *** Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***
A week with Plan 9, Exploring Swap on FreeBSD, how to create a FreeBSD pkg mirror using bastille and poudriere, How to set up FreeBSD 12 VNET jail with ZFS, Creating Comfy FreeBSD Jails Using Standard Tools, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines A Week With Plan 9 (https://thedorkweb.substack.com/p/a-week-with-plan-9) I spent the first week of 2021 learning an OS called Plan 9 from Bell Labs. This is a fringe Operating System, long abandoned by it’s original authors. It's also responsible for a great deal of inspiration elsewhere. If you’ve used the Go language, /proc, UTF-8 or Docker, you’ve used Plan 9-designed features. This issue dives into Operating System internals and some moderately hard computer science topics. If that sort of thing isn’t your bag you might want to skip ahead. Normal service will resume shortly. Exploring Swap on FreeBSD (https://klarasystems.com/articles/exploring-swap-on-freebsd/) On modern Unix-like systems such as FreeBSD, “swapping” refers to the activity of paging out the contents of memory to a disk and then paging it back in on demand. The page-out activity occurs in response to a lack of free memory in the system: the kernel tries to identify pages of memory that probably will not be accessed in the near future, and copies their contents to a disk for safekeeping until they are needed again. When an application attempts to access memory that has been swapped out, it blocks while the kernel fetches that saved memory from the swap disk, and then resumes execution as if nothing had happened. News Roundup How to create a FreeBSD pkg mirror using bastille and poudriere (https://hackacad.net/post/2021-01-13-build-a-freebsd-pkg-mirror-with-bastille-poudriere/) This a short how-to for creating a FreeBSD pkg mirror using BastilleBSD and Poudriere. How to set up FreeBSD 12 VNET jail with ZFS (https://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/configuring-freebsd-12-vnet-jail-using-bridgeepair-zfs/) How do I install, set up and configure a FreeBSD 12 jail with VNET on ZFS? How can I create FreeBSD 12 VNET jail with /etc/jail.conf to run OpenVPN, Apache, Wireguard and other Internet-facing services securely on my BSD box? FreeBSD jail is nothing but operating system-level virtualization that allows partitioning a FreeBSD based Unix server. Such systems have their root user and access rights. Jails can use network subsystem virtualization infrastructure or share an existing network. FreeBSD jails are a powerful way to increase security. Usually, you create jail per services such as an Nginx/Apache webserver with PHP/Perl/Python app, WireGuard/OpeNVPN server, MariaDB/PgSQL server, and more. This page shows how to configure a FreeBSD Jail with vnet and ZFZ on FreeBSD 12.x. Creating Comfy FreeBSD Jails Using Standard Tools (https://kettunen.io/post/standard-freebsd-jails/) Docker has stormed into software development in recent years. While the concepts behind it are powerful and useful, similar tools have been used in systems for decades. FreeBSD’s jails in one of those tools which build upon even older chroot(2) To put it shortly, with these tools, you can make a safe environment separated from the rest of the system. Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Chris - USB BSD variant (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/389/feedback/Chris%20-%20USB%20BSD%20variant) Jacob - host wifi through a jail (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/389/feedback/Jacob%20-%20host%20wifi%20through%20a%20jail) Jordan - new tool vs updating existing tool (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/389/feedback/Jordan%20-%20new%20too%20vs%20updating%20existing%20tool) *** Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***
FreeBSD Q4 2020 Status report, a must-have security tool from OpenBSD, Bastille Port Redirection and Persistence, FreeBSD Wall Display Computer, etymology of command-line tools, GhostBSD 21.01.15 Release Notes, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines FreeBSD quarterly status report for Q4 2020 (https://www.freebsd.org/news/status/report-2020-10-2020-12/) Block spammers/abusive IPs with Pf-badhost in OpenBSD. A 'must have' security tool! (https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20210119113425) Pf-badhost is a very practical, robust, stable and lightweight security script for network servers. It's compatible with BSD based operating systems such as {Open,Free,Net,Dragonfly}BSD and MacOS. It prevents potentially-bad IP addresses that could possibly attack your servers (and waste your bandwidth and fill your logfiles), by blocking all those IPs contacting your server, and therefore it makes your server network/resources lighter and the logs of important services running on your server become simpler, more readable and efficient. News Roundup Bastille Port Redirection and Persistence (https://bastillebsd.org/blog/2021/01/13/bastille-port-redirection-and-persistence/) Bastille supports redirecting (rdr) ports from the host system into target containers. This port redirection is commonly used when running Internet services such as web servers, dns servers, email and many others. Any service you want to make public outside of your cluster will likely require port redirection (with some exceptions, see below). FreeBSD Wall Display Computer (https://blog.tyk.nu/blog/freebsd-wall-display-computer/) I've recently added a wall mounted 30" monitor for Grafana in my home. I can highly recommend doing the same, especially in a world where more work from home is becoming the norm. The etymology of command-line tools (https://i.redd.it/sni9gaxfj2d61.png) GhostBSD 21.01.15 Release Notes (https://ghostbsd.org/21.01.15_release_notes) I am happy to announce the availability of the new ISO 21.01.15. This new ISO comes with a clean-up of packages that include removing LibreOffice and Telegram from the default selection. We did this to bring the zfs RW live file systems to run without problem on 4GB of ram machine. We also removed the UFS full disk option from the installer. Users can still use custom partitions to setup UFS partition, but we discourage it. We also fixed the Next button's restriction in the custom partition related to some bug that people reported. We also fix the missing default locale setup and added the default setup for Linux Steam, not to forget this ISO includes kernel, userland and numerous application updates. Beastie Bits Interview with Brian Kernighan (https://corecursive.com/brian-kernighan-unix-bell-labs1/) *** ###Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv)
GNN's tips for surviving Cabin Fever and Coding from Home, Self-host a password manager on OpenBSD, Preliminary OpenBSD Support added to OBS, Dan's CURL tip of the Day, List of some Shell goodies for OpenBSD, and more NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines GNN's tips for surviving Cabin Fever and Coding from Home (https://queue.acm.org/detail.cfm?id=3437846) Forgive me if this seems off topic, but I was wondering if you had any advice for the majority of us who are now KFH (koding from home). I don't know how KV works day to day, but it seems pretty clear that the status quo has changed at most workplaces in the last several months, and it's hard to know if there are things we could be doing to stay productive while we're all at home, ordering delivery, and microwaving our mail. Does KV have any good guidance? Self-host a password manager on OpenBSD (https://www.tumfatig.net/20210105/self-host-a-password-manager-on-openbsd/) I’ve been using Rubywarden to store and access my passwords from OpenBSD workstations and iOS toys. But recent redondant failures from the iOS App and rubywarden not being maintained anymore led to the need for a new solution. I was investing on pass+pgp+git but it was quite complex. News Roundup Preliminary OpenBSD Support added to OBS (https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20210113072623) Dan's CURL tip of the Day (https://mobile.twitter.com/DLangille/status/1323963716153626626) List of some Shell goodies for OpenBSD (https://www.vincentdelft.be/post/post_20210102) I'm sharing here some practices I'm following and some small tips/tools which facilitate my usage of OpenBSD in my day to day. Some are really specific to my usage, others could be re-used. Beastie Bits • [Traditional text mode games from BSD](https://github.com/msharov/bsd-games) • [FreeBSD Easter Eggs](https://twitter.com/freebsdfrau/status/972893680473317377) • [A prehistory and history of Unix Slide Deck](https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1BxnFiP_Hv3HJbbYRfSxpTym7GzqxJPQlTE6Ur5h1Al8/edit#slide=id.g951f86c343_0_95) • [How to use Android USB Tethering to get Internet on FreeBSD](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cAEmtrEZlV8) • [VPN'Othon #2 for CharmBUG](https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/387/charmbug_event.md) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions • [Kev - Ramdisk](https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/387/feedback/kev%20-%20ramdisk.md) • [John - new to freebsd](https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/387/feedback/John%20-%20new%20to%20freebsd) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***
386: Aye, 386!

386: Aye, 386!

2021-01-2137:00

Routing and Firewalling VLANS with FreeBSD, FreeBSD 12 VNET jail with ZFS howto, pkgsrc-2020Q4 released, FreeBSD on Raspberry Pi 4 With 4GB of RAM, HardenedBSD December 2020 Status Report, and more NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines Routing and Firewalling VLANS with FreeBSD (https://klarasystems.com/articles/routing-and-firewalling-vlans-with-freebsd/) In this article we are going to look at and integrate two network isolation technologies, VLANs and VNET. VLANs are common place, and if you have done some network management or design then you are likely to have interacted with them. The second are FreeBSDs VNET virtual network stacks, a powerful network stack isolation technology that gives FreeBSD jails super powers. Ethernet VLAN (standardised by IEEE 802.1Q) are an extension to Ethernet and provide an essential method for scaling network deployments. They are used in all environments to enable reuse of common infrastructure by isolating portions of networks from each other. VLANs allow the reuse of common cables, switches and routers to carry completely different networks. It is common to have data that must be separated from different networks carried on common cables until their VLAN tags are finally stripped at a gateway switch or router. How to set up FreeBSD 12 VNET jail with ZFS (https://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/configuring-freebsd-12-vnet-jail-using-bridgeepair-zfs/) How do I install, set up and configure a FreeBSD 12 jail with VNET on ZFS? How can I create FreeBSD 12 VNET jail with /etc/jail.conf to run OpenVPN, Apache, Wireguard and other Internet-facing services securely on my BSD box? FreeBSD jail is nothing but operating system-level virtualization that allows partitioning a FreeBSD based Unix server. Such systems have their root user and access rights. Jails can use network subsystem virtualization infrastructure or share an existing network. FreeBSD jails are a powerful way to increase security. Usually, you create jail per services such as an Nginx/Apache webserver with PHP/Perl/Python app, WireGuard/OpeNVPN server, MariaDB/PgSQL server, and more. This page shows how to configure a FreeBSD Jail with vnet and ZFS on FreeBSD 12.x. News Roundup pkgsrc-2020Q4 released (https://mail-index.netbsd.org/netbsd-announce/2021/01/08/msg000322.html) The pkgsrc developers are proud to announce the 69th quarterly release of pkgsrc, the cross-platform packaging system. pkgsrc is available with more than 24,000 packages, running on 23 separate platforms; more information on pkgsrc itself is available at https://www.pkgsrc.org/ FreeBSD ON A Raspberry PI 4 With 4GB of RAM (https://lambdaland.org/posts/2020-12-23_freebsd_rpi4/) This is the story of how I managed to get FreeBSD running on a Raspberry Pi 4 with 4GB of RAM, though I think the setup story is pretty similar for those with 2GB and 8GB.1 HardenedBSD December 2020 Status Report (https://hardenedbsd.org/article/shawn-webb/2020-12-31/hardenedbsd-december-2020-status-report) Happy New Year! On this the last day of 2020, I submit December's status report. Beastie Bits Christmas Cards The Unix Way - with pic and troff (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xMijdTWSUEE&feature=youtu.be) Fast RPI3 upgrade from source (cross compile) (https://forums.freebsd.org/threads/fast-upgrade-raspberry-pi3-from-source.78169/) *** ###Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Robert - zfs question (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/386/feedback/robert%20-%20zfs%20question.md) Neb - AMA episode.md (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/386/feedback/neb%20-%20AMA%20episode.md) Joe - puppet (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/386/feedback/joe%20-%20puppet.md) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***
Description: History of FreeBSD: Early Days of FreeBSD, mesh VPN using OpenBSD and WireGuard, FreeBSD Foundation Sponsors LLDB Improvements, Host your Cryptpad web office suite with OpenBSD, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines History of FreeBSD - Part 3: Early Days of FreeBSD (https://klarasystems.com/articles/history-of-freebsd-part-3-early-days-of-freebsd/?utm_source=bsdnow) In this third part of our series on the history of FreeBSD, we start tracing the early days of FreeBSD and the events that would eventually shape the project and the future of open source software. A mesh VPN using OpenBSD and WireGuard (https://www.tumfatig.net/20201202/a-mesh-vpn-using-openbsd-and-wireguard/?utm_source=bsdnow) WireGuard is a new coming to OpenBSD 6.8 and it looks like a simple and efficient way to connect computers. I own a few VPS (hello Vultr, hello OpenBSD.amsterdam) that tend to be connected through filtered public services and/or SSH tunnels. And that’s neither efficient nor easy to manage. Here comes the wg(4) era where all those peers will communicate with a bit more privacy and ease of management. News Roundup Foundation Sponsors FreeBSD LLDB Improvements (https://freebsdfoundation.org/blog/guest-blog-foundation-sponsors-freebsd-lldb-improvements/?utm_source=bsdnow) With FreeBSD Foundation grant, Moritz Systems improved LLDB support for FreeBSD The LLDB project builds on libraries provided by LLVM and Clang to provide a great modern debugger. It uses the Clang ASTs and the expression parser, LLVM JIT, LLVM disassembler, etc so that it provides an experience that “just works”. It is also blazing fast and more permissively licensed than GDB, the GNU Debugger. LLDB is the default debugger in Xcode on macOS and supports debugging C, Objective-C, and C++ on the desktop and iOS devices and the simulator. Host your Cryptpad web office suite with OpenBSD (https://dataswamp.org/~solene/2020-12-14-cryptpad-openbsd.html) In this article I will explain how to deploy your own Cryptpad instance with OpenBSD. Cryptpad is a web office suite featuring easy real time collaboration on documents. Cryptpad is written in JavaScript and the daemon acts as a web server. Beastie Bits OPNsense 20.7.7 Released (https://opnsense.org/opnsense-20-7-7-released/?utm_source=bsdnow) Introducing OpenZFS 2.0 Webinar - Jan 20th @ noon Eastern / 17:00 UTC. (https://klarasystems.com/learning/webinars/webinar-introducing-openzfs-2-0/?utm_source=bsdnow) BSD In Die Hard (https://www.reddit.com/r/BSD/comments/kk3c6y/merry_xmas/) Managing jails with Ansible: a showcase for building a container infrastructure on FreeBSD (https://papers.freebsd.org/2019/bsdcan/dengg-managing_jails_with_ansible/) BSD Hardware (https://bsd-hardware.info) New WINE chapter in FreeBSD handbook (https://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/wine.html) *** Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. *** Feedback/Questions scott- zfs question (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/385/feedback/scott-%20zfs%20question) Bruce - copy paste on esxi (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/385/feedback/Bruce%20-%20copy%20paste%20on%20esxi) Julian - an apology for Allan (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/385/feedback/Julian%20-%20an%20apology%20for%20Allan) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv)
384: In memoriam

384: In memoriam

2021-01-0735:00

Allen K. Briggs Memorial Scholarship, Toward an automated tracking of OpenBSD ports contributions, Trying OpenZFS 2 on FreeBSD 12.2-RELEASE, OpenBSD on TECLAST F7 Plus, Multi-volume support in HAMMER2, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines Allen K. Briggs Memorial Scholarship (http://blog.netbsd.org/tnf/entry/allen_k_briggs_memorial_scholarship) Allen Briggs was one of the earliest members of the NetBSD community, pursuing his interest in macBSD, and moving to become a NetBSD developer when the two projects merged. Allen was known for his quiet and relaxed manner, and always brought a keen wisdom with him; allied with his acute technical expertise, he was one of the most valued members of the NetBSD community. The Allen K. Briggs Memorial Scholarship is an endowment to provide scholarships in perpetuity for summer programs at the North Carolina School of Science & Math, which Allen considered to be a place that fundamentally shaped him as a person. We would love to invite Allen's friends and colleagues from the BSD community to donate to this cause so that we can provide more scholarships to students with financial need each year. We are approximately halfway to our goal of $50K with aspirations to exceed that target and fund additional scholarships. Toward an automated tracking of OpenBSD ports contributions (https://dataswamp.org/~solene/2020-11-15-openbsd-ports-ci.html) A first step for the CI service would be to create a database of diffs sent to ports. This would allow people to track what has been sent and not yet committed and what the state of the contribution is (build/don’t build, apply/don’t apply). News Roundup Trying OpenZFS 2 on FreeBSD 12.2-RELEASE (https://rubenerd.com/trying-openzfs-on-freebsd-12-release/?utm_source=bsdnow) OpenZFS 2 is a huge achievement, and makes me bullish about the long term prospects for the world’s most trustworthy and nicest to use storage system. You can even use try it today on FreeBSD 12.2-RELEASE, though I recommend tracking -CURRENT for these sorts of features. OpenBSD on TECLAST F7 Plus (https://www.tumfatig.net/20201215/openbsd-on-teclast-f7-plus/?utm_source=bsdnow) I got myself a TECLAST F7 Plus laptop. It comes preinstalled with Windows 10 but I planned to use it as my daily driver. So I installed OpenBSD 6.8 on it. Multi-volume support in HAMMER2 (https://www.dragonflydigest.com/2020/12/28/25287.html) commit (http://lists.dragonflybsd.org/pipermail/commits/2020-December/770072.html) > This commit adds initial multi-volumes support for HAMMER2. Maximum supported volumes is 64. The feature and implementation is similar to multi-volumes support in HAMMER1. *** Beastie Bits FreeBSD Last SVN Commit (https://svnweb.freebsd.org/base/head/README?view=markup&pathrev=368820) FreeBSD First git Commit (https://cgit.freebsd.org/src/commit/?id=5ef5f51d2bef80b0ede9b10ad5b0e9440b60518c) Introducing OpenZFS 2.0 Webinar - Jan 20th @ noon Eastern / 17:00 UTC. (https://klarasystems.com/learning/webinars/webinar-introducing-openzfs-2-0/?utm_source=bsdnow) *** Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. *** Feedback/Questions jay - feedback for ian (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/384/feedback/jay%20-%20feedback%20for%20ian) Iebluefire - concerns about freebsd (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/384/feedback/Iebluefire%20-%20concerns%20about%20freebsd) mike - zfs cluster aware (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/384/feedback/mike%20-%20zfs%20cluster%20aware) *** Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***
383: Scale the tail

383: Scale the tail

2020-12-3143:12

FreeBSD Remote Process Plugin Final Milestone achieved, Tailscale for OpenBSD, macOS to FreeBSD migration, monitoring of our OpenBSD machines, OPNsense 20.7.6 released, and more NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines FreeBSD Remote Process Plugin: Final Milestone Achieved (https://www.moritz.systems/blog/freebsd-remote-plugin-final-milestone-achieved/) Moritz Systems have been contracted by the FreeBSD Foundation to modernize the LLDB debugger’s support for FreeBSD. We are working on a new plugin utilizing the more modern client-server layout that is already used by Darwin, Linux, NetBSD and (unofficially) OpenBSD. The new plugin is going to gradually replace the legacy one. Tailscale on OpenBSD (https://rakhesh.com/linux-bsd/tailscale-on-openbsd/) I spent some time setting this up today evening and thought I’d post the steps here. Nothing fancy, just putting together various pieces actually. I assume you know what Tailscale is; if not check out their website. Basically it is a mesh network built on top of Wireguard. Using it you can have all your devices both within your LAN(s) and outside be on one overlay network as if they are all on the same LAN and can talk to each other. It’s my new favourite thing! News Roundup macOS to FreeBSD migration a.k.a why I left macOS (https://antranigv.am/weblog_en/posts/macos_to_freebsd/) This is not a technical documentation for how I migrated from macOS to FreeBSD. This is a high-level for why I migrated from macOS to FreeBSD. Not so long ago, I was using macOS as my daily driver. The main reason why I got a macbook was the underlying BSD Unix and the nice graphics it provides. Also, I have an iPhone. But they were also the same reasons for why I left macOS. Our monitoring of our OpenBSD machines, such as it is (as of November 2020 (https://utcc.utoronto.ca/~cks/space/blog/sysadmin/OurOpenBSDMonitoring) We have a number of OpenBSD firewalls in service (along with some other OpenBSD servers for things like VPN endpoints), and I was recently asked how we monitor PF and overall network traffic on them. I had to disappoint the person who asked with my answer, because right now we mostly don't (although this is starting to change). OPNsense 20.7.6 released (https://opnsense.org/opnsense-20-7-6-released/) This update brings the usual mix of reliability fixes, plugin and third party software updates: FreeBSD, HardenedBSD, PHP, OpenSSH, StrongSwan, Suricata and Syslog-ng amongst others. Please note that Let's Encrypt users need to reissue their certificates manually after upgrading to this version to fix the embedded certificate chain issue with the current signing CA switch going on. NYC Bug Jan 2021 with Michael W. Lucas (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/383/nycbug) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions cy - .so files (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/383/feedback/cy%20-%20.so%20files) ben - mixer volume (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/383/feedback/ben%20-%20mixer%20volume) probono - live cds (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/383/feedback/probono%20-%20live%20cds) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***
382: BSDNow Q&A 2020

382: BSDNow Q&A 2020

2020-12-2401:06:51

We asked for it, you answered our call. This episode features you interviewing us with questions that you sent in. JT, Allan, and Benedict answer everything that you ever wanted to know in this week’s special episode of BSDNow. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Interview - Allan Jude - Allan.jude@gmail.com (Allan.jude@gmail.com) / @allanjude (https://twitter.com/allanjude) Interview - Benedict Reuschling - bcr@freebsd.org (mailto:bcr@freebsd.org) / @bsdbcr (https://twitter.com/bsdbcr) Interview - JT Pennington - jt@obs-sec.com (mailto:jt@obs-sec.com) / @q5sys (https://twitter.com/q5sys) AMA questions Benedict: You work at a university right? Were you already into tech before you started working there? What do you do there? Yes, I do work at the University of Applied Sciences, Darmstadt, Germany. I’m a lab engineer there (without a lab, but with a big data cluster). I teach in the winter semester an undergraduate, elective course called “Unix for Developers”. Yes, I was already in tech by that time. Did some previous work at companies before (selling hardware at the call-in hotline and later in the store) and during my CS studies. Allan: What’s the next big FreeBSD Project you plan on doing? JT: How did you get involved in BSD? Weren't you a Linux guy? All: Is there any way you can create an entire episode of BSDnow on hardware that runs OpenBSD and FreeBSD? We see you audacity, etc on a mac. Benedict: Not sure about OpenBSD (don’t use it), but FreeBSD should be doable for my part. If we switch from Skype to a different video chat tool, the rest is already there. Production side may be more difficult, but not impossible. All: if you could finish up one project right now... what would it be? Benedict: Updated ZFS chapter in the FreeBSD handbook. All: How did all of you guys meet? All: My question is, do you guys use FreeBSD as your main desktop OS? If not, what do you use? Benedict: No, but Mac OS is close enough. Doing a lot of SSHing into FreeBSD from there. All: Can you all give us the best shot of outside of their windows? JT’s answer: https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-2LSbspL/0/69437dbb/5K/i-2LSbspL-5K.jpg Allan: https://photos.app.goo.gl/UnKXnKMt6cn8FDhNA Benedict: No, it’s dark outside anyway. ;-) All: How old were you when you got your first computer and what was that computer? Allan: 12 or 13, a 486DX2/66hz with an insane 32mb of RAM, 400 and 500 MB SCSI HDDs, 14400 baud model, and a 1.7x CD rom drive Benedict: Around 13 or so. 386DX2, 4 MB RAM, IDE disk drive (no idea how big, but it wasn’t much), 3.5” floppy, DOS, and a lot of games. JT: Technically the first was a Atari 1200XL with a 6502 CPU running at 1.79 MHz 64KB RAM. It had it's own OS and you could load programs off of either cartridges, floppy disks, or cassette tapes. First PC Clone was a Packard Bell with a 386 and 1mb ram which later was upgraded to 4mb and a Dual speed CD-ROM. My dad got me a Compaq 286 laptop... this one (show)... a year or so later because he got tired of fighting me for the computer. All: Can we have a peek at your bookcase and what books are there? Allan: No picture handy, but my shelf is pretty small, mostly a collection of autographed FreeBSD books. I have D&I with all 3 autographs (took some travel to acquire), and a copy of my first book (FreeBSD Mastery: ZFS) autographed by Jeff Bonwick and Matt Ahrens, the creators of ZFS, plus a bunch of other big names in ZFS like George Wilson. JT’s answer: So... my library is packed away... but here’s about half of it... the rest is still in storage. https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-SBG2KDv/0/0b9856b8/4K/i-SBG2KDv-4K.jpg Software Collection: https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-HfTVPN9/0/ad610dd4/O/i-HfTVPN9.jpg Benedict: A mix of FreeBSD books (by MWL), the graveyard book, 4 hour work week, the once and future king (took me a long time to finish that one), Total Immersion swimming (still learning to swim) and some books in german language, fiction and tech. Groff lives in there while the pandemic lasts. All: What desktop/Window Manager/shell do each of you primarily use? Benedict: Mainly Mac OS, when on FreeBSD it’s i3. Zsh with zsh-autosuggestions currently. JT: Lumina/zsh Allan: Lumina and tcsh, want to learn zsh but never gotten time to change All: What spoken languages do you speak? Benedict: German and English (obviously), learning a bit of Spanish via Duolingo at the moment JT: English, Bad English, and some French. All: Do you have Non-Computer hobbies if so what are those? Benedict: Tai Chi Chuan (Yang Style) JT: I'd say photography, but that's a job for me. I have a lot of varied interests, Krav Maga, working on my VW Corrado, working on the old Victorian house I bought, and camping/backpacking. Ive done the northern half of the AT (Appalachian Trail, I want to finish it up and then do the PCT and CDT. (Pacific Crest Trail and Continental Divide Trail). All: When COVID passes, when are either of you are coming to BSD pizza night in Portland, OR, USA so I can buy you a beer/wine/whisky or pizza/coffee/tea (or six) Rapid Fire: All: What was the first car you ever owned? All: Do you own a vehicle and if so what is the make/model? All: Favorite Star franchise? Star Wars, Star Trek, Stargate, Battlestar, etc. JT: Will you ever host any more BSDNow episodes? All: Favorite superhero? Marvel and/or DC. All: Favorite game(s) of all time? All: Pants or no pants on virtual meetings/presentations? All: Do you or have you used alternative operating systems that are not "main stream or is considered retro" if so what are those? All: Who has more animals at home? Allan: Does Allan have any batteries for his tetris cubes? Can we see that thing light up? Allan and Benedict: Are you guys going to go on JT's new show? If you’re wondering what show this is, here are the two shows Im a host of: https://www.opensourcevoices.org & https://www.theopiniondominion.org Allan and Benedict: Have Allan or Benedict lost anything on the way to and from a conference? Benedict: Is Benedict going to do his NOEL blocks again? Benedict: Does Benedict make his bed every Wednesday morning? It always looks great! Not just Wednesdays, but pretty much every day. Here, watch this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKZRFDCbGTA Nuff said. ;-) JT: Are you batman because the episodes are always awesome sir so thank you JT’s answer: Can you ever admit to being batman? If I were batman wouldn't I have to deny it? All: What's your Daily Driver Hardware? All: Who has more servers or VMs at home? Benedict: Allan, easily JT: Allan definitely beats me with VMs, but I think I might give him a run on servers. 4x 4u HP DL580s, one HP DL980, three HP C3000 8 bay bladecenters, three HP C7000 16 bay Bladecenters, 2x Sun 280R, bunch of Dell and IBM 1Us… but all my stuff is old. Allan has all the new and shiny stuff. The Pile in the Kitchen: https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-HBScrpk/0/4b058cc5/X2/i-HBScrpk-X2.jpg The other pile: https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-wNxFszV/0/e7a4b2d6/X2/i-wNxFszV-X2.jpg All: What book(s) are you currently reading? Benedict: Antifragile by Nassim Taleb JT: Douglas Hofstader - Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid. Douglas Rushkoff - program or be programmed. Also a 4 part book series on the American civil war written in the 1880s, by people in the civil war. All: Favorite mechanical keyboard switch? Cherry MX, Kalih, Gateron, etc. Benedict: Cherry MX brown currently Allan: Cherry MX Blue (Coolermaster Master Keys Pro-L) JT: I prefer scissor switches, so I use a Logitech K740. Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv)
381: Shell origins

381: Shell origins

2020-12-1741:57

The Origin of the Shell, Return to Plan 9, ArisbluBSD: Why a new BSD?, OPNsense 20.7.5 released, Midnight BSD 2.0 Release Status, HardenedBSD November 2020 Status Report, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines The Origin of the Shell (https://multicians.org/shell.html) CTSS was developed during 1963 and 64. I was at MIT on the computer center staff at that time. After having written dozens of commands for CTSS, I reached the stage where I felt that commands should be usable as building blocks for writing more commands, just like subroutine libraries. Hence, I wrote "RUNCOM", a sort of shell driving the execution of command scripts, with argument substitution. The tool became instantly most popular, as it became possible to go home in the evening while leaving behind long runcoms executing overnight. It was quite neat for boring and repetitive tasks such as renaming, moving, updating, compiling, etc. whole directories of files for system and application maintenance and monitoring. Return to Plan 9 (https://boxbase.org/entries/2020/nov/1/return-to-plan9/) Plan 9 from Bell Labs has held the same charm after my last visit that took a few days. This time I'll keep this operating system in an emulator where I can explore into it when I am distracted. News Roundup Why a new BSD? (https://blog.fivnex.co/2020/11/arisblubsd-why-new-bsd.html) This article is to explain some decisions and plans made by the ArisbluBSD team, why we are making our own thing, and what the plan is for the OS. We mainly want to talk about five things: desktop, package management, software availability, custom software, and the future of the OS. We mostly want to explain what the goal of the OS is, and how we plan to expand in the near future. Without further ado, let's explain ArisbluBSD's plan. OPNsense 20.7.5 released (https://opnsense.org/opnsense-20-7-5-released/) We return briefly for a small patch set and plan to pin the 20.1 upgrade path to this particular version to avoid unnecessary stepping stones. We wish you all a healthy Friday. And of course: patch responsibly! Midnight BSD 2.0 Release Status (https://www.justjournal.com/users/mbsd/entry/33841) We identified some issues with the 2.0 ISOs slated for release with the ZFS bootloader not working. Until this issue is resolved, we are unable to build release ISOs. We've left the old ones up as they work fine for anyone using UFS. HardenedBSD November 2020 Status Report (https://hardenedbsd.org/article/shawn-webb/2020-11-25/hardenedbsd-november-2020-status-report) We're getting close to the end of November. My wife and I have plans this weekend, so I thought I'd take the time to write November's status report today. Beastie Bits • [rga: ripgrep, but also search in PDFs, E-Books, Office documents, zip, tar.gz, etc.](https://phiresky.github.io/blog/2019/rga--ripgrep-for-zip-targz-docx-odt-epub-jpg/) • [exa - A modern replacement for ls](https://the.exa.website/) • [The myriad meanings of pwd in Unix systems](https://qmacro.org/2020/11/08/the-meaning-of-pwd-in-unix-systems/) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Karl - Camera Help (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/381/feedback/Karl%20-%20camera%20help.md) Alejandro - domain registrar (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/381/feedback/alejandro%20-%20domain%20registrar.md) Johnny - thoughts on 372 (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/381/feedback/Johnny%20-%20thoughts%20on%20372) *** Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***
380: Early ZFS-mas

380: Early ZFS-mas

2020-12-1043:59

We read FreeBSD’s 3rd quarter status report, OpenZFS 2.0, adding check-hash checks in UFS filesystem, OpenSSL 3.0 /dev/crypto issues on FreeBSD, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines 3rd Quarter FreeBSD Report (https://www.freebsd.org/news/status/report-2020-07-2020-09.html) The call for submissions for the 4th Quarter is out (https://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-quarterly-calls/2020/000007.html) OpenZFS 2.0 (https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2020/12/openzfs-2-0-release-unifies-linux-bsd-and-adds-tons-of-new-features/) This Monday, ZFS on Linux lead developer Brian Behlendorf published the OpenZFS 2.0.0 release to GitHub. Along with quite a lot of new features, the announcement brings an end to the former distinction between "ZFS on Linux" and ZFS elsewhere (for example, on FreeBSD). This move has been a long time coming—the FreeBSD community laid out its side of the roadmap two years ago—but this is the release that makes it official. News Roundup Revision 367034 (https://svnweb.freebsd.org/changeset/base/367034) Various new check-hash checks have been added to the UFS filesystem over various major releases. Superblock check hashes were added for the 12 release and cylinder-group and inode check hashes will appear in the 13 release. OpenSSL 3.0 /dev/crypto issues on FreeBSD (https://rubenerd.com/openssl-3-written-to-break-on-freebsd/) So, just learned that the OpenSSL devs decided to break /dev/crypto on FreeBSD. OS108-9.1 XFCE amd64 released (https://forums.os108.org/d/32-os108-91-xfce-amd64-released) OS108 is a fast, open and Secure Desktop Operating System built on top of NetBSD. > Installing OS108 to your hard drive is done by using the sysinst utility, the process is basically the same as installing NetBSD itself. Please refer to the NetBSD guide for installation details, http://www.netbsd.org/docs/guide/en/part-install.html Installation Video (https://youtu.be/cgAeY21gXR4) *** Beastie Bits OpenBGPD 6.8p1 portable: released Nov 5th, 2020 (http://www.openbgpd.org/ftp.html) IRC Awk Bot (http://kflu.github.io/2020/08/15/2020-08-15-awk-irc-bot/) Docker on FreeBSD using bhyve and sshfs (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVkJZJEdZNY) The UNIX Command Language (1976) (https://github.com/susam/tucl) *** Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions santi - openrc (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/380/feedback/santi%20-%20openrc.md) trond - python2 and mailman (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/380/feedback/trond%20-%20python2%20and%20mailmane%20and%20sshfs) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***
379: bhyve my guest

379: bhyve my guest

2020-12-0337:19

Adventures in Freebernetes, tracing kernel functions, The better way of building FreeBSD networks, New beginnings: CDBUG virtual meetings, LibreSSL update in DragonFly, Signal-cli with scli on FreeBSD, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines Adventures in Freebernetes: bhyve My Guest (https://productionwithscissors.run/2020/10/29/adventures-in-freebernetes-bhyve-my-guest/) Part 2 of experiments in FreeBSD and Kubernetes: Creating your first guest Tracing Kernel Functions: FBT stack() and arg (https://zinascii.com/2020/fbt-args-and-stack.html?s=03) In my previous post I described how FBT intercepts function calls and vectors them into the DTrace framework. That laid the foundation for what I want to discuss in this post: the implementation of the stack() action and built-in arg variables. These features rely on the precise layout of the stack, the details of which I touched on previously. In this post I hope to illuminate those details a bit more with the help of some visuals, and then guide you through the implementation of these two DTrace features as they relate to the FBT provider. News Roundup Dummynet: The Better Way of Building FreeBSD Networks (https://klarasystems.com/articles/dummynet-the-better-way-of-building-freebsd-networks/) Dummynet is the FreeBSD traffic shaper, packet scheduler, and network emulator. Dummynet allows you to emulate a whole set of network environments in a straight-forward way. It has the ability to model delay, packet loss, and can act as a traffic shaper and policer. Dummynet is roughly equivalent to netem in Linux, but we have found that dummynet is easier to integrate and provides much more consistent results. New beginnings: CDBUG virtual meetings (http://lists.nycbug.org/pipermail/cdbug-talk/2020-October/000901.html) I had overwhelmingly positive responses from the broader *BSD community about restarting CDBUG meetings as virtual, at least for now. Hopefully this works well and even when we're back to in-person meetings we can still find a way to bring in virtual attendees. LibreSSL update in DragonFly (https://www.dragonflydigest.com/2020/11/10/25143.html) DragonFly has a new version of libressl, noting cause it has a newer TLS1.3 implementation – something that may be necessary for you. Signal-cli with scli on FreeBSD (https://antranigv.am/weblog_en/posts/freebsd-signal-cli-scli/) So couple of days ago I migrated from macOS on Macbook Pro to FreeBSD on ThinkPad T480s. Beastie Bits Firefox is not paxctl safe for NetBSD (https://anonhg.netbsd.org/pkgsrc/rev/9386adbd052e) FreeBSD 12.2-RELEASE on Microsoft Azure Marketplace (https://azuremarketplace.microsoft.com/en-us/marketplace/apps/thefreebsdfoundation.freebsd-12_2?tab=Overview) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions carlos - BSD Now around the world (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/379/feedback/carlos%20-%20BSD%20Now%20around%20the%20world.md) paulo - freebsd on a Bananapi (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/379/feedback/paulo%20-%20freebsd%20on%20a%20Bananapi.md) paulo - followup (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/379/feedback/paulo%20-%20followup.md) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***
378: Networknomicon

378: Networknomicon

2020-11-2656:20

Interview with Michael W. Lucas: SNMP and TLS book, cashflow for creators, book sale and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines Interview with Michael W. Lucas SNMP Book (https://mwl.io/nonfiction/networking#snmp) The Networknomicon (https://mwl.io/nonfiction/networking#networknomicon) Sponsor the TLS Book (https://www.tiltedwindmillpress.com/product-category/sponsor/) Cashflow for creators (https://mwl.io/nonfiction/biz-craft) Book sale (https://mwl.io/blog/9313) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) *** Special Guest: Michael W Lucas.
History of FreeBD: BSDi and USL Lawsuits, Building a Website on Google Compute Engine, Firewall ban-sharing across machines, OpenVPN as default gateway on OpenBSD, Sorting out what the Single Unix Specification is, Switching from Apple to a Thinkpad for development, and more NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines History of FreeBSD : Part 2 : BSDi and USL Lawsuits (https://klarasystems.com/articles/history-of-freebsd-part-2-bsdi-and-usl-lawsuits/) In this second part of our series on the history of FreeBSD, we continue to trace the pre-history of FreeBSD and the events that would eventually shape the project and the future of open source software. Building a Web Site on Google Compute Engine (https://cromwell-intl.com/open-source/google-freebsd-tls/) Here's how I deployed a web site to the Google Cloud Platform. I used FreeBSD for good performance, stability, and minimal complexity. I set up HTTPS with free Let's Encrypt TLS certificates for both RSA and ECC. Then I adjusted the Apache configuration for a good score from the authoritative Qualys server analysis. News Roundup Firewall ban-sharing across machines (https://chown.me/blog/acacia) As described in My infrastructure as of 2019, my machines are located in three different sites and are loosely coupled. Nonetheless, I wanted to set things up so that if an IP address is acting maliciously toward one machine, all my machines block that IP at once so the meanie won't get to try one machine after another. OpenVPN as default gateway on OpenBSD (https://dataswamp.org/~solene/2020-10-27-openbsd-openvpn.html) If you plan to use an OpenVPN tunnel to reach your default gateway, which would make the tun interface in the egress group, and use tun0 in your pf.conf which is loaded before OpenVPN starts? Here are the few tips I use to solve the problems. Sorting out what the Single Unix Specification is and covers (https://utcc.utoronto.ca/~cks/space/blog/unix/SingleUnixSpecificationWhat) Sorting out what the Single Unix Specification is and covers October 8, 2020 I've linked to the Single Unix Specification any number of times, for various versions of it (when I first linked to it, it was at issue 6, in 2006; it's now up to a 2018 edition). But I've never been quite clear what it covered and didn't cover, and how it related to POSIX and similar things. After yesterday's entry got me looking at the SuS site again, I decided to try to sort this out once and for all. Bye-bye, Apple (http://blog.cretaria.com/posts/bye-bye-apple.html) The days of Apple products are behind me. I had been developing on a Macbook for over twelve years, but now, I’ve switched to an ever trending setup: OpenBSD on a Thinkpad. The new platform is a winner. Everything is clean, quick, and configurable. When I ps uaxww, I’m not hogging ‘gigs’ of RAM just to have things up and running. There’s no black magic that derails me at every turn. In short, my sanity has been long restored. Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Chris - small projects (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/377/feedback/Chris%20-%20small%20projects.md) Jens - ZFS Question (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/377/feedback/Jens%20-%20ZFS%20Question.md) One pool to rule them all (https://ftfl.ca/blog/2016-09-17-zfs-fde-one-pool-conversion.html) Shroyer - Dotnet on FreeBSD for Jellyfin (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/377/feedback/Shroyer%20-%20Dotnet%20on%20FreeBSD%20for%20Jellyfin.md) *** Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***
FreeBSD 12.2 is available, ZFS Webinar, Enhancing Syzkaller support for NetBSD, how the OpenBSD -stable packages are built, OPNsense 20.7.4 released, and more NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines FreeBSD 12.2 Release (https://www.freebsd.org/releases/12.2R/relnotes.html) The release notes for FreeBSD 12.2-RELEASE contain a summary of the changes made to the FreeBSD base system on the 12-STABLE development line. This document lists applicable security advisories that were issued since the last release, as well as significant changes to the FreeBSD kernel and userland. Some brief remarks on upgrading are also presented. ZFS Webinar: November 18th (https://klarasystems.com/learning/best-practices-for-optimizing-zfs1/) Join us on November 18th for a live discussion with Allan Jude (VP of Engineering at Klara Inc) in this webinar centred on “best practices of ZFS” Building Your Storage Array – Everything from picking the best hardware to RAID-Z and using mirrors. Keeping up with Data Growth – Expanding and growing your pool, and of course, shrinking with device evacuation. Datasets and Properties – Controlling settings with properties and many other tricks! News Roundup Google Summer of Code 2020: [Final Report] Enhancing Syzkaller support for NetBSD (https://blog.netbsd.org/tnf/entry/google_summer_of_code_20202) Sys2syz would give an extra edge to Syzkaller for NetBSD. It has a potential of efficiently automating the conversion of syscall definitions to syzkaller’s grammar. This can aid in increasing the number of syscalls covered by Syzkaller significantly with the minimum possibility of manual errors. Let’s delve into its internals. How the OpenBSD -stable packages are built (https://dataswamp.org/~solene/2020-10-29-official-openbsd-stable-architecture.html) In this long blog post, I will write about the technical details of the OpenBSD stable packages building infrastructure. I have setup the infrastructure with the help of Theo De Raadt who provided me the hardware in summer 2019, since then, OpenBSD users can upgrade their packages using pkg_add -u for critical updates that has been backported by the contributors. Many thanks to them, without their work there would be no packages to build. Thanks to pea@ who is my backup for operating this infrastructure in case something happens to me. OPNsense 20.7.4 released (https://opnsense.org/opnsense-20-7-4-released/) This release finally wraps up the recent Netmap kernel changes and tests. The Realtek vendor driver was updated as well as third party software cURL, libxml2, OpenSSL, PHP, Suricata, Syslog-ng and Unbound just to name a couple of them. Beastie Bits Binutils and linker changes (https://www.dragonflydigest.com/2020/11/03/25120.html) 28 Years of NetBSD contributions (https://github.com/NetBSD/src/graphs/contributors) Bluetooth Audio on OpenBSD (https://ifconfig.se/bluetooth-audio-openbsd.html) K8s Bhyve (https://k8s-bhyve.convectix.com) *** Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Sean - C Flags (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/376/feedback/Sean%20-%20C%20Flags.md) Thierry - RPI ZFS question (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/376/feedback/Thierry%20-%20RPI%20ZFS%20question.md) Thierry's script (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/376/feedback/script.md) *** Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***
bhyve - The FreeBSD Hypervisor, udf information leak, being a vim user instead of classic vi, FreeBSD on ESXi ARM Fling: Fixing Virtual Hardware, new FreeBSD Remote Process Plugin in LLDB, OpenBSD Laptop, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines bhyve - The FreeBSD Hypervisor (https://klarasystems.com/articles/bhyve-the-freebsd-hypervisor/) FreeBSD has had varying degrees of support as a hypervisor host throughout its history. For a time during the mid-2000s, VMWare Workstation 3.x could be made to run under FreeBSD’s Linux Emulation, and Qemu was ported in 2004, and later the kQemu accelerator in 2005. Then in 2009 a port for VirtualBox was introduced. All of these solutions suffered from being a solution designed for a different operating system and then ported to FreeBSD, requiring constant maintenance. ZFS and FreeBSD Support Klara offers flexible Support Subscriptions for your ZFS and FreeBSD infrastructure. Get a world class team of experts to back you up. Check it out on our website! (https://klarasystems.com/support/) udf info leak (https://gist.github.com/CTurt/a00fb4164e13342567830b052aaed94b) FreeBSD UDF driver info leak Analysis done on FreeBSD release 11.0 because that's what I had around. + Fix committed to FreeBSD (https://svnweb.freebsd.org/changeset/base/366005) News Roundup I'm now a user of Vim, not classical Vi (partly because of windows) (https://utcc.utoronto.ca/~cks/space/blog/unix/VimNowAUser) In the past I've written entries (such as this one) where I said that I was pretty much a Vi user, not really a Vim user, because I almost entirely stuck to Vi features. In a comment on my entry on not using and exploring Vim features, rjc reinforced this, saying that I seemed to be using vi instead of vim (and that there was nothing wrong with this). For a long time I thought this way myself, but these days this is not true any more. These days I really want Vim, not classical Vi. FreeBSD on ESXi ARM Fling: Fixing Virtual Hardware (https://vincerants.com/freebsd-on-esxi-arm-fling-fixing-virtual-hardware/) With the current state of FreeBSD on ARM in general, a number of hardware drivers are either set to not auto-load on boot, or are entirely missing altogether. This page is to document my findings with various bits of hardware, and if possible, list fixes. Introduction of a new FreeBSD Remote Process Plugin in LLDB (https://www.moritz.systems/blog/introduction-of-a-new-freebsd-remote-process-plugin-in-lldb/) Moritz Systems have been contracted by the FreeBSD Foundation to modernize the LLDB debugger’s support for FreeBSD. We are writing a new plugin utilizing the more modern client-server layout that is already used by Darwin, Linux, NetBSD and (unofficially) OpenBSD. The new plugin is going to gradually replace the legacy one. OpenBSD Laptop (https://functionallyparanoid.com/2020/10/14/openbsd-laptop/) Hi, I know it’s been a while. I recently had to nuke and re-pave my personal laptop and I thought it would be a nice thing to share with the community how I set up OpenBSD on it so that I have a useful, modern, secure environment for getting work done. I’m not going to say I’m the expert on this or that this is the BEST way to set up OpenBSD, but I thought it would be worthwhile for folks doing Google searches to at least get my opinion on this. So, given that, let’s go… Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Ethan - Linux user wanting to try out OpenBSD (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/375/feedback/Ethan%20-%20Linux%20user%20wanting%20to%20try%20out%20OpenBSD.md) iian - Learning IT (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/375/feedback/iian%20-%20Learning%20IT.md) johnny - bsd swag (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/375/feedback/johnny%20-%20bsd%20swag.md) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***
OpenBSD 6.8 has been released, NetBSD 9.1 is out, OpenZFS devsummit report, BastilleBSD’s native container management for FreeBSD, cleaning up old tarsnap backups, Michael W. Lucas’ book sale, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines OpenBSD 6.8 (https://www.openbsd.org/68.html) Released Oct 18, 2020. (OpenBSD's 25th anniversary) NetBSD 9.1 Released (https://www.netbsd.org/releases/formal-9/NetBSD-9.1.html) The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 9.1, the first update of the NetBSD 9 release branch. It represents a selected subset of fixes deemed important for security or stability reasons, as well as new features and enhancements. OpenZFS Developer Summit 2020 (https://klarasystems.com/articles/openzfs-developer-summit-part-1/) As with most other conferences in the last six months, this year’s OpenZFS Developer’s Summit was a bit different than usual. Held via Zoom to accommodate for 2020’s new normal in terms of social engagements, the conference featured a mix of talks delivered live via webinars, and breakout sessions held as regular meetings. This helped recapture some of the “hallway track” that would be lost in an online conference. • After attending the conference, I wrote up some of my notes from each of the talks • Part 2 (https://klarasystems.com/articles/openzfs-developer-summit-part-2/) ZFS and FreeBSD Support Klara offers flexible Support Subscriptions for your ZFS and FreeBSD infrastructure, simply sign up for our monthly subscription! What's even better is that for the month of October we are giving away 3 months for free, for every yearly subscription, and one month free when you sign up for a 6-months subscription! Check it out on our website! (https://klarasystems.com/support/) News Roundup BastilleBSD - native container management for FreeBSD (https://fibric.hashnode.dev/bastillebsd-native-container-management-for-freebsd) Some time ago, I had the requirement to use FreeBSD in a project, and soon the question came up if Docker and Kubernetes can be used. On FreeBSD, Docker is not very well supported, and even if you can get it running, Linux is used in a Docker container. My experience with Docker on FreeBSD is awful, and so I started looking for alternatives. A quick search on one of the most significant online search engines led me to Jails and then to BastilleBSD. Tarsnap – cleaning up old backups (https://dan.langille.org/2020/09/10/tarsnap-cleaning-up-old-backups/) I use Tarsnap for my critical data. Case in point, I use it to backup my Bacula database dump. I use Bacula to backup my hosts. The database in question keeps track of what was backed up, from what host, the file size, checksum, where that backup is now, and many other items. Losing this data is annoying but not a disaster. It can be recreated from the backup volumes, but that is time consuming. As it is, the file is dumped daily, and rsynced to multiple locations. MWL - BookSale (https://mwl.io/archives/8009) For those interested in such things, I recently posted my 60,000th tweet. This prodded me to try an experiment I’ve been pondering for a while. Over at my ebookstore, two of my books are now on a “Name Your Own Price” sale. You can get git commit murder and PAM Mastery for any price you wish, with a minimum of $1. Beastie Bits Brian Kernighan: UNIX, C, AWK, AMPL, and Go Programming | Lex Fridman Podcast #109 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9upVbGSBFo) The UNIX Time-Sharing System - Dennis M. Ritchie and Ken Thompson - July 1974 (https://chsasank.github.io/classic_papers/unix-time-sharing-system.html#) Using a 1930 Teletype as a Linux Terminal (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2XLZ4Z8LpEE) *** ###Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions lars - infosec handbook (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/374/feedback/lars%20-%20infosec%20handbook.md) scott - zfs import (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/374/feedback/scott%20-%20zfs%20import.md) zhong - first episode (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/374/feedback/zhong%20-%20first%20episode.md) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***
We have an interview with Kyle Evans for you this week. We talk about his grep project, lua and flua in base, as well as bectl, being on the core team and a whole lot of other stuff. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Interview - Kyle Evans - kevans@freebsd.org (mailto:kevans@freebsd.org) / @kaevans91 (https://twitter.com/kaevans91) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv)
372: Slow SSD scrubs

372: Slow SSD scrubs

2020-10-1548:04

Wayland on BSD, My BSD sucks less than yours, Even on SSDs, ongoing activity can slow down ZFS scrubs drastically, OpenBSD on the Desktop, simple shell status bar for OpenBSD and cwm, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines Wayland on BSD (https://blog.netbsd.org/tnf/entry/wayland_on_netbsd_trials_and) After I posted about the new default window manager in NetBSD I got a few questions, including "when is NetBSD switching from X11 to Wayland?", Wayland being X11's "new" rival. In this blog post, hopefully I can explain why we aren't yet! My BSD sucks less than yours (https://www.bsdfrog.org/pub/events/my_bsd_sucks_less_than_yours-full_paper.pdf) This paper will look at some of the differences between the FreeBSD and OpenBSD operating systems. It is not intended to be solely technical but will also show the different "visions" and design decisions that rule the way things are implemented. It is expected to be a subjective view from two BSD developers and does not pretend to represent these projects in any way. Video + EuroBSDCon 2017 Part 1 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZhpaKuXKob4) + EuroBSDCon 2017 Part 2 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYp70KWD824) News Roundup Even on SSDs, ongoing activity can slow down ZFS scrubs drastically (https://utcc.utoronto.ca/~cks/space/blog/solaris/ZFSSSDActivitySlowsScrubs) Back in the days of our OmniOS fileservers, which used HDs (spinning rust) across iSCSI, we wound up changing kernel tunables to speed up ZFS scrubs and saw a significant improvement. When we migrated to our current Linux fileservers with SSDs, I didn't bother including these tunables (or the Linux equivalent), because I expected that SSDs were fast enough that it didn't matter. Indeed, our SSD pools generally scrub like lightning. OpenBSD on the Desktop (Part I) (https://paedubucher.ch/articles/2020-09-05-openbsd-on-the-desktop-part-i.html) Let's install OpenBSD on a Lenovo Thinkpad X270. I used this computer for my computer science studies. It has both Arch Linux and Windows 10 installed as dual boot. Now that I'm no longer required to run Windows, I can ditch the dual boot and install an operating system of my choice. A simple shell status bar for OpenBSD and cwm(1) (https://www.tumfatig.net/20200923/a-simple-shell-status-bar-for-cwm/) These days, I try to use simple and stock software as much as possible on my OpenBSD laptop. I’ve been playing with cwm(1) for weeks and I was missing a status bar. After trying things like Tint2, Polybar etc, I discovered @gonzalo’s termbar. Thanks a lot! As I love scripting, I decided to build my own. Beastie Bits DragonFly v5.8.3 released to address to issues (http://lists.dragonflybsd.org/pipermail/commits/2020-September/769777.html) OpenSSH 8.4 released (http://www.openssh.com/txt/release-8.4) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Dane - FreeBSD vs Linux in Microservices and Containters (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/372/feedback/Dane%20-%20FreeBSD%20vs%20Linux%20in%20Microservices%20and%20Containters.md) Mason - questions.md (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/372/feedback/Mason%20-%20questions.md) Michael - Tmux License.md (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/372/feedback/Michael%20-%20Tmux%20License.md) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***
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Comments (10)

elrey741

23:18: TLS intercept

Dec 30th
Reply

elrey741

Chris - installing FreeBSD 13-current: use bhyve w/Linux vm to handle wifi card

Nov 8th
Reply

elrey741

1:07: encrypted crash dumps on freebsd: https://oshogbo.vexillium.org/blog/74/

May 23rd
Reply

elrey741

25:28: cbsd - https://github.com/cbsd/cbsd

Feb 14th
Reply

elrey741

43:45: links to videos it looks like they created a playlist so I figured I would include the link for people that want it. - vbsdcon 2019 playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL54iSRSPZwagDiph7xLTaDLBHHy6WAiXD - in kernel tls framing (eurobsdcon): https://youtu.be/p9fbofDUUr4 - dns over https (eurobsdcon): https://youtu.be/ZxTdEEuyxHU

Nov 1st
Reply

elrey741

21:00: what are the other 6 books that he had to write? It would be awesome if he (Michael W. Lucas) could list recommendations for other books to read, below the description or something, so people know how books are correlated. If people want to read it without reading the other books ok, but for those who don't know how they correlate (i.e. me 😅). it would be nice if I can read through them in order, so you don't get frustrated not knowing what is getting discussed and have to stop to reading and read another whole book to grasp the concept.

Oct 25th
Reply

elrey741

14:00: good to know about ZFS limitations. hopefully will be fixed in OpenZFS eventually.

Oct 19th
Reply

elrey741

1:3:48: good explanation about FIBs in routing tables

Oct 15th
Reply (1)

elrey741

1:11:14 - pf for multi jails

Sep 13th
Reply
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