DiscoverBSD Now
BSD Now
Claim Ownership

BSD Now

Author: Jupiter Broadcasting

Subscribed: 633Played: 6,597
Share

Description

Created by three guys who love BSD, we cover the latest news and have an extensive series of tutorials, as well as interviews with various people from all areas of the BSD community. It also serves as a platform for support and questions. We love and advocate FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, DragonFlyBSD and TrueOS. Our show aims to be helpful and informative for new users that want to learn about them, but still be entertaining for the people who are already pros.
The show airs on Wednesdays at 2:00PM (US Eastern time) and the edited version is usually up the following day.
95 Episodes
Reverse
333: Unix Keyboard Joy

333: Unix Keyboard Joy

2020-01-1600:40:29

Your Impact on FreeBSD in 2019, Wireguard on OpenBSD Router, Amazon now has FreeBSD/ARM 12, pkgsrc-2019Q4, The Joys of UNIX Keyboards, OpenBSD on Digital Ocean, and more. Headlines Your Impact on FreeBSD in 2019 (https://www.freebsdfoundation.org/blog/your-impact-on-freebsd-in-2019/) It’s hard to believe that 2019 is nearly over. It has been an amazing year for supporting the FreeBSD Project and community! Why do I say that? Because as I reflect over the past 12 months, I realize how many events we’ve attended all over the world, and how many lives we’ve touched in so many ways. From advocating for FreeBSD to implementing FreeBSD features, my team has been there to help make FreeBSD the best open source project and operating system out there. In 2019, we focused on supporting a few key areas where the Project needed the most help. The first area was software development. Whether it was contracting FreeBSD developers to work on projects like wifi support, to providing internal staff to quickly implement hardware workarounds, we’ve stepped in to help keep FreeBSD innovative, secure, and reliable. Software development includes supporting the tools and infrastructure that make the development process go smoothly, and we’re on it with team members heading up the Continuous Integration efforts, and actively involved in the clusteradmin and security teams. Our advocacy efforts focused on recruiting new users and contributors to the Project. We attended and participated in 38 conferences and events in 21 countries. From giving FreeBSD presentations and workshops to staffing tables, we were able to have 1:1 conversations with thousands of attendees. Our travels also provided opportunities to talk directly with FreeBSD commercial and individual users, contributors, and future FreeBSD user/contributors. We’ve seen an increase in use and interest in FreeBSD from all of these organizations and individuals. These meetings give us a chance to learn more about what organizations need and what they and other individuals are working on. The information helps inform the work we should fund. Wireguard on OpenBSD Router (https://obscurity.xyz/bsd/open/wireguard.html) wireguard (wg) is a modern vpn protocol, using the latest class of encryption algorithms while at the same time promising speed and a small code base. modern crypto and lean code are also tenants of openbsd, thus it was a no brainer to migrate my router from openvpn over to wireguard. my setup : a collection of devices, both wired and wireless, that are nat’d through my router (openbsd 6.6) out via my vpn provider azire* and out to the internet using wg-quick to start wg. running : doubtless this could be improved on, but currently i start wg manually when my router boots. this, and the nat'ing on the vpn interface mean its impossible for clients to connect to the internet without the vpn being up. as my router is on a ups and only reboots when a kernel patch requires it, it’s a compromise i can live with. run wg-quick (please replace vpn with whatever you named your wg .conf file.) and reload pf rules. News Roundup Amazon now has FreeBSD/ARM 12 (https://aws.amazon.com/marketplace/pp/B081NF7BY7) AWS, the cloud division of Amazon, announced in December the next generation of its ARM processors, the Graviton2. This is a custom chip design with a 7nm architecture. It is based on 64-bit ARM Neoverse cores. Compared to first-generation Graviton processors (A1), today’s new chips should deliver up to 7x the performance of A1 instances in some cases. Floating point performance is now twice as fast. There are additional memory channels and cache speed memory access should be much faster. The company is working on three types of Graviton2 EC2 instances that should be available soon. Instances with a “g” suffix are powered by Graviton2 chips. If they have a “d” suffix, it also means that they have NVMe local storage. General-purpose instances (M6g and M6gd) Compute-optimized instances (C6g and C6gd) Memory-optimized instances (R6g and R6gd) You can choose instances with up to 64 vCPUs, 512 GiB of memory and 25 Gbps networking. And you can see that ARM-powered servers are not just a fad. AWS already promises a 40% better price/performance ratio with ARM-based instances when you compare them with x86-based instances. AWS has been working with operating system vendors and independent software vendors to help them release software that runs on ARM. ARM-based EC2 instances support Amazon Linux 2, Ubuntu, Red Hat, SUSE, Fedora, Debian and FreeBSD. It also works with multiple container services (Docker, Amazon ECS, and Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service). Coverage of AWS Announcement (https://techcrunch.com/2019/12/03/aws-announces-new-arm-based-instances-with-graviton2-processors/) Announcing the pkgsrc-2019Q4 release (https://mail-index.netbsd.org/pkgsrc-users/2020/01/06/msg030130.html) The pkgsrc developers are proud to announce the 65th quarterly release of pkgsrc, the cross-platform packaging system. pkgsrc is available with more than 20,000 packages, running on 23 separate platforms; more information on pkgsrc itself is available at https://www.pkgsrc.org/ In total, 190 packages were added, 96 packages were removed, and 1,868 package updates (to 1388 unique packages) were processed since the pkgsrc-2019Q3 release. As usual, a large number of updates and additions were processed for packages for go (14), guile (11), perl (170), php (10), python (426), and ruby (110). This continues pkgsrc's tradition of adding useful packages, updating many packages to more current versions, and pruning unmaintained packages that are believed to have essentially no users. The Joys of UNIX Keyboards (https://donatstudios.com/UNIX-Keyboards) I fell in love with a dead keyboard layout. A decade or so ago while helping a friends father clean out an old building, we came across an ancient Sun Microsystems server. We found it curious. Everything about it was different from what we were used to. The command line was black on white, the connectors strange and foreign, and the keyboard layout was bizarre. We never did much with it; turning it on made all the lights in his home dim, and our joint knowledge of UNIX was nonexistent. It sat in his bedroom for years supporting his television at the foot of his bed. I never forgot that keyboard though. The thought that there was this alternative layout out there seemed intriguing to me. OpenBSD on Digital Ocean (https://www.going-flying.com/blog/openbsd-on-digitalocean.html) Last night I had a need to put together a new OpenBSD machine. Since I already use DigitalOcean for one of my public DNS servers I wanted to use them for this need but sadly like all too many of the cloud providers they don't support OpenBSD. Now they do support FreeBSD and I found a couple writeups that show how to use FreeBSD as a shim to install OpenBSD. They are both sort of old at this point and with OpenBSD 6.6 out I ran into a bit of a snag. The default these days is to use a GPT partition table to enable EFI booting. This is generally pretty sane but it looks to me like the FreeBSD droplet doesn't support this. After the installer rebooted the VM failed to boot, being unable to find the bootloader. Thankfully DigitalOcean has a recovery ISO that you can boot by simply switching to it and powering off and then on your Droplet. Beastie Bits FreeBSD defaults to LLVM on PPC (https://svnweb.freebsd.org/base?view=revision&revision=356111) Theo De Raadt Interview between Ottawa 2019 Hackathon and BSDCAN 2019 (https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20191231214356) Bastille Poll about what people would like to see in 2020 (https://twitter.com/BastilleBSD/status/1211475103143251968) Notes on the classic book : The Design of the UNIX Operating System (https://github.com/suvratapte/Maurice-Bach-Notes) Multics History (https://www.multicians.org/) First meeting of the Hamilton BSD user group, February 11, 2020 18:30 - 21:00, Boston Pizza on Upper James St (http://studybsd.com/) Feedback/Questions Bill - 1.1 CDROM (http://dpaste.com/2H9CW6R) Greg - More 50 Year anniversary information (http://dpaste.com/2SGA3KY) Dave - Question time for Allan (http://dpaste.com/3ZAEKHD#wrap) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag.
332: The BSD Hyperbole

332: The BSD Hyperbole

2020-01-0900:45:12

Announcing HyperbolaBSD, IPFW In-Kernel NAT setup on FreeBSD, Wayland and WebRTC enabled for NetBSD 9/Linux, LLDB Threading support ready for mainline, OpenSSH U2F/FIDO support in base, Dragonfly drm/i915: Update, and more. Headlines HyperbolaBSD Announcement (https://www.hyperbola.info/news/announcing-hyperbolabsd-roadmap/) Due to the Linux kernel rapidly proceeding down an unstable path, we are planning on implementing a completely new OS derived from several BSD implementations. This was not an easy decision to make, but we wish to use our time and resources to create a viable alternative to the current operating system trends which are actively seeking to undermine user choice and freedom. This will not be a "distro", but a hard fork of the OpenBSD kernel and userspace including new code written under GPLv3 and LGPLv3 to replace GPL-incompatible parts and non-free ones. Reasons for this include: Linux kernel forcing adaption of DRM, including HDCP. Linux kernel proposed usage of Rust (which contains freedom flaws and a centralized code repository that is more prone to cyber attack and generally requires internet access to use.) Linux kernel being written without security and in mind. (KSPP is basically a dead project and Grsec is no longer free software) Many GNU userspace and core utils are all forcing adaption of features without build time options to disable them. E.g. (PulseAudio / SystemD / Rust / Java as forced dependencies) As such, we will continue to support the Milky Way branch until 2022 when our legacy Linux-libre kernel reaches End of Life. Future versions of Hyperbola will be using HyperbolaBSD which will have the new kernel, userspace and not be ABI compatible with previous versions. HyperbolaBSD is intended to be modular and minimalist so other projects will be able to re-use the code under free license. Forum Post (https://forums.hyperbola.info/viewtopic.php?id=315) A simple IPFW In-Kernel NAT setup on FreeBSD (https://www.neelc.org/posts/freebsd-ipfw-nat/) After graduating college, I am moving from Brooklyn, NY to Redmond, WA (guess where I got a job). I always wanted to re-do my OPNsense firewall (currently a HP T730) with stock FreeBSD and IPFW’s in-kernel NAT. Why IPFW? Benchmarks have shown IPFW to be faster which is especially good for my Tor relay, and because I can! However, one downside of IPFW is less documentation vs PF, even less without natd (which we’re not using), and this took me time to figure this out. But since my T730 is already packed, I am testing this on a old PC with two NICs, and my laptop [1] as a client with an USB-to-Ethernet adapter. News Roundup HEADS UP: Wayland and WebRTC enabled for NetBSD 9/Linux (https://mail-index.netbsd.org/pkgsrc-users/2020/01/05/msg030124.html) This is just a heads up that the Wayland option is now turned on by default for NetBSD 9 and Linux in cases where it peacefully coexists with X11. Right now, this effects the following packages: graphics/MesaLib devel/SDL2 www/webkit-gtk x11/gtk3 The WebRTC option has also been enabled by default on NetBSD 9 for two Firefox versions: www/firefox, www/firefox68 Please keep me informed of any fallout. Hopefully, there will be none. If you want to try out Wayland-related things on NetBSD 9, wm/velox/MESSAGE may be interesting for you. LLDB Threading support now ready for mainline (https://blog.netbsd.org/tnf/entry/lldb_threading_support_now_ready) Upstream describes LLDB as a next generation, high-performance debugger. It is built on top of LLVM/Clang toolchain, and features great integration with it. At the moment, it primarily supports debugging C, C++ and ObjC code, and there is interest in extending it to more languages. In February, I have started working on LLDB, as contracted by the NetBSD Foundation. So far I've been working on reenabling continuous integration, squashing bugs, improving NetBSD core file support, extending NetBSD's ptrace interface to cover more register types and fix compat32 issues and fixing watchpoint support. Then, I've started working on improving thread support which is taking longer than expected. You can read more about that in my September 2019 report. So far the number of issues uncovered while enabling proper threading support has stopped me from merging the work-in-progress patches. However, I've finally reached the point where I believe that the current work can be merged and the remaining problems can be resolved afterwards. More on that and other LLVM-related events happening during the last month in this report. OpenSSH U2F/FIDO support in base (https://www.undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20191115064850) Hardware backed keys can be generated using "ssh-keygen -t ecdsa-sk" (or "ed25519-sk" if your token supports it). Many tokens require to be touched/tapped to confirm this step. You'll get a public/private keypair back as usual, except in this case, the private key file does not contain a highly-sensitive private key but instead holds a "key handle" that is used by the security key to derive the real private key at signing time. So, stealing a copy of the private key file without also stealing your security key (or access to it) should not give the attacker anything. drm/i915: Update to Linux 4.8.17 (http://lists.dragonflybsd.org/pipermail/commits/2019-December/720257.html) drm/i915: Update to Linux 4.8.17 Broxton, Valleyview and Cherryview support improvements Broadwell and Gen9/Skylake support improvements Broadwell brightness fixes from OpenBSD Atomic modesetting improvements Various bug fixes and performance enhancements Beastie Bits Visual Studio Code port for FreeBSD (https://github.com/tagattie/FreeBSD-VSCode) OpenBSD syscall call-from verification (https://marc.info/?l=openbsd-tech&m=157488907117170&w=2) Peertube on OpenBSD (https://www.22decembre.eu/en/2019/12/09/peertube-14-openbsd/) Fuzzing Filesystems on NetBSD via AFL+KCOV by Maciej Grochowski (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbNCqFdQEyk&feature=youtu.be) Twitter Bot for Prop65 (https://twitter.com/prop65bot/status/1199003319307558912) Interactive vim tutorial (https://www.openvim.com/) First BSD user group meeting in Hamilton, February 11, 2020 18:30 - 21:00, Boston Pizza on Upper James St (http://studybsd.com/) *** Feedback/Questions Samir - cgit (http://dpaste.com/2B22M24#wrap) Russell - R (http://dpaste.com/0J5TYY0#wrap) Wolfgang - Question (http://dpaste.com/3MQAH27#wrap) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag.
331: Why Computers Suck

331: Why Computers Suck

2020-01-0201:09:47

How learning OpenBSD makes computers suck a little less, How Unix works, FreeBSD 12.1 Runs Well on Ryzen Threadripper 3970X, BSDCan CFP, HardenedBSD Infrastructure Goals, and more. Headlines Why computers suck and how learning from OpenBSD can make them marginally less horrible (https://telegra.ph/Why-OpenBSD-is-marginally-less-horrible-12-05) How much better could things actually be if we abandoned the enterprise development model? Next I will compare this enterprise development approach with non-enterprise development - projects such as OpenBSD, which do not hesitate to introduce ABI breaking changes to improve the codebase. One of the most commonly referred to pillars of the project's philosophy has long been its emphasis on clean functional code. Any code which makes it into OpenBSD is subject to ongoing aggressive audits for deprecated, or otherwise unmaintained code in order to reduce cruft and attack surface. Additionally the project creator, Theo de Raadt, and his team of core developers engage in ongoing development for proactive mitigations for various attack classes many of which are directly adopted by various multi-platform userland applications as well as the operating systems themselves (Windows, Linux, and the other BSDs). Frequently it is the case that introducing new features (not just deprecating old ones) introduces new incompatibilities against previously functional binaries compiled for OpenBSD. To prevent the sort of kernel memory bloat that has plagued so many other operating systems for years, the project enforces a hard ceiling on the number of lines of code that can ever be in ring 0 at a given time. Current estimates guess the number of bugs per line of code in the Linux kernel are around 1 bug per every 10,000 lines of code. Think of this in the context of the scope creep seen in the Linux kernel (which if I recall correctly is currently at around 100,000,000 lines of code), as well as the Windows NT kernel (500,000,000 lines of code) and you quickly begin to understand how adding more and more functionality into the most privileged components of the operating system without first removing old components begins to add up in terms of the drastic difference seen between these systems in the number of zero day exploits caught in the wild respectively. How Unix Works: Become a Better Software Engineer (https://neilkakkar.com/unix.html) Unix is beautiful. Allow me to paint some happy little trees for you. I’m not going to explain a bunch of commands – that’s boring, and there’s a million tutorials on the web doing that already. I’m going to leave you with the ability to reason about the system. Every fancy thing you want done is one google search away. But understanding why the solution does what you want is not the same. That’s what gives you real power, the power to not be afraid. And since it rhymes, it must be true. News Roundup FreeBSD 12.1 Runs Refreshingly Well With AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X (https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=freebsd-amd-3970x&num=1) For those of you interested in AMD's new Ryzen Threadripper 3960X/3970X processors with TRX40 motherboards for running FreeBSD, the experience in our initial testing has been surprisingly pleasant. In fact, it works out-of-the-box which one could argue is better than the current Linux support that needs the MCE workaround for booting. Here are some benchmarks of FreeBSD 12.1 on the Threadripper 3970X compared to Linux and Windows for this new HEDT platform. It was refreshing to see FreeBSD 12.1 booting and running just fine with the Ryzen Threadripper 3970X 32-core/64-thread processor from the ASUS ROG ZENITH II EXTREME motherboard and all core functionality working including the PCIe 4.0 NVMe SSD storage, onboard networking, etc. The system was running with 4 x 16GB DDR4-3600 memory, 1TB Corsair Force MP600 NVMe SSD, and Radeon RX 580 graphics. It was refreshing to see FreeBSD 12.1 running well with this high-end AMD Threadripper system considering Linux even needed a boot workaround. While the FreeBSD 12.1 experience was trouble-free with the ASUS TRX40 motherboard (ROG Zenith II Extreme) and AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X, DragonFlyBSD unfortunately was not. Both DragonFlyBSD 5.6.2 stable and the DragonFlyBSD daily development snapshot from last week were yielding a panic on boot. So with that, DragonFlyBSD wasn't tested for this Threadripper 3970X comparison but just FreeBSD 12.1. FreeBSD 12.1 on the Threadripper 3970X was benchmarked both with its default LLVM Clang 8.0.1 compiler and again with GCC 9.2 from ports for ruling out compiler differences. The FreeBSD 12.1 performance was compared to last week's Windows 10 vs. Linux benchmarks with the same system. BSDCan 2020 CFP (https://lists.bsdcan.org/pipermail/bsdcan-announce/2019-December/000180.html) BSDCan 2020 will be held 5-6 (Fri-Sat) June, 2020 in Ottawa, at the University of Ottawa. It will be preceded by two days of tutorials on 3-4 June (Wed-Thu). NOTE the change of month in 2020 back to June Also: do not miss out on the Goat BOF on Tuesday 2 June. We are now accepting proposals for talks. The talks should be designed with a very strong technical content bias. Proposals of a business development or marketing nature are not appropriate for this venue. See http://www.bsdcan.org/2020/ If you are doing something interesting with a BSD operating system, please submit a proposal. Whether you are developing a very complex system using BSD as the foundation, or helping others and have a story to tell about how BSD played a role, we want to hear about your experience. People using BSD as a platform for research are also encouraged to submit a proposal. Possible topics include: How we manage a giant installation with respect to handling spam. and/or sysadmin. and/or networking. Cool new stuff in BSD Tell us about your project which runs on BSD other topics (see next paragraph) From the BSDCan website, the Archives section will allow you to review the wide variety of past BSDCan presentations as further examples. Both users and developers are encouraged to share their experiences. HardenedBSD Infrastructure Goals (https://github.com/lattera/articles/blob/master/hardenedbsd/2019-12-01_infrastructure/article.md) 2019 has been an extremely productive year with regards to HardenedBSD's infrastructure. Several opportunities aligned themselves in such a way as to open a door for a near-complete rebuild with a vast expansion. The last few months especially have seen a major expansion of our infrastructure. We obtained a number of to-be-retired Dell R410 servers. The crash of our nightly build server provided the opportunity to deploy these R410 servers, doubling our build capacity. My available time to spend on HardenedBSD has decreased compared to this time last year. As part of rebuilding our infrastructure, I wanted to enable the community to be able to contribute. I'm structuring the work such that help is just a pull request away. Those in the HardenedBSD community who want to contribute to the infrastructure work can simply open a pull request. I'll review the code, and deploy it after a successful review. Users/contributors don't need access to our servers in order to improve them. My primary goal for the rest of 2019 and into 2020 is to become fully self-hosted, with the sole exception of email. I want to transition the source-of-truth git repos to our own infrastructure. We will still provide a read-only mirror on GitHub. As I develop this infrastructure, I'm doing so with human rights in mind. HardenedBSD is in a very unique position. In 2020, I plan to provide production Tor Onion Services for the various bits of our infrastructure. HardenedBSD will provide access to its various internal services to its developers and contributors. The entire development lifecycle, going from dev to prod, will be able to happen over Tor. Transparency will be key moving forward. Logs for the auto-sync script are now published directly to GitHub. Build logs will be, soon, too. Logs of all automated processes, and the code for those processes, will be tracked publicly via git. This will be especially crucial for development over Tor. Integrating Tor into our infrastructure so deeply increases risk and maintenance burden. However, I believe that through added transparency, we will be able to mitigate risk. Periodic audits will need to be performed and published. I hope to migrate HardenedBSD's site away from Drupal to a static site generator. We don't really need the dynamic capabilities Drupal gives us. The many security issues Drupal and PHP both bring also leave much to be desired. So, that's about it. I spent the last few months of 2019 laying the foundation for a successful 2020. I'm excited to see how the project grows. Beastie Bits FuryBSD - KDE plasma flavor now available (https://www.furybsd.org/kde-plasma-flavor-now-available/) DragonFly - git: virtio - Fix LUN scan issue w/ Google Cloud (http://lists.dragonflybsd.org/pipermail/commits/2019-November/719945.html) LPI is looking for BSD Specialist learning material writers (https://wiki.lpi.org/wiki/BSD_Specialist_Objectives_V1.0) ZFS sync/async + ZIL/SLOG, explained (https://jrs-s.net/2019/05/02/zfs-sync-async-zil-slog/) BSD-Licensed Combinatorics library/utility (https://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-announce/2019-December/001921.html) SSL client vs server certificates and bacula-fd (https://dan.langille.org/2019/11/29/ssl-client-vs-server-certificates-and-bacula-fd/) MaxxDesktop planning to come to FreeBSD (https://www.facebook.com/maxxdesktop/posts/2761326693888282) Project Page (https://www.facebook.com/maxxdesktop/) Feedback/Questions Tom - ZFS Mirror with different speeds (http://dpaste.com/3ZGYNS3#wrap) Jeff - Knowledge is power (http://dpaste.com/1H9QDCR#wrap) Johnny - Episode 324 response to Jacob (http://dpaste.com/1A7Q9EV) Pat - NYC*BUG meeting Jan Meeting Location (http://dpaste.com/0QPZ2GC) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag.
Authentication Vulnerabilities in OpenBSD, NetBSD 9.0 RC1 is available, Running FreeNAS on a DigitalOcean droplet, NomadBSD 1.3 is here, at e2k19 nobody can hear you scream, and more. Headlines Authentication vulnerabilities in OpenBSD (https://www.openwall.com/lists/oss-security/2019/12/04/5) We discovered an authentication-bypass vulnerability in OpenBSD's authentication system: this vulnerability is remotely exploitable in smtpd, ldapd, and radiusd, but its real-world impact should be studied on a case-by-case basis. For example, sshd is not exploitable thanks to its defense-in-depth mechanisms. From the manual page of login.conf: OpenBSD uses BSD Authentication, which is made up of a variety of authentication styles. The authentication styles currently provided are: passwd Request a password and check it against the password in the master.passwd file. See loginpasswd(8). skey Send a challenge and request a response, checking it with S/Key (tm) authentication. See loginskey(8). yubikey Authenticate using a Yubico YubiKey token. See loginyubikey(8). For any given style, the program /usr/libexec/auth/loginstyle is used to perform the authentication. The synopsis of this program is: /usr/libexec/auth/login_style [-v name=value] [-s service] username class This is the first piece of the puzzle: if an attacker specifies a username of the form "-option", they can influence the behavior of the authentication program in unexpected ways. login_passwd [-s service] [-v wheel=yes|no] [-v lastchance=yes|no] user [class] The service argument specifies which protocol to use with the invoking program. The allowed protocols are login, challenge, and response. (The challenge protocol is silently ignored but will report success as passwd-style authentication is not challenge-response based). This is the second piece of the puzzle: if an attacker specifies the username "-schallenge" (or "-schallenge:passwd" to force a passwd-style authentication), then the authentication is automatically successful and therefore bypassed. Case study: smtpd Case study: ldapd Case study: radiusd Case study: sshd Acknowledgments: We thank Theo de Raadt and the OpenBSD developers for their incredibly quick response: they published patches for these vulnerabilities less than 40 hours after our initial contact. We also thank MITRE's CVE Assignment Team. First release candidate for NetBSD 9.0 available! (https://blog.netbsd.org/tnf/entry/first_release_candidate_for_netbsd) Since the start of the release process four months ago a lot of improvements went into the branch - more than 500 pullups were processed! This includes usbnet (a common framework for usb ethernet drivers), aarch64 stability enhancements and lots of new hardware support, installer/sysinst fixes and changes to the NVMM (hardware virtualization) interface. We hope this will lead to the best NetBSD release ever (only to be topped by NetBSD 10 next year). Here are a few highlights of the new release: Support for Arm AArch64 (64-bit Armv8-A) machines, including "Arm ServerReady" compliant machines (SBBR+SBSA) Enhanced hardware support for Armv7-A Updated GPU drivers (e.g. support for Intel Kabylake) Enhanced virtualization support Support for hardware-accelerated virtualization (NVMM) Support for Performance Monitoring Counters Support for Kernel ASLR Support several kernel sanitizers (KLEAK, KASAN, KUBSAN) Support for userland sanitizers Audit of the network stack Many improvements in NPF Updated ZFS Reworked error handling and NCQ support in the SATA subsystem Support a common framework for USB Ethernet drivers (usbnet) More information on the RC can be found on the NetBSD 9 release page (https://www.netbsd.org/releases/formal-9/NetBSD-9.0.html) News Roundup Running FreeNAS on a Digitalocean droplet (https://www.shlomimarco.com/post/running-freenas-on-a-digitalocean-droplet) ZFS is awesome. FreeBSD even more so. FreeNAS is the battle-tested, enterprise-ready-yet-home-user-friendly software defined storage solution which is cooler then deep space, based on FreeBSD and makes heavy use of ZFS. This is what I (and soooooo many others) use for just about any storage-related task. I can go on and on and on about what makes it great, but if you're here, reading this, you probably know all that already and we can skip ahead. I've needed an offsite FreeNAS setup to replicate things to, to run some things, to do some stuff, basically, my privately-owned, tightly-controlled NAS appliance in the cloud, one I control from top to bottom and with support for whatever crazy thing I'm trying to do. Since I'm using DigitalOcean as my main VPS provider, it seemed logical to run FreeNAS there, however, you can't. While DO supports many many distos and pre-setup applications (e.g OpenVPN), FreeNAS isn't a supported feature, at least not in the traditional way :) Before we begin, here's the gist of what we're going to do: Base of a FreeBSD droplet, we'll re-image our boot block device with FreeNAS iso. We'll then install FreeNAS on the second block device. Once done we're going to do the ol' switcheroo: we're going to re-image our original boot block device using the now FreeNAS-installed second block device. Part 1: re-image our boot block device to boot FreeNAS install media. Part 2: Install FreeNAS on the second block-device Part 3: Re-image the boot block device using the FreeNAS-installed block device NomadBSD 1.3 is now available (https://nomadbsd.org/) From the release notes: The base system has been changed to FreeBSD 12.1-RELEASE-p1 Due to a deadlock problem, FreeBSD's unionfs has been replaced by unionfs-fuse The GPT layout has been changed to MBR. This prevents problems with Lenovo systems that refuse to boot from GPT if "lenovofix" is not set, and systems that hang on boot if "lenovofix" is set. Support for ZFS installations has been added to the NomadBSD installer. The rc-script for setting up the network interfaces has been fixed and improved. Support for setting the country code for the wlan device has been added. Auto configuration for running in VirtualBox has been added. A check for the default display has been added to the graphics configuration scripts. This fixes problems where users with Optimus have their NVIDIA card disabled, and use the integrated graphics chip instead. NVIDIA driver version 440 has been added. nomadbsd-dmconfig, a Qt tool for selecting the display manager theme, setting the default user and autologin has been added. nomadbsd-adduser, a Qt tool for added preconfigured user accounts to the system has been added. Martin Orszulik added Czech translations to the setup and installation wizard. The NomadBSD logo, designed by Ian Grindley, has been changed. Support for localized error messages has been added. Support for localizing the password prompts has been added. Some templates for starting other DEs have been added to ~/.xinitrc. The interfaces of nomadbsd-setup-gui and nomadbsd-install-gui have been improved. A script that helps users to configure a multihead systems has been added. The Xorg driver for newer Intel GPUs has been changed from "intel" to "modesetting". /proc has been added to /etc/fstab A D-Bus session issue has been fixed which prevented thunar from accessing samba shares. DSBBg which allows users to change and manage wallpapers has been added. The latest version of update_obmenu now supports auto-updating the Openbox menu. Manually updating the Openbox menu after packet (de)installation is therefore no longer needed. Support for multiple keyboard layouts has been added. www/palemoon has been removed. mail/thunderbird has been removed. audio/audacity has been added. deskutils/orage has been added. the password manager fpm2 has been replaced by KeePassXC mail/sylpheed has been replaced by mail/claws-mail multimedia/simplescreenrecorder has been added. DSBMC has been changed to DSBMC-Qt Many small improvements and bug fixes. At e2k19 nobody can hear you scream (https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20191204170908) After 2 years it was once again time to pack skis and snowshoes, put a satellite dish onto a sledge and hike through the snowy rockies to the Elk Lakes hut. I did not really have much of a plan what I wanted to work on but there were a few things I wanted to look into. One of them was rpki-client and the fact that it was so incredibly slow. Since Bob beck@ was around I started to ask him innocent X509 questions ... as if there are innocent X509 questions! Mainly about the abuse of the X509STORE in rpki-client. Pretty soon it was clear that rpki-client did it all wrong and most of the X509 verification had to be rewritten. Instead of only storing the root certificates in the store and passing the intermediate certs as a chain to the verification function rpki-client threw everything into it. The X509STORE is just not built for such an abuse and so it was no wonder that this was slow. Lucky me I pulled benno@ with me into this dark hole of libcrypto code. He managed to build up an initial diff to pass the chains as a STACKOF(X509) and together we managed to get it working. A big thanks goes to ingo@ who documented most of the functions we had to use. Have a look at STACKOF(3) and skpopfree(3) to understand why benno@ and I slowly turned crazy. Our next challenge was to only load the necessary certificate revocation list into the X509STORECTX. While doing those changes it became obvious that some of the data structures needed better lookup functions. Looking up certificates was done using a linear lookup and so we replaced the internal certificate and CRL tables with RB trees for fast lookups. deraadt@ also joined the rpki-client commit fest and changed the output code to use rename(2) so that files are replaced in an atomic operation. Thanks to this rpki-client can now be safely run from cron (there is an example in the default crontab). I did not plan to spend most of my week hacking on rpki-client but in the end I'm happy that I did and the result is fairly impressive. Working with libcrypto code and especially X509 was less than pleasant. Our screams of agony died away in the snowy rocky mountains and made Bob deep dive into UVM with a smile since he knew that benno@ and I had it worse. In case you wonder thanks to all changes at e2k19 rpki-client improved from over 20min run time to validate all VRPS to roughly 1min to do the same job. A factor 20 improvement! Thanks to Theo, Bob and Howie to make this possible. To all the cooks for the great food and to Xplornet for providing us with Internet at the hut. Beastie Bits FOSDEM 2020 BSD Devroom schedule (https://fosdem.org/2020/schedule/track/bsd/) Easy Minecraft Server on FreeBSD Howto (https://www.freebsdfoundation.org/freebsd/how-to-guides/easy-minecraft-server-on-freebsd/) stats(3) framework in the TCP stack (https://svnweb.freebsd.org/base?view=revision&revision=355304) 4017 days of uptime (https://twitter.com/EdwinKremer/status/1203071684535889921) sysget - A front-end for every package manager (https://github.com/emilengler/sysget) PlayOnBSD’s Cross-BSD Shopping Guide (https://www.playonbsd.com/shopping_guide/) Feedback/Questions Pat asks about the proper disk drive type for ZFS (http://dpaste.com/2FDN26X#wrap) Brad asks about a ZFS rosetta stone (http://dpaste.com/2X8PBMC#wrap) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag. Special Guest: Mariusz Zaborski.
329: Lucas’ Arts

329: Lucas’ Arts

2019-12-1900:51:051

In this episode, we interview Michael W. Lucas about his latest book projects, including the upcoming SNMP Mastery book. Interview - Michael Lucas Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag. Special Guest: Michael W Lucas.
328: EPYC Netflix Stack

328: EPYC Netflix Stack

2019-12-1200:57:43

LLDB Threading support now ready, Multiple IPSec VPN tunnels with FreeBSD, Netflix Optimized FreeBSD's Network Stack More Than Doubled AMD EPYC Performance, happy eyeballs with unwind(8), AWS got FreeBSD ARM 12, OpenSSH U2F/FIDO support, and more. Headlines LLDB Threading support now ready for mainline (https://blog.netbsd.org/tnf/entry/lldb_threading_support_now_ready) Upstream describes LLDB as a next generation, high-performance debugger. It is built on top of LLVM/Clang toolchain, and features great integration with it. At the moment, it primarily supports debugging C, C++ and ObjC code, and there is interest in extending it to more languages. In February, I have started working on LLDB, as contracted by the NetBSD Foundation. So far I've been working on reenabling continuous integration, squashing bugs, improving NetBSD core file support, extending NetBSD's ptrace interface to cover more register types and fix compat32 issues and fixing watchpoint support. Then, I've started working on improving thread support which is taking longer than expected. You can read more about that in my September 2019 report. So far the number of issues uncovered while enabling proper threading support has stopped me from merging the work-in-progress patches. However, I've finally reached the point where I believe that the current work can be merged and the remaining problems can be resolved afterwards. More on that and other LLVM-related events happening during the last month in this report. Multiple IPSec VPN tunnels with FreeBSD (https://blog.socruel.nu/text-only/how-to-multiple-ipsec-vpn-tunnels-on-freebsd.txt) The FreeBSD handbook describes an IPSec VPN tunnel between 2 FreeBSD hosts (see https://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/ipsec.html) But it is also possible to have multiple, 2 or more, IPSec VPN tunnels created and running on a FreeBSD host. How to implement and configure this is described below. The requirements is to have 3 locations (A, B and C) connected with IPSec VPN tunnels using FreeBSD (11.3-RELEASE). Each location has 1 IPSec VPN host running FreeBSD (VPN host A, B and C). VPN host A has 2 IPSec VPN tunnels: 1 to location B (VPN host B) and 1 to location C (VPN host C). News Roundup Netflix Optimized FreeBSD's Network Stack More Than Doubled AMD EPYC Performance (https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=Netflix-NUMA-FreeBSD-Optimized) Drew Gallatin of Netflix presented at the recent EuroBSDcon 2019 conference in Norway on the company's network stack optimizations to FreeBSD. Netflix was working on being able to deliver 200Gb/s network performance for video streaming out of Intel Xeon and AMD EPYC servers, to which they are now at 190Gb/s+ and in the process that doubled the potential of EPYC Naples/Rome servers and also very hefty upgrades too for Intel. Netflix has long been known to be using FreeBSD in their data centers particularly where network performance is concerned. But in wanting to deliver 200Gb/s throughput from individual servers led them to making NUMA optimizations to the FreeBSD network stack. Allocating NUMA local memory for kernel TLS crypto buffers and for backing files sent via sentfile were among their optimizations. Changes to network connection handling and dealing with incoming connections to Nginx were also made. For those just wanting the end result, Netflix's NUMA optimizations to FreeBSD resulted in their Intel Xeon servers going from 105Gb/s to 191Gb/s while the NUMA fabric utilization dropped from 40% to 13%. unwind(8); "happy eyeballs" (https://marc.info/?l=openbsd-tech&m=157475113130337&w=2) In case you are wondering why happy eyeballs: It's a variation on this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Happy_Eyeballs unwind has a concept of a best nameserver type. It considers a configured DoT nameserver to be better than doing it's own recursive resolving. Recursive resolving is considered to be better than asking the dhcp provided nameservers. This diff sorts the nameserver types by quality, as above (validation, resolving, dead...), and as a tie breaker it adds the median of the round trip time of previous queries into the mix. One other interesting thing about this is that it gets us past captive portals without a check URL, that's why this diff is so huge, it rips out all the captive portal stuff (please apply with patch -E): 17 files changed, 385 insertions(+), 1683 deletions(-) Please test this. I'm particularly interested in reports from people who move between networks and need to get past captive portals. Amazon now has FreeBSD ARM 12 (https://aws.amazon.com/marketplace/pp/B081NF7BY7) Product Overview FreeBSD is an operating system used to power servers, desktops, and embedded systems. Derived from BSD, the version of UNIX developed at the University of California, Berkeley, FreeBSD has been continually developed by a large community for more than 30 years. FreeBSD's networking, security, storage, and monitoring features, including the pf firewall, the Capsicum and CloudABI capability frameworks, the ZFS filesystem, and the DTrace dynamic tracing framework, make FreeBSD the platform of choice for many of the busiest web sites and most pervasive embedded networking and storage systems. OpenSSH U2F/FIDO support in base (https://www.undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20191115064850) I just committed all the dependencies for OpenSSH security key (U2F) support to base and tweaked OpenSSH to use them directly. This means there will be no additional configuration hoops to jump through to use U2F/FIDO2 security keys. Hardware backed keys can be generated using "ssh-keygen -t ecdsa-sk" (or "ed25519-sk" if your token supports it). Many tokens require to be touched/tapped to confirm this step. You'll get a public/private keypair back as usual, except in this case, the private key file does not contain a highly-sensitive private key but instead holds a "key handle" that is used by the security key to derive the real private key at signing time. So, stealing a copy of the private key file without also stealing your security key (or access to it) should not give the attacker anything. Once you have generated a key, you can use it normally - i.e. add it to an agent, copy it to your destination's authorized_keys files (assuming they are running -current too), etc. At authentication time, you will be prompted to tap your security key to confirm the signature operation - this makes theft-of-access attacks against security keys more difficult too. Please test this thoroughly - it's a big change that we want to have stable before the next release. Beastie Bits DragonFly - git: virtio - Fix LUN scan issue w/ Google Cloud (http://lists.dragonflybsd.org/pipermail/commits/2019-November/719945.html) Really fast Markov chains in ~20 lines of sh, grep, cut and awk (https://0x0f0f0f.github.io/posts/2019/11/really-fast-markov-chains-in-~20-lines-of-sh-grep-cut-and-awk/) FreeBSD Journal Sept/Oct 2019 (https://www.freebsdfoundation.org/past-issues/security-3/) Michael Dexter is raising money for Bhyve development (https://twitter.com/michaeldexter/status/1201231729228308480) syscall call-from verification (https://marc.info/?l=openbsd-tech&m=157488907117170) FreeBSD Forums Howto Section (https://forums.freebsd.org/forums/howtos-and-faqs-moderated.39/) Feedback/Questions Jeroen - Feedback (http://dpaste.com/0PK1EG2#wrap) Savo - pfsense ports (http://dpaste.com/0PZ03B7#wrap) Tin - I want to learn C (http://dpaste.com/2GVNCYB#wrap) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag.
327: ZFS Rename Repo

327: ZFS Rename Repo

2019-12-0501:23:27

We read FreeBSD’s third quarterly status report, OpenBSD on Sparc64, ZoL repo move to OpenZFS, GEOM NOP, keeping NetBSD up-to-date, and more. Headlines FreeBSD third quarterly status report for 2019 (https://www.freebsd.org/news/status/report-2019-07-2019-09.html) This quarter the reports team has been more active than usual thanks to a better organization: calls for reports and reminders have been sent regularly, reports have been reviewed and merged quickly (I would like to thank debdrup@ in particular for his reviewing work). Efficiency could still be improved with the help of our community. In particular, the quarterly team has found that many reports have arrived in the last days before the deadline or even after. I would like to invite the community to follow the guidelines below that can help us sending out the reports sooner. Starting from next quarter, all quarterly status reports will be prepared the last month of the quarter itself, instead of the first month after the quarter's end. This means that deadlines for submitting reports will be the 1st of January, April, July and October. Next quarter will then be a short one, covering the months of November and December only and the report will probably be out in mid January. OpenBSD on Sparc64 (https://eerielinux.wordpress.com/2019/10/10/openbsd-on-sparc64-6-0-to-6-5/) OpenBSD, huh? Yes, I usually write about FreeBSD and that’s in fact what I tried installing on the machine first. But I ran into problems with it very early on (never even reached single user mode) and put it aside for later. Since I powered up the SunFire again last month, I needed an OS now and chose OpenBSD for the simple reason that I have it available. First I wanted to call this article simply “OpenBSD on SPARC” – but that would have been misleading since OpenBSD used to support 32-bit SPARC processors, too. The platform was just put to rest after the 5.9 release. Version 6.0 was the last release of OpenBSD that came on CD-ROM. When I bought it, I thought that I’d never use the SPARC CD. But here was the chance! While it is an obsolete release, it comes with the cryptographic signatures to verify the next release. So the plan is to start at 6.0 as I can trust the original CDs and then update to the latest release. This will also be an opportunity to recap on some of the things that changed over the various versions. News Roundup ZoL repo move to OpenZFS (https://zfsonlinux.topicbox.com/groups/zfs-discuss/T13eedc32607dab41/zol-repo-move-to-openzfs) Because it will contain the ZFS source code for both Linux and FreeBSD, we will rename the "ZFSonLinux" code repository to "OpenZFS". Specifically, the repo at http://github.com/ZFSonLinux/zfs will be moved to the OpenZFS organization, at http://github.com/OpenZFS/zfs. The next major release of ZFS for Linux and FreeBSD will be "OpenZFS 2.0", and is expected to ship in 2020. Mcclure111 Sun Thread (https://twitter.com/mcclure111/status/1196557401710837762) A long time ago— like 15 years ago— I worked at Sun Microsystems. The company was nearly dead at the time (it died a couple years later) because they didn't make anything that anyone wanted to buy anymore. So they had a lot of strange ideas about how they'd make their comeback. GEOM NOP (https://oshogbo.vexillium.org/blog/71/) Sometimes while testing file systems or applications you want to simulate some errors on the disk level. The first time I heard about this need was from Baptiste Daroussin during his presentation at AsiaBSDCon 2016. He mentioned how they had built a test lab with it. The same need was recently discussed during the PGCon 2019, to test a PostgreSQL instance. If you are FreeBSD user, I have great news for you: there is a GEOM provider which allows you to simulate a failing device. GNOP allows us to configure transparent providers from existing ones. The first interesting option of it is that we can slice the device into smaller pieces, thanks to the ‘offset option’ and ‘stripsesize’. This allows us to observe how the data on the disk is changing. Let’s assume that we want to observe the changes in the GPT table when the GPT flags are added or removed (for example the bootme flags which are described here). We can use dd every time and analyze it using absolute values from the disks. Keeping NetBSD up-to-date with pkg_comp 2.0 (https://jmmv.dev/2017/02/pkg_comp-2.0-tutorial-netbsd.html) This is a tutorial to guide you through the shiny new pkg_comp 2.0 on NetBSD. Goals: to use pkg_comp 2.0 to build a binary repository of all the packages you are interested in; to keep the repository fresh on a daily basis; and to use that repository with pkgin to maintain your NetBSD system up-to-date and secure. This tutorial is specifically targeted at NetBSD but should work on other platforms with some small changes. Expect, at the very least, a macOS-specific tutorial as soon as I create a pkg_comp standalone installer for that platform. Beastie Bits DragonFly - Radeon Improvements (http://lists.dragonflybsd.org/pipermail/commits/2019-November/720070.html) NomadBSD review (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7DglP7SbnlA&feature=share) Spongebob OpenBSD Security Comic (https://files.yukiisbo.red/openbsd_claim.png) Forth : The Early Years (https://colorforth.github.io/HOPL.html) LCM+L PDP-7 booting and running UNIX Version 0 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pvaPaWyiuLA) Feedback/Questions Chris - Ctrl-T (http://dpaste.com/284E5BV) Improved Ctrl+t that shows kernel backtrace (https://asciinema.org/a/xfSpvPT61Cnd9iRgbfIjT6kYj) Brian - Migrating NexentaStore to FreeBSD/FreeNAS (http://dpaste.com/05GDK8H#wrap) Avery - How to get involved (http://dpaste.com/26KW801#wrap) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag.
326: Certified BSD

326: Certified BSD

2019-11-2801:00:06

LPI releases BSD Certification, openzfs trip report, Using FreeBSD with ports, LLDB threading support ready, Linux versus Open Source Unix, and more. Headlines Linux Professional Institute Releases BSD Specialist Certification - re BSD Certification Group (https://www.lpi.org/articles/linux-professional-institute-releases-bsd-specialist-certification) Linux Professional Institute extends its Open Technology certification track with the BSD Specialist Certification. Starting October 30, 2019, BSD Specialist exams will be globally available. The certification was developed in collaboration with the BSD Certification Group which merged with Linux Professional Institute in 2018. G. Matthew Rice, the Executive Director of Linux Professional Institute says that "the release of the BSD Specialist certification marks a major milestone for Linux Professional Institute. With this new credential, we are reaffirming our belief in the value of, and support for, all open source technologies. As much as possible, future credentials and educational programs will include coverage of BSD.” OpenZFS Trip Report (https://www.ixsystems.com/blog/openzfs-dev-summit-2019/) The seventh annual OpenZFS Developer Summit took place on November 4th and 5th in San Francisco and brought together a healthy mix of familiar faces and new community participants. Several folks from iXsystems took part in the talks, hacking, and socializing at this amazing annual event. The messages of the event can be summed up as Unification, Refinement, and Ecosystem Tooling. News Roundup Using FreeBSD with Ports (2/2): Tool-assisted updating (https://eerielinux.wordpress.com/2019/09/12/using-freebsd-with-ports-2-2-tool-assisted-updating/) Part 1 here: https://eerielinux.wordpress.com/2019/08/18/using-freebsd-with-ports-1-2-classic-way-with-tools/ In the previous post I explained why sometimes building your software from ports may make sense on FreeBSD. I also introduced the reader to the old-fashioned way of using tools to make working with ports a bit more convenient. In this follow-up post we’re going to take a closer look at portmaster and see how it especially makes updating from ports much, much easier. For people coming here without having read the previous article: What I describe here is not what every FreeBSD admin today should consider good practice (any more)! It can still be useful in special cases, but my main intention is to discuss this for building up the foundation for what you actually should do today. LLDB Threading support now ready for mainline (http://blog.netbsd.org/tnf/entry/lldb_threading_support_now_ready) Upstream describes LLDB as a next generation, high-performance debugger. It is built on top of LLVM/Clang toolchain, and features great integration with it. At the moment, it primarily supports debugging C, C++ and ObjC code, and there is interest in extending it to more languages. In February, I have started working on LLDB, as contracted by the NetBSD Foundation. So far I've been working on reenabling continuous integration, squashing bugs, improving NetBSD core file support, extending NetBSD's ptrace interface to cover more register types and fix compat32 issues and fixing watchpoint support. Then, I've started working on improving thread support which is taking longer than expected. You can read more about that in my September 2019 report. So far the number of issues uncovered while enabling proper threading support has stopped me from merging the work-in-progress patches. However, I've finally reached the point where I believe that the current work can be merged and the remaining problems can be resolved afterwards. More on that and other LLVM-related events happening during the last month in this report. Linux VS open source UNIX (https://www.adminbyaccident.com/politics/linux-vs-open-source-unix/) Beastie Bits Support for Realtek RTL8125 2.5Gb Ethernet controller (https://marc.info/?l=openbsd-tech&m=157380442230074&w=2) Computer Files Are Going Extinct (https://onezero.medium.com/the-death-of-the-computer-file-doc-43cb028c0506) FreeBSD kernel hacking (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FUub_UtF3c) Modern BSD Computing for Fun on a VAX! Trying to use a VAX in today's world by Jeff Armstrong (https://youtu.be/e7cJ7v2lYdE) MidnightBSD 1.2 Released (https://www.justjournal.com/users/mbsd/entry/33779) Feedback/Questions Paulo - Zfs snapshots (http://dpaste.com/0WQRP43#wrap) Phillip - GCP (http://dpaste.com/075ZQE1#wrap) A Listener - Old episodes? (http://dpaste.com/3YJ4119#wrap) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag.
325: Cracking Rainbows

325: Cracking Rainbows

2019-11-2100:57:40

FreeBSD 12.1 is here, A history of Unix before Berkeley, FreeBSD development setup, HardenedBSD 2019 Status Report, DNSSEC, compiling RainbowCrack on OpenBSD, and more. Headlines FreeBSD 12.1 (https://www.freebsd.org/releases/12.1R/announce.html) Some of the highlights: BearSSL has been imported to the base system. The clang, llvm, lld, lldb, compiler-rt utilities and libc++ have been updated to version 8.0.1. OpenSSL has been updated to version 1.1.1d. Several userland utility updates. For a complete list of new features and known problems, please see the online release notes and errata list, available at: https://www.FreeBSD.org/releases/12.1R/relnotes.html A History of UNIX before Berkeley: UNIX Evolution: 1975-1984. (http://www.darwinsys.com/history/hist.html) Nobody needs to be told that UNIX is popular today. In this article we will show you a little of where it was yesterday and over the past decade. And, without meaning in the least to minimise the incredible contributions of Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie, we will bring to light many of the others who worked on early versions, and try to show where some of the key ideas came from, and how they got into the UNIX of today. Our title says we are talking about UNIX evolution. Evolution means different things to different people. We use the term loosely, to describe the change over time among the many different UNIX variants in use both inside and outside Bell Labs. Ideas, code, and useful programs seem to have made their way back and forth - like mutant genes - among all the many UNIXes living in the phone company over the decade in question. Part One looks at some of the major components of the current UNIX system - the text formatting tools, the compilers and program development tools, and so on. Most of the work described in Part One took place at Research'', a part of Bell Laboratories (now AT&T Bell Laboratories, then as nowthe Labs''), and the ancestral home of UNIX. In planned (but not written) later parts, we would have looked at some of the myriad versions of UNIX - there are far more than one might suspect. This includes a look at Columbus and USG and at Berkeley Unix. You'll begin to get a glimpse inside the history of the major streams of development of the system during that time. News Roundup My FreeBSD Development Setup (https://adventurist.me/posts/00296) I do my FreeBSD development using git, tmux, vim and cscope. I keep a FreeBSD fork on my github, I have forked https://github.com/freebsd/freebsd to https://github.com/adventureloop/freebsd OPNsense 19.7.6 released (https://opnsense.org/opnsense-19-7-6-released/) As we are experiencing the Suricata community first hand in Amsterdam we thought to release this version a bit earlier than planned. Included is the latest Suricata 5.0.0 release in the development version. That means later this November we will releasing version 5 to the production version as we finish up tweaking the integration and maybe pick up 5.0.1 as it becomes available. LDAP TLS connectivity is now integrated into the system trust store, which ensures that all required root and intermediate certificates will be seen by the connection setup when they have been added to the authorities section. The same is true for trusting self-signed certificates. On top of this, IPsec now supports public key authentication as contributed by Pascal Mathis. HardenedBSD November 2019 Status Report. (https://hardenedbsd.org/article/shawn-webb/2019-11-09/hardenedbsd-status-report) We at HardenedBSD have a lot of news to share. On 05 Nov 2019, Oliver Pinter resigned amicably from the project. All of us at HardenedBSD owe Oliver our gratitude and appreciation. This humble project, named by Oliver, was born out of his thesis work and the collaboration with Shawn Webb. Oliver created the HardenedBSD repo on GitHub in April 2013. The HardenedBSD Foundation was formed five years later to carry on this great work. DNSSEC enabled in default unbound(8) configuration. (https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20191110123908) DNSSEC validation has been enabled in the default unbound.conf(5) in -current. The relevant commits were from Job Snijders (job@) How to Install Shopware with NGINX and Let's Encrypt on FreeBSD 12 (https://www.howtoforge.com/how-to-install-shopware-with-nginx-and-lets-encrypt-on-freebsd-12/) Shopware is the next generation of open source e-commerce software. Based on bleeding edge technologies like Symfony 3, Doctrine2 and Zend Framework Shopware comes as the perfect platform for your next e-commerce project. This tutorial will walk you through the Shopware Community Edition (CE) installation on FreeBSD 12 system by using NGINX as a web server. Requirements Make sure your system meets the following minimum requirements: + Linux-based operating system with NGINX or Apache 2.x (with mod_rewrite) web server installed. + PHP 5.6.4 or higher with ctype, gd, curl, dom, hash, iconv, zip, json, mbstring, openssl, session, simplexml, xml, zlib, fileinfo, and pdo/mysql extensions. PHP 7.1 or above is strongly recommended. + MySQL 5.5.0 or higher. + Possibility to set up cron jobs. + Minimum 4 GB available hard disk space. + IonCube Loader version 5.0.0 or higher (optional). How to Compile RainbowCrack on OpenBSD (https://cromwell-intl.com/open-source/compiling-rainbowcrack-on-openbsd.html) Project RainbowCrack was originally Zhu Shuanglei's implementation, it's not clear to me if the project is still just his or if it's even been maintained for a while. His page seems to have been last updated in August 2007. The Project RainbowCrack web page now has just binaries for Windows XP and Linux, both 32-bit and 64-bit versions. Earlier versions were available as source code. The version 1.2 source code does not compile on OpenBSD, and in my experience it doesn't compile on Linux, either. It seems to date from 2004 at the earliest, and I think it makes some version-2.4 assumptions about Linux kernel headers. You might also look at ophcrack, a more modern tool, although it seems to be focused on cracking Windows XP/Vista/7/8/10 password hashes Feedback/Questions Reese - Amature radio info (http://dpaste.com/2RDG9K4#wrap) Chris - VPN (http://dpaste.com/2K4T2FQ#wrap) Malcolm - NAT (http://dpaste.com/138NEMA) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag.
324: Emergency Space Mode

324: Emergency Space Mode

2019-11-1400:46:30

Migrating drives and zpool between hosts, OpenBSD in 2019, Dragonfly’s new zlib and dhcpcd, Batch renaming images and resolution with awk, a rant on the X11 ICCCM selection system, hammer 2 emergency space mode, and more. Headlines Migrating drives and the zpool from one host to another. (https://dan.langille.org/2019/10/26/migrating-drives-and-the-zpool-from-one-host-to-another/) Today is the day. Today I move a zpool from an R710 into an R720. The goal: all services on that zpool start running on the new host. Fortunately, that zpool is dedicated to jails, more or less. I have done some planning about this, including moving a poudriere on the R710 into a jail. Now it is almost noon on Saturday, I am sitting in the basement (just outside the server room), and I’m typing this up. In this post: FreeBSD 12.0 Dell R710 (r710-01) Dell R720 (r720-01) drive caddies from eBay and now I know the difference between SATA and SATAu PLEASE READ THIS first: Migrating ZFS Storage Pools (https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E19253-01/819-5461/gbchy/index.html) OpenBSD in 2019 (https://blog.habets.se/2019/10/OpenBSD-in-2019.html) I’ve used OpenBSD on and off since 2.1. More back then than in the last 10 years or so though, so I thought I’d try it again. What triggered this was me finding a silly bug in GNU cpio that has existed with a “FIXME” comment since at least 1994. I checked OpenBSD to see if it had a related bug, but as expected no it was just fine. I don’t quite remember why I stopped using OpenBSD for servers, but I do remember filesystem corruption on “unexpected power disconnections” (even with softdep turned on), which I’ve never really seen on Linux. That and that fewer things “just worked” than with Linux, which matters more when I installed more random things than I do now. I’ve become a lot more minimalist. Probably due to less spare time. Life is better when you don’t run things like PHP (not that OpenBSD doesn’t support PHP, just an example) or your own email server with various antispam tooling, and other things. This is all experience from running OpenBSD on a server. On my next laptop I intend to try running OpenBSD on the dektop, and will see if that more ad-hoc environment works well. E.g. will gnuradio work? Lack of other-OS VM support may be a problem. Verdict Ouch, that’s a long list of bad stuff. Still, I like it. I’ll continue to run it, and will make sure my stuff continues working on OpenBSD. And maybe in a year I’ll have a review of OpenBSD on a laptop. News Roundup New zlib, new dhcpcd (https://www.dragonflydigest.com/2019/10/29/23683.html) zlib and dhcpcd are both updated in DragonFly… but my quick perusal of the commits makes it sound like bugfix only; no usage changes needed. DHCPCD Commit: http://lists.dragonflybsd.org/pipermail/commits/2019-October/719768.html ZLIB Commit: http://lists.dragonflybsd.org/pipermail/commits/2019-October/719772.html Batch renaming images, including image resolution, with awk (https://victoria.dev/verbose/batch-renaming-images-including-image-resolution-with-awk/) The most recent item on my list of “Geeky things I did that made me feel pretty awesome” is an hour’s adventure that culminated in this code: $ file IMG* | awk 'BEGIN{a=0} {print substr($1, 1, length($1)-5),a++"_"substr($8,1, length($8)-1)}' | while read fn fr; do echo $(rename -v "s/$fn/img_$fr/g" *); done IMG_20170808_172653_425.jpg renamed as img_0_4032x3024.jpg IMG_20170808_173020_267.jpg renamed as img_1_3024x3506.jpg IMG_20170808_173130_616.jpg renamed as img_2_3024x3779.jpg IMG_20170808_173221_425.jpg renamed as img_3_3024x3780.jpg IMG_20170808_173417_059.jpg renamed as img_4_2956x2980.jpg IMG_20170808_173450_971.jpg renamed as img_5_3024x3024.jpg IMG_20170808_173536_034.jpg renamed as img_6_4032x3024.jpg IMG_20170808_173602_732.jpg renamed as img_7_1617x1617.jpg IMG_20170808_173645_339.jpg renamed as img_8_3024x3780.jpg IMG_20170909_170146_585.jpg renamed as img_9_3036x3036.jpg IMG_20170911_211522_543.jpg renamed as img_10_3036x3036.jpg IMG_20170913_071608_288.jpg renamed as img_11_2760x2760.jpg IMG_20170913_073205_522.jpg renamed as img_12_2738x2738.jpg // ... etc etc The last item on the aforementioned list is “TODO: come up with a shorter title for this list.” I hate the X11 ICCCM selection system, and you should too - A Rant (http://www.call-with-current-continuation.org/rants/icccm.txt) d00d, that document is devilspawn. I've recently spent my nights in pain implementing the selection mechanism. WHY OH WHY OH WHY? why me? why did I choose to do this? and what sick evil twisted mind wrote this damn spec? I don't know why I'm working with it, I just wanted to make a useful program. I didn't know what I was getting myself in to. Nobody knows until they try it. And once you start, you're unable to stop. You can't stop, if you stop then you haven't completed it to spec. You can't fail on this, it's just a few pages of text, how can that be so hard? So what if they use Atoms for everything. So what if there's no explicit correlation between the target type of a SelectionNotify event and the type of the property it indicates? So what if the distinction is ambiguous? So what if the document is littered with such atrocities? It's not the spec's fault, the spec is authoritative. It's obviously YOUR (the implementor's) fault for misunderstanding it. If you didn't misunderstand it, you wouldn't be here complaining about it would you? HAMMER2 emergency space mode (https://www.dragonflydigest.com/2019/10/22/23652.html) As anyone who has been running HAMMER1 or HAMMER2 has noticed, snapshots and copy on write and infinite history can eat a lot of disk space, even if the actual file volume isn’t changing much. There’s now an ‘emergency mode‘ for HAMMER2, where disk operations can happen even if there isn’t space for the normal history activity. It’s dangerous, in that the normal protections against data loss if power is cut go away, and snapshots created while in this mode will be mangled. So definitely don’t leave it on! Beastie Bits The BastilleBSD community has started work on over 100 automation templates (https://twitter.com/BastilleBSD/status/1186659762458501120) PAM perturbed (https://www.dragonflydigest.com/2019/10/23/23654.html) OpenBSD T-Shirts now available (https://teespring.com/stores/openbsd) FastoCloud (Opensource Media Service) now available on FreeBSD (https://old.reddit.com/r/freebsd/comments/dlyqtq/fastocloud_opensource_media_service_now_available/) Unix: A History and a Memoir by Brian Kernighan now available (https://www.cs.princeton.edu/~bwk/) OpenBSD Moonlight game streaming client from a Windows + Nvidia PC (https://www.reddit.com/r/openbsd_gaming/comments/d6xboo/openbsd_moonlight_game_streaming_client_from_a/) *** Feedback/Questions Tim - Release Notes for Lumina 1.5 (http://dpaste.com/38DNSXT#wrap) Answer Here (http://dpaste.com/3QJX8G3#wrap) Brad - vBSDcon Trip Report (http://dpaste.com/316MGVX#wrap) Jacob - Using terminfo on FreeBSD (http://dpaste.com/131N05J#wrap) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag.
323: OSI Burrito Guy

323: OSI Burrito Guy

2019-11-0700:49:22

The earliest Unix code, how to replace fail2ban with blacklistd, OpenBSD crossed 400k commits, how to install Bolt CMS on FreeBSD, optimized hammer2, appeasing the OSI 7-layer burrito guys, and more. Headlines The Earliest Unix Code: An Anniversary Source Code Release (https://computerhistory.org/blog/the-earliest-unix-code-an-anniversary-source-code-release/) What is it that runs the servers that hold our online world, be it the web or the cloud? What enables the mobile apps that are at the center of increasingly on-demand lives in the developed world and of mobile banking and messaging in the developing world? The answer is the operating system Unix and its many descendants: Linux, Android, BSD Unix, MacOS, iOS—the list goes on and on. Want to glimpse the Unix in your Mac? Open a Terminal window and enter “man roff” to view the Unix manual entry for an early text formatting program that lives within your operating system. 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the start of Unix. In the summer of 1969, that same summer that saw humankind’s first steps on the surface of the Moon, computer scientists at the Bell Telephone Laboratories—most centrally Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie—began the construction of a new operating system, using a then-aging DEC PDP-7 computer at the labs. This man sent the first online message 50 years ago (https://www.cbc.ca/radio/thecurrent/the-current-for-oct-29-2019-1.5339212/this-man-sent-the-first-online-message-50-years-ago-he-s-since-seen-the-web-s-dark-side-emerge-1.5339244) As many of you have heard in the past, the first online message ever sent between two computers was "lo", just over 50 years ago, on Oct. 29, 1969. It was supposed to say "log," but the computer sending the message — based at UCLA — crashed before the letter "g" was typed. A computer at Stanford 560 kilometres away was supposed to fill in the remaining characters "in," as in "log in." The CBC Radio show, “The Current” has a half-hour interview with the man who sent that message, Leonard Kleinrock, distinguished professor of computer science at UCLA "The idea of the network was you could sit at one computer, log on through the network to a remote computer and use its services there," 50 years later, the internet has become so ubiquitous that it has almost been rendered invisible. There's hardly an aspect in our daily lives that hasn't been touched and transformed by it. Q: Take us back to that day 50 years ago. Did you have the sense that this was going to be something you'd be talking about a half a century later? A: Well, yes and no. Four months before that message was sent, there was a press release that came out of UCLA in which it quotes me as describing what my vision for this network would become. Basically what it said is that this network would be always on, always available. Anybody with any device could get on at anytime from any location, and it would be invisible. Well, what I missed ... was that this is going to become a social network. People talking to people. Not computers talking to computers, but [the] human element. Q: Can you briefly explain what you were working on in that lab? Why were you trying to get computers to actually talk to one another? A: As an MIT graduate student, years before, I recognized I was surrounded by computers and I realized there was no effective [or efficient] way for them to communicate. I did my dissertation, my research, on establishing a mathematical theory of how these networks would work. But there was no such network existing. AT&T said it won't work and, even if it does, we want nothing to do with it. So I had to wait around for years until the Advanced Research Projects Agency within the Department of Defence decided they needed a network to connect together the computer scientists they were supervising and supporting. Q: For all the promise of the internet, it has also developed some dark sides that I'm guessing pioneers like yourselves never anticipated. A: We did not. I knew everybody on the internet at that time, and they were all well-behaved and they all believed in an open, shared free network. So we did not put in any security controls. When the first spam email occurred, we began to see the dark side emerge as this network reached nefarious people sitting in basements with a high-speed connection, reaching out to millions of people instantaneously, at no cost in time or money, anonymously until all sorts of unpleasant events occurred, which we called the dark side. But in those early days, I considered the network to be going through its teenage years. Hacking to spam, annoying kinds of effects. I thought that one day this network would mature and grow up. Well, in fact, it took a turn for the worse when nation states, organized crime and extremists came in and began to abuse the network in severe ways. Q: Is there any part of you that regrets giving birth to this? A: Absolutely not. The greater good is much more important. News Roundup How to use blacklistd(8) with NPF as a fail2ban replacement (https://www.unitedbsd.com/d/63-how-to-use-blacklistd8-with-npf-as-a-fail2ban-replacement) blacklistd(8) provides an API that can be used by network daemons to communicate with a packet filter via a daemon to enforce opening and closing ports dynamically based on policy. The interface to the packet filter is in /libexec/blacklistd-helper (this is currently designed for npf) and the configuration file (inspired from inetd.conf) is in etc/blacklistd.conf Now, blacklistd(8) will require bpfjit(4) (Just-In-Time compiler for Berkeley Packet Filter) in order to properly work, in addition to, naturally, npf(7) as frontend and syslogd(8), as a backend to print diagnostic messages. Also remember npf shall rely on the npflog* virtual network interface to provide logging for tcpdump() to use. Unfortunately (dont' ask me why ??) in 8.1 all the required kernel components are still not compiled by default in the GENERIC kernel (though they are in HEAD), and are rather provided as modules. Enabling NPF and blacklistd services would normally result in them being automatically loaded as root, but predictably on securelevel=1 this is not going to happen. FreeBSD’s handbook chapter on blacklistd (https://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/firewalls-blacklistd.html) OpenBSD crossed 400,000 commits (https://marc.info/?l=openbsd-tech&m=157059352620659&w=2) Sometime in the last week OpenBSD crossed 400,000 commits (*) upon all our repositories since starting at 1995/10/18 08:37:01 Canada/Mountain. That's a lot of commits by a lot of amazing people. (*) by one measure. Since the repository is so large and old, there are a variety of quirks including ChangeLog missing entries and branches not convertible to other repo forms, so measuring is hard. If you think you've got a great way of measuring, don't be so sure of yourself -- you may have overcounted or undercounted. Subject to the notes Theo made about under and over counting, FreeBSD should hit 1 million commits (base + ports + docs) some time in 2020 NetBSD + pkgsrc are approaching 600,000, but of course pkgsrc covers other operating systems too How to Install Bolt CMS with Nginx and Let's Encrypt on FreeBSD 12 (https://www.howtoforge.com/how-to-install-bolt-cms-nginx-ssl-on-freebsd-12/) Bolt is a sophisticated, lightweight and simple CMS built with PHP. It is released under the open-source MIT-license and source code is hosted as a public repository on Github. A bolt is a tool for Content Management, which strives to be as simple and straightforward as possible. It is quick to set up, easy to configure, uses elegant templates. Bolt is created using modern open-source libraries and is best suited to build sites in HTML5 with modern markup. In this tutorial, we will go through the Bolt CMS installation on FreeBSD 12 system by using Nginx as a web server, MySQL as a database server, and optionally you can secure the transport layer by using acme.sh client and Let's Encrypt certificate authority to add SSL support. Requirements The system requirements for Bolt are modest, and it should run on any fairly modern web server: PHP version 5.5.9 or higher with the following common PHP extensions: pdo, mysqlnd, pgsql, openssl, curl, gd, intl, json, mbstring, opcache, posix, xml, fileinfo, exif, zip. Access to SQLite (which comes bundled with PHP), or MySQL or PostgreSQL. Apache with mod_rewrite enabled (.htaccess files) or Nginx (virtual host configuration covered below). A minimum of 32MB of memory allocated to PHP. hammer2 - Optimize hammer2 support threads and dispatch (http://lists.dragonflybsd.org/pipermail/commits/2019-September/719632.html) Refactor the XOP groups in order to be able to queue strategy calls, whenever possible, to the same CPU as the issuer. This optimizes several cases and reduces unnecessary IPI traffic between cores. The next best thing to do would be to not queue certain XOPs to an H2 support thread at all, but I would like to keep the threads intact for later clustering work. The best scaling case for this is when one has a large number of user threads doing I/O. One instance of a single-threaded program on an otherwise idle machine might see a slightly reduction in performance but at the same time we completely avoid unnecessarily spamming all cores in the system on the behalf of a single program, so overhead is also significantly lower. This will tend to increase the number of H2 support threads since we need a certain degree of multiplication for domain separation. This should significantly increase I/O performance for multi-threaded workloads. You know, we might as well just run every network service over HTTPS/2 and build another six layers on top of that to appease the OSI 7-layer burrito guys (http://boston.conman.org/2019/10/17.1) I've seen the writing on the wall, and while for now you can configure Firefox not to use DoH, I'm not confident enough to think it will remain that way. To that end, I've finally set up my own DoH server for use at Chez Boca. It only involved setting up my own CA to generate the appropriate certificates, install my CA certificate into Firefox, configure Apache to run over HTTP/2 (THANK YOU SO VERY XXXXX­XX MUCH GOOGLE FOR SHOVING THIS HTTP/2 XXXXX­XXX DOWN OUR THROATS!—no, I'm not bitter) and write a 150 line script that just queries my own local DNS, because, you know, it's more XXXXX­XX secure or some XXXXX­XXX reason like that. Sigh. Beastie Bits An Oral History of Unix (https://www.princeton.edu/~hos/Mahoney/unixhistory) NUMA Siloing in the FreeBSD Network Stack [pdf] (https://people.freebsd.org/~gallatin/talks/euro2019.pdf) EuroBSDCon 2019 videos available (https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLskKNopggjc6NssLc8GEGSiFYJLYdlTQx) Barbie knows best (https://twitter.com/eksffa/status/1188638425567682560) For the #OpenBSD #e2k19 attendees. I did a pre visit today. (https://twitter.com/bob_beck/status/1188226661684301824) Drawer Find (https://twitter.com/pasha_sh/status/1187877745499561985) Slides - Removing ROP Gadgets from OpenBSD - AsiaBSDCon 2019 (https://www.openbsd.org/papers/asiabsdcon2019-rop-slides.pdf) Feedback/Questions Bostjan - Open source doesn't mean secure (http://dpaste.com/1M5MVCX#wrap) Malcolm - Allan is Correct. (http://dpaste.com/2RFNR94) Michael - FreeNAS inside a Jail (http://dpaste.com/28YW3BB#wrap) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag.
322: Happy Birthday, Unix

322: Happy Birthday, Unix

2019-10-3101:07:30

Unix is 50, Hunting down Ken's PDP-7, OpenBSD and OPNSense have new releases, Clarification on what GhostBSD is, sshuttle - VPN over SSH, and more. Headlines Unix is 50 (https://www.bell-labs.com/unix50/) In the summer of 1969 computer scientists Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie created the first implementation of Unix with the goal of designing an elegant and economical operating system for a little-used PDP-7 minicomputer at Bell Labs. That modest project, however, would have a far-reaching legacy. Unix made large-scale networking of diverse computing systems — and the Internet — practical. The Unix team went on to develop the C language, which brought an unprecedented combination of efficiency and expressiveness to programming. Both made computing more "portable". Today, Linux, the most popular descendent of Unix, powers the vast majority of servers, and elements of Unix and Linux are found in most mobile devices. Meanwhile C++ remains one of the most widely used programming languages today. Unix may be a half-century old but its influence is only growing. Hunting down Ken's PDP-7: video footage found (https://bsdimp.blogspot.com/2019/10/video-footage-of-first-pdp-7-to-run-unix.html) In my prior blog post, I traced Ken's scrounged PDP-7 to SN 34. In this post I'll show that we have actual video footage of that PDP-7 due to an old film from Bell Labs. this gives us almost a minute of footage of the PDP-7 Ken later used to create Unix. News Roundup OpenBSD 6.6 Released (https://openbsd.org/66.html) Announce: https://marc.info/?l=openbsd-tech&m=157132024225971&w=2 Upgrade Guide: https://openbsd.org/faq/upgrade66.html Changelog: https://openbsd.org/plus66.html OPNsense 19.7.5 released (https://opnsense.org/opnsense-19-7-5-released/) Hello friends and followers, Lots of plugin and ports updates this time with a few minor improvements in all core areas. Behind the scenes we are starting to migrate the base system to version 12.1 which is supposed to hit the next 20.1 release. Stay tuned for more infos in the next month or so. Here are the full patch notes: + system: show all swap partitions in system information widget + system: flatten services_get() in preparation for removal + system: pin Syslog-ng version to specific package name + system: fix LDAP/StartTLS with user import page + system: fix a PHP warning on authentication server page + system: replace most subprocess.call use + interfaces: fix devd handling of carp devices (contributed by stumbaumr) + firewall: improve firewall rules inline toggles + firewall: only allow TCP flags on TCP protocol + firewall: simplify help text for direction setting + firewall: make protocol log summary case insensitive + reporting: ignore malformed flow records + captive portal: fix type mismatch for timeout read + dhcp: add note for static lease limitation with lease registration (contributed by Northguy) + ipsec: add margintime and rekeyfuzz options + ipsec: clear $dpdline correctly if not set + ui: fix tokenizer reorder on multiple saves + plugins: os-acme-client 1.26[1] + plugins: os-bind will reload bind on record change (contributed by blablup) + plugins: os-etpro-telemetry minor subprocess.call replacement + plugins: os-freeradius 1.9.4[2] + plugins: os-frr 1.12[3] + plugins: os-haproxy 2.19[4] + plugins: os-mailtrail 1.2[5] + plugins: os-postfix 1.11[6] + plugins: os-rspamd 1.8[7] + plugins: os-sunnyvalley LibreSSL support (contributed by Sunny Valley Networks) + plugins: os-telegraf 1.7.6[8] + plugins: os-theme-cicada 1.21 (contributed by Team Rebellion) + plugins: os-theme-tukan 1.21 (contributed by Team Rebellion) + plugins: os-tinc minor subprocess.call replacement + plugins: os-tor 1.8 adds dormant mode disable option (contributed by Fabian Franz) + plugins: os-virtualbox 1.0 (contributed by andrewhotlab) Dealing with the misunderstandings of what is GhostBSD (http://ghostbsd.org/node/194) Since the release of 19.09, I have seen a lot of misunderstandings on what is GhostBSD and the future of GhostBSD. GhostBSD is based on TrueOS with FreeBSD 12 STABLE with our twist to it. We are still continuing to use TrueOS for OpenRC, and the new package's system for the base system that is built from ports. GhostBSD is becoming a slow-moving rolling release base on the latest TrueOS with FreeBSD 12 STABLE. When FreeBSD 13 STABLE gets released, GhostBSD will be upgraded to TrueOS with FreeBSD 13 STABLE. Our official desktop is MATE, which means that the leading developer of GhostBSD does not officially support XFCE. Community releases are maintained by the community and for the community. GhostBSD project will provide help to build and to host the community release. If anyone wants to have a particular desktop supported, it is up to the community. Sure I will help where I can, answer questions and guide new community members that contribute to community release. There is some effort going on for Plasma5 desktop. If anyone is interested in helping with XFCE and Plasma5 or in creating another community release, you are well come to contribute. Also, Contribution to the GhostBSD base system, to ports and new ports, and in house software are welcome. We are mostly active on Telegram https://t.me/ghostbsd, but you can also reach us on the forum. SHUTTLE – VPN over SSH | VPN Alternative (https://www.terminalbytes.com/sshuttle-vpn-over-ssh-vpn-alternative/) Looking for a lightweight VPN client, but are not ready to spend a monthly recurring amount on a VPN? VPNs can be expensive depending upon the quality of service and amount of privacy you want. A good VPN plan can easily set you back by 10$ a month and even that doesn’t guarantee your privacy. There is no way to be sure whether the VPN is storing your confidential information and traffic logs or not. sshuttle is the answer to your problem it provides VPN over ssh and in this article we’re going to explore this cheap yet powerful alternative to the expensive VPNs. By using open source tools you can control your own privacy. VPN over SSH – sshuttle sshuttle is an awesome program that allows you to create a VPN connection from your local machine to any remote server that you have ssh access on. The tunnel established over the ssh connection can then be used to route all your traffic from client machine through the remote machine including all the dns traffic. In the bare bones sshuttle is just a proxy server which runs on the client machine and forwards all the traffic to a ssh tunnel. Since its open source it holds quite a lot of major advantages over traditional VPN. OpenSSH 8.1 Released (http://www.openssh.com/txt/release-8.1) Security ssh(1), sshd(8), ssh-add(1), ssh-keygen(1): an exploitable integer overflow bug was found in the private key parsing code for the XMSS key type. This key type is still experimental and support for it is not compiled by default. No user-facing autoconf option exists in portable OpenSSH to enable it. This bug was found by Adam Zabrocki and reported via SecuriTeam's SSD program. ssh(1), sshd(8), ssh-agent(1): add protection for private keys at rest in RAM against speculation and memory side-channel attacks like Spectre, Meltdown and Rambleed. This release encrypts private keys when they are not in use with a symmetric key that is derived from a relatively large "prekey" consisting of random data (currently 16KB). This release includes a number of changes that may affect existing configurations: ssh-keygen(1): when acting as a CA and signing certificates with an RSA key, default to using the rsa-sha2-512 signature algorithm. Certificates signed by RSA keys will therefore be incompatible with OpenSSH versions prior to 7.2 unless the default is overridden (using "ssh-keygen -t ssh-rsa -s ..."). New Features ssh(1): Allow %n to be expanded in ProxyCommand strings ssh(1), sshd(8): Allow prepending a list of algorithms to the default set by starting the list with the '^' character, E.g. "HostKeyAlgorithms ^ssh-ed25519" ssh-keygen(1): add an experimental lightweight signature and verification ability. Signatures may be made using regular ssh keys held on disk or stored in a ssh-agent and verified against an authorized_keys-like list of allowed keys. Signatures embed a namespace that prevents confusion and attacks between different usage domains (e.g. files vs email). ssh-keygen(1): print key comment when extracting public key from a private key. ssh-keygen(1): accept the verbose flag when searching for host keys in known hosts (i.e. "ssh-keygen -vF host") to print the matching host's random-art signature too. All: support PKCS8 as an optional format for storage of private keys to disk. The OpenSSH native key format remains the default, but PKCS8 is a superior format to PEM if interoperability with non-OpenSSH software is required, as it may use a less insecure key derivation function than PEM's. Beastie Bits Say goodbye to the 32 CPU limit in NetBSD/aarch64 (https://twitter.com/jmcwhatever/status/1185584719183962112) vBSDcon 2019 videos (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvcdrOSlYOSzOzLjv_n1_GQ/videos) Browse the web in the terminal - W3M (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Hfda0Tjqsg&feature=youtu.be) NetBSD 9 and GSoC (http://netbsd.org/~kamil/GSoC2019.html#slide1) BSDCan 2019 Videos (https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLeF8ZihVdpFegPoAKppaDSoYmsBvpnSZv) NYC*BUG Install Fest: Nov 6th 18:45 @ Suspenders (https://www.nycbug.org/index?action=view&id=10673) FreeBSD Miniconf at linux.conf.au 2020 Call for Sessions Now Open (https://www.freebsdfoundation.org/blog/freebsd-miniconf-at-linux-conf-au-2020-call-for-sessions-now-open/) FOSDEM 2020 - BSD Devroom Call for Participation (https://people.freebsd.org/~rodrigo/fosdem20/) University of Cambridge looking for Research Assistants/Associates (https://twitter.com/ed_maste/status/1184865668317007874) Feedback/Questions Trenton - Beeping Thinkpad (http://dpaste.com/0ZEXNM6#wrap) Alex - Per user ZFS Datasets (http://dpaste.com/1K31A65#wrap) Allan’s old patch from 2015 (https://reviews.freebsd.org/D2272) Javier - FBSD 12.0 + ZFS + encryption (http://dpaste.com/1XX4NNA#wrap) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag.
321: The Robot OS

321: The Robot OS

2019-10-2400:55:16

An interview with Trenton Schulz about his early days with FreeBSD, Robot OS, Qt, and more. Interview - Trenton Schulz - freenas@norwegianrockcat.com (mailto:freenas@norwegianrockcat.com) Robot OS on FreeBSD BR: Welcome to the show. Can you tell us a little bit about yourself and how you got started with BSD? AJ: You were working for Trolltech (creators of Qt). Was FreeBSD used there and how? BR: Can you tell us more about the work you are doing with Robot OS on FreeBSD? AJ: Was EuroBSDcon your first BSD conference? How did you like it? BR: Do you have some tips or advice on how to get started with the BSDs? AJ: Is there anything else you’d like to tell us before we let you go? Beastie Bits FreeBSD Miniconf at linux.conf.au 2020 Call for Sessions Now Open (https://www.freebsdfoundation.org/blog/freebsd-miniconf-at-linux-conf-au-2020-call-for-sessions-now-open/) Portland BSD Pizza Night: Oct 24th, 19:00 @ Rudy’s Gourmet Pizza (http://calagator.org/events/1250476319) NYC*BUG Install Fest: Nov 6th 18:45 @ Suspenders (https://www.nycbug.org/index?action=view&id=10673) FOSDEM 2020 - BSD Devroom Call for Participation (https://people.freebsd.org/~rodrigo/fosdem20/) University of Cambridge looking for Research Assistants/Associates (https://twitter.com/ed_maste/status/1184865668317007874) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag. Special Guest: Trenton Shulz.
320: Codebase: Neck Deep

320: Codebase: Neck Deep

2019-10-1700:56:41

Headlines FreeBSD and custom firmware on the Google Pixelbook (https://unrelenting.technology/articles/FreeBSD-and-custom-firmware-on-the-Google-Pixelbook) FreeBSD and custom firmware on the Google Pixelbook Back in 2015, I jumped on the ThinkPad bandwagon by getting an X240 to run FreeBSD on. Unlike most people in the ThinkPad crowd, I actually liked the clickpad and didn\u2019t use the trackpoint much. But this summer I\u2019ve decided that it was time for something newer. I wanted something.. lighter and thinner (ha, turns out this is actually important, I got tired of carrying a T H I C C laptop - Apple was right all along); with a 3:2 display (why is Lenovo making these Serious Work\u2122 laptops 16:9 in the first place?? 16:9 is awful in below-13-inch sizes especially); with a HiDPI display (and ideally with a good size for exact 2x scaling instead of fractional); with USB-C ports; without a dGPU, especially without an NVIDIA GPU; assembled with screws and not glue (I don\u2019t necessarily need expansion and stuff in a laptop all that much, but being able to replace the battery without dealing with a glued chassis is good); supported by FreeBSD of course (\u201csome development required\u201d is okay but I\u2019m not going to write big drivers); how about something with open source firmware, that would be fun. I was considering a ThinkPad X1 Carbon from an old generation - the one from the same year as the X230 is corebootable, so that\u2019s fun. But going back in processor generations just doesn\u2019t feel great. I want something more efficient, not less! And then I discovered the Pixelbook. Other than the big huge large bezels around the screen, I liked everything about it. Thin aluminum design, a 3:2 HiDPI screen, rubber palm rests (why isn\u2019t every laptop ever doing that?!), the \u201cconvertibleness\u201d (flip the screen around to turn it into.. something rather big for a tablet, but it is useful actually), a Wacom touchscreen that supports a pen, mostly reasonable hardware (Intel Wi-Fi), and that famous coreboot support (Chromebooks\u2019 stock firmware is coreboot + depthcharge). So here it is, my new laptop, a Google Pixelbook. Conclusion Pixelbook, FreeBSD, coreboot, EDK2 good. Seriously, I have no big words to say, other than just recommending this laptop to FOSS enthusiasts :) Porting NetBSD to the AMD x86-64: a case study in OS portability (https://www.usenix.org/legacy/publications/library/proceedings/bsdcon02/full_papers/linden/linden_html/index.html) Abstract NetBSD is known as a very portable operating system, currently running on 44 different architectures (12 different types of CPU). This paper takes a look at what has been done to make it portable, and how this has decreased the amount of effort needed to port NetBSD to a new architecture. The new AMD x86-64 architecture, of which the specifications were published at the end of 2000, with hardware to follow in 2002, is used as an example. Portability Supporting multiple platforms was a primary goal of the NetBSD project from the start. As NetBSD was ported to more and more platforms, the NetBSD kernel code was adapted to become more portable along the way. General Generally, code is shared between ports as much as possible. In NetBSD, it should always be considered if the code can be assumed to be useful on other architectures, present or future. If so, it is machine-independent and put it in an appropriate place in the source tree. When writing code that is intended to be machine-independent, and it contains conditional preprocessor statements depending on the architecture, then the code is likely wrong, or an extra abstraction layer is needed to get rid of these statements. Types Assumptions about the size of any type are not made. Assumptions made about type sizes on 32-bit platforms were a large problem when 64-bit platforms came around. Most of the problems of this kind had to be dealt with when NetBSD was ported to the DEC Alpha in 1994. A variation on this problem had to be dealt with with the UltraSPARC (sparc64) port in 1998, which is 64-bit, but big endian (vs. the little-endianness of the Alpha). When interacting with datastructures of a fixed size, such as on-disk metadata for filesystems, or datastructures directly interpreted by device hardware, explicitly sized types are used, such as uint32t, int8t, etc. Conclusions and future work The port of NetBSD to AMD's x86-64 architecture was done in six weeks, which confirms NetBSD's reputation as being a very portable operating system. One week was spent setting up the cross-toolchain and reading the x86-64 specifications, three weeks were spent writing the kernel code, one week was spent writing the userspace code, and one week testing and debugging it all. No problems were observed in any of the machine-independent parts of the kernel during test runs; all (simulated) device drivers, file systems, etc, worked without modification. News Roundup ZFS performance really does degrade as you approach quota limits (https://utcc.utoronto.ca/~cks/space/blog/solaris/ZFSFullQuotaPerformanceIssue) Every so often (currently monthly), there is an "OpenZFS leadership meeting". What this really means is 'lead developers from the various ZFS implementations get together to talk about things'. Announcements and meeting notes from these meetings get sent out to various mailing lists, including the ZFS on Linux ones. In the September meeting notes, I read a very interesting (to me) agenda item: Relax quota semantics for improved performance (Allan Jude) Problem: As you approach quotas, ZFS performance degrades. Proposal: Can we have a property like quota-policy=strict or loose, where we can optionally allow ZFS to run over the quota as long as performance is not decreased. This is very interesting to me because of two reasons. First, in the past we have definitely seen significant problems on our OmniOS machines, both when an entire pool hits a quota limit and when a single filesystem hits a refquota limit. It's nice to know that this wasn't just our imagination and that there is a real issue here. Even better, it might someday be improved (and perhaps in a way that we can use at least some of the time). Second, any number of people here run very close to and sometimes at the quota limits of both filesystems and pools, fundamentally because people aren't willing to buy more space. We have in the past assumed that this was relatively harmless and would only make people run out of space. If this is a known issue that causes serious performance degradation, well, I don't know if there's anything we can do, but at least we're going to have to think about it and maybe push harder at people. The first step will have to be learning the details of what's going on at the ZFS level to cause the slowdown. (It's apparently similar to what happens when the pool is almost full, but I don't know the specifics of that either.) With that said, we don't seem to have seen clear adverse effects on our Linux fileservers, and they've definitely run into quota limits (repeatedly). One possible reason for this is that having lots of RAM and SSDs makes the effects mostly go away. Another possible reason is that we haven't been looking closely enough to see that we're experiencing global slowdowns that correlate to filesystems hitting quota limits. We've had issues before with somewhat subtle slowdowns that we didn't understand (cf), so I can't discount that we're having it happen again. Fixing up KA9Q-unix, or "neck deep in 30 year old codebases.." (http://adrianchadd.blogspot.com/2019/09/fixing-up-ka9q-unix-or-neck-deep-in-30.html) I'll preface this by saying - yes, I'm still neck deep in FreeBSD's wifi stack and 802.11ac support, but it turns out it's slow work to fix 15 year old locking related issues that worked fine on 11abg cards, kinda worked ok on 11n cards, and are terrible for these 11ac cards. I'll .. get there. Anyhoo, I've finally been mucking around with AX.25 packet radio. I've been wanting to do this since I was a teenager and found out about its existence, but back in high school and .. well, until a few years ago really .. I didn't have my amateur radio licence. But, now I do, and I've done a bunch of other stuff with a bunch of other radios. The main stumbling block? All my devices are either Apple products or run FreeBSD - and none of them have useful AX.25 stacks. The main stacks of choice these days run on Linux, Windows or are a full hardware TNC. So yes, I was avoiding hacking on AX.25 stuff because there wasn't a BSD compatible AX.25 stack. I'm 40 now, leave me be. But! A few weeks ago I found that someone was still running a packet BBS out of San Francisco. And amazingly, his local node ran on FreeBSD! It turns out Jeremy (KK6JJJ) ported both an old copy of KA9Q and N0ARY-BBS to run on FreeBSD! Cool! I grabbed my 2m radio (which is already cabled up for digital modes), compiled up his KA9Q port, figured out how to get it to speak to Direwolf, and .. ok. Well, it worked. Kinda. HAMMER2 and fsck for review (https://www.dragonflydigest.com/2019/09/24/23540.html) HAMMER2 is Copy on Write, meaning changes are made to copies of existing data. This means operations are generally atomic and can survive a power outage, etc. (You should read up on it!) However, there\u2019s now a fsck command, useful if you want a report of data validity rather than any manual repair process. [The return of startx(1) for non-root users with some caveats (https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20190917091236) Mark Kettenis (kettenis@) has recently committed changes which restore a certain amount of startx(1)/xinit(1) functionality for non-root users. The commit messages explain the situation: ``` CVSROOT: /cvs Module name: src Changes by: kettenis@cvs.openbsd.org 2019/09/15 06:25:41 Modified files: etc/etc.amd64 : fbtab etc/etc.arm64 : fbtab etc/etc.hppa : fbtab etc/etc.i386 : fbtab etc/etc.loongson: fbtab etc/etc.luna88k: fbtab etc/etc.macppc : fbtab etc/etc.octeon : fbtab etc/etc.sgi : fbtab etc/etc.sparc64: fbtab Log message: Add ttyC4 to lost of devices to change when logging in on ttyC0 (and in some cases also the serial console) such that X can use it as its VT when running without root privileges. ok jsg@, matthieu@ CVSROOT: /cvs Module name: xenocara Changes by: kettenis@cvs.openbsd.org 2019/09/15 06:31:08 Modified files: xserver/hw/xfree86/common: xf86AutoConfig.c Log message: Add modesetting driver as a fall-back when appropriate such that we can use it when running without root privileges which prevents us from scanning the PCI bus. This makes startx(1)/xinit(1) work again on modern systems with inteldrm(4), radeondrm(4) and amdgpu(4). In some cases this will result in using a different driver than with xenodm(4) which may expose issues (e.g. when we prefer the intel Xorg driver) or loss of acceleration (e.g. older cards supported by radeondrm(4)). ok jsg@, matthieu@ ``` Beastie Bits ASCII table and history. Or, why does Ctrl+i insert a Tab in my terminal? (https://bestasciitable.com/) Sourcehut makes BSD software better (https://sourcehut.org/blog/2019-09-12-sourcehut-makes-bsd-software-better/) Chaosnet for Unx (https://github.com/LM-3/chaos) The Vim-Inspired Editor with a Linguistic Twist (https://cosine.blue/2019-09-06-kakoune.html) bhyvearm64: CPU and Memory Virtualization on Armv8.0-A (https://papers.freebsd.org/2019/bsdcan/elisei-bhyvearm64_cpu_and_memory_virtualization_on_armv8.0_a/) DefCon25 - Are all BSD created Equally - A Survey of BSD Kernel vulnerabilities (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2m56Yq-EIs) Feedback/Questions Tim - GSoC project ideas for pf rule syntax translation (http://dpaste.com/1RCSFK7#wrap) Brad - Steam on FreeBSD (http://dpaste.com/2SKA9YB#wrap) Ruslan - FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report - Q2 2019 (http://dpaste.com/0DQM3Q1) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag.
319: Lack Rack, Jack

319: Lack Rack, Jack

2019-10-1001:07:501

Causing ZFS corruption for fun, NetBSD Assembly Programming Tutorial, The IKEA Lack Rack for Servers, a new OmniOS Community Edition LTS has been published, List Block Devices on FreeBSD lsblk(8) Style, Project Trident 19.10 available, and more. Headlines Causing ZFS corruption for fun and profit (https://datto.engineering/post/causing-zfs-corruption) Datto backs up data, a lot of it. At the time of writing Datto has over 500 PB of data stored on ZFS. This count includes both backup appliances that are sent to customer sites, as well as cloud storage servers that are used for secondary and tertiary backup of those appliances. At this scale drive swaps are a daily occurrence, and data corruption is inevitable. How we handle this corruption when it happens determines whether we truly lose data, or successfully restore from secondary backup. In this post we'll be showing you how at Datto we intentionally cause corruption in our testing environments, to ensure we're building software that can properly handle these scenarios. Causing Corruption Since this is a mirror setup, a naive solution to cause corruption would be to randomly dd the same sectors of both /dev/sdb and /dev/sdc. This works, but is equally likely to just overwrite random unused space, or take down the zpool entirely. What we really want is to corrupt a specific snapshot, or even a specific file in that snapshot, to simulate a more realistic minor corruption event. Luckily we have a tool called zdb that lets us view some low level information about datasets. Conclusion At the 500 PB scale, it's not a matter of if data corruption will happen but when. Intentionally causing corruption is one of the strategies we use to ensure we're building software that can handle these rare (but inevitable) events. To others out there using ZFS: I'm curious to hear how you've solved this problem. We did quite a bit of experimentation with zinject before going with this more brute force method. So I'd be especially interested if you've had luck simply simulating corruption with zinject. NetBSD Assembly Programming Tutorial (https://polprog.net/blog/netbsdasmprog/) A sparc64 version is also being prepared and will be added when done This post describes how to write a simple hello world program in pure assembly on NetBSD/amd64. We will not use (nor link against) libc, nor use gcc to compile it. I will be using GNU as (gas), and therefore the AT&T syntax instead of Intel. Why assembly? Why not? Because it's fun to program in assembly directly. Contrary to a popular belief assembly programs aren't always faster than what optimizing compilers produce. Nevertheless it's good to be able to read assembly, especially when debugging C programs Due to the nature of the guide, visit the site for the complete breakdown News Roundup The IKEA Lack Rack for Servers (https://wiki.eth0.nl/index.php/LackRack) The LackRack First occurrence on eth0:2010 Winterlan, the LackRack is the ultimate, low-cost, high shininess solution for your modular datacenter-in-the-living-room. Featuring the LACK (side table) from Ikea, the LackRack is an easy-to-implement, exact-fit datacenter building block. It's a little known fact that we have seen Google engineers tinker with Lack tables since way back in 2009. The LackRack will certainly make its appearance again this summer at eth0:2010 Summer. Summary When temporarily not in use, multiple LackRacks can be stacked in a space-efficient way without disassembly, unlike competing 19" server racks. The LackRack was first seen on eth0:2010 Winterlan in the no-shoe Lounge area. Its low-cost and perfect fit are great for mounting up to 8 U of 19" hardware, such as switches (see below), or perhaps other 19" gear. It's very easy to assemble, and thanks to the design, they are stable enough to hold (for example) 19" switches and you can put your bottle of Club-Mate on top! Multi-shiny LackRack can also be painted to your specific preferences and the airflow is unprecedented! Howto You can find a howto on buying a LackRack on this page. This includes the proof that a 19" switch can indeed be placed in the LackRack in its natural habitat! OmniOS Community Edition r151030 LTS - Published at May 6, 2019 (https://omniosce.org/article/release-030) The OmniOS Community Edition Association is proud to announce the general availability of OmniOS - r151030. OmniOS is published according to a 6-month release cycle, r151030 LTS takes over from r151028, published in November 2018; and since it is a LTS release it also takes over from r151022. The r151030 LTS release will be supported for 3 Years. It is the first LTS release published by the OmniOS CE Association since taking over the reins from OmniTI in 2017. The next LTS release is scheduled for May 2021. The old stable r151026 release is now end-of-life. See the release schedule for further details. This is only a small selection of the new features, and bug fixes in the new release; review the release notes for full details. If you upgrade from r22 and want to see all new features added since then, make sure to also read the release notes for r24, r26 and r28. For full relase notes including upgrade instructions; release notes (https://omniosce.org/releasenotes.html) upgrade instructions (https://omniosce.org/upgrade.html) List Block Devices on FreeBSD lsblk(8) Style (https://vermaden.wordpress.com/2019/09/27/list-block-devices-on-freebsd-lsblk8-style/) When I have to work on Linux systems I usually miss many nice FreeBSD tools such as these for example to name the few: sockstat, gstat, top -b -o res, top -m io -o total, usbconfig, rcorder, beadm/bectl, idprio/rtprio,… but sometimes – which rarely happens – Linux has some very useful tool that is not available on FreeBSD. An example of such tool is lsblk(8) that does one thing and does it quite well – lists block devices and their contents. It has some problems like listing a disk that is entirely used under ZFS pool on which lsblk(8) displays two partitions instead of information about ZFS just being there – but we all know how much in some circles the CDDL licensed ZFS is unloved in that GPL world. Example lsblk(8) output from Linux system: $ lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sr0 11:0 1 1024M 0 rom sda 8:0 0 931.5G 0 disk |-sda1 8:1 0 500M 0 part /boot `-sda2 8:2 0 931G 0 part |-vg_local-lv_root (dm-0) 253:0 0 50G 0 lvm / |-vg_local-lv_swap (dm-1) 253:1 0 17.7G 0 lvm [SWAP] `-vg_local-lv_home (dm-2) 253:2 0 1.8T 0 lvm /home sdc 8:32 0 232.9G 0 disk `-sdc1 8:33 0 232.9G 0 part `-md1 9:1 0 232.9G 0 raid10 /data sdd 8:48 0 232.9G 0 disk `-sdd1 8:49 0 232.9G 0 part `-md1 9:1 0 232.9G 0 raid10 /data What FreeBSD offers in this department? The camcontrol(8) and geom(8) commands are available. You can also use gpart(8) command to list partitions. Below you will find output of these commands from my single disk laptop. Please note that because of WordPress limitations I need to change all > < characters to ] [ ones in the commands outputs. See the article for the rest of the guide Project Trident 19.10 Now Available (https://project-trident.org/post/2019-10-05_19.10_available/) This is a general package update to the CURRENT release repository based upon TrueOS 19.10 PACKAGE CHANGES FROM 19.08 New Packages: 601 Deleted Packages: 165 Updated Packages: 3341 Beastie Bits NetBSD building tools (https://imgur.com/gallery/0sG4b1K) Sponsorships open for SNMP Mastery (https://mwl.io/archives/4569) pkgsrc-2019Q3 release announcement (2019-10-03) (http://mail-index.netbsd.org/pkgsrc-users/2019/10/03/msg029485.html) pfetch - A simple system information tool written in POSIX sh (https://github.com/dylanaraps/pfetch) Taking NetBSD kernel bug roast to the next level: Kernel Fuzzers (quick A.D. 2019 overview) (https://netbsd.org/~kamil/eurobsdcon2019_fuzzing/presentation.html#slide1) Cracking Ken Thomson’s password (https://leahneukirchen.org/blog/archive/2019/10/ken-thompson-s-unix-password.html) Feedback/Questions Evilham - Couple Questions (http://dpaste.com/2JC85WV) Rob - APU2 alternatives and GPT partition types (http://dpaste.com/0SDX9ZX) Tom - FreeBSD journal article by A. Fengler (http://dpaste.com/2B43MY1#wrap) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag.
318: The TrueNAS Library

318: The TrueNAS Library

2019-10-0300:46:40

DragonFlyBSD vs. FreeBSD vs. Linux benchmark on Ryzen 7, JFK Presidential Library chooses TrueNAS for digital archives, FreeBSD 12.1-beta is available, cool but obscure X11 tools, vBSDcon trip report, Project Trident 12-U7 is available, a couple new Unix artifacts, and more. Headlines DragonFlyBSD 5.6 vs. FreeBSD 12 vs. Linux - Ryzen 7 3700X (https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=bsd-linux-3700x) For those wondering how well FreeBSD and DragonFlyBSD are handling AMD's new Ryzen 3000 series desktop processors, here are some benchmarks on a Ryzen 7 3700X with MSI MEG X570 GODLIKE where both of these popular BSD operating systems were working out-of-the-box. For some fun mid-week benchmarking, here are those results of FreeBSD 12.0 and DragonFlyBSD 5.6.2 up against openSUSE Tumbleweed and Ubuntu 19.04. Back in July I looked at FreeBSD 12 on the Ryzen 9 3900X but at that time at least DragonFlyBSD had troubles booting on that system. When trying out the Ryzen 7 3700X + MSI GODLIKE X570 motherboard on the latest BIOS, everything "just worked" without any compatibility issues for either of these BSDs. We've been eager to see how well DragonFlyBSD is performing on these new AMD Zen 2 CPUs with DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon having publicly expressed being impressed by the new AMD Ryzen 3000 series CPUs. For comparison to those BSDs, Ubuntu 19.04 and openSUSE Tumbleweed were tested on the same hardware in their out-of-the-box configurations. While Clear Linux is normally the fastest, on this system Clear's power management defaults had caused issues in being unable to detect the Samsung 970 EVO Plus NVMe SSD used for testing and so we left it out this round. All of the hardware was the same throughout testing as were the BIOS settings and running the Ryzen 7 3700X at stock speeds. (Any differences in the reported hardware for the system table just come down to differences in what is exposed by each OS for reporting.) All of the BSD/Linux benchmarks on this eight core / sixteen thread processor were run via the Phoronix Test Suite. In the case of FreeBSD 12.0, we benchmarked both with its default LLVM Clang 6.0 compiler as well as with GCC 9.1 so that it would match the GCC compiler being the default on the other operating systems under test. JFK Presidential Library Chooses iXsystems TrueNAS to Preserve Precious Digital Archives (https://www.ixsystems.com/blog/jfk-presidential-library-pr/) iXsystems is honored to have the TrueNAS® M-Series unified storage selected to store, serve, and protect the entire digital archive for the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation. This is in support of the collection at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum (JFK Library). Over the next several years, the Foundation hopes to grow the digital collection from hundreds of terabytes today to cover much more of the Archives at the Kennedy Library. Overall there is a total of 25 million documents, audio recordings, photos, and videos once the project is complete. Having first deployed the TrueNAS M50-HA earlier in 2019, the JFK Library has now completed the migration of its existing digital collection and is now in the process of digitizing much of the rest of its vast collection. Not only is the catalog of material vast, it is also diverse, with files being copied to the storage system from a variety of sources in numerous file types. To achieve this ambitious goal, the library required a high-end NAS system capable of sharing with a variety of systems throughout the digitization process. The digital archive will be served from the TrueNAS M50 and made available to both in-person and online visitors. With precious material and information comes robust demands. The highly-available TrueNAS M-Series has multiple layers of protection to help keep data safe, including data scrubs, checksums, unlimited snapshots, replication, and more. TrueNAS is also inherently scalable with data shares only limited by the number of drives connected to the pool. Perfect for archival storage, the deployed TrueNAS M50 will grow with the library’s content, easily expanding its storage capacity over time as needed. Supporting a variety of protocols, multi-petabyte scalability in a single share, and anytime, uninterrupted capacity expansion, the TrueNAS M-Series ticked all the right boxes. Youtube Video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rFjH5-0Fiw) News Roundup FreeBSD 12.1-beta available (https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=FreeBSD-12.1-Beta-Released) FreeBSD 12.0 is already approaching one year old while FreeBSD 12.1 is now on the way as the next installment with various bug/security fixes and other alterations to this BSD operating system. FreeBSD 12.1 has many security/bug fixes throughout, no longer enables "-Werror" by default as a compiler flag (Update: This change is just for the GCC 4.2 compiler), has imported BearSSL into the FreeBSD base system as a lightweight TLS/SSL implementation, bzip2recover has been added, and a variety of mostly lower-level changes. More details can be found via the in-progress release notes. For those with time to test this weekend, FreeBSD 12.1 Beta 1 is available for all prominent architectures. The FreeBSD release team is planning for at least another beta or two and around three release candidates. If all goes well, FreeBSD 12.1 will be out in early November. Announcement Link (https://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-stable/2019-September/091533.html) Cool, but obscure X11 tools. More suggestions in the source link (https://cyber.dabamos.de/unix/x11/) ASClock Free42 FSV2 GLXGears GMixer GVIM Micropolis Sunclock Ted TiEmu X026 X48 XAbacus XAntfarm XArchiver XASCII XBiff XBill XBoard XCalc XCalendar XCHM XChomp XClipboard XClock XClock/Cat Clock XColorSel XConsole XDiary XEarth XEdit Xev XEyes XFontSel XGalaga XInvaders 3D XKill XLennart XLoad XLock XLogo XMahjongg XMan XMessage XmGrace XMixer XmMix XMore XMosaic XMOTD XMountains XNeko XOdometer XOSView Xplore XPostIt XRoach XScreenSaver XSnow XSpread XTerm XTide Xv Xvkbd XWPE XZoom vBSDCon 2019 trip report from iXSystems (https://www.ixsystems.com/blog/vbsdcon-2019/) The fourth biennial vBSDCon was held in Reston, VA on September 5th through 7th and attracted attendees and presenters from not only the Washington, DC area, but also Canada, Germany, Kenya, and beyond. While MeetBSD caters to Silicon Valley BSD enthusiasts on even years, vBSDcon caters to East Coast and DC area enthusiasts on odd years. Verisign was again the key sponsor of vBSDcon 2019 but this year made a conscious effort to entrust the organization of the event to a team of community members led by Dan Langille, who you probably know as the lead BSDCan organizer. The result of this shift was a low key but professional event that fostered great conversation and brainstorming at every turn. Project Trident 12-U7 now available (https://project-trident.org/post/2019-09-21_stable12-u7_available/) Package Summary New Packages: 130 Deleted Packages: 72 Updated Packages: 865 Stable ISO - https://pkg.project-trident.org/iso/stable/Trident-x64-TOS-12-U7-20190920.iso A Couple new Unix Artifacts (https://minnie.tuhs.org//pipermail/tuhs/2019-September/018685.html) I fear we're drifting a bit here and the S/N ratio is dropping a bit w.r.t the actual history of Unix. Please no more on the relative merits of version control systems or alternative text processing systems. So I'll try to distract you by saying this. I'm sitting on two artifacts that have recently been given to me: by two large organisations of great significance to Unix history who want me to keep "mum" about them as they are going to make announcements about them soon* and I am going slowly crazy as I wait for them to be offically released. Now you have a new topic to talk about :-) Cheers, Warren * for some definition of "soon" Beastie Bits NetBSD machines at Open Source Conference 2019 Hiroshima (https://mail-index.netbsd.org/netbsd-advocacy/2019/09/16/msg000813.html) Hyperbola a GNU/Linux OS is using OpenBSD's Xenocara (https://www.hyperbola.info/news/end-of-xorg-support/) Talos is looking for a FreeBSD Engineer (https://www.talosintelligence.com/careers/freebsd_engineer) GitHub - dylanaraps/pure-sh-bible: A collection of pure POSIX sh alternatives to external processes. (https://github.com/dylanaraps/pure-sh-bible) dsynth: you’re building it (https://www.dragonflydigest.com/2019/09/23/23523.html) Percy Ludgate, the missing link between Babbage’s machine and everything else (http://lists.sigcis.org/pipermail/members-sigcis.org/2019-September/001606.html) Feedback/Questions Bruce - Down the expect rabbithole (http://dpaste.com/147HGP3#wrap) Bruce - Expect (update) (http://dpaste.com/37MNVSW#wrap) David - Netgraph answer (http://dpaste.com/2SE1YSE) Mason - Beeps? (http://dpaste.com/00KKXJM) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag.
317: Bots Building Jails

317: Bots Building Jails

2019-09-2600:52:36

Setting up buildbot in FreeBSD jails, Set up a mail server with OpenSMTPD, Dovecot and Rspamd, OpenBSD amateur packet radio with HamBSD, DragonFlyBSD's HAMMER2 gets fsck, return of startx for users. Headlines EuroBSDcon 2019 Recap (https://2019.eurobsdcon.org/) We’re back from EuroBSDcon in Lillehammer, Norway. It was a great conference with 212 people attending. 2 days of tutorials (https://2019.eurobsdcon.org/tutorial-speakers/), parallel to the FreeBSD Devsummit (https://wiki.freebsd.org/DevSummit/201909), followed by two days of talks (https://2019.eurobsdcon.org/program/). Some speakers uploaded their slides to papers.freebsd.org (https://papers.freebsd.org/2019/eurobsdcon/) already with more to come. The social event was also interesting. We visited an open air museum with building preserved from different time periods. In the older section they had a collection of farm buildings, a church originally built in the 1200s and relocated to the museum, and a school house. In the more modern area, they had houses from 1915, and each decade from 1930 to 1990, plus a “house of the future” as imagined in 2001. Many had open doors to allow you to tour the inside, and some were even “inhabited”. The latter fact gave a much more interactive experience and we could learn additional things about the history of that particular house. The town at the end included a general store, a post office, and more. Then, we all had a nice dinner together in the museum’s restaurant. The opening keynote by Patricia Aas was very good. Her talk on embedded ethics, from her perspective as someone trying to defend the sanctity of Norwegian elections, and a former developer for the Opera web browser, provided a great deal of insight into the issues. Her points about how the tech community has unleashed a very complex digital work upon people with barely any technical literacy were well taken. Her stories of trying to explain the problems with involving computers in the election process to journalists and politicians struck a chord with many of us, who have had to deal with legislation written by those who do not truly understand the issues with technology. Setting up buildbot in FreeBSD jails (https://andidog.de/blog/2018-04-22-buildbot-setup-freebsd-jails) In this article, I would like to present a tutorial to set up buildbot, a continuous integration (CI) software (like Jenkins, drone, etc.), making use of FreeBSD’s containerization mechanism "jails". We will cover terminology, rationale for using both buildbot and jails together, and installation steps. At the end, you will have a working buildbot instance using its sample build configuration, ready to play around with your own CI plans (or even CD, it’s very flexible!). Some hints for production-grade installations are given, but the tutorial steps are meant for a test environment (namely a virtual machine). Buildbot’s configuration and detailed concepts are not in scope here. Setting up a mail server with OpenSMTPD, Dovecot and Rspamd (https://poolp.org/posts/2019-09-14/setting-up-a-mail-server-with-opensmtpd-dovecot-and-rspamd/) Self-hosting and encouraging smaller providers is for the greater good First of all, I was not clear enough about the political consequences of centralizing mail services at Big Mailer Corps. It doesn’t make sense for Random Joe, sharing kitten pictures with his family and friends, to build a personal mail infrastructure when multiple Big Mailer Corps offer “for free” an amazing quality of service. They provide him with an e-mail address that is immediately available and which will generally work reliably. It really doesn’t make sense for Random Joe not to go there, and particularly if even techies go there without hesitation, proving it is a sound choice. There is nothing wrong with Random Joes using a service that works. What is terribly wrong though is the centralization of a communication protocol in the hands of a few commercial companies, EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THEM coming from the same country (currently led by a lunatic who abuses power and probably suffers from NPD), EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THEM having been in the news and/or in a court for random/assorted “unpleasant” behaviors (privacy abuses, eavesdropping, monopoly abuse, sexual or professional harassment, you just name it…), and EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THEM growing user bases that far exceeds the total population of multiple countries combined. News Roundup The HamBSD project aims to bring amateur packet radio to OpenBSD (https://hambsd.org/) The HamBSD project aims to bring amateur packet radio to OpenBSD, including support for TCP/IP over AX.25 and APRS tracking/digipeating in the base system. HamBSD will not provide a full AX.25 stack but instead only implement support for UI frames. There will be a focus on simplicity, security and readable code. The amateur radio community needs a reliable platform for packet radio for use in both leisure and emergency scenarios. It should be expected that the system is stable and resilient (but as yet it is neither). DragonFlyBSD's HAMMER2 Gets Basic FSCK Support (https://www.dragonflydigest.com/2019/09/24/23540.html) HAMMER2 is Copy on Write, meaning changes are made to copies of existing data. This means operations are generally atomic and can survive a power outage, etc. (You should read up on it!) However, there’s now a fsck command, useful if you want a report of data validity rather than any manual repair process. commit (https://gitweb.dragonflybsd.org/dragonfly.git/commitdiff/5554cc8b81fbfcfd347f50be3f3b1b9a54b871b) Add initial fsck support for HAMMER2, although CoW fs doesn't require fsck as a concept. Currently no repairing (no write), just verifying. Keep this as a separate command for now. https://i.redd.it/vkdss0mtdpo31.jpg The return of startx for users (http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20190917091236) Add modesetting driver as a fall-back when appropriate such that we can use it when running without root privileges which prevents us from scanning the PCI bus. This makes startx(1)/xinit(1) work again on modern systems with inteldrm(4), radeondrm(4) and amdgpu(4). In some cases this will result in using a different driver than with xenodm(4) which may expose issues (e.g. when we prefer the intel Xorg driver) or loss of acceleration (e.g. older cards supported by radeondrm(4)). Beastie Bits Ori Bernstein will be giving the October talk at NYCBUG (http://lists.nycbug.org:8080/pipermail/talk/2019-September/018046.html) BSD Pizza Night: 2019/09/26, 7–9PM, Portland, Oregon, USA (http://calagator.org/events/1250476200) Nick Wolff : Home Lab Show & Tell (http://knoxbug.org/2019-09-30) Installing the Lumina Desktop in DragonflyBSD (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWkCjj4_xsk) dhcpcd 8.0.6 added (https://www.dragonflydigest.com/2019/09/20/23519.html) Feedback/Questions Bruce - FOSDEM videos (http://dpaste.com/15ABRRB#wrap) Lars - Super Cluster of BSD on Rock64Pr (http://dpaste.com/1X9FEJJ) Madhukar - Question (http://dpaste.com/0TWF1NB#wrap) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag.
316: git commit FreeBSD

316: git commit FreeBSD

2019-09-1901:05:04

NetBSD LLVM sanitizers and GDB regression test suite, Ada—The Language of Cost Savings, Homura - a Windows Games Launcher for FreeBSD, FreeBSD core team appoints a WG to explore transition to Git, OpenBSD 6.6 Beta tagged, Project Trident 12-U5 update now available, and more. Headlines LLVM santizers and GDB regression test suite. (http://blog.netbsd.org/tnf/entry/llvm_santizers_and_gdb_regression) As NetBSD-9 is branched, I have been asked to finish the LLVM sanitizer integration. This work is now accomplished and with MKLLVM=yes build option (by default off), the distribution will be populated with LLVM files for ASan, TSan, MSan, UBSan, libFuzzer, SafeStack and XRay. I have also transplanted basesystem GDB patched to my GDB repository and managed to run the GDB regression test-suite. NetBSD distribution changes I have enhanced and imported my local MKSANITIZER code that makes whole distribution sanitization possible. Few real bugs were fixed and a number of patches were newly written to reflect the current NetBSD sources state. I have also merged another chunk of the fruits of the GSoC-2018 project with fuzzing the userland (by plusun@). The following changes were committed to the sources: ab7de18d0283 Cherry-pick upstream compiler-rt patches for LLVM sanitizers 966c62a34e30 Add LLVM sanitizers in the MKLLVM=yes build 8367b667adb9 telnetd: Stop defining the same variables concurrently in bss and data fe72740f64bf fsck: Stop defining the same variable concurrently in bss and data 40e89e890d66 Fix build of tubsan/tubsanxx under MKSANITIZER b71326fd7b67 Avoid symbol clashes in tests/usr.bin/id under MKSANITIZER c581f2e39fa5 Avoid symbol clashes in fs/nfs/nfsservice under MKSANITIZER 030a4686a3c6 Avoid symbol clashes in bin/df under MKSANITIZER fd9679f6e8b1 Avoid symbol clashes in usr.sbin/ypserv/ypserv under MKSANITIZER 5df2d7939ce3 Stop defining _rpcsvcdirty in bss and data 5fafbe8b8f64 Add missing extern declaration of ibmachemips in installboot d134584be69a Add SANITIZERRENAMECLASSES in bsd.prog.mk 2d00d9b08eae Adapt tests/kernel/tsubrprf for MKSANITIZER ce54363fe452 Ship with sanitizer/lsan_interface.h for GCC 7 7bd5ee95e9a0 Ship with sanitizer/lsan_interface.h for LLVM 7 d8671fba7a78 Set NODEBUG for LLVM sanitizers 242cd44890a2 Add PAXCTL_FLAG rules for MKSANITIZER 5e80ab99d9ce Avoid symbol clashes in test/rump/modautoload/t_modautoload with sanitizers e7ce7ecd9c2a sysctl: Add indirection of symbols to remove clash with sanitizers 231aea846aba traceroute: Add indirection of symbol to remove clash with sanitizers 8d85053f487c sockstat: Add indirection of symbols to remove clash with sanitizers 81b333ab151a netstat: Add indirection of symbols to remove clash with sanitizers a472baefefe8 Correct the memset(3)'s third argument in i386 biosdisk.c 7e4e92115bc3 Add ATF c and c++ tests for TSan, MSan, libFuzzer 921ddc9bc97c Set NOSANITIZER in i386 ramdisk image 64361771c78d Enhance MKSANITIZER support 3b5608f80a2b Define targetnotsupported_body() in TSan, MSan and libFuzzer tests c27f4619d513 Avoids signedness bit shift in dbgetvalue() 680c5b3cc24f Fix LLVM sanitizer build by GCC (HAVE_LLVM=no) 4ecfbbba2f2a Rework the LLVM compiler_rt build rules 748813da5547 Correct the build rules of LLVM sanitizers 20e223156dee Enhance the support of LLVM sanitizers 0bb38eb2f20d Register syms.extra in LLVM sanitizer .syms files Almost all of the mentioned commits were backported to NetBSD-9 and will land 9.0. Homura - a Windows Games Launcher for FreeBSD (https://github.com/Alexander88207/Homura) Inspired by lutris (a Linux gaming platform), we would like to provide a game launcher to play windows games on FreeBSD. Makes it easier to run games on FreeBSD, by providing the tweaks and dependencies for you Dependencies curl bash p7zip zenity webfonts alsa-utils (Optional) winetricks vulkan-tools mesa-demos i386-wine-devel on amd64 or wine-devel on i386 News Roundup Ada—The Language of Cost Savings? (https://www.electronicdesign.com/embedded-revolution/ada-language-cost-savings) Many myths surround the Ada programming language, but it continues to be used and evolve at the same time. And while the increased adoption of Ada and SPARK, its provable subset, is slow, it’s noticeable. Ada already addresses more of the features found in found in heavily used embedded languages like C+ and C#. It also tackles problems addressed by upcoming languages like Rust. Chris concludes, “Development technologies have a profound impact on one of the largest and most variable costs associated with embedded-system engineering—labor. At a time when on-time system deployment can not only impact customer satisfaction, but access to services revenue streams, engineering team efficiency is at a premium. Our research showed that programming language choices can have significant influence in this area, leading to shorter projects, better schedules and, ultimately, lower development costs. While a variety of factors can influence and dictate language choice, our research showed that Ada’s evolution has made it an increasingly compelling option for engineering organizations, providing both technically and financially sound solution.” In general, Ada already makes embedded “programming in the large” much easier by handling issues that aren’t even addressed in other languages. Though these features are often provided by third-party software, it results in inconsistent practices among developers. Ada also supports the gamut of embedded platforms from systems like Arm’s Cortex-M through supercomputers. Learning Ada isn’t as hard as one might think and the benefits can be significant. FreeBSD core team appoints a WG to explore transitioning from Subversion to Git. (https://www.freebsd.org/news/status/report-2019-04-2019-06.html#FreeBSD-Core-Team) The FreeBSD Core Team is the governing body of FreeBSD. Core approved source commit bits for Doug Moore (dougm), Chuck Silvers (chs), Brandon Bergren (bdragon), and a vendor commit bit for Scott Phillips (scottph). The annual developer survey closed on 2019-04-02. Of the 397 developers, 243 took the survey with an average completion time of 12 minutes. The public survey closed on 2019-05-13. It was taken by 3637 users and had a 79% completion rate. A presentation of the survey results took place at BSDCan 2019. The core team voted to appoint a working group to explore transitioning our source code 'source of truth' from Subversion to Git. Core asked Ed Maste to chair the group as Ed has been researching this topic for some time. For example, Ed gave a MeetBSD 2018 talk on the topic. There is a variety of viewpoints within core regarding where and how to host a Git repository, however core feels that Git is the prudent path forward. OpenBSD 6.6 Beta tagged (https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20190810123243) ``` CVSROOT: /cvs Module name: src Changes by: deraadt@cvs.openbsd.org 2019/08/09 21:56:02 Modified files: etc/root : root.mail share/mk : sys.mk sys/arch/macppc/stand/tbxidata: bsd.tbxi sys/conf : newvers.sh sys/sys : param.h usr.bin/signify: signify.1 Log message: move to 6.6-beta ``` Preliminary release notes (https://www.openbsd.org/66.html) Improved hardware support, including: clang(1) is now provided on powerpc. IEEE 802.11 wireless stack improvements: Generic network stack improvements: Installer improvements: Security improvements: + Routing daemons and other userland network improvements + The ntpd(8) daemon now gets and sets the clock in a secure way when booting even when a battery-backed clock is absent. + bgdp(8) improvements + Assorted improvements: + The filesystem buffer cache now more aggressively uses memory outside the DMA region, to improve cache performance on amd64 machines. The BER API previously internal to ldap(1), ldapd(8), ypldap(8), and snmpd(8) has been moved into libutil. See berreadelements(3). Support for specifying boot device in vm.conf(5). OpenSMTPD 6.6.0 LibreSSL 3.0.X API and Documentation Enhancements Completed the port of RSA_METHOD accessors from the OpenSSL 1.1 API. Documented undescribed options and removed unfunctional options description in openssl(1) manual. OpenSSH 8.0 Project Trident 12-U5 update now available (https://project-trident.org/post/2019-09-04_stable12-u5_available/) This is the fifth general package update to the STABLE release repository based upon TrueOS 12-Stable. Package changes from Stable 12-U4 Package Summary New Packages: 20 Deleted Packages: 24 Updated Packages: 279 New Packages (20) artemis (biology/artemis) : 17.0.1.11 catesc (games/catesc) : 0.6 dmlc-core (devel/dmlc-core) : 0.3.105 go-wtf (sysutils/go-wtf) : 0.20.0_1 instead (games/instead) : 3.3.0_1 lidarr (net-p2p/lidarr) : 0.6.2.883 minerbold (games/minerbold) : 1.4 onnx (math/onnx) : 1.5.0 openzwave-devel (comms/openzwave-devel) : 1.6.897 polkit-qt-1 (sysutils/polkit-qt) : 0.113.0_8 py36-traitsui (graphics/py-traitsui) : 6.1.2 rubygem-aws-sigv2 (devel/rubygem-aws-sigv2) : 1.0.1 rubygem-defaultvaluefor32 (devel/rubygem-defaultvaluefor32) : 3.2.0 rubygem-ffi110 (devel/rubygem-ffi110) : 1.10.0 rubygem-zeitwerk (devel/rubygem-zeitwerk) : 2.1.9 sems (net/sems) : 1.7.0.g20190822 skypat (devel/skypat) : 3.1.1 tvm (math/tvm) : 0.4.1440 vavoom (games/vavoom) : 1.33_15 vavoom-extras (games/vavoom-extras) : 1.30_4 Deleted Packages (24) geeqie (graphics/geeqie) : Unknown reason iriverter (multimedia/iriverter) : Unknown reason kde5 (x11/kde5) : Unknown reason kicad-doc (cad/kicad-doc) : Unknown reason os-nozfs-buildworld (os/buildworld) : Unknown reason os-nozfs-userland (os/userland) : Unknown reason os-nozfs-userland-base (os/userland-base) : Unknown reason os-nozfs-userland-base-bootstrap (os/userland-base-bootstrap) : Unknown reason os-nozfs-userland-bin (os/userland-bin) : Unknown reason os-nozfs-userland-boot (os/userland-boot) : Unknown reason os-nozfs-userland-conf (os/userland-conf) : Unknown reason os-nozfs-userland-debug (os/userland-debug) : Unknown reason os-nozfs-userland-devtools (os/userland-devtools) : Unknown reason os-nozfs-userland-docs (os/userland-docs) : Unknown reason os-nozfs-userland-lib (os/userland-lib) : Unknown reason os-nozfs-userland-lib32 (os/userland-lib32) : Unknown reason os-nozfs-userland-lib32-development (os/userland-lib32-development) : Unknown reason os-nozfs-userland-rescue (os/userland-rescue) : Unknown reason os-nozfs-userland-sbin (os/userland-sbin) : Unknown reason os-nozfs-userland-tests (os/userland-tests) : Unknown reason photoprint (print/photoprint) : Unknown reason plasma5-plasma (x11/plasma5-plasma) : Unknown reason polkit-qt5 (sysutils/polkit-qt) : Unknown reason secpanel (security/secpanel) : Unknown reason Beastie Bits DragonFlyBSD - msdosfs updates (https://www.dragonflydigest.com/2019/09/10/23472.html) Stand out as a speaker (https://science.sciencemag.org/content/365/6455/834.full) Not a review of the 7th Gen X1 Carbon (http://akpoff.com/archive/2019/not_a_review_of_the_lenovo_x1c7.html) FreeBSD Meets Linux At The Open Source Summit (https://www.tfir.io/2019/08/24/freebsd-meets-linux-at-the-open-source-summit/) QEMU VM Escape (https://blog.bi0s.in/2019/08/24/Pwn/VM-Escape/2019-07-29-qemu-vm-escape-cve-2019-14378/) Porting wine to amd64 on NetBSD, third evaluation report. (http://blog.netbsd.org/tnf/entry/porting_wine_to_amd64_on1) OpenBSD disabled DoH by default in Firefox (https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20190911113856) Feedback/Questions Reinis - GELI with UEFI (http://dpaste.com/0SG8630#wrap) Mason - Beeping (http://dpaste.com/1FQN173) [CHVT feedback] DJ - Feedback (http://dpaste.com/08M3XNH#wrap) Ben - chvt (http://dpaste.com/274RVCE#wrap) Harri - Marc's chvt question (http://dpaste.com/23R1YMK#wrap) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag.
315: Recapping vBSDcon 2019

315: Recapping vBSDcon 2019

2019-09-1201:16:55

vBSDcon 2019 recap, Unix at 50, OpenBSD on fan-less Tuxedo InfinityBook, humungus - an hg server, how to configure a network dump in FreeBSD, and more. Headlines vBSDcon Recap Allan and Benedict attended vBSDcon 2019, which ended last week. It was held again at the Hyatt Regency Reston and the main conference was organized by Dan Langille of BSDCan fame.The two day conference was preceded by a one day FreeBSD hackathon, where FreeBSD developers had the chance to work on patches and PRs. In the evening, a reception was held to welcome attendees and give them a chance to chat and get to know each other over food and drinks. The first day of the conference was opened with a Keynote by Paul Vixie about DNS over HTTPS (DoH). He explained how we got to the current state and what challenges (technical and social) this entails. If you missed this talk and are dying to see it, it will also be presented at EuroBSDCon next week John Baldwin followed up by giving an overview of the work on “In-Kernel TLS Framing and Encryption for FreeBSD” abstract (https://www.vbsdcon.com/schedule/2019-09-06.html#talk:132615) and the recent commit we covered in episode 313. Meanwhile, Brian Callahan was giving a separate session in another room about “Learning to (Open)BSD through its porting system: an attendee-driven educational session” where people had the chance to learn about how to create ports for the BSDs. David Fullard’s talk about “Transitioning from FreeNAS to FreeBSD” was his first talk at a BSD conference and described how he built his own home NAS setup trying to replicate FreeNAS’ functionality on FreeBSD, and why he transitioned from using an appliance to using vanilla FreeBSD. Shawn Webb followed with his overview talk about the “State of the Hardened Union”. Benedict’s talk about “Replacing an Oracle Server with FreeBSD, OpenZFS, and PostgreSQL” was well received as people are interested in how we liberated ourselves from the clutches of Oracle without compromising functionality. Entertaining and educational at the same time, Michael W. Lucas talk about “Twenty Years in Jail: FreeBSD Jails, Then and Now” closed the first day. Lucas also had a table in the hallway with his various tech and non-tech books for sale. People formed small groups and went into town for dinner. Some returned later that night to some work in the hacker lounge or talk amongst fellow BSD enthusiasts. Colin Percival was the keynote speaker for the second day and had an in-depth look at “23 years of software side channel attacks”. Allan reprised his “ELI5: ZFS Caching” talk explaining how the ZFS adaptive replacement cache (ARC) work and how it can be tuned for various workloads. “By the numbers: ZFS Performance Results from Six Operating Systems and Their Derivatives” by Michael Dexter followed with his approach to benchmarking OpenZFS on various platforms. Conor Beh was also a new speaker to vBSDcon. His talk was about “FreeBSD at Work: Building Network and Storage Infrastructure with pfSense and FreeNAS”. Two OpenBSD talks closed the talk session: Kurt Mosiejczuk with “Care and Feeding of OpenBSD Porters” and Aaron Poffenberger with “Road Warrior Disaster Recovery: Secure, Synchronized, and Backed-up”. A dinner and reception was enjoyed by the attendees and gave more time to discuss the talks given and other things until late at night. We want to thank the vBSDcon organizers and especially Dan Langille for running such a great conference. We are grateful to Verisign as the main sponsor and The FreeBSD Foundation for sponsoring the tote bags. Thanks to all the speakers and attendees! humungus - an hg server (https://humungus.tedunangst.com/r/humungus) Features View changes, files, changesets, etc. Some syntax highlighting. Read only. Serves multiple repositories. Allows cloning via the obvious URL. Supports go get. Serves files for downloads. Online documentation via mandoc. Terminal based admin interface. News Roundup OpenBSD on fan-less Tuxedo InfinityBook 14″ v2. (https://hazardous.org/archive/blog/openbsd/2019/09/02/OpenBSD-on-Infinitybook14) The InfinityBook 14” v2 is a fanless 14” notebook. It is an excellent choice for running OpenBSD - but order it with the supported wireless card (see below.). I’ve set it up in a dual-boot configuration so that I can switch between Linux and OpenBSD - mainly to spot differences in the drivers. TUXEDO allows a variety of configurations through their webshop. The dual boot setup with grub2 and EFI boot will be covered in a separate blogpost. My tests were done with OpenBSD-current - which is as of writing flagged as 6.6-beta. See Article for breakdown of CPU, Wireless, Video, Webcam, Audio, ACPI, Battery, Touchpad, and MicroSD Card Reader Unix at 50: How the OS that powered smartphones started from failure (https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2019/08/unix-at-50-it-starts-with-a-mainframe-a-gator-and-three-dedicated-researchers/) Maybe its pervasiveness has long obscured its origins. But Unix, the operating system that in one derivative or another powers nearly all smartphones sold worldwide, was born 50 years ago from the failure of an ambitious project that involved titans like Bell Labs, GE, and MIT. Largely the brainchild of a few programmers at Bell Labs, the unlikely story of Unix begins with a meeting on the top floor of an otherwise unremarkable annex at the sprawling Bell Labs complex in Murray Hill, New Jersey. It was a bright, cold Monday, the last day of March 1969, and the computer sciences department was hosting distinguished guests: Bill Baker, a Bell Labs vice president, and Ed David, the director of research. Baker was about to pull the plug on Multics (a condensed form of MULTiplexed Information and Computing Service), a software project that the computer sciences department had been working on for four years. Multics was two years overdue, way over budget, and functional only in the loosest possible understanding of the term. Trying to put the best spin possible on what was clearly an abject failure, Baker gave a speech in which he claimed that Bell Labs had accomplished everything it was trying to accomplish in Multics and that they no longer needed to work on the project. As Berk Tague, a staffer present at the meeting, later told Princeton University, “Like Vietnam, he declared victory and got out of Multics.” Within the department, this announcement was hardly unexpected. The programmers were acutely aware of the various issues with both the scope of the project and the computer they had been asked to build it for. Still, it was something to work on, and as long as Bell Labs was working on Multics, they would also have a $7 million mainframe computer to play around with in their spare time. Dennis Ritchie, one of the programmers working on Multics, later said they all felt some stake in the success of the project, even though they knew the odds of that success were exceedingly remote. Cancellation of Multics meant the end of the only project that the programmers in the Computer science department had to work on—and it also meant the loss of the only computer in the Computer science department. After the GE 645 mainframe was taken apart and hauled off, the computer science department’s resources were reduced to little more than office supplies and a few terminals. Some of Allan’s favourite excerpts: In the early '60s, Bill Ninke, a researcher in acoustics, had demonstrated a rudimentary graphical user interface with a DEC PDP-7 minicomputer. Acoustics still had that computer, but they weren’t using it and had stuck it somewhere out of the way up on the sixth floor. And so Thompson, an indefatigable explorer of the labs’ nooks and crannies, finally found that PDP-7 shortly after Davis and Baker cancelled Multics. With the rest of the team’s help, Thompson bundled up the various pieces of the PDP-7—a machine about the size of a refrigerator, not counting the terminal—moved it into a closet assigned to the acoustics department, and got it up and running. One way or another, they convinced acoustics to provide space for the computer and also to pay for the not infrequent repairs to it out of that department’s budget. McIlroy’s programmers suddenly had a computer, kind of. So during the summer of 1969, Thompson, Ritchie, and Canaday hashed out the basics of a file manager that would run on the PDP-7. This was no simple task. Batch computing—running programs one after the other—rarely required that a computer be able to permanently store information, and many mainframes did not have any permanent storage device (whether a tape or a hard disk) attached to them. But the time-sharing environment that these programmers had fallen in love with required attached storage. And with multiple users connected to the same computer at the same time, the file manager had to be written well enough to keep one user’s files from being written over another user’s. When a file was read, the output from that file had to be sent to the user that was opening it. It was a challenge that McIlroy’s team was willing to accept. They had seen the future of computing and wanted to explore it. They knew that Multics was a dead-end, but they had discovered the possibilities opened up by shared development, shared access, and real-time computing. Twenty years later, Ritchie characterized it for Princeton as such: “What we wanted to preserve was not just a good environment in which to do programming, but a system around which a fellowship could form.” Eventually when they had the file management system more or less fleshed out conceptually, it came time to actually write the code. The trio—all of whom had terrible handwriting—decided to use the Labs’ dictating service. One of them called up a lab extension and dictated the entire code base into a tape recorder. And thus, some unidentified clerical worker or workers soon had the unenviable task of trying to convert that into a typewritten document. Of course, it was done imperfectly. Among various errors, “inode” came back as “eye node,” but the output was still viewed as a decided improvement over their assorted scribbles. In August 1969, Thompson’s wife and son went on a three-week vacation to see her family out in Berkeley, and Thompson decided to spend that time writing an assembler, a file editor, and a kernel to manage the PDP-7 processor. This would turn the group’s file manager into a full-fledged operating system. He generously allocated himself one week for each task. Thompson finished his tasks more or less on schedule. And by September, the computer science department at Bell Labs had an operating system running on a PDP-7—and it wasn’t Multics. By the summer of 1970, the team had attached a tape drive to the PDP-7, and their blossoming OS also had a growing selection of tools for programmers (several of which persist down to this day). But despite the successes, Thompson, Canaday, and Ritchie were still being rebuffed by labs management in their efforts to get a brand-new computer. It wasn’t until late 1971 that the computer science department got a truly modern computer. The Unix team had developed several tools designed to automatically format text files for printing over the past year or so. They had done so to simplify the production of documentation for their pet project, but their tools had escaped and were being used by several researchers elsewhere on the top floor. At the same time, the legal department was prepared to spend a fortune on a mainframe program called “AstroText.” Catching wind of this, the Unix crew realized that they could, with only a little effort, upgrade the tools they had written for their own use into something that the legal department could use to prepare patent applications. The computer science department pitched lab management on the purchase of a DEC PDP-11 for document production purposes, and Max Mathews offered to pay for the machine out of the acoustics department budget. Finally, management gave in and purchased a computer for the Unix team to play with. Eventually, word leaked out about this operating system, and businesses and institutions with PDP-11s began contacting Bell Labs about their new operating system. The Labs made it available for free—requesting only the cost of postage and media from anyone who wanted a copy. The rest has quite literally made tech history. See the link for the rest of the article How to configure a network dump in FreeBSD? (https://www.oshogbo.vexillium.org/blog/68/) A network dump might be very useful for collecting kernel crash dumps from embedded machines and machines with a larger amount of RAM then available swap partition size. Besides net dumps we can also try to compress the core dump. However, often this may still not be enough swap to keep whole core dump. In such situation using network dump is a convenient and reliable way for collecting kernel dump. So, first, let’s talk a little bit about history. The first implementation of the network dumps was implemented around 2000 for the FreeBSD 4.x as a kernel module. The code was implemented in 2010 with the intention of being part of FreeBSD 9.0. However, the code never landed in FreeBSD. Finally, in 2018 with the commit r333283 by Mark Johnston the netdump client code landed in the FreeBSD. Subsequently, many other commitments were then implemented to add support for the different drivers (for example r333289). The first official release of FreeBSD, which support netdump is FreeBSD 12.0. Now, let’s get back to the main topic. How to configure the network dump? Two machines are needed. One machine is to collect core dump, let’s call it server. We will use the second one to send us the core dump - the client. See the link for the rest of the article Beastie Bits Sudo Mastery 2nd edition is not out (https://mwl.io/archives/4530) Empirical Notes on the Interaction Between Continuous Kernel Fuzzing and Development (http://users.utu.fi/kakrind/publications/19/vulnfuzz_camera.pdf) soso (https://github.com/ozkl/soso) GregKH - OpenBSD was right (https://youtu.be/gUqcMs0svNU?t=254) Game of Trees (https://gameoftrees.org/faq.html) Feedback/Questions BostJan - Another Question (http://dpaste.com/1ZPCCQY#wrap) Tom - PF (http://dpaste.com/3ZSCB8N#wrap) JohnnyK - Changing VT without keys (http://dpaste.com/3QZQ7Q5#wrap) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag.
314: Swap that Space

314: Swap that Space

2019-09-0500:48:28

Unix virtual memory when you have no swap space, Dsynth details on Dragonfly, Instant Workstation on FreeBSD, new servers new tech, Experimenting with streaming setups on NetBSD, NetBSD’s progress towards Steam support thanks to GSoC, and more. Headlines What has to happen with Unix virtual memory when you have no swap space (https://utcc.utoronto.ca/~cks/space/blog/unix/NoSwapConsequence) Recently, Artem S. Tashkinov wrote on the Linux kernel mailing list about a Linux problem under memory pressure (via, and threaded here). The specific reproduction instructions involved having low RAM, turning off swap space, and then putting the system under load, and when that happened (emphasis mine): Once you hit a situation when opening a new tab requires more RAM than is currently available, the system will stall hard. You will barely be able to move the mouse pointer. Your disk LED will be flashing incessantly (I'm not entirely sure why). [...] I'm afraid I have bad news for the people snickering at Linux here; if you're running without swap space, you can probably get any Unix to behave this way under memory pressure. If you can't on your particular Unix, I'd actually say that your Unix is probably not letting you get full use out of your RAM. To simplify a bit, we can divide pages of user memory up into anonymous pages and file-backed pages. File-backed pages are what they sound like; they come from some specific file on the filesystem that they can be written out to (if they're dirty) or read back in from. Anonymous pages are not backed by a file, so the only place they can be written out to and read back in from is swap space. Anonymous pages mostly come from dynamic memory allocations and from modifying the program's global variables and data; file backed pages come mostly from mapping files into memory with mmap() and also, crucially, from the code and read-only data of the program. See link for the rest of the article Dsynth details on Dragonfly (https://www.dragonflydigest.com/2019/08/27/23398.html) First, history: DragonFly has had binaries of dports available for download for quite some time. These were originally built using poudriere, and then using the synth tool put together by John Marino. Synth worked both to build all software in dports, and as a way to test DragonFly’s SMP capability under extreme load. Matthew Dillon is working on a new version, called dsynth. It is available now but not yet part of the build. He’s been working quickly on it and there’s plenty more commits than what I have linked here. It’s already led to finding more high-load fixes. dsynth DSynth is basically synth written in C, from scratch. It is designed to give us a bulk builder in base and be friendly to porting and jails down the line (for now its uses chroot's). The original synth was written by John R. Marino and its basic flow was used in writing this program, but as it was written in ada no code was directly copied. The intent is to make dsynth compatible with synth's configuration files and directory structure. This is a work in progress and not yet ready for prime-time. Pushing so we can get some more eyeballs. Most of the directives do not yet work (everything, and build works, and 'cleanup' can be used to clean up any dangling mounts). dsynth code (https://gitweb.dragonflybsd.org/dragonfly.git/blob/HEAD:/usr.bin/dsynth/dsynth.1) News Roundup Instant Workstation (https://euroquis.nl/freebsd/2019/08/12/instant-workstation.html) Some considerable time ago I wrote up instructions on how to set up a FreeBSD machine with the latest KDE Plasma Desktop. Those instructions, while fairly short (set up X, install the KDE meta-port, .. and that’s it) are a bit fiddly. So – prompted slightly by a Twitter exchange recently – I’ve started a mini-sub-project to script the installation of a desktop environment and the bits needed to support it. To give it at least a modicum of UI, dialog(1) is used to ask for an environment to install and a display manager. The tricky bits – pointed out to me after I started – are hardware support, although a best-effort is better than having nothing, I think. In any case, in a VBox host it’s now down to running a single script and picking Plasma and SDDM to get a usable system for me. Other combinations have not been tested, nor has system-hardware-setup. I’ll probably maintain it for a while and if I have time and energy it’ll be tried with nVidia (those work quite well on FreeBSD) and AMD (not so much, in my experience) graphics cards when I shuffle some machines around. Here is the script in my GitHub repository with notes-for-myself. (https://raw.githubusercontent.com/adriaandegroot/FreeBSDTools/master/bin/instant-workstation) New Servers, new Tech (https://www.dragonflydigest.com/2019/08/26/23396.html) Following up on an earlier post, the new servers for DragonFly are in place. The old 40-core machine used for bulk build, monster, is being retired. The power efficiency of the new machines is startling. Incidentally, this is where donations go – infrastructure. New servers in the colo, monster is being retired (http://lists.dragonflybsd.org/pipermail/users/2019-August/358271.html) We have three new servers in the colo now that will be taking most/all bulk package building duties from monster and the two blades (muscles and pkgbox64) that previously did the work. Monster will be retired. The new servers are a dual-socket Xeon (sting) and two 3900X based systems (thor and loki) which all together burn only around half the wattage that monster burned (500W vs 1000W) and 3 times the performance. That's at least a 6:1 improvement in performance efficiency. With SSD prices down significantly the new machines have all-SSDs. These new machines allow us to build dports binary packages for release, master, and staged at the same time and reduces the full-on bulk build times for getting all three done down from 2 weeks to 2 days. It will allow us to more promptly synchronize updates to ports with dports and get binary packages up sooner. Monster, our venerable 48-core quad-socket opteron is being retired. This was a wonderful dev machine for working on DragonFly's SMP algorithms over the last 6+ years precisely because its inter-core and inter-socket latencies were quite high. If a SMP algorithm wasn't spot-on, you could feel it. Over the years DragonFly's performance on monster in doing things like bulk builds increased radically as the SMP algorithms got better and the cores became more and more localized. This kept monster relevant far longer than I thought it would be. But we are at a point now where improvements in efficiency are just too good to ignore. Monster's quad-socket opteron (4 x 12 core 6168's) pulls 1000W under full load while a single Ryzen 3900X (12 core / 24 thread) in a server configuration pulls only 150W, and is slightly faster on the same workload to boot. I would like to thank everyone's generous donations over the last few years! We burned a few thousand on the new machines (as well as the major SSD upgrades we did to the blades) and made very good use of the money, particularly this year as prices for all major components (RAM, SSDs, CPUs, Mobos, etc) have dropped significantly. Experimenting with streaming setups on NetBSD (https://dressupgeekout.blogspot.com/2019/08/experimenting-with-streaming-setups-on.html?m=1) Ever since OBS was successfully ported to NetBSD, I’ve been trying it out, seeing what works and what doesn’t. I’ve only just gotten started, and there’ll definitely be a lot of tweaking going forward. Capturing a specific application’s windows seems to work okay. Capturing an entire display works, too. I actually haven’t tried streaming to Twitch or YouTube yet, but in a previous experiment a few weeks ago, I was able to run a FFmpeg command line and that could stream to Twitch mostly OK. My laptop combined with my external monitor allows me to have a dual-monitor setup wherein the smaller laptop screen can be my “broadcasting station” while the bigger screen is where all the action takes place. I can make OBS visible on all Xfce workspaces, but keep it tucked away on that display only. Altogether, the setup should let me use the big screen for the fun stuff but I can still monitor everything in the small screen. NetBSD Made Progress Thanks To GSoC In Its March Towards Steam Support (https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=NetBSD-Linux-DRM-Ioctl-GSoC2019) Ultimately the goal is to get Valve's Steam client running on NetBSD using their Linux compatibility layer while the focus the past few months with Google Summer of Code 2019 were supporting the necessary DRM ioctls for allowing Linux software running on NetBSD to be able to tap accelerated graphics support. Student developer Surya P spent the summer working on compat_netbsd32 DRM interfaces to allow Direct Rendering Manager using applications running under their Linux compatibility layer. These interfaces have been tested and working as well as updating the "suse131" packages in NetBSD to make use of those interfaces. So the necessary interfaces are now in place for Linux software running on NetBSD to be able to use accelerated graphics though Steam itself isn't yet running on NetBSD with this layer. Those curious about this DRM ioctl GSoC project can learn more from the NetBSD blog (https://blog.netbsd.org/tnf/entry/gsoc_2019_report_implementation_of). NetBSD has also been seeing work this summer on Wayland support and better Wine support to ultimately make this BSD a better desktop operating system and potentially a comparable gaming platform to Linux. Beastie Bits FreeBSD in Wellington? (https://twitter.com/MengTangmu/status/1163265206660694016) FreeBSD on GFE (https://twitter.com/onewilshire/status/1163792878642114560) Clarification (https://twitter.com/onewilshire/status/1166323112620826624) Distrotest.net now with BSDs (https://distrotest.net/) Lecture: Anykernels meet fuzzing NetBSD (https://fahrplan.events.ccc.de/camp/2019/Fahrplan/events/10334.html) Sun Microsystems business plan from 1982 [pdf] (https://www.khoslaventures.com/wp-content/uploads/SunMicrosystem_bus_plan.pdf) Feedback/Questions Alan - Questions (http://dpaste.com/1Z8EGTW) Rodriguez - Feedback and a question (http://dpaste.com/2PZFP4X#wrap) Jeff - OpenZFS follow-up, FreeBSD Adventures (http://dpaste.com/02ZM6YE#wrap) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) Your browser does not support the HTML5 video tag.
loading
Comments (6)

elrey741

43:45: links to videos it looks like they created a playlist so I figured I would include the link for people that want it. - vbsdcon 2019 playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL54iSRSPZwagDiph7xLTaDLBHHy6WAiXD - in kernel tls framing (eurobsdcon): https://youtu.be/p9fbofDUUr4 - dns over https (eurobsdcon): https://youtu.be/ZxTdEEuyxHU

Nov 1st
Reply

elrey741

21:00: what are the other 6 books that he had to write? It would be awesome if he (Michael W. Lucas) could list recommendations for other books to read, below the description or something, so people know how books are correlated. If people want to read it without reading the other books ok, but for those who don't know how they correlate (i.e. me 😅). it would be nice if I can read through them in order, so you don't get frustrated not knowing what is getting discussed and have to stop to reading and read another whole book to grasp the concept.

Oct 25th
Reply

elrey741

14:00: good to know about ZFS limitations. hopefully will be fixed in OpenZFS eventually.

Oct 19th
Reply

elrey741

1:3:48: good explanation about FIBs in routing tables

Oct 15th
Reply (1)

elrey741

1:11:14 - pf for multi jails

Sep 13th
Reply
loading
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store