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There’s been an explosion of interest in psychedelics over the last 10 years, and phrases like “psychedelic-assisted therapy” have gone from the relative fringes of the mental health conversation to bursting into the mainstream. Alongside a great deal of hype is a growing body of research revealing the potential of substances like psilocybin and MDMA as novel treatments for depression, addiction, and PTSD. On today’s episode of Being Well, Forrest is joined by Dr. Albert Garcia-Romeu from the Johns Hopkins Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research. They explore the history and current state of psychedelic research, their subjective effects, the necessity of the “trip,” how psychedelics work in the brain, why researchers are so interested in these substances, and what a psychedelic-assisted therapy session looks like.About Our Guest: Dr. Garcia-Romeu is a member of the Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences faculty at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research examines the effects of psychedelics in humans, with a focus on psilocybin as an aid in the treatment of addiction.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction1:55: Dr. Garcia-Romeu’s background3:00: What substances have been the focus of research?8:10: The history of psychedelics11:15: Usefulness and subjective effects of classical psychedelics (LSD/Psilocybin)17:35: Ego loss or “ego-death” and the role of spirituality in mental health21:40: What is happening neurologically with Psilocybin? 27:55: Psychedelics may be the best current treatment option for some conditions35:05: How close is the research to proving efficacy?38:05: The relative safety of psychedelics41:00: What does a psychedelic-assisted therapy session look like?47:00: Self-guidance in a session49:50: Duration of treatment, financial and legal access54:00: Using psychedelics for personal growth, spiritual practice, and even recreation58:00: Where is the field going?59:25: RecapSupport the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Sponsors:Bombas designed their socks, shirts, and underwear to be the clothes you can’t wait to put on every day. Visit bombas.com/beingwell and use code beingwell for 20% off. Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Ready to shake up your protein Ritual? Being Well listeners get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/WELL.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
The median life expectancy for a man living in the United States is roughly 80 years. That works out to 960 months, 4,160 weeks, or about 29,000 days. Rick is sneaking up on 70 years old, which means, on average, he's got about 10 years – or 520 weeks – left. Putting the time we have left into simple numbers can be both a bit daunting and remarkably clarifying. When you're in the middle of them, the days can blur together. But the truth is that our time’s limited, and how we use it is up to us. On today’s episode of Being Well, Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson talk about what's helped them come to terms with mortality, the reality of our limited time, and how we can use that knowledge to refine our focus and live a more fulfilling life.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction4:00: How Rick’s relationship with death has changed over time11:05: Appreciating life as a comfort in accepting death14:00: Dukkah, Tanha, and contentment16:30: Distinguishing the ocean (reality) from the wave (ego)21:20: Acceptance, contraction, and expansion25:35: Finite experiences, and undelivered communications31:30: “Life is for the living”33:10: Giving, contribution, contentment, and fulfillment40:05: What to do about regret?47:40: Serenity in old age49:00: Practical ways to hold awareness of death55:05: Recap Grief and Loss Workshop: We all face losses in life, from separation and disappointment to shocking, even traumatic events. Join me August 13 and 14 for 7 hours of LIVE, online teaching focused on learning simple, powerful practices that help us come to terms with loss, heal, and find happiness again. Use coupon code BEINGWELL25 at checkout for an additional 25% off the registration price.Support the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link. Sponsors:Bombas designed their socks, shirts, and underwear to be the clothes you can’t wait to put on every day. Visit bombas.com/beingwell and use code beingwell for 20% off. Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Ready to shake up your protein Ritual? Being Well listeners get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/WELL.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
Shame is one of the most complex and difficult emotions we experience on a regular basis, and one that can have seriously negative impacts on our sense of self-worth and ability to experience healthy connection with others.On this episode of Being Well, Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson take a deep dive into what shame is, how it develops, and what distinguishes it from guilt and other related emotions. They then focus on questioning our assumptions about shame, which can help us identify where it comes from. Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction1:40: The biological roots of shame4:00: Shame's ties to our assumptions about the world 7:00: Impropriety, and shame as a psychological stage of development9:55: Distinguishing shame from guilt14:00: Unnecessary shame, healthy remorse, and your own integrity system21:55: Who decides what being good looks like?25:40: Morality in the service of power32:20: What helps us work with experiences of shame38:25: Isolation and the value of sharing with others in some way43:50: Working with your shame story49:00: Shame, group belonging, and personal change51:25: Recap Rick's Grief and Loss Workshop: We all face losses in life, from separation and disappointment to shocking, even traumatic events. Join Rick August 13 and 14 for 7 hours of LIVE, online teaching focused on learning simple, powerful practices that help us come to terms with them, heal, and find happiness again. Use coupon code BeingWell50 at checkout for an additional $50 off the registration price.Support the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Sponsors:Bombas designed their socks, shirts, and underwear to be the clothes you can’t wait to put on every day. Visit bombas.com/beingwell and use code beingwell for 20% off. Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Ready to shake up your protein Ritual? Being Well listeners get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/WELL.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
There’s a lot of loss in the world these days, both in our individual lives and in our broader communities, and with those losses comes grief. Grief is one of the most challenging emotions to be with, and it can be difficult to offer generalized advice because everyone's experience of grief is profoundly unique. On today’s episode of Being Well, Forrest is joined by one of the world’s leading researchers on grief, Dr. Mary-Frances O’Connor, to help us better understand grief and grieving. They explore why grief is such a unique and intense emotion, how grief works in the brain, the problems with generalized models like the “five stages of grief,” and how we can learn to live with loss.About Our Guest: Mary-Frances is a neuroscientist, clinical psychologist, and associate professor of psychology at the University of Arizona, where she directs the Grief, Loss and Social Stress Lab, which investigates the effects of grief on the brain and the body. She’s also the author of the wonderful book The Grieving Brain: The Surprising Science of How We Learn from Love and Loss. Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction and disclaimer3:35: Mary-Frances’ personal background6:55: Distinguishing grief from grieving9:20: Self-criticism, and the over-focus on recovery11:20: Grief isn't "something to get over"13:00: Attachment, and our neurological map16:00: Prediction error19:30: Complicated grief25:00: Spiritual practice, or having a worldview that incorporates death28:05: Is there a ‘normal’ grieving process?35:25: Pathology, and normal human experiences46:00: Neurological overview of grief in the brain50:40: The Dual Process Model of Grief54:10: Sometimes distraction is okay56:15: Therapeutic practices and learning from grief1:01:00: Grief and its relationship to love1:03:40: Recap Rick's Grief and Loss Workshop: We all face losses in life, from separation and disappointment to shocking, even traumatic events. Join Rick August 13 and 14 for 7 hours of LIVE, online teaching focused on learning simple, powerful practices that help us come to terms with them, heal, and find happiness again. Use coupon code BEINGWELL25 at checkout for an additional 25% off the registration price.Support the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Sponsors:Bombas designed their socks, shirts, and underwear to be the clothes you can’t wait to put on every day. Visit bombas.com/beingwell and use code beingwell for 20% off. Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Ready to shake up your protein Ritual? Being Well listeners get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/WELL.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
One of the most important and challenging skills we can develop is learning to regulate our strong emotions. While it’s very natural to have fluctuations in how we feel about others and ourselves, for some people these ups and downs are particularly intense. At clinical levels, this is known as Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). BPD is characterized by a pattern of instability in a person’s emotions, moods, behavior, self-image, and relationships. BPD is fairly common, and it's even more common for "borderline-y tendencies" to  show up in our lives. On this episode of Being Well, Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson explore what to do when these tendencies show up, how to cultivate a healthy balance of sensitivity and tolerance to distress, regulating and nurturing ourselves, and how to navigate relationships with others when they exhibit borderline tendencies.As a disclaimer, formal diagnosis of any condition should be done with a medical professional working directly with the person in question. This podcast episode is not a substitute for that.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction2:00: What are "borderline tendencies"?6:50: 9 Symptoms of BPD9:10: The what, why, and how of mental health11:25: Childhood influences on borderline tendencies15:05: Instability, impulsivity, and the drive for reassurance25:00: Recognizing varying degrees of borderline patterns27:00: Practical tips–regulation and nurturance32:50: Boundaries, and avoiding spiraling37:50: Acceptance, and the desire for change40:35: Sensitivity and distress tolerance45:00: What to do when you notice borderline tendencies in a relationship51:00: Recognizing how much someone's nature is going to change53:35: Treatability54:50: RecapRick's Grief and Loss Workshop: We all face losses in life, from separation and disappointment to shocking, even traumatic events. Join Rick August 13 and 14 for 7 hours of LIVE, online teaching focused on learning simple, powerful practices that help us come to terms with them, heal, and find happiness again. Use coupon code BeingWell50 at checkout for an additional $50 off the registration price.Support the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Sponsors:Bombas designed their socks, shirts, and underwear to be the clothes you can’t wait to put on every day. Visit bombas.com/beingwell and use code beingwell for 20% off. Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Ready to shake up your protein Ritual? Being Well listeners get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/WELL.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
How to Make Learning STICK

How to Make Learning STICK

2022-07-1101:04:201

One of the most important skills we can develop is learning how to learn–how to update old beliefs about ourselves, take in new information, and build psychological resources like courage, gratitude, and confidence. We have experiences from which we could potentially learn all the time, but how often are we able to actually implement lasting change from our positive experiences?On this episode of Being Well, Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson dive into Rick’s recently published study on our capacity for deliberate growth. We talk a bit about the neurological components of learning, how the study worked, and what the practical takeaways are to help us make learning stick.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Positive Neuroplasticity Training:  Learn how to change your brain for the better in the 6-part course from Rick his study was based on!  Use code BEWELL50 for $50 off the purchase price.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction1:55: The focus of Rick’s recently published study on how to learn4:35: Our capacity for deliberate growth7:30: How does learning work in the brain?11:25: Activation and installation16:00: Acknowledging the difficulty of deliberate change16:55: The HEAL framework22:15: How Rick’s study results were measured30:05: The results of the study39:10: Possibilities for future studies42:00: Little moments of recognition44:05: Takeaways45:50: Assessing the whole notion of statistical significance51:05: Control groups and clusters54:05: Rick reads the final statement from the study.56:05: Recap  Wednesday Meditation Group: Join Rick for his freely offered online weekly meditation, talk, and discussion.Support the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link. Sponsors:Bombas designed their socks, shirts, and underwear to be the clothes you can’t wait to put on every day. Visit bombas.com/beingwell and use code beingwell for 20% off. Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Ready to shake up your protein Ritual? Being Well listeners get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/WELL.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
When a child is particularly emotionally intelligent, and a parent is particularly emotionally vulnerable, an inversion of the typical relationship can occur where the child devotes themselves to meeting the parent’s needs rather than the other way around. This can lead the child to lose touch with their own wants and needs – with their authentic self – which then leads to underlying feelings of worthlessness, uncertainty, and self-alienation in adulthood.Extreme versions of this pattern are known as parentification, but mild to moderate versions are surprisingly common. On today’s episode of Being Well, Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson explore how we can heal from the effects of these difficult early experiences and rediscover who we truly are. This material was completely eye-opening for me, and it’s one of my favorite episodes we've ever produced.Want to learn more? Check out Alice Miller’s classic book The Drama of the Gifted Child.Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction2:55: Distinction between parentification and the gifted child5:05: Serving a psychological function - what is the “gift” we’re talking about?7:50: Self-definition vs. defining yourself through relationship10:30: Examples of generational patterns16:45: Accumulation of subtle forms of parentification over time21:55: Patterns of interaction, and differentiation24:00: Summary of material so far27:00: “The manic defense against depression”30:30: What can people do?35:00: Love, aspiration, and power in parenting styles40:20: Creating a coherent (and balanced) narrative43:30: Seductive narratives, grief not shame, claiming your nature51:25: What emotions were you permitted?53:35: RecapWednesday Meditation Group: Join Rick for his freely offered online weekly meditation, talk, and discussion.Support the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Sponsors:Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Ready to shake up your protein Ritual? Being Well listeners get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/WELL.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
A little while ago, we had an episode on self-awareness where Rick emphasized how the majority of what people have to become self-aware of is the good inside themselves. The point felt significant enough to expand into a full episode about how to connect with our best parts.On this episode of Being Well, Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson focus on how to accept, appreciate, and connect with our positive aspects, and how to deal with some of the developmental blocks that prevent us from embracing the good in ourselves. We look at how the culture we’re in affects our perspective, how to manage fears of conceit, and how to experience more intimacy and courage by releasing cynicism.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction3:20: What gets in the way of us hearing the good news about ourselves?5:40: Stories we’re told about ourselves that form our identity10:45: Reconnecting with childhood positive qualities17:10: Intentions, talents, efforts23:25: Avoiding conceit and the fear of sounding conceited30:40: Releasing ideas that human nature is fundamentally bad34:25: Tribalism36:35: Seeing the cultural water we swim in41:15: Intimacy, cynicism, courage46:40: Cherishing ourselves and others47:35: Recap Wednesday Meditation Group: Join Rick for his freely offered online weekly meditation, talk, and discussion.Support the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link. Sponsors:Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Ready to shake up your protein Ritual? Being Well listeners get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/WELL.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
Complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (CPTSD) is the result of the slow accumulation of many small traumatic experiences over time. On our most popular Being Well episode to date, Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson explored the details of CPTSD with Pete Walker, and on today’s episode, Forrest is joined by his partner Elizabeth Ferreira to discuss the topic through a more personal lens. Elizabeth shares her CPTSD origin story, what CPTSD feels like, and how to create a compassionate environment with or without a therapist so you can safely process grief, experience out repressed emotions, and learn to express your needs.Check out Elizabeth's NEW PODCAST!About our Guest: Elizabeth is a recent graduate of the Somatic Psychology program at the California Institute of Integral Studies (CIIS), and is currently earning hours toward her MFT license. She creates content on YouTube and Instagram focused on CPTSD, PMDD, and becoming a more whole version of who you are.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction2:15: Elizabeth’s story5:20: Trauma in the broader family system8:40: A “normal” story11:50: Loneliness, and the parts of us we leave behind15:00: Repressed emotions17:10: Adverse childhood experiences20:35: Stepping out of adverse environments25:15: Trauma work as grief work29:10: Symptoms of Complex PTSD34:50: How do you need to be comforted?37:30: Creating the sense of safety40:30: Somatic interventions45:30: Being witnessed47:10: Claiming your needs50:10: Facing the dreaded experience53:50: Accuracy vs. sensitivity57:05: Hidden parts1:00:00: Start by joining1:04:20: RecapSupport the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Sponsors:Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Try Splendid Spoon today and take meal-planning off your plate. Just go to SplendidSpoon.com/BEINGWELL for $50 off your first boxReady to shake up your protein Ritual? Being Well listeners get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/WELL.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
You might have heard the line “attachment is the root of suffering.” It comes from the Buddha, but you don’t have to be a Buddhist to recognize that becoming overly attached to a particular outcome, person, or view of yourself can lead to a lot of suffering. At the same time, there are clearly things that are sensible to be attached to – like our loved ones, a basic moral compass, and fundamentals like food and shelter. So, what’s the problem with attachment?On this episode of Being Well, Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson discuss the problem with attachment, what differentiates healthy and unhealthy forms of attachment, and what we can do to relax attachment over time.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction2:10: Learning from Buddhism without trying to be a Buddhist8:45: Two kinds of suffering12:00: Distinguishing healthy desire and unhealthy desire19:40: Markers of problematic attachments24:10: Self-concept, and an example from Forrest of relaxing attachment 30:25: Balancing "Right View" and nonattachment42:25: Pain and release50:55: What’s useful for you?55:45: RecapSupport the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Sponsors:Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Try Splendid Spoon today and take meal-planning off your plate. Just go to SplendidSpoon.com/BEINGWELL for $50 off your first boxReady to shake up your protein Ritual? Being Well listeners get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/WELL.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
On one of our favorite episodes of Being Well, Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson are joined by author and therapist Terry Real to talk about how to overcome the myth of toxic individualism, break trauma cycles, and experience real intimacy in our relationships. They discuss how to balance acceptance and agency, develop a healthy sense of trust and self-esteem, communicate what we want effectively, and experience our power through collaboration rather than dominance. Terry describes how we can move past the delusions of toxic individualism and patriarchy that plague our culture, moving away from ‘me vs. you’ and into Us.About our Guest: Terrence Real is an internationally recognized family therapist, speaker, and bestselling author. He is the founder of the Relational Life Institute, which offers workshops for couples as well as professional training for clinicians in his Relational Life Therapy (RLT) methodology. His latest book is Us: Getting Past You and Me to Build a More Loving Relationship which comes out June 7th.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction1:45: Terry’s personal transformation4:55: Regulating up to our parents7:05: The Adaptive Child vs. the Wise Adult14:25: Us vs. the delusions of individualism and patriarchy18:05: Balancing acceptance and agency22:45: Enlightened self-interest and working with couples29:25: Three phases to get more of what you want in relationships without a counselor33:35: How to support people–particularly women–in dealing with unfairness37:15: Gendered tendencies–moving into intimacy and out of patriarchy43:20: Shame and healthy self-esteem49:40: Relational reckoning and relational integrity56:55: Repairing trust and grandiosity1:01:00: RecapSupport the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Sponsors:Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Try Splendid Spoon today and take meal-planning off your plate. Just go to SplendidSpoon.com/BEINGWELL for $50 off your first boxReady to shake up your protein Ritual? Being Well listeners get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/WELL.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
When was the last time you went through a day without comparing yourself to anyone? For instance, by comparing your life to someone else’s highlight reel on social media, or being critical of your own willpower and abilities? Avoiding these mental traps can be difficult in a culture that emphasizes the importance of being 'special.'Of course, we are all special – and all ordinary. On this episode of Being Well, Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson are joined by psychologist and author Dr. Ronald Siegel to discuss why that might not be such a bad thing. They discuss how to drop the myth of the extraordinary, how to heal from feelings of inadequacy, and what healthy self-esteem looks like.About our Guest: Dr. Siegel is Assistant Professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School, international speaker on the topics of mindfulness and compassion, and author of several books including his latest, The Extraordinary Gift of Being Ordinary: Finding Happiness Right Where You Are.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction1:50: What prompted Ron’s inquiry into being ordinary7:00: Cultural and evolutionary factors12:55: Fluctuations in self-esteem based on success and failure16:40: Social connection as antidote18:35: What being ordinary looks like20:45: Three ways to drop the myth of the extraordinary31:35: Rick’s path to healing his own feelings of inadequacy38:55: Predispositions to having a sense of worth and value44:40: Love vs. ‘specialness’48:40: Reaping the benefits of self-esteem without getting caught in its traps56:10: RecapSupport the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Sponsors:Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Try Splendid Spoon today and take meal-planning off your plate. Just go to SplendidSpoon.com/BEINGWELL for $50 off your first box.Ready to shake up your protein Ritual? Being Well listeners get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/WELL.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
Anger is one of the most complex, demanding, and difficult emotions we deal with on a regular basis, in part because it has both many costs and many uses. It burdens our bodies, relationships, and the world around us. And at the same time, there is a vital energy associated with anger that is extremely powerful and, when harnessed effectively, quite useful.On this episode of Being Well, Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson explore the varied ways anger surfaces, how we can relate to it, and how in recognizing what it has to tell us we can channel its energy towards good ends.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction2:10: Framing anger relative to other emotions6:15: The three poisons12:20: Useful aspects of anger and issues with labeling it as bad22:45: Repression and not downregulating others’ emotions28:30: Treating anger with respect rather than fear30:15: What supports us in healthily claiming anger?38:00: Characteristics that can predispose people to be angry39:40: The Empty Boat and recognizing anger as an affliction against onesself43:10: RecapSupport the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Have a question for us? Email: contact@beingwellpodcast.com to submit questions or potential topics you'd like us to explore in future episodes.Sponsors:Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Try Splendid Spoon today and take meal-planning off your plate. Just go to SplendidSpoon.com/BEINGWELL for $50 off your first boxConnect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
Self-awareness is both one of the most important skills for a person to have, and one of the most challenging to develop. In this episode of Being Well, Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson explore what it takes to increase self-awareness over time, the different forms of awareness that come into play, and why maintaining self-awareness can be such a struggle. Rick then emphasizes how we can develop a greater awareness of the positive aspects of ourselves. Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction1:45: Rick’s observations of people’s self-awareness when beginning therapy 6:10: Distinguishing internal and external self-awareness7:40: Different types of internal self-awareness12:20: Why is it hard to become self-aware?18:45: Positive discoveries and Forrest’s personal experience29:05: The natural movement toward health and sanity33:35: What causes us to lose touch with positive aspects of our nature?42:45: How can we cultivate more self-awareness over time?49:45: Questions to ask yourself54:50: A creative exercise for mapping out parts of yourself58:10: RecapSupport the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Have a question for us? Email: contact@beingwellpodcast.com to submit questions or potential topics you'd like us to explore in future episodes.Sponsors:Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Try Splendid Spoon today and take meal-planning off your plate. Just go to SplendidSpoon.com/BEINGWELL for $50 off your first boxDiscover your full genetic potential by uploading your existing DNA test results at genomelink.io. No trial period, no credit card, and no hidden fees!Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson open up the mailbag to explore a variety of listener questions. They talk about what causes our brains to become attached to unwanted habits, how to know which of your thoughts are worth listening to, and the pros and cons of saying "kind of." They then consider how to improve sibling relationships, and what to do with the positive emotions we experience during meditation.Have a question for us? Email: contact@beingwellpodcast.com to submit questions or topics you'd like us to explore in future episodes.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction1:45: Why do our brains keep us stuck on unwanted patterns or ways of thinking?10:45: Three kinds of craving and the machinery of becoming13:50: Why do we say “kind of” all the time?25:50: How do you know which of your thoughts are worth listening to?31:15: How do you improve a sibling relationship?40:35: What do you do with positive emotions during meditation?48:40: RecapWednesday Night Meditation with Rick: https://www.rickhanson.net/teaching/wednesday-meditations-with-dr-rick-hanson/Support the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Sponsors:Try Splendid Spoon today and take meal-planning off your plate. Just go to SplendidSpoon.com/BEINGWELL for $50 off your first boxJoin over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
We all have things we want to accomplish in life, but having goals or knowing we should be doing something is often not nearly enough to get us to actually sustain our efforts in getting where we want to go.Today on Being Well, Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson explore how to optimize our motivation. They discuss the brain's dopamine system, and distinguish motivation from discipline and liking from wanting. They then explore how we can align the brain's underlying biological circuitry with our desires, so we can stay relaxed and engaged while achieving our goals.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction2:05: Motivation vs. Discipline5:30: Why don't we just want the things we know are good for us?11:00: Creating unity between our biology and cognitive processing15:50: Dopamine: An Overview21:30: Distinguishing liking from wanting25:35: Natural variations in dopamine metabolism28:55: How people with lower levels of dopamine can stay motivated33:35: Updating the reward value of your experiences37:20: Being, doing, and having43:05: What has helped Rick stay diligent and let go of resistance46:40: Practical how-tos for interacting with the dopaminergic system 50:35: Letting fish be fish52:30: RecapSupport the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Sponsors:Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Try Splendid Spoon today and take meal-planning off your plate. Just go to SplendidSpoon.com/BEINGWELL for $50 off your first boxConnect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
With so much suffering going on in the world that’s worthy of our compassion and engagement, it’s easy to become overwhelmed by it even as we have the desire to remain engaged. Secondary traumatic stress is the stress we are exposed to when we interact with other people’s stress, and it manifests at both an individual and societal level. When not managed effectively, it wears us down and diminishes our ability to contribute in a positive way.On this episode of Being Well, Forrest talks with trauma expert Laura van Dernoot Lipsy about how we can better manage secondary traumatic stress, how to avoid burnout and overwhelm, and what it looks like to stay hopeful and live fully in the face of daunting societal challenges.About Our Guest: Laura van Dernoot Lipsky is the founder and director of The Trauma Stewardship Institute and author of Trauma Stewardship: An Everyday Guide to Caring for Self While Caring for Others and The Age of Overwhelm. She is a widely recognized pioneer in the field of trauma exposure and has worked locally, nationally, and internationally for more than three decades.  Laura is also the host of Future Tripping, a podcast about navigating overwhelm.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction1:35: Laura’s personal experience4:10: How secondary trauma shows up for people6:45: Martyrdom and the responsibility of organizations to create sustainable environments10:30: Concern with how trauma is normalized within communities14:10: Internalized oppression and overwhelm in the broader culture17:40: The broader systemic context and the ineffectiveness of burning yourself out21:50: The necessity of taking breaks26:40: How to feel okay taking time to unplug from discourse on charged topics33:35: Differentiating between spheres of control and acknowledging grief37:45: Finding ways to stay hopeful40:35: What Laura is grateful for and stressed about44:35: RecapSupport the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Have a question for us? Email: contact@beingwellpodcast.com to submit questions or potential topics you'd like us to explore in future episodes.Sponsors:Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Try Splendid Spoon today and take meal-planning off your plate. Just go to SplendidSpoon.com/BEINGWELL for $50 off your first boxConnect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
It’s normal and healthy for us to try to process our experiences emotionally, but sometimes during that process we find ourselves getting stuck on the same painful memory, anxiety, or disturbing thought. This frustrating experience, known as rumination, is a common psychological challenge that is both discouraging and unhelpful.On this episode of Being Well, Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson spell out what rumination is, where it comes from, and how it functions in the brain. They then explore what practices and strategies we can use to identify rumination when it comes up, and move through an obsessive thought compassionately and effectively.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction2:25: How do we define rumination?7:45: What do we get out of rumination?13:30: Distinguishing rumination from grieving16:30: Where rumination comes from in people18:40: The default mode network22:30: Ways to disengage the default mode network 25:50: Strange attractors, Krishna, and the Gopis30:35: Thought acceptance and noting33:15: Recurring themes of your rumination37:10: Novelty38:45: Self-constructing invites rumination, self-acceptance undermines it47:05: A quick walkthrough for dealing with a negative thought53:00: RecapSupport the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Have a question for us? Email: contact@beingwellpodcast.com to submit questions or potential topics you'd like us to explore in future episodes.Sponsors:Make Woven Earth a part of your nightly routine, and use code BEINGWELL20 for 20% off your purchase of Single Products.Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Try Splendid Spoon today and take meal-planning off your plate. Just go to SplendidSpoon.com/BEINGWELL for $50 off your first box.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
We’ve spent a lot of time on the podcast exploring how we can improve our skills in romantic relationships, but for many people one of the most difficult parts of a relationship is getting into one in the first place. On this episode, Forrest talks with Logan Ury, Director of Relationship Science at the dating app Hinge, about the psychology of dating. They explore chemistry, romance, apps, and how to reframe our self-limiting tendencies so we can find love that is fulfilling and brings out the best in us.About our Guest: Logan Ury is a behavioral scientist turned dating coach, and the author of  How to Not Die Alone: The Surprising Science That Will Help You Find Love. She is the Director of Relationship Science at the dating app Hinge, and former head of Google’s behavioral science team the Irrational Lab.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction  1:40: Why is modern dating so hard?4:15: Romanticism6:20: Being in a relationship for self-actualization8:25: Romanticizers, Maximizers, and Hesitators11:15: Reframes for the Romanticizer14:20: What kind of shared qualities actually matter?19:25: Reframes for the Maximizer26:35: The tendency to externalize problems and avoid vulnerability32:25: Reframes for the Hesitator36:50: Information vs. emotion - appreciation for romance41:05: Bids, and turning towards43:05: What other things do people tend to underestimate in relationships?47:20: The aspect of you that is brought out by your partner48:45: How to use apps in more effective ways51:00: RecapSupport the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Have a question for us? Email: contact@beingwellpodcast.com to submit questions or potential topics you'd like us to explore in future episodes.Sponsors:Visit Pendulumlife.com and use code BEINGWELL for 20% off your first month of membership.Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
On this episode, Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson take a deep dive into defining stress, how it functions, how it impacts our lives and bodies, and what we can do to repair from its effects. We discuss how to distinguish stress from effort, the influence of the modern world on how stressed we feel, the various biological mechanisms involved in stress, and the challenges presented by chronic exposure to it. We then consider what we can do to increase resilience, including positively responding to stressors even in the midst of  limitations and uncertainty.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction1:50: What is stress exactly?3:30: Distinguishing stress from effort7:25: Circles of concern and what we can actually influence10:15: Zebras, and different levels of allostatic load15:30: How the Endocrine System and Nervous System respond to stress21:45: The amygdala response23:20: What are the costs of stress?35:30: The story so far36:25: How do we positively adapt to stress?41:35: The influence of basic lifestyle factors43:50: Questions to ask yourself45:30: Claiming agency while accepting limitations and uncertainty51:05: What we can do to repair from the effects of our stress57:40: RecapSupport the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Sponsors:Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Try Splendid Spoon today and take meal-planning off your plate. Just go to SplendidSpoon.com/BEINGWELL for $50 off your first boxDiscover your full genetic potential by uploading your existing DNA test results at genomelink.io. No trial period, no credit card, and no hidden fees!Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website
Comments (25)

Sean Moore

Great episode.. Thanks

Jul 25th
Reply

Allison Elder

LOVED this episode. Thank you to you both, but especially Elizabeth for her vulnerability in sharing her personal story. It helps and gives the rest of us courage to share our stories! We can learn so much from one another when we break down the walls and share. Thank you so much!

Jun 23rd
Reply

Allison Elder

First time listening. Thank you so much for your efforts!

Feb 16th
Reply

S Roy

This is one of my favorites! Beautiful dialogue on an important topic. Thank you!

Feb 7th
Reply

S Roy

You two are so solid and always engaging. I love the pacing, tone, curiosity, and beautiful father/son dialogue every single time. Thank you for your thoughtful and consistent creations. Love, love, love!

Feb 7th
Reply

S Roy

you always provide value in your discussions and i feel that this topic is very relevant today. thank you very much for this content. fantastic!

Nov 30th
Reply

S Roy

Each podcast is consistently full of excellent material and I appreciate the Hansons' commitment to helping us rewire our brains to become more kind, loving, and compassionate human beings towards others and ourselves. I also enjoy the summary at the end of each podcast. Thank you for the hard work you put in on our behalves.

Oct 25th
Reply

Riri

A thorough show about psychology. Thank you very much!

Jul 14th
Reply (2)

Anna-Marie

A gentle and loving look at our layers of being that have been shaped by our contact with the world. Lovely holding and exploration of "our original source". Thank you

Jun 26th
Reply

Saffron Berridge

Thank you, this was a lovely meditation and I like the idea of some additional shorter episodes

Nov 30th
Reply

Tiina Mosse

Wonderful listening as always!

Aug 22nd
Reply

Katie Elizabeth

First time listening to the show! I have to say that I was super impressed with the host and his on-point insightful questions/responses. Dr. Alfie is a super hero. Her work is outstanding! I gained so much knowledge from listening to her interview and highly suggest it to those working in counseling, psychiatry, and social work.

Aug 12th
Reply

Thomas Badilla

I really enjoyed this episode. The concepts were easy to understand.

Aug 3rd
Reply

D S

Bye, bye.

Jun 7th
Reply

English with Sarvy

enjoyed this episode like hell

Mar 11th
Reply

English with Sarvy

enjoyed so much. thanks.

Mar 10th
Reply

Gulbahar Abdurasulova

great episode. thank you

Dec 15th
Reply

Gulbahar Abdurasulova

great episode! Thank you so much for this podcast!

Jul 8th
Reply

Shahar Danziger

להתמקד בחיוב ולא בשלילה.. לשמוע עוד מלא לא;)

Jun 4th
Reply

ForexTraderNYC

wow Rick! heard him on Jordan Harbinger some great thinking n ideas! instant subscribed..

May 9th
Reply
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