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Author: Bloomberg Radio

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Host June Grasso speaks with prominent attorneys and legal scholars, analyzing major legal issues and cases in the news. The show examines all aspects of the legal profession, from intellectual property to criminal law, from bankruptcy to securities law, drawing on the deep research tools of BloombergLaw.com.

1532 Episodes
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Intellectual property litigator Terence Ross, a partner at Katten Muchin Rosenman, discusses an appeal over the Second Circuit's finding that Andy Warhol infringed the copyright of a photographer in his silkscreens of rock icon Prince. Richard Ausness, a professor at the University of Kentucky Law School discusses the landmark opioid trial in West Virginia. June Grasso hosts
Joshua Davis, a professor at the University of San Francisco Law School, discusses Epic Games allegations that Apple's 30% commission on app sales is a violation of antitrust law. Mark Osler, a professor at the University of St. Thomas School of Law, discusses Supreme Court oral arguments over drug sentencing laws. June Grasso hosts.
Andrew Rossman, a partner at Quinn Emanuel discusses a case where a Delaware judge ordered Kohlberg & Co. to complete its private equity purchase of DecoPac Inc., a cake decorating technology company, despite the economic turmoil of the pandemic. Mark Osler, a professor at the University of St. Thomas School of Law who specializes in sentencing policy, discusses Supreme Court oral arguments over allowing shorter sentences for lower level drug offenders. June Grasso hosts.
Steve Sanders, a professor at Indiana University Maurer School of Law, discusses the U.S. Supreme Court leaving intact California’s ban on government-funded travel to states it sees as having anti-LGBTQ policies, rejecting Texas’s bid to challenge the policy. Carl Tobias, a professor at the University of Richmond School of Law, discusses President Biden's latest judicial nominees. June Grasso hosts.
First Amendment expert Eugene Volokh, a professor at UCLA Law School, discusses Supreme Court justices struggling with a case over a 14-year-old cheerleader’s profane Snapchat rant, that led to her suspension from the team. Former federal prosecutor Robert Mintz, a partner at McCarter & English, discusses the justices agreeing to hear a case involving the right of a defendant to confront witnesses against him/her at trial. June Grasso hosts.
Leon Fresco, a partner at Holland & Knight, discusses the Supreme Court giving a victory to longtime immigrants who entered the country illegally but now have strong ties to the community. Madison Alder, Bloomberg Law Reporter, discusses hearings for judicial nominees and how the Biden administration got an early start on vetting potential judicial nominees. June Grasso hosts.
Second Amendment expert, Adam Winkler, a professor at UCLA Law School, discusses the Supreme Court agreeing to use a New York case to consider whether the government must let most people carry a handgun in public for self-defense. First Amendment attorney Jeff Lewis discusses states passing anti-protest laws. June Grasso hosts.
Jordan Rubin, Bloomberg Law Reporter, discusses the Supreme Court ruling that will make it more likely that people who commit homicides as minors will die in prison. Greg Stohr, Bloomberg Supreme Court Reporter, discusses the Supreme Court deciding to hear a major new Second Amendment case. Joseph Re, a partner at Knobbe Martens and president of the American Intellectual Property Law Association, discusses a Supreme Court patent case that pits inventors against their former employers. June Grasso hosts.
Pat Parenteau, Professor of Environmental Law at Vermont Law School, discusses the legal maneuvering of the Biden administration in implementing its environmental agenda. Andrea Matwyshyn, Professor and Associate Dean of Innovation and Technology at Penn State Law School, discusses the Supreme Court slashing the Federal Trade Commissions power to recoup billions of dollars for consumers in court.
David Harris, a professor at the University of Pittsburgh Law School, author of, "A City Divided: Race, Fear and the Law in Police Confrontations" and host of the "Criminal Injustice" podcast, discusses what's ahead in the Derek Chauvin case and the federal investigation into the police department of Minneapolis. Leon Fresco, a partner at Holland & Knight, discusses the Supreme Court indicating it will curb green card applications. June Grasso hosts.
Former federal prosecutor Robert Mintz, a partner at McCarter & English, and former public defender Christa Groshek, managing attorney of Groshek Law, discuss the guilty verdict in the trial of Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd and the sentencing ahead. Bloomberg Legal Reporter Patricia Hurtado discusses the latest investigation into New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. June Grasso hosts.
Former public defender Christa Groshek, managing attorney of Groshek Law in Minneapolis, discusses the strategies in the closing arguments in the trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer charged in the death of George Floyd. David Yaffe-Bellany, Bloomberg Legal Reporter, discusses the first plea agreement with a founding member of the far-right Oath Keepers group, stemming from the U.S. Capitol riot. June Grasso hosts.
Bloomberg Legal Reporter Laurel Calkins discusses how juries in three small Texas towns have churned out a series of multimillion-dollar verdicts, totaling more than $3.7 billion in patent awards against big tech companies during the pandemic. June Grasso hosts.
Constitutional law professor Neil Kinkopf of the Georgia State University College of Law, discusses the Biden Commission to study changes to the Supreme Court, the legislation to add justices to the court and Justice Stephen Breyer's speech against court packing. June Grasso hosts.
Former federal prosecutor Elie Honig discusses the charges against a former Minnesota police officer for the shooting of a Black motorist in a traffic stop, and the last day of testimony in the trial of Derek Chauvin for the death of George Floyd. Michael Schmidt, vice chair of the Labor & Employment Department at Cozen O'Connor, discusses the legal and practical implications of employees not wanting to return to the office after working remotely. June Grasso hosts.
Constitutional law professor Akram Faizer of Lincoln Memorial University, discusses the American Civil Liberties Union’s legal challenge to a South Carolina return-to-work order for state employees. Bloomberg Legal Reporter Erik Larson discusses the federal investigation of U.S. Representative Matt Gaetz, a Florida Republican, on sex trafficking allegations. June Grasso hosts.
Shyam Balganesh, a professor at Columbia Law School, discusses the Supreme Court ruling that Google didn’t commit copyright infringement when it used Oracle’s programming code in the Android operating system. Richard Frase, a professor at the University of Minnesota Law School, discusses the first 9 days of testimony in the trial of Derek Chauvin for the death of George Floyd. June Grasso hosts.
Securities attorney Robert Heim, a partner at Tarter, Krinsky & Drogan, discusses the latest craze in digital assets, NFT's (non-fungible tokens), and the spectacular prices they've been garnering. Bloomberg Legal Reporter Patricia Hurtado, discusses the suit for defamation against Netflix by a private equity and real estate executive accused of paying bribes to get his children into Harvard, Stanford and USC, over a documentary about the college admissions cheating scheme. June Grasso hosts.
Professor Andrea Matwyshyn, Associate Dean of Innovation and Technology at Penn State Law, discusses why Facebook is likely to face scrutiny from federal and state regulators, as well as lawsuits from consumers, after data on more than half a billion users became widely available online. Kimberly Strawbridge Robinson, Bloomberg Law Supreme Court Reporter, discusses how the U.S. Solicitor General was snubbed again by the Supreme Court. June Grasso hosts.
Matthew Schettenhelm, Bloomberg Intelligence Litigation and Government Analyst, discusses the implications of the Supreme Court allowing the Federal Communications Commission to relax the limits on the ownership of local television and radio stations. June Grasso hosts.
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Comments (2)

muddy ali

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Jan 31st
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Spluke

Please equalize sound levels. The ads are alarmingly louder than the podcast.

Mar 23rd
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