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Bullying, Life & Stuff with Rhonda Orr
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Bullying, Life & Stuff with Rhonda Orr

Author: Rhonda Orr

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Rhonda Orr is the president and founder of Rhonda's STOP BULLYING Foundation. On this podcast, she expands on the newspaper advice columns she writes with Dr. Cheri L. McDonald, "Dear Rhonda & Dr. Cheri.." Rhonda speaks directly to you, with real-world, actionable advice.
121 Episodes
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Have you ever worked for someone who confused leadership with fear? A good leader doesn’t need to motivate people by intimidating them. What can you do when a supervisor who bullies subordinates has the support of top management?That’s what a woman wrote to us asking about this week.
Experts love to categorize things -- like behavior. They group parents under titles such as Helicopter parent, or Tiger parent, or Snowplow parent. The latest is the Lawnmower parent. This week, we got a letter from a woman who encountered that term and doesn’t really recognize it.
Domestic abuse can happen in any relationship. Even couples that seem to be happy… to have it all … can be experiencing violence in the home. And — though it might start as a relatively minor incident – the abuse can easily become worse as time passes. That’s what concerns the woman who wrote us this week. She’s been abused by her husband and now she’s wondering if it’s time to get the police involved.
Regret can be a powerful emotion. When that negative feeling remains unresolved over time, it may grow to feel overwhelming. Today, we have a letter from a man who is feeling regret. Years ago, he failed to stand up for a friend. He wishes he had, and it’s been on his mind for all this time. What can he do now? What should he do?
If there’s one thing I’ve learned in six years of writing the column with Dr. Cheri, it’s that bullies can be found everywhere. This week’s letter proves that. It’s from a girl whose sister is a bully as threatening as any stranger she might encounter at school. Her sister is just plain scary. And her parents don’t seem to care. What can she do?
This week, roasting makes another appearance on our show. If you haven’t heard of it, it’s where someone goes on social media and invites people to “roast,” or insult them. It may start out funny as friends make harmless comments, but once the request gets outside that circle, strangers will say some pretty awful things.This week, we got a letter from a girl who tried it and was hit with hundreds of nasty comments. Her mother was less than empathetic, to say the least.
FOMO is a Thing | Ep. 113

FOMO is a Thing | Ep. 113

2019-04-0200:21:24

Ever heard of FOMO? It’s the Fear of Missing Out, and it’s usually caused by spending too much time on social media, watching what othes are doing. Some people get so wrapped up in their friends’ lives—as shown online, which isn’t necessarily reality—that they begin to neglect their own lives. That’s what has one mother worried this week. She feels like her daughter is missing out on life because she’s afraid of missing out on others’ lives.
Being a single mom is tough. I know—I’ve been one. But it’s even harder when that child grows up and claims you’ve had a bad impact on their life. It shakes you to your core to find out that your child, for whom you thought you were doing your best, believes you failed. This week, we heard from a mom who just found out that her 26-year-old son, whom she still supports, blames her for his troubles.
The controversy over legal abortion is raging, and politicians are once again debating what to do about it. Often left out of that debate, though, is the impact on the family that an abortion can have. This week, we heard from a mother who is distraught over her daughter’s decision to have a late-term abortion. She’s unhappy that her daughter was diagnosed with a mood disorder, seemingly with the intent to allow her to terminate the pregnancy. You might guess that we have strong opinions on this subject. You’d be right.
One of the great injustices in our society is the way that men are treated versus women when it comes to sexual activity. Men are given a pass—even treated as though they’ve made conquests—if they’re promiscuous. Women, on the other hand, are looked down upon if they are even believed to have had multiple sex partners. And this so-called “slut-shaming” affects girls who aren’t promiscuous at all. Once they’re labeled a slut, even if they’re not, that label sticks. This week, we heard from a college girl still plagued by the accusation that she’s a slut, from an experience in high school.
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