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CISO-Security Vendor Relationship Podcast
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CISO-Security Vendor Relationship Podcast

Author: David Spark, Founder, Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson, CISO, Lyft

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Discussions, tips, and debates around improving the communications and services that security vendors provide to their customers, the security buyer.
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All links and images for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/isnt-that-adorable-our-little-ciso-has-an-opinion/) We're spoon-feeding "respect" to the CISO on this week's CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast. This episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson. Our sponsored guest this week, thanks to Trend Micro, is Jim Shilts, founder, North American DevOps Group. Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor Trend Micro. Trend Micro Incorporated, a global leader in cybersecurity solutions, helps to make the world safe for exchanging digital information. Our innovative solutions for consumers, businesses, and governments provide layered security for data centers, cloud environments, networks, and endpoints. For more information, visit www.trendmicro.com. On this week's episode Why is everyone talking about this now? Gary Hayslip, CISO, Softbank Investment Advisers and regular guest, posted an article about a growing trend of CISO frustration and why they don't last at an organization. This article addresses many issues around burnout, but I want to focus on this one stat from an ISC(2) study which states, "Sixty three percent of respondents said they wanted to work at an organization where their opinions on the existing security posture were taken seriously." Hard to keep any security staff in place if they're not respected. We talk a lot about being able to talk to the board, but the communications has to be two way. How clear are executives in understanding that respect and listening to their cyberstaff is in their best interest? What annoys a security professional Deidre Diamond of CyberSN, asks this very pointed question, "We are short 500k cyber professionals in the US and 89% of our current cyber professionals are open to new opportunities; why are jobs taking on average 4-9 months to fill?" That last stat is CyberSN's data estimates. She's arguing there is plenty of supply. Why is this taking so darn long? Nobody's happy. What's Worse?! We've got a question tailored for our DevOps guest this week. Please, enough. No, more. DevOps and security. This is a topic that has grown over time, evolved in branding, and Mike has spoken out about how much he don't like the term DevSecOps. As we regularly do in this segment, what have you heard enough of on the DevOps and security debate and what would you like to hear a lot more? Two factor authentication is a smart step towards more secure password management but what happens the moment after you have convinced the employees of your company to adopt 2FA, when you then say, “Oh yes, don’t forget your SIM PIN.” 2FA might stop hackers from using easily searchable information like someone’s mother’s maiden name, but these bad actors have already discovered the weak link in this particular chain. They call the phone provider, pretend to be that specific victim and ask to swap the victim’s SIM account information to a new SIM card – one that is in their possession. That way, everything the victim did with their phone – texting, banking, and receiving 2FA passcodes – all goes to this new phone. More on CISO Series. Check out lots more cloud security tips sponsored by OpenVPN, provider of next-gen secure and scalable communication software. OpenVPN Access Server keeps your company’s data safe with end-to-end encryption, secure remote access, and extension for your centralized UTM. Hey, you're a CISO, what's your take on this? Nigel Hedges, CISO, CPA Australia, asked, "Should security operations exist in infrastructure/operations teams?" Nigel asked this questions to colleagues and got mixed results. One CISO said it was doomed to fail, others said its up to leadership and a CISO doesn't need to own secops. "Other people were adamant that the focus required to manage secops, and streamlined incident response cant work within infra because the primary objectives of infra are towards service availability and infra projects," said Nigel who went on to ask, "Is this important prior to considering using a security vendor to provided managed security operations? Is it important to 'get the house in order' prior to using managed secops vendors? And is it easier to get the house in order when secops is not in infra?"
All links and images for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/rest-assured-were-confident-our-security-sucks/) We may not have the protection you want, but what we lack in adequate security we make up in confidence. Sleep better at night after you listen to this week's episode of CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast. This episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson. Our guest this week is Billy Spears (@billyjspears), CISO, loanDepot. Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor, CyberInt. The high ROI is what makes spear phishing campaigns so attractive to threat actors. Read our breakdown of TA505’s latest series of attacks. CyberInt has been tracking various activities surrounding this and other similar attacks where legit means were used to hack international companies in the retail & financial industries. On this week’s episode Why is everybody talking about this now? Tip of the hat to Eduardo Ortiz for forwarding this discussion Stuart Mitchell of Stott and May initiated on LinkedIn asking if there should be a "golden bullet" clause in a CISO's contract. He was referring to the CISO of Capital One who had to step down and take on a consulting role after the breach. What are arguments for and against? Ask a CISO Nir Rothenberg, CISO, Rapyd asks, "If you were given control of company IT, what would be the first things you would do?" What's Worse?! Should a CISO be closing sales or securing the company? Hey, you're a CISO, what's your take on this? According to Nominet's Cyber Confidence Report, 71 percent of CISOs say their organization uses the company's security posture as a selling point, even though only 17% of CISOs are confident about their security posture. There are probably many factors that contribute to this disparity. Is it a gap that will ever close, or is this just the nature of security people vs. sales? Bluetooth is a convenient and easy method of sharing data between devices, which, of course, qualifies it as a prime target for exploitation. A trio of researchers has discovered a vulnerability that has the potential of attacking billions of Bluetooth-enabled devices, including phones, laptops, IoT and IIoT technologies. In short, this Key Negotiation of Bluetooth vulnerability, which has been given the acronym KNOB, exploits the pairing encryption protocol within the Bluetooth Classic wireless technology standard, which supports encryption keys with entropy between 1 and 16 bytes/octets. It inserts between the pairing devices forcing both to agree to encryption with 1 byte or 8 bits of entropy, after which it simply brute-forces the encryption keys. More on CISO Series. Check out lots more cloud security tips sponsored by OpenVPN, provider of next-gen secure and scalable communication software. OpenVPN Access Server keeps your company’s data safe with end-to-end encryption, secure remote access, and extension for your centralized UTM. What do you think of this pitch? How targeted should your pitch have to be?  
All links and images for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/what-security-advice-will-your-family-ignore/) This Thanksgiving we wish you lots of luck convincing your family members to use a password manager. Would getting them to switch political allegiances be easier? This episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson. Our guest this week is Jeff Hudesman, head of information security, DailyPay. Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor Tenable. Effective vulnerability prioritization helps you answer three questions: Where should we prioritize based on risk? Which vulnerabilities are likeliest to be exploited? What should we fix first? Tenable gives you the accurate and actionable data you need to answer these questions and better secure your business. Learn more: tenable.com/predictive-prioritization. On this week’s episode Why is everybody talking about this now? Rich Malewicz, CIO, Livingston County, started a thread of common threats and scams we should warn family and friends about over the holidays. Lots of great advice. We discuss our favorites, whether we turn into family tech support, and if you had one cyber holiday wish for every family member, what would it be? Hey, you're a CISO, what's your take on this? When is the right time and WRONG time to start red teaming? (the process of letting ethical hackers loose on your business to test your defenses, your blue team.) What exactly is it you're testing? Are you testing your network's resiliency or your business' resiliency? "What's Worse?!" Three options in this "What's Worse?!" scenario. The great CISO challenge We have repeatedly touted on the podcast the benefits of multi-factor authentication or MFA. Our guest implemented an MFA solution at his company. We talk about the challenges, criteria, and roll out like? And did they see any visible evidence of security improvements? Casey from accounting is getting frustrated, waiting for client files being held up by the firewall. Jordan is trying to join a video conference that needs a plugin, but the firewall won’t let it through. So they call the IT manager who then disables it. This happens a lot. Maybe not in large companies, but small law firms, medical clinics, or small businesses that might use an old-school administrator who will either turn off the firewall or opt out of using one altogether, believing in the power of a cheap antivirus product to keep things safe. More on CISO Series. Check out lots more cloud security tips sponsored by OpenVPN, provider of next-gen secure and scalable communication software. OpenVPN Access Server keeps your company’s data safe with end-to-end encryption, secure remote access, and extension for your centralized UTM. What do you think of this pitch? There is lots of disagreement over whether this pitch is any good.
All links and images for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/dos-and-donts-of-trashing-your-competition/) We want to malign our competitors, but just don't know how mean we should be. Miss Manners steps in on the latest episode of CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast. This episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and special guest co-host, Mark Eggleston (@meggleston), CISO, Health Partners Plans, and our guest is Anahi Santiago (@AnahiSantiago), CISO, ChristianaCare Health System. We recorded in front of a live audience at Evanta's CISO Executive Summit in Philadelphia on November 5th, 2019. Recording CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast in front of a live audience at Evanta's CISO Executive Summit in Philadelphia (11-05-19) Thanks to this week's podcast sponsors Trend Micro, Thinkst, and Secure Controls Framework. Trend Micro Incorporated, a global leader in cybersecurity solutions, helps to make the world safe for exchanging digital information. Our innovative solutions for consumers, businesses, and governments provide layered security for data centers, cloud environments, networks, and endpoints. For more information, visit www.trendmicro.com. The Secure Controls Framework (SCF) is a meta-framework – a framework of frameworks. This free solution is available for companies to use to design, implement and manage their cybersecurity and privacy controls in an efficient and sustainable manner. Our approach provides a comprehensive solution to manage complex compliance needs. Most companies find out way too late that they’ve been breached. Thinkst Canary changes this. Find out why the Thinkst Canary is one of the most loved products in the business and why the smartest security teams in the world run Canary. Visit https://canary.tools. On this week’s episode Why is everyone talking about this now? Greg van der Gaast, former guest who runs security at The University of Salford, initiated a popular LinkedIn discussion on the topic of human error. According to his colleague Matthew Trump of the University of Sussex, in critical industries, such as aerospace, oil & gas, and medical, “human error” is not an acceptable answer. You simply have to prevent the incident. If not, a mistake can be both a regulatory violation and lethal. But people are a part of the security equation. It’s unavoidable. We know zero erros is impossible, but can you accept “human error” as a fail point? Hey, you’re a CISO, what’s your take on this? Listener David said, “One thing I have experienced at my last two jobs is integrating with a ‘global’ security team whose security program is effectively and functionally inferior to our own. In these occasions, the global security team wanted us to remove current safeguards, processes/procedures and tooling that reduced the preparedness and effectiveness of our security program and introduced risk(s) that we have not been exposed to in years. All of these changes were always touted as a ‘one team’ initiative but never once was due diligence on security posture taken into account. “What is the best way to go about a consolidation like this? Do you not mess with a good thing and ask the ‘better’ security program to report up incidents, conform to compliance check boxes etc. or as a CISO do you sign off on a risk acceptance knowing that the operating company is now in a worse state of security.” “What’s Worse?!” We’ve got two rounds of really bad scenarios. What annoys a security professional Geoff Belknap, former guest and CISO of LinkedIn, appreciates a vendor’s desire to “bring like minds” together around food or drink, but the invite is not welcome on a weekend. Belknap feels that the weekend intrudes into a CISO’s personal/family space. There was a lot of debate and disagreements on this, but there were some solutions. One mentioned a vendor invite that included round trip Lyft rides and childcare. Oh, they did something stupid on social media again Jason Hoenich, CEO of Habitu8 posted on LinkedIn that he didn’t appreciate Fortinet writing about security training for CSO Online, something for which Jason’s business does and for which he believes Fortinet does not have any expertise. It appears this was a sponsored article, but Jason didn’t point to the article nor did he isolate specifically what he felt was wrong with Fortinet’s advice. Here at the CISO Series, we like Jason and Habitu8. They’ve been strong contributors to the community. But complaining and not pointing to any concrete evidence is not the best way to convince an audience. Earlier this year we saw something similar with the CEO of Crowdstrike going after the CEO of Cybereason claiming an underhanded sales tactic that was not specified nor anyone at Cybereason knew what he was talking about. Is it OK to go after your competition in a public forum? If so, what’s the most professional and respectful way to handle it? It’s time for the audience question speed round Our Philadelphia audience has questions and our CISOs had some answers. We rattle off a quick series of questions and answers to close the show.
All links and images for this post can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/get-out-the-fud-is-coming-from-the-inside/) On this week's CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast, we're pointing fingers at practitioners, not vendors, for promoting the FUD (fear, uncertainty, and doubt) scare-a-thon. This episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson. Our guest this week is Eddie Contreras (@CISOEdwardC), CISO, Frost Bank. Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor Trend Micro. Trend Micro Incorporated, a global leader in cybersecurity solutions, helps to make the world safe for exchanging digital information. Our innovative solutions for consumers, businesses, and governments provide layered security for data centers, cloud environments, networks, and endpoints. For more information, visit www.trendmicro.com. On this week's episode Why is everyone talking about this now? On LinkedIn, Ron C. of CoreSolutions Software said, "Cybersecurity is no longer just a technical problem. It’s now more of a people problem! So why aren’t businesses prioritizing security awareness training for their staff?" There was a massive response and mixed agreement. Regardless, are we falling short on security awareness training? Is it not effective? Is it too complicated to pull off? Is the cost not justified? More importantly, has security awareness training had any impact? Hey, you're a CISO, what's your take on this? accidentalciso on our reddit channel, r/cisoseries, asks, How does a security professional know if "CISO truly is the right career goal for them? I don’t think the reality of the role is consistent with what one might think early on in their career." What was it about the CISO role that makes a security professional want to pursue it and how does that previous perception of what a CISO did counter or align with what was really experienced? It's time to play, "What's Worse?!" Is there a worst type of attack? Ask a CISO James Dobra, Bromium, asks, "Are security organizations guilty of using FUD internally, e.g. with the board and with users, while complaining that vendors use it too much?" Does FUD happen internally? Do security teams do it to get the money they want and/or shame users into submission? On August 30, 2019, white hat hacker Tavis Ormandy discovered a vulnerability in a LastPass browser extension. This was a vulnerability, not a breach and was very quickly remedied without damage. But it still causes chills when the last bastion of password security reveals its Achilles heel. It’s like seeing your family doctor contract a terminal disease. But for CISOs, this might be a good thing. Password complacency and sloppy security hygiene are the scourge of security specialists everywhere. A SaaS-based password manager that uses hashes and salts to remove the existence of physical passwords in their own vaults, is still a highly proactive solution. More found on CISO Series. Check out lots more cloud security tips sponsored by OpenVPN, provider of next-gen secure and scalable communication software. OpenVPN Access Server keeps your company’s data safe with end-to-end encryption, secure remote access, and extension for your centralized UTM. First 90 Days of a CISO Both Mike and our guest, Ed, are second time CISOs in their first 90 days at the role. We review what mistakes they made the first time as a CISO that they're actively avoiding this time. Are there any hurdles that are simply unavoidable and they're just going to have to face it like any new CISO would.  
All links and images for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/say-it-loud-i-didnt-read-the-privacy-policy-and-im-proud/) If we don't understand the purpose of a privacy policy, why should we bother reading it? We're claiming the cyber ignorance defense on the latest episode of CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast. This episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson. Our guest this week is Roger Hale (@haleroger), CISO in residence, YL Ventures. Mike Johnson, co-host, CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast, Roger Hale, CISO in residence, YL Ventures, David Spark, producer, CISO Series. Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor Zix. Zix simplifies administration and reporting with a single management interface. Configuring, deploying, and monitoring email security and unified archiving services has never been easier – or faster. ZixSuite combines a cloud-based email threat protection, email encryption, and unified business communications archiving, all backed by Zix’s gold standard 24/7/365 support. On this week's episode How CISOs are digesting the latest security news We're blowing it with general cybersecurity education. According to a study by the Pew Internet Research Center, most Americans don't understand or can't identify basic cybersecurity concepts such as two-factor authentication, private browsing, or the purpose of a privacy policy. We talk a lot about the important of education and it appears we're not doing a good job. What are some creative ways we can dramatically improve these numbers? Hey, you're a CISO, what's your take on this? Cai Thomas, Tessian, has an article on TechRadar on the dangers of sending corporate work via personal email accounts. He outlines the issues. As per the previous story, chances are very high people are completely unaware of the risk their placing the company in by forwarding corporate email to personal accounts. No amount of education is going to solve this problem. What are the systems that companies can and should setup to give people a better alternative than sending emails to personal accounts? What's Worse?! How damaging can not having a seat on the board be? Ask a CISO Nick Sorensen, Whistic, asks, "What do you see the most proactive vendors doing to prepare for vendor security reviews from their customers?" “Your bank account has been frozen.” That’s now an old chestnut in the scamming world, but it thrives through increasingly sophisticated spoofing activities that include a banks’ real phone number and real-looking pop-up websites for password refresh requests. Even IT experts can get caught by these things occasionally, as some have even confessed on this very podcast series. This level of relentless innovation is worth keeping front of mind when considering the amounts of data that Internet of Things devices are creating but that organizations have no plan or space for. IBM, Forrester, and others have suggested that maybe 1 percent of data generated from IoT connectivity is being used, mostly for immediate learning or predictive activities. More available on CISO Series. Check out lots more cloud security tips sponsored by OpenVPN, provider of next-gen secure and scalable communication software. OpenVPN Access Server keeps your company’s data safe with end-to-end encryption, secure remote access, and extension for your centralized UTM. First 90 days of a CISO Today is Roger's first official day as a CISO in residence at YL Ventures. What the heck does that mean, and how does that differ from being an operational CISO?
All links and images for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/ill-see-your-gated-whitepaper-and-raise-you-one-fake-email-address/) We're all in with not wanting "follow up email marketing" on the latest episode of CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast. This episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson. Our guest this week is Ian Amit (@iiamit), CSO, Cimpress. Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor Trend Micro. Trend Micro Incorporated, a global leader in cybersecurity solutions, helps to make the world safe for exchanging digital information. Our innovative solutions for consumers, businesses, and governments provide layered security for data centers, cloud environments, networks, and endpoints. For more information, visit www.trendmicro.com. On this week's episode Why is everyone talking about this now? To gate or not to gate. Mike posted on LinkedIn about how much he appreciated vendors who don't gate their content behind a registration wall. The post blew up on LinkedIn. The overwhelming response got some vendors willing to change their tune. Hey, you're a CISO, what's your take on this? Kevin Kieda of RSA Security asks, "For an initial meeting what are the things you want the sales person to know about your business that many of them don't." Kevin says he gets frustrated that he gets the sense a prospect wants them to know what tools they're using even though he knows he often can't find out that information. What is the must know, nice to know, and boy I'm impressed you know that? Mike Johnson recommends BuiltWith.com for basic OSINT on a company site. What's Worse?! Whose mistakes are worse? Your own or the vendor's? The great CISO challenge Factor Analysis of Information Risk (FAIR) is a risk framework (often laid ontop of others) that simplifies the understanding of risk by identifying the blocks that contribute to risk and their relationship to each other and then quantifying that in terms of money. Ian, can you give me an example of how you actually do this? Since its inception back in 2010, Zero Trust Architecture has been gaining traction. Much of the interest stems from the nature of work and data today – people working from anywhere on any device, and data racing around networks and to and from the cloud means there is no single fortress where everything can exist safely. Operating on a belief that everything inside the perimeter is safe because it’s inside the perimeter is no match to today’s hacking, penetration and inside sabotage. The establishment of new perimeter protections, including microtunnels and MFA is best applied to new cloud deployments but must still somehow be factored into a legacy architecture without becoming more inconvenient and vulnerable than what it is trying to replace. More on CISO Series. Check out lots more cloud security tips sponsored by OpenVPN, provider of next-gen secure and scalable communication software. OpenVPN Access Server keeps your company’s data safe with end-to-end encryption, secure remote access, and extension for your centralized UTM. Why is this a bad pitch? What's the polite way to hande the way too generic vendor request. We offer two examples of non-specific pitches that are obviously just begging for a CISO's time. Is there a polite way to refute the request and let them know without talking down to them and letting them know that this isn't a tactic they should pursue?
All links and images for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/rated-1-in-irresponsible-security-journalism/) No security alert is too small for us to completely misrepresent its severity. The sky is falling on the latest episode of CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast. Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor, Zix. Zix simplifies administration and reporting with a single management interface. Configuring, deploying, and monitoring email security and unified archiving services has never been easier – or faster. ZixSuite combines a cloud-based email threat protection, email encryption, and unified business communications archiving, all backed by Zix’s gold standard 24/7/365 support. On this week's episode Why is everybody talking about this now? Two recent stories showed some fallibility in multi-factor authentication or MFA. We repeatedly recommended MFA on this show. But, the FBI announced some technical and social engineering techniques that are being used to break multi-factor authentication. In addition, Twitter admitted that email addresses and phone numbers used to set up MFA might have been sent to third party advertisers. The FBI says its news shouldn't change our trust in MFA. William Gregorian, CISO, Addepar, posted on LinkedIn that the press is claiming that MFA is broken and that's irresponsible journalism. Let's dig a little deeper Security professionals thrive on hearing about and learning about the latest threats. It feeds the latest security headlines and conferences. While it's often fascinating and keeps everyone interested, to what level are security concerns based on well-known years old threats vs. the latest threats? "What's Worse?!" Whose mistakes are worse? Yours or the vendors'? Please, enough. No, more. We've talked a lot about machine learning on this show and the definition of it is broad. What's ML's value in threat protection. We discuss what we've heard enough about with regard to machine learning being used for threat protection And what would we like to hear a lot more. When companies in retail or enterprise remind their online visitors to change their passwords, are they doing them a favor or causing them grief? Password managers exist, of course, as do newer forms of passwordless authentication, multifactor authentication and behavioral and biometric data. But ultimately, whose responsibility is this? Should a merchant website place the onus of personal security back on the customer? And if so, how would this protect the merchant’s own property? If this jeopardizes a sale or transaction, the cost of proactive security, at least for the short term appears too great. And it’s obvious, from the avalanche of data breaches of recent years that stored data of any sort becomes a permanent liability. More available on CISO Series. Check out lots more cloud security tips sponsored by OpenVPN, provider of next-gen secure and scalable communication software. OpenVPN Access Server keeps your company’s data safe with end-to-end encryption, secure remote access, and extension for your centralized UTM. Ask a CISO Gina Yacone, a consultant with Agio, asks, "If you’re performing a table top exercise. Who are the only three people you would want to have a seat at that table?"
All links and images for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/cybercrimes-solved-in-an-hour-or-your-next-ones-free/) In the real world, cybercrimes just don't get solved as fast as they do on CSI. So we're offering a guarantee. If we don't catch the cyber-perpetrator in an hour (including commercial breaks) we'll make sure you're attacked again. This episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson. Our sponsored guest this week is Jason Hill (@chillisec), lead researcher at CyberInt Research Lab. Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor, Cyberint. The high ROI is what makes spear phishing campaigns so attractive to threat actors. Read our breakdown of TA505’s latest series of attacks. CyberInt has been tracking various activities surrounding this and other similar attacks where legit means were used to hack international companies in the retail & financial industries. On this week's episode What annoys a security professional Question on Quora asks, "What does everybody get wrong about working in the field of forensics?" There were a handful of answers from looking to TV and film dramas to that it's only a post mortem analysis. What are the biggest misconception of digital forensics? Why is everybody talking about this now? Tip of the hat to Stu Hirst of Just Eat who posted this Dilbert cartoon that got a flurry of response. Read for yourself, but in essence, it's a boss that thought technology would solve all his problems. Not realizing that people and process are also part of the equation. All too familiar. The "I've been hearing a lot about __________" phenomenon. What causes this behavior and how do you manage it? "What's Worse?!" How much flexibility to you require in your security team and the business? Please, Enough. No, More. How far can AI go? Where does the human element need to exist? What are the claims of the far reaching capabilities of AI? We discuss what we'd like to hear regarding the realistic capabilities and limitations of AI. Every year, the Fall season sees billions of dollars being spent on home-based IoT devices. The back-to-school sales are the starting point, Cyber Monday is the clubhouse turn and the year-end holiday season is the finish line. As usual, these devices – printers, DVRs, IP cameras, smart home assistants, are relatively inexpensive and provide plug and play convenience, to satisfy an impatient customer base. For the rest of the cloud tip, head to CISO Series. Check out lots more cloud security tips sponsored by OpenVPN, provider of next-gen secure and scalable communication software. OpenVPN Access Server keeps your company’s data safe with end-to-end encryption, secure remote access, and extension for your centralized UTM. We don't have much time. What's your decision? What are the best models for crowdsourcing security? There are entire businesses, such as bug bounty firms, that are dedicated to creating crowdsourced security environments. Our guest this week is passionate about investigative work. We asked him and Mike what elements they've found that inspire and simplify the community to participate in a crowdsourced security effort.
All links and images for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/mapping-unsolvable-problems-to-unattainable-solutions/) We're busting out the Cyber Defense Matrix to see what our security program we'll never be able to achieve. This episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson. Our guest this week Sounil Yu (@sounilyu), former chief security scientist for Bank of America and creator of the Cyber Defense Matrix. David Spark, producer, CISO Series, Sounil Yu, creator, Cyber Defense Matrix, Mike Johnson, co-host, CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor, Zix. Zix simplifies administration and reporting with a single management interface. Configuring, deploying, and monitoring email security and unified archiving services has never been easier – or faster. ZixSuite combines a cloud-based email threat protection, email encryption, and unified business communications archiving, all backed by Zix’s gold standard 24/7/365 support. On this week's episode Why is everybody talking about this now? Mike asked the LinkedIn community, "What's bad security advice that needs to die?" We had an entire episode of Defense in Depth on this very topic called "Bad Best Practices." The post got nearly 300 responses, so it's obviously something many people are passionate about. Is there a general theme to bad security advice? The great CISO challenge Sounil Yu is the creator of a very simple problem-to-solution chart for security professionals called the Cyber Defense Matrix. This simple chart allows a cyber professional to see how their tools, processes, and people are mapped to all different levels of security protection. We discuss the purpose of the matrix and all the real world applications. "What's Worse?!" We have a real world "What's Worse?!" scenario and Mike and Sounil compete to see if they answered the way the real world scenario actually played out. Hey, you're a CISO, what's your take on this? Last week on Defense in Depth we talked about a discussion initiated by Christophe Foulon of ConQuest Federal on cyber resiliency. Some people argued that it should be a security professional's primary focus because its action is in line with the interests of the business. Should a cyber professional shift their focus to resiliency over security? Would that facilitate better alignment with the business? Exploitable weaknesses measured in decades. Not a comforting thought. But this is a reality that exists in at least two major IT ecosystems. The first is Microsoft and the second is firmware. Teams belonging to Google’s Project Zero have found exploitable security flaws affecting all versions of Windows going back to Windows XP – which presents a logistical nightmare for admins the world over. Sarah Zatko, Chief Scientist at the Cyber Independent Testing Lab spoke recently at Red Hat and DEF CON in Las Vegas about deficiencies in the security of firmware, including those from companies that manufacture the world’s best-known routers. More available at CISO Series. Check out lots more cloud security tips sponsored by OpenVPN, provider of next-gen secure and scalable communication software. OpenVPN Access Server keeps your company’s data safe with end-to-end encryption, secure remote access, and extension for your centralized UTM. Ask a CISO Thanks to Chris Castaldo, CISO at Dataminr, for this post on new research from the firm Marsh and Microsoft. According to the study, half of the respondents didn't consider cyber risk when adopting new tech. A full 11 percent did no due diligence to actually evaluate the risk a new technology may introduce. Does it take that much effort to understand the basic risks of introducing a new technology? What are some first level research efforts that should be done with any new tech consideration or adoption?  
All links and images for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/wait-what-good-news-in-cybersecurity/) On this episode of CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast, cybercrime fails and we brag about it. This episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson. Our guest this week is Geoff Belknap (@geoffbelknap), CISO, LinkedIn. Mike Johnson, co-host, CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast, Geoff Belknap, CISO, LinkedIn, and David Spark, producer, CISO Series. Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor Trend Micro. On this week's episode How CISOs are digesting the latest security news We simply don't hear enough good news cybersecurity stories that make those involved proud. What are the cybersecurity stories that aren't being told publicly that should be? First 90 Days of a CISO Michael Farnum, Set Solutions, said, "If you come into the job and aren’t willing to critically review existing projects AND put a stop to the ones that are questionable, then you are going to cause yourself problems later. It might seem like an unwise political move when new to the company, but you have to be willing to swing the axe (or at least push the pause button) on anything that doesn’t make sense." Not so easy, but where's the line where you can actually push and say, "We're changing course"? It's time to play, "What's Worse?!" We've got a split decision! Hey, you're a CISO, what's your take on this? On a previous episode of Defense in Depth, we talked about employee hacking or getting the staff on the same page as the CISO and the security program. I quoted instructor Sarah Mancinho who said, "I am a firm believer that CISOs/CIOs should have their own dedicated IT strategic communications person(s) that report to them, and not any other office. Most comms roles I've seen...had to report to HR/PR/General Comms....none of whom really knew anything about technology/technical comms/infosec....and had little to no interaction with the IT/security team." My co-host, Allan Alford, loved this idea, never had it, but would love to have it. What value could a dedicated PR person bring to the security team? The devious new Android malware called Cerberus steals credentials by using a downloaded fake Adobe Flash player. That is not really innovative in itself, but what’s interesting is the way it seeks to avoid detection by using the phone’s accelerometer to confirm that the infected target is a real device and not on the screen of a security analyst. According to ESET researcher Lukas Stefanko, quoted in Forbes, the app actually counts a number of physical footsteps taken by the phone’s owner, and deploys once the required number has been reached.  For more, check out the full tip on CISO Series. Check out lots more cloud security tips sponsored by OpenVPN, provider of next-gen secure and scalable communication software. OpenVPN Access Server keeps your company’s data safe with end-to-end encryption, secure remote access, and extension for your centralized UTM. Why is everybody talking about this now? What's behind the cybersecurity skills shortage? In an article on the Forbes Council, Mark Aiello, president of cybersecurity recruiting firm CyberSN, pointed out some ugly truths as to why it's so difficult to hire cybersecurity talent. He pointed to low pay, the desire to find unicorns, poor job descriptions, training and growth. Is the core issue that the cybersecurity industry just does a very poor job welcoming new entrants? Today, what does a cybersecurity professional need walking in the door? And what are CISOs willing to accept no knowledge of, yet willing to train?
All images and links for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/serious-hackers-wear-two-black-hoodies/) We're doubling down and embracing the absolute worst of hacker tropes. Put on your black hoodie and then a second one. Boot up your Matrix screensaver and listen to the latest episode of CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast. This episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson. Our sponsored guest this week is Bruce Potter (@gdead), CISO, Expel. Here are the links to the items Bruce mentioned on the show: Expel's third-party assessment framework NIST CSF (and soon to be PF) self assessment tool Oh Noes! The incident response role playing game Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor Expel Expel is flipping today’s managed security model on its head (Ouch!) for on-prem and cloud, taking a technology-driven approach that lets analysts focus on what humans do best: exercise judgment and manage relationships. The company offers 24x7 monitoring through its security operations center-as-a-service, using the security tools customers already have. On this week's episode We’ve got listeners, and they’ve got questions A listener, who wishes to remain anonymous asks, "I am a one person security organization, and I get frustrated reading industry news and even listening to the CISO Series (love the show). My frustration is that so very often articles, blogs and podcasts assume that you/your organization has a security TEAM... How do you thrive and not just survive as a security shop of one?" What can a one-person shop expect to do, and not do? Let's dig a little deeper Bruce is also the founder of the Shmoo Group and his wife is the organizer for the annual ShmooCon which is a hacker conference held in DC every year. I'm stunned that his 2200-person event sells out in less than 20 seconds. There is obviously huge demand to attend and speak at your event. This year's event he had 168 submitted talks and 41 were accepted. Bruce tells us what makes a great ShmooCon submission and what were the most memorable talks from ShmooCon. "What's Worse?!" Today's game probably speaks to the number one problem with every company's security program. Hey, you're a CISO, what's your take on this? An issue that comes up in security all the time is "how do you do more with less." Are there ways to advance your security program when you don't have more budget or more people to do so? Study after study shows a top priority for cloud users is having visibility into application and data traffic. But most are not getting it. Nine out of ten respondents believe that access to packet data is needed for effective monitoring. So even though the cloud providers maintain the fortress, the enterprise still needs to see what’s going on. They’re ultimately responsible, after all. Cloud needs its own approach to monitoring, more closely based on how cloud customers interact with their data. It needs its own tools and greater level of communication between them and their providers. More on CISO Series. Check out lots more cloud security tips sponsored by OpenVPN, provider of next-gen secure and scalable communication software. OpenVPN Access Server keeps your company’s data safe with end-to-end encryption, secure remote access, and extension for your centralized UTM. Why is everybody talking about this now? We have talked in the past about the tired and negative image of the hacker in the black hoodie. It's pretty much all you see in stock photos. And since that's all any media outlet uses, that image just keeps getting reinforced. Poking fun and I think truly trying to find a better hacker image meme, Casey Ellis, founder of Bugcrowd, challenged others on LinkedIn to find a better "hacker stock photo" than the one he posted of hands coming out of a screen and typing on your keyboard with a cat looking on. We debate the truly worst hacker images we've seen and we propose a possible new stock image of the hacker.
Links and images for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/ciso-confessions-its-not-you-its-me-/) Vendors are trying to understand why CISOs are ghosting them and sometimes, it really isn't their fault. CISOs accept the blame on the latest episode of CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast. This episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and joining me is special guest co-host Betsy Bevilacqua (@HEALTHeSECURITY), CISO, Butterfly Network. Our guest will be Matt Southworth (@bronx), CISO of Priceline. This episode was recorded live in WeWork's Times Square location on September 5th, 2019. Here are all the photos. Enormous thanks to WeWork for hosting this event. They're hiring! Contact JJ Agha, vp of information security at WeWork. Also, huge thanks to David Raviv and the NY Information Security Meetup group for partnering with us on this event. Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor Tehama, Tenable, and Devo. Tehama provides secure and compliant virtual desktops on the cloud, and all the IT infrastructure needed for enterprises to connect and grow global and remote teams. Tehama's built-in SOC 2 Type II controls reduce the risk of malware intrusion from endpoint devices, data breaches, and other vulnerabilities.  Learn more at tehama.io. Effective vulnerability prioritization helps you answer three questions: Where should we prioritize based on risk? Which vulnerabilities are likeliest to be exploited? What should we fix first? Tenable gives you the accurate and actionable data you need to answer these questions and better secure your business. Learn more: tenable.com/predictive-prioritization. SOC teams have been struggling with many of the same issues for years – lack of visibility, too much noise – all while the threat landscape grows more complex. Devo Security Operations is a next-gen cloud SIEM that enables you to gain complete visibility, reduce noise, and focus on the threats that matter most to the business. On this week's episode How are CISOs digesting the latest security news? An article on Bloomberg and an ensuing discussion on LinkedIn pointed out that costs after a breach go beyond fines and lost reputation. It also includes the cost to keep top cybersecurity talent. Salaries for a CISO post-breach can range from $2.5-$6.5 million, that includes stock. What could a security professional show and demonstrate in this time of crisis that they are the one to hire to garner such a salary? Hey, you're a CISO, what's your take on this? Michael Mortensen of Risk Based Security asks a question about when there's considerable dialogue with a prospect, and they go cold. Michael wants to know what causes this? He has theories on sales people being impatient or wrong set of expectations, but he's interested in the CISO's viewpoint. Assuming you have had conversations with a vendor, have you gone cold on their outreach? If so, what was the reason? It's time to play, "What's Worse?!" Two rounds lots of agreement, but plenty of struggle. Why is everybody talking about this now? Cryptography firm Crown Sterling has sued Black Hat for breaching its sponsorship agreement and also suing 10 individuals for orchestrating a disruption of the company's sponsored talk at the conference in which the CEO presented a finding on discovering prime numbers which are key to public-key encryption. The crowd didn't like it and they booed him. You can see a video of one individual yelling, "Get off the stage, you shouldn't be here." Crown Sterling argued that Black Hat was in violation of their sponsorship agreement because they didn't do enough to stop it. At Black Hat and related parties I saw many printed signs about codes of conduct. It doesn't appear anyone had a plan to enforce those rules. What has happened in the security community that some security professionals feel they have the right to shout down a speaker like this? If one of these 10 disruptors was your employee, how would you respond? What's a CISO to do? So much of a job of a CISO is to change behavior. How do CISOs change behavior to a more secure posture? Where should a CISO start? What's the low hanging fruit? It’s time for the audience question speed round Our audience has questions, and our CISOs tried to come up with as many answers as possible. Our closing question put my guest co-host in the hot seat.
Links and images for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/getting-over-our-security-%e2%89%a0-compliance-obsession/) We repeat "Security ≠ Compliance" so often it's become our mantra. Does anyone pay attention to it anymore? We're unpacking our compulsion to keep saying it on the latest episode of CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast. This episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson. Our guest this week is Chris Hymes (@secwrks), head of information security, enterprise IT, and data protection officer, Riot Games, makers of League of Legends. Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor Expel Expel is flipping today’s managed security model on its head (Ouch!) for on-prem and cloud, taking a technology-driven approach that lets analysts focus on what humans do best: exercise judgment and manage relationships. The company offers 24x7 monitoring through its security operations center-as-a-service, using the security tools customers already have. On this week's episode Why is everyone talking about this now? On LinkedIn, Omar Khawaja, CISO, Highmark Health, argued that every time a security person repeats the "Security does not equal compliance" trope, it translates to a belief that compliance is useless. This caused a flurry of discussion. Is compliance useless? If not, Omar asks what should "Security does not equal compliance" be replaced with? Essentially, how should compliance be viewed in an overall security program? Ask a CISO Scott Holt, sales engineer, cmd, asked our CISOs how they're balancing keeping their information and infrastructure private while at the same time working with vendors to fill security needs? "What's Worse?!" We've got a question based on the build vs. buy debate. Hey, You're a CISO, what's your take on this? Paul Makowski, Polyswarm, asks a question that's very relevant to their business. He said, "Enterprises often subscribe to multiple feeds [of threat intelligence]. They learn their strengths and weaknesses and develop weighting algorithms to divine highest quality intelligence in the context of what's being analyzed. How can the industry close the feedback loop with threat intelligence providers, providing them with an opportunity to improve coverage and efficacy (false positive / false negative rates)?" The Shared Responsibility Model for cloud is, as Amazon and others describe it, the difference between the “security OF the cloud” and “security IN the cloud,” with cloud service providers taking care of the OF, and clients taking care of the IN. “In the cloud” means the data, the access – especially guest access, and the usage. More on CISO Series. Check out lots more cloud security tips sponsored by OpenVPN, provider of next-gen secure and scalable communication software. OpenVPN Access Server keeps your company’s data safe with end-to-end encryption, secure remote access, and extension for your centralized UTM. Close your eyes. Breathe in. It’s time for a little security philosophy. Steven Trippier, Group CISO, Anglian Water Services, asked, "What are the right metrics to use to illustrate the success / performance of the security team?" We've asked this question before and one of the most popular answers was "mean time to identify and remediate." But here's the philosophical question that Steven asks, "How does this change in an environment where breaches/malware outbreaks are uncommon and stats such as mean time to identify and mean time to contain are not relevant?"
All images and links for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/open-this-email-for-an-exclusive-look-at-our-clickable-web-links/) You'll be dazzled by the clickability of our web links on this week's episode of CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast. This episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson. Our guest this week Aanchal Gupta (@nchlgpt), head of security for Calibra, Facebook. Aanchal Gupta, Head of Security for Calibra, Facebook, Mike Johnson, Co-Host, CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast, David Spark, Producer, CISO Series Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor Expel. Expel is flipping today’s managed security model on its head (Ouch!) for on-prem and cloud, taking a technology-driven approach that lets analysts focus on what humans do best: exercise judgment and manage relationships. The company offers 24x7 monitoring through its security operations center-as-a-service, using the security tools customers already have. On this week's episode Hey, You're a CISO, what's your take on this? Last month, Brian Krebs reported a breach from the 6th-largest cloud solutions provider PCM Inc. which let intruders rifle through Office365 email/documents for a number of customers. In response, listener Alexander Rabke, Unbound Tech, asked, "Would CISOs continue to do business with ‘security’ companies that are breached?" What's your recommendation for sales people who are at such an organization? How should they manage news like this? Ask a CISO We know there are plenty of pros and cons of telecommuting. I'm eager to hear from both of you how security leaders value telecommuting. What are the challenges to a CISO of managing a virtual staff? What's Worse?! We've got two extreme scenarios you'd never see in the real world. Why is everybody talking about this now? Mike, on LinkedIn you ranted about the term DevSecOps that it was a distraction and that "It's really no different (at a high level) than building security into an Agile development process, or a Waterfall process." I agree but I would argue that when DevOps was introduced it was about getting two groups working in tandem. At the time it was a mistake to omit security. Last year at Black Hat I produced a video where I asked attendees, "Should security and DevOps be in couples counseling together?" Everyone universally said, "Yes", but I was taken aback that many of the security people responded, "that they should just listen to me." Which, if you've ever been in couples counseling knows that the technique doesn't work. I argue that the term DevSecOps was brought about to say, "Hey everybody, you have to include us as well." Mike recommends Kelly Shortridge and Nicole Forsgren presentation at Black Hat 2019, "The Inevitable Marriage of DevOps and Security". Companies continue to take advantage of the economies of scale offered by multi-tenant cloud services, but complacency is dangerous. Multi-tenant cloud is often described as being like a big apartment building, but the big difference is that the walls that separate tenants from each other are not solid, but software. Software is built by humans which closes the circle: unpredictable humans in an unpredictable world. I’m not just talking about hacking here. What about compliance? GDPR’s austere and perhaps old-world view that data on a German citizen must stay in Germany, is nonetheless the law, and carries substantial fines for transgression. This requires data centers to be run from multiple countries, but so long as they’re connected by a cable no data is ever truly isolated. Future regulations affecting health records or patents or blockchain transactions might find themselves in limbo when it comes to coming to rest in a certain section of a certain cloud. For the moment, companies are focusing mostly on the cost-efficiencies of shacking up with other tenants in the same building, but very soon, this too might not be enough. Check out lots more cloud security tips sponsored by OpenVPN, provider of next-gen secure and scalable communication software. OpenVPN Access Server keeps your company’s data safe with end-to-end encryption, secure remote access, and extension for your centralized UTM. The great CISO challenge Lauren Zink of Amtrust posted an article from Infosec Institute asking, "What are you to do with repeat offenders in social engineering exercises?" The article offers some helpful suggestions. In the discussion, there was some pointing fingers at security training designed to purposefully trick employees. Have either of you had to deal with repeat offenders? What did you do? What's your advice for other security leaders... and HR?  
All links and images for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/like-fine-wine-our-vendor-bs-meter-gets-better-with-age/)  The bouquet of this particular vendor BS is a mixture of FUD, unnecessary urgency, and a hint of pecan. Look to your left and grab the spittoon because we don't expect everyone to swallow what you're about to hear on this week's episode of CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast. This episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson. Our guest this week is Olivia Rose, CISO for MailChimp. Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor Remediant Eighty one percent of cyberattacks utilize stolen administrative credentials. Yet, legacy enterprise password vaults solve only a fraction of the problem and are difficult to rollout. Remediant’s SecureONE takes a new approach to privileged access management: offering agent-less, vault-less, continuous detection and just-in-time-administration. Learn what Remediant can do in a half-day POC deployment. On this week's episode Why is everyone talking about this now? One of the reasons we hate hearing security buzzwords is because it doesn't help us understand what it is a vendor is trying to sell. When a vendor says we have a "zero trust" product, what does that mean? We delve into some of the tell-tale signs that a vendor or consultant is trying to BS you. According to Olivia Rose, if you're going to pitch a CISO, make sure you can answer the following simply and succinctly: What does our product/service do? What specific security problem does it solve? How will it affect the typical strategic/business drivers for a company? It's time for "Ask a CISO" Fernando Montenegro, analyst for 451 Research, asked, "How can the CISO be a change agent for the security team so it can better align with the business?" What's Worse?! For this week's game I picked a question very apropos for our guest's current situation. Um… maybe you shouldn't have done that Unconscious bias towards women in professional settings is not always overt nor intentional, but it happens. We discuss some examples of unconscious bias for both women and men. And we discuss how too much of it can really push women out of the security industry. A distributed denial of service attack is the scourge of IT security. According to Verisign, one-third of all downtime incidents are attributed to DDoS attacks, and thousands happen every day. Are they created by sophisticated black hatted evil doers from an underground lair? Of course not. Welcome to the world of cybercrime-as-a-service. You too can silence a competitor or cause havoc for pretty much anyone for as low as $23.99 a month. Just have your credit card or Bitcoin ready. For more, go to CISOSeries.com. Check out lots more cloud security tips sponsored by OpenVPN, provider of next-gen secure and scalable communication software. OpenVPN Access Server keeps your company’s data safe with end-to-end encryption, secure remote access, and extension for your centralized UTM. First 90 days of a CISO Being just six weeks in, our guest, Olivia Rose is living the first 90 days of a CISO. We asked her and Mike what it's like those first few weeks. And to no one's surprise, it's beyond overwhelming.
All links and images for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/if-capital-one-listened-to-our-podcast-they-still-would-have-been-breached/)  We guarantee listening to our show would have done absolutely nothing to prevent the Capital One breach. We've consulted our lawyers and we feel confident about making that claim. It's all coming up on this week's episode of CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast. This episode was recorded in the ExtraHop booth during Black Hat 2019. It is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson. Our sponsored guest this week is Tom Stitt (@BlinkerBilly), sr. director, product marketing - security, ExtraHop. Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor ExtraHop Unlike security solutions that focus on signature- and rule-based detection, ExtraHop Reveal(x) helps you rise above the noise of alerts with complete east-west visibility and machine learning for real-time detection of known and unknown threats, plus guided investigations for rapid response. Find and address real threats faster with ExtraHop. On this week's episode Why is everyone talking about this now? I have noticed an either disturbing or coincidental trend. Every year, just before either RSA or Black Hat conferences, there is some massive breach. This year it was Capital One. In the past we've had Ashley Madison, Target, Marriott - all within a few months of the shows. I know I know I know that CISOs absolutely hate being sold on FUD (fear, uncertainty, and doubt), but all conferences are affected by industry relevant news. You simply can't avoid it. Capital One was brought up multiple times during the Black Hat conference. We discuss the do's and don'ts of bringing up the most recent breach at a huge trade show. We don't have much time. What's your decision? On LinkedIn, you asked "When your risk and threat models all agree that this feature/product/decision is of low concern but your gut tells you otherwise, what do you do?" It appears most people said go with your gut to which Richard Seiersen of Soluble pointed out that guts are models too. What happens when you're faced with such a scenario and what causes the tools and threat models to be so off your gut? "What's Worse?!" We've got a split decision and a really fun scenario. Please, Enough. No, More. Today's topic is "network behavior analysis." In the world of anomaly detection, what have Mike and Tom heard enough about and what would you like to hear a lot more? It’s been two weeks. Time to change your password again. How many times have we all bumped up against this wall – intended to help keep us secure, but extremely annoying when you have things do do? The battle for password security has been a long and arduous one, moving and evolving, sometimes ahead of, but more often lagging behind the activities of the hackers and bad guys, whose limitless resources seek out every possible weakness. Challenge questions and strings of letters, numbers and characters might soon be coming to the end of their functional life, as security companies start to roll out biometric and behavioral security protocols in their place. Paired with increased access to data and artificial intelligence, it will become easier for organizations to contemplate a switch from basic strings of words to something more esoteric – a retinal scan paired with an extensive ergonomic behavior database for every individual. These things are not new to the consumer marketplace of course. Apple iPhones are one of many devices that can be unlocked by a fingerprint, and credit card companies and web applications routinely call out unusual login behaviors. But the new secret sauce in all of this is the availability of huge amounts of data in real time, which can be used to analyze a much larger set of behavioral activity, not simply an unusually timed login. This can then be managed by an Identity-as-a-service (IDaaS) company that would take over the administration, upkeep and security of its clients using the as-a-service model. A retinal scan paired with a secure knowledge of which hand you carry your coffee in and where you bought it might very soon replace the old chestnut challenge of your mother’s maiden name. That one should stay safe with Mom. Check out lots more cloud security tips sponsored by OpenVPN, provider of next-gen secure and scalable communication software. OpenVPN Access Server keeps your company’s data safe with end-to-end encryption, secure remote access, and extension for your centralized UTM. And now, a listener drops some serious knowledge On LinkedIn, Ian Murphy of LMNTRIX put together an incredibly funny presentation with great graphics entitled the BS Cybersecurity Awards which included such impressive glass statuettes like the "It'll Never Happen to Us" Award and the "Cash Burner" Award. In general, they were awards for all the bad repeated behavior we see from vendors and users in cybersecurity. What are the awards that are not given out that we'd actually like to see?
All links and images for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/improve-security-by-hiring-people-who-know-everything/) If you're having a hard time securing your infrastructure, then maybe you need to step up the requirements for expertise. Why not ask for everything? We're offering unreasonable advice on this week's episode of CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast. This episode was recorded in front of a live audience at ADAPT's CISO Edge conference in Sydney, Australia. This special episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Liam Connolly, CISO of Seek. Our guest is Matt Boon (@mattjboon), director of strategic research for ADAPT. Plus, we have a special sponsored guest appearance from John Karabin, vp, cybersecurity, Dimension Data. Thanks to this episode's sponsors Dimension Data/NTT and ADAPT By 1 October 2019, all 28 NTT companies, including Dimension Data, will be branded as NTT. Together we enable the connected future. Visit NTT at hello.global.ntt. ADAPT’s mission is to equip IT executives with the knowledge, relationships, inspiration and tools needed to gain competitive advantage. ADAPT’s membership platform provides business leaders with fact-based insights, actionable patterns of success and the collective experience of 3,000 peers to improve strategic IT, security, and business decisions. Visit ADAPT for more. On this week's episode Why is everyone talking about this now? Independent security consultant Simon Goldsmith sent this post from Stu Hirst, a security engineer at JUST EAT who posted a job listing that requested subject matter expertise on 12 different aspects of security. This highly demanding request resulted in well over 200 responses from the community. Is it laziness on the part of the company posting? Is it an attempt to just capture job seekers' search queries? Or is it simply an editorial mistake that they shouldn't have requested subject matter expertise but rather basic knowledge across 12 different aspects of security? Ask a CISO Mitch Renshaw, Fortinet, describes a problem that many vendors are having. He says: "Fortinet’s broad portfolio makes it hard to give a concise yet effective overview of our value. As a result I’m worried my emails are going long. Customers know us for our firewalls – and a full firewall refresh is hard to come by as a sales rep. So if I get more targeted in my demand generation techniques, I’m met with an 'I’m all set, I’ve got Palo/checkpoint/juniper/etc.'" Mitch has got a conundrum. He's looking for the happy medium on how to sell a company with a wide variety of products, some of which are highly commoditized in the industry. How should he reach out to security professionals? "What's Worse?!" We play two rounds and the audience gets to play along as well. Hey, you're a CISO, what's your take on this?' My American co-host, Mike Johnson, asked this question of the LinkedIn community, and I ask you this as well. "Why do sites still **** out the password field on a login page?" It's designed to stop shoulder surfing. Is this really the main problem? What else is it helping or hurting, like password reuse? Passwords are a broken system that are easily hacked. We have solutions that add layers on top of it, like multi-factor authentication. What solutions do we have for the password process itself? OK, what's the risk? Ross Young of Capital One, asks this question about what risk should you be willing to take on? "What should cyber professionals do when they can’t contract or outsource services like pen testing however they struggle to acquire the talent they need. If they train folks they find them poached sooner and if they don’t they are stuck without the talent they need to survive." Why is this a bad pitch? We've got a pitch sent in to us from Eduardo Ortiz. It's not his pitch, but one he received. You may need to strap in when you hear this. It’s time for the audience question speed round Yep, it's just like it sounds. I ask the panel to ask some questions submitted from our audience.    
Find all images and links for this episode on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/just-click-accept-as-we-explain-informed-consent/) Even if you do give "informed" consent, do you really understand what we're doing with your data? Heck, we don't know what we're going to do with it yet, but we sure know we want a lot of it. It's all coming up on this week's episode of CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast. This episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson. Our guest this week is Francesco Cipollone (@FrankSEC42), head of security architecture and strategy, HSBC Global Banking and Markets. Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor ExtraHop Unlike security solutions that focus on signature- and rule-based detection, ExtraHop Reveal(x) helps you rise above the noise of alerts with complete east-west visibility and machine learning for real-time detection of known and unknown threats, plus guided investigations for rapid response. Find and address real threats faster with ExtraHop. On this week's episode Should you ignore this security advice? This is advice you should not ignore. It comes from an article by Jonathan Jaffe, director of information security at People.ai where he offered up a great recipe for startup security. We discussed standout tips and were there any disagreements or omissions? Close your eyes. Breathe in. It's time for a little security philosophy. Phil Huggins, GoCardless, said, "If we don't know what value is in our data until it has been enriched and analysed can we give informed consent as to its use?" What's Worse?! We're concerned with the state of data in this game. Ask a CISO Mike Baier, Takeda Pharmaceuticals, asks, "When faced with the scenario of the vendor providing a recent SOC 2 Type 2 report, and then tells you that their internal policies/procedures are considered 'highly confidential' and cannot be shared, what tips would you provide for language that could help cause the vendor to provide the required documentation?" The 1979 movie When a Stranger Calls gave us that unforgettable horror moment when the police informed Jill that the calls from the stalker were coming from inside the house. Nineteen years earlier, Hitchcock’s Psycho did a similar type of thing with the shower scene. We humans have a real problem when danger pops up in the place we feel safest – our homes. A similar problem happens in corporate IT security. We place a great deal of attention on watching for external hackers, as well as those that seek to dupe our overstressed employees into clicking that spearfishing link. What was it that Edward Hermann’s character, the vampire, said in the Lost Boys? “You have to invite us in.” But what about internal bad actors? There are those who see great opportunity in accessing, stealing and selling company resources – data – like social security numbers, credit card numbers and medical files. More on CISO Series. Check out lots more cloud security tips sponsored by OpenVPN, provider of next-gen secure and scalable communication software. OpenVPN Access Server keeps your company’s data safe with end-to-end encryption, secure remote access, and extension for your centralized UTM. OK, what's the risk? A question from Robert Samuel, CISO, Government of Nova Scotia that I edited somewhat. It's commonly said that the business has the authority for risk-trade off decisions and that security is there just to provide information about the risk and measurement of the risk. I'm going to push this a little. Is this always the case? Do you sometimes disagree with the business or is it your attitude of "I communicated the risk, it's time for me to tap out."
All images and links for this episode can be found on CISO Series (https://cisoseries.com/who-are-the-perfect-targets-for-ransomware/) If you've got lots of critical data, a massive insurance policy, and poor security infrastructure, you might be a perfect candidate to be hit with ransomware. This week and this week only, it's an extortion-free episode of CISO/Security Vendor Relationship Podcast. This episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson. Our guest this week is Sean Walls (@sean_walls2000), vp, cybersecurity, Eurofins. Thanks to this week's podcast sponsor Core Security Assigning and managing entitlements rapidly to get employees the access they need is critical, but it can come at the cost of accuracy and security. Core Security’s identity governance and administration (IGA) solutions provide the intelligent, visual context needed to efficiently manage identity related security risks across any enterprise. On this week's episode How CISOs are digesting the latest security news An article in the NYTimes points to a new trend in ransomware that is specifically attacking small governments with weak computer protections and strong insurance policies. Payments from $400-$600K. Lake City, Florida, population 12K paid $460K to extortionists. They got some of their information back but they have been set back years of what will require rescanning of paper documents. Mike, I know your standard philosophy is to not pay the ransom, but after a ransomware attack against the city of Atlanta, the mayor refused to pay $51,000 in extortion demands, and so far it's cost the city $7.2 million. Probably more. These payments by the small cities must be incentivizing more attacks. Does this information change the way you're willing to approach ransomware. What can a small city with zero cybersecurity staff do to create a program to reduce their risk to such a ransomware attack? Ask a CISO Bindu Sundaresan, AT&T Consulting Solutions, asks a very simple question, "How is each security initiative supporting the right business outcome?" Do you find yourself selling security into the business this way? If not, would you be more successful selling security to the business if you did do this? What's Worse?! We've got a split decision on what information we prefer after a breach. Listen up, it’s security awareness training time Jon Sanders, Elevate Security, said, "Security awareness involves A LOT of selling… there’s no cookie cutter approach in security awareness or sales!" Is the reason security training is so tough because so many security people are not born salespeople? I've interviewed many and there's a lot of "just listen to me attitude," which really doesn't work in sales. Cloud Security Tip, sponsored by OpenVPN We talk a lot about penetration testing here, given that it remains a staple of proactive IT security. But not everyone feels it’s all it’s cracked up to be. Or should that be, all it’s hacked up to be?” More than one cybersecurity organization points out there are a few flaws in the pen testing concept that make it worth a second look. Pen testing often consists of a small collection of attacks performed within a set time period against a small sample of situations. Some experts doubt the efficacy of testing against a limited field of known vulnerabilities, without knowing what other weaknesses exist in plain sight, or merely invisible to jaded eyes. More on CISO Series... What do you think of this pitch? We have a pitch from Technium in which our CISOs question what exactly are they selling?
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