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On May 24, several news outlets reported on the internal workings of a Chinese run Uyghur internment camp in Xinjiang. The reports included detailed blueprints of the camp’s interiors, classified speeches from officials, and the personal information of police officers.An anonymous source hacked the information and got it out of China and into the hands of journalists. It’s part of a recent trend in resurgent hacktivism. On this episode of Cyber, Motherboard Staff Writer Joseph Cox walks us through the recent hack and what it’s like when journalists work with hackers.Stories discussed in this episode:Hacker Leaks Mountain of Files From Inside Xinjiang CampsWe’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live during the week. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The atom. For a few brief years in the middle of the 20th century, America and the world was cowed by the awesome possibility and terrifying reality of nuclear energy. Nuclear power had the potential to revolutionize the world but nuclear bombs could destroy it. But still … for a brief moment it seemed like nuclear energy would save the world. Then came Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and The China Syndrome. America fell out of love with nuclear energy.That might be changing. Climate change and scientific advances might just be the shot in the arm the flagging nuclear energy industry needs. But did the dangers actually go away?That’s the subject of the excellent podcast Wild Thing. Its third season is all about the shifting landscape of nuclear energy. It’s comprehensive, excellent, and it’s produced and hosted by former NPR editor Laura Krantz. On this episode of Cyber, Krantz sits down with Matthew to discuss Going Nuclear.We’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live during the week. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The image is now iconic. An arctic wolf fursona in a Starbucks smock. Stance set wide. A sign in his hand held high that reads “UNION YES!”This was Michael Vestigo dressed in his Fursona as Apollo, a former Starbucks employee in Overland Park, Kansas. Why former? The company fired him for “displaying violent and threatening behavior” after he participated in a walkout of his location as part of a unionization effort.Vestigo is fighting to get his job back and he’s not the only person Starbucks has retaliated against for trying to form a union. As Apollo, he’s become a symbol of a movement that’s sweeping the country. Apollo joined us on today’s episode of Cyber to answer your burning questions about Unions and Starbucks. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
This bonus episode of Cyber is sponsored by Command Line Heroes. If you like Cyber, you’re going to like Command Line Heroes. It’s an original podcast from Red Hat where listeners hear epic true tales of how developers, programmers, hackers, geeks, and open source rebels are revolutionizing the technology landscape.It’s an award winning show that’s been running for nine seasons. Every season has a theme and season 9 is all about the dark side of programming. Botnets, logic bombs, and—of course—ransomware. If you’ve ever wanted to know about the origins of some of the things you hate most on the internet, this season of Command Line Heroes has you covered.With Matthew on this show are Command Line Heroes producers Kim Huang and Johan Philippine.Command Line Heroes Is Available wherever you listen to podcasts.We’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live during the week. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Some days I think that maybe we’re not all gonna make it. It’s been a bad week for cryptocurrency and, as of this recording, it’s only Tuesday. Bitcoin is down. Ethereum down. Stablecoin seems not so stable. The NFT market is on fire. There’s copium all around, panicked posters, and soothing souls advising everyone to buy the dip.But won’t that just exacerbate the problem? Won’t that just delay what people outside the crypto space have been waiting to see happen: the great crypto crash.On this episode of Cyber, Motherboard Managing Editor Jordan Perason is here to answer all our burning crypto questions.We’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live during the week. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Facebook’s biggest strength is quickly becoming its largest headache. For years, Facebook has survived by tracking every little thing its users do and selling that on to everyone. But now a slew of regulations across the globe are looking to crack down on the social media site and, according to leaked documents, Facebook has no idea how to get compliant. Worse, the social media giant has no idea where any given piece of data goes once it enters its ecosystem.On this episode of Cyber, we sit down with Motherboard Senior Staff Writer Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai to talk about the regulation “tsunami” facing the social media site.Stories discussed in this episode:Facebook Doesn’t Know What It Does With Your Data, Or Where It Goes: Leaked DocumentLawmakers Call For Better Facebook User Data OversightWe’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live during the week. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Your data is valuable. Everything you do online and everywhere you go with your phone is tracked. And there’s a robust market for that data, a market that lets governments and private individuals purchase reams of your personal data. What if the CDC wanted to track people’s phones to see if they’re obeying Covid-19 lockdown orders? They can do that. What about a private individual paying to track the whereabouts of groups of people who visited Planned Parenthood? Also possible.On this episode of Cyber, Motherboard Senior Staff Writer Joseph Cox comes on to discuss SafeGraph and the data it’s selling to anyone who is willing to pay.Stories discussed in this episode:Data Broker Is Selling Location Data of People Who Visit Abortion ClinicsCDC Tracked Millions of Phones to See If Americans Followed COVID Lockdown OrdersHow the U.S. Military Buys Location Data from Ordinary AppsLeaked Location Data Shows Another Muslim Prayer App Tracking UsersGoogle Bans Location Data Firm Funded by Former Saudi Intelligence HeadWe’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live during the week. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Elon Musk’s attempts to buy Twitter have sent ripples through the social media platform. There is a story here about panic, the limited reach of social media, and the increasingly fuzzy nature of the private/ public space … but I think all that is a surface level analysis. For me, the more interesting story is the corporate what lies just underneath.You see, Musk is the richest man not because he invented anything wonderful and world changing. No, he’s rich because he’s good at making money. He’s a businessman first and foremost. Through that lens, the story of the Twitter acquisition becomes one of shitposts and SEC filings, a bizarre fight between tech titans, a rehashing of old corporate techniques like “poison pills” and “hostile takeovers.”On this episode of Cyber, we sit down with Motherboard features writer and editor Maxwell Strachan. He’s here to answer all your burning questions about Musk’s attempted Twitter takeover.Stories discussed in this episode:Twitter Loses Elon Musk the Board Member, Regains Elon Musk the ShitposterTwitter and Elon Musk Are Now at WarWe Spoke to an Old-School Corporate Raider About Elon Musk and TwitterWe’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live during the week. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Drones are here to stay. The U.S. Military may have pioneered the art of using drones in a war zone, but America’s cops are pushing the tech on the homefront. From the Boston Dynamics dogs taking temperatures in Hawaii to quadcopters patrolling the skies, the cops are very interested in drone tech.One of the big companies in the field is Skydio. It advertises itself directly to police officers and has cultivated relationships with departments across the country. This week on Cyber, host Matthew Gault and Motherboard Editor-in-Chief Jason Koebler discuss the close relationship between Skydio and America’s police.Stories discussed in this episode:When Police Do Marketing for Surveillance Tech CompaniesWorld’s Richest Man Gets What He Wanted (Elon Musk Becomes King Shit of Turd Mountain)Everything You Need to Know About Ring, Amazon’s Surveillance Camera CompanyWe’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live during the week. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Are you using two-factor authentication for all your accounts? Do you have Apple Pay or another service hooked up to a bank card? Well, so do criminals. It’s the growth of a scheme Cyber first reported on about six months ago. Thanks to bots that help criminals trick you into giving up your 2FA codes, they're now able to set up links between Apple Pay bank cards. It’s shockingly easy to do and, bizarrely, shockingly hard to stop.On this episode of Cyber, Motherboard Staff Writer Joseph Cox walks us through how criminals are circumventing 2FA and using Apple Pay to go on spending sprees.Stories discussed in this episode:Criminals Abuse Apple Pay in Spending SpreesThe Booming Underground Market for Bots That Steal Your 2FA CodesWe’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live during the week. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Trains, trains, trains. You might not think of them very often but they make America run. Getting stuff from point A to Point B is more than a full time job. Our world runs on logistical supply chains that are supported, in large part, by freight trains.But what happens if the people doing those jobs don’t get much sleep? What happens when the company running the trains implements systems that deprive its already weary workforce of much needed Zs? This week on Cyber, Motherboard Senior Staff Writer Aaron Gordon is here to answer all those questions. Stories discussed in this episode:‘The Worst and Most Egregious Attendance Policy’ Is Pushing Railroad Workers to the BrinkAmtrak Is Streaming an Empty Railroad on Twitch to Beef With Freight Rail Companies‘What Choice Do I Have?’ Freight Train Conductors Are Forced to Work Tired, Sick, and StressedWe’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live during the week. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Every week we publish multiple incredible stories on Motherboard. This week there were so many that we couldn’t decide which one we wanted to focus on. So. We’re gonna do something a little different for this episode.That’s right, we’re going full Cipher. If you’re familiar with the show, Cipher is that infrequent segment we do where we decipher the week’s biggest tech stories. On this episode of Cyber we answer the questions: Is it illegal to run a private Club Penguin server? How is T-Mobile dealing with hackers? And why can’t I get on to the Raid Forums and what happens if you make an illegal trip to North Korea to spread the gospel of the Blockchain.Here to help sort through these headlines is the man who wrote many of them: Motherboard Staff Writer Joseph Cox.Stories discussed in this episode:Cops Arrest 3 People for Running ‘Club Penguin Rewritten’ Beloved by MillionsLaw Enforcement Seizes RaidForums, One of the Most Important Hacking SitesT-Mobile Secretly Bought Its Customer Data from Hackers to Stop Leak. It Failed.US Extradites Man Who Allegedly Sold Backdoored Phones for the FBIEthereum Programmer Jailed for North Korea Trip Wanted to Clone Dogs, Become ‘Crypto Hero’We’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live during the week. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Police records reviewed by Motherboard show that, as security experts immediately predicted when the product launched, this technology has been used as a tool to stalk and harass women.Of the 150 total police reports mentioning AirTags, in 50 cases women called the police because they started getting notifications that their whereabouts were being tracked by an AirTag they didn’t own. Of those, 25 could identify a man in their lives—ex-partners, husbands, bosses—who they strongly suspected planted the AirTags on their cars in order to follow and harass them. Those women reported that current and former intimate partners—the most likely people to harm women overall—are using AirTags to stalk and harass them. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Close your eyes. Imagine it's 2010. You’ve just learned about something called Bitcoin, a cryptocurrency. You spend $50 and get 50 of the coins, thinking the whole thing is funny. Cut to 2022. What you spent around 50 bucks on in 2010 is now worth 2 million dollars.There’s just one problem. You need a password to access that 2 million and 2010 was a long time ago. It’s a problem plaguing the world of cryptocurrency: an epidemic of millionaires unable to access their cash. But there are options.To deal with the problem, a cottage industry of asset recovery specialists has emerged. One is Crypto Asset Recovery, a startup run by a father-son team in New Hampshire.They are Chris and Charlie Brooks and they are here with me today to talk about the business of breaking in.Chris and Charlie also appeared on an episode of Motherboard’s TV show Cryptoland, which you can stream at YouTube.com/motherboard.We’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live during the week.  Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
For many, playing video games for a living is a dream come true. Whether you’re streaming on Twitch or doing speedruns for charity, there are viable ways to earn a living playing video games. But get NFTs and the blockchain in the mix and, well, you’ve got a whole different system.Today we’re gonna talk about Axie Infinity, the most popular of the so-called ‘play-to-earn’ games. The promise of Axie and others is that you can earn money simply by playing the game. But how much? Is Axie fun? How easy is it to cash out? And wait … this game has bosses and managers? What the hell is going on?This week on Cyber, Motherboard Staff Writer Edward Ongweso Jr. is here to help us untangle this hellishly complicated nightmare of “play-to-earn” gaming. His latest on the site is “The Metaverse Has Bosses Too. Meet the ‘Managers’ of Axie Infinity.”We’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live during the week.  Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
We’ve got a special presentation on the show for you today, an interview with Yuliana Shemetovets, the spokesperson for a group of ethical hackers going to war with Belarusian dictator Alexander Lukashenko. They’re called the Cyber Partisans and they’re responsible for hacks against the Lukashenko regime.Lukashenko is a die-hard Putin ally who has been in charge of Belarus since 1994. In that time, the country has become more unstable. Protestors have disappeared from the streets and Belarus has allowed Russian troops to move through the country to strike at Ukraine.The Cyber Partisans have worked behind the scenes to disrupt Lukashenko’s regime. They’ve hacked the Belarusian railway system, which still runs on Windows XP, and obtained phone calls between government officials.You’ll hear a little untranslated Belarussian in this episode. I only want to highlight one bit that I think is important. When Shemetovets is talking about acquiring phone calls, we’ll play the raw audio of Belarussian government officials talking. What you’re hearing is someone bragging about beating up a protestor.“I open the…car door, and pull this [woman] by her hair. I kicked her, and told the riot police to..and that bitch started screaming.”The translated audio has quite a few more explivites in it.This is an on-camera interview that first aired on VICE News as an episode of SuperUsers. It was produced by Louise McLoughlin and Cal Bateman.We’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live on Wednesdays at 4pm EST. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
There are thousands of people still trapped in Ukraine and trying to flee. Millions are internally displaced and many are crossing the Polish border and finding refuge. But, for foreign students stuck in Ukraine, it can be much much more difficult to leave. A war zone is a terrible place to be no matter who you are, but these foreign students are facing unprecedented challenges. Thankfully, there are people trying to help.That’s the subject of the Motherboard story “Inside the OSINT Operation to Get Foreign Students Out of Ukraine.” It was written by Sebastian Skov Andersen and Gabriel Geiger. One of the OSINT organizers is Chris Kubecka. On Cyber this week, all three are here to discuss the operation and the ongoing struggles of foreign nationals trying to flee a war zone.We’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live on Wednesdays at 4pm EST. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Stories of the death of religion in America are overblown. If you’re in the right part of the country, there are vibrant Christian communities developing apps, working in Christian-startups, and spreading their faith on Instagram and YouTube. There is a whole community and culture just outside of the mainstream using tech in all sorts of wild and interesting ways.This week on Cyber, we explore the weird world of evangelical tech with Corrina Laughlin. She is a professor of media studies at Loyola Marymount University and author of the book Redeem All: How Digital Life is Changing Evangelical Culture.We’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live on Wednesdays at 4pm EST. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
It started with SIM swapping and escalated into hacks of Okta, Microsoft, Nvidia, and EA. They’re LAPSUS$, a hacking collective that’s been the boogeyman of big corporations for the past few years. People have wondered about their motivations and identities.Now, seven of them have been arrested. They’re mostly teenagers who used unsophisticated methods to get the better of some of the world’s most powerful companies.On today’s episode of Cyber, Motherboard staff writer Joseph Cox walks us through what happened. It’s the subject of his story “LAPSUS$: How a Sloppy Extortion Gang Became One of the Most Prolific Hacking Groups.”We’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live on Wednesdays at 4pm EST. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
We all type it. Some of us say it. Three little letters. L O L. Whether you’re laughing out loud or softening the blow of bad news, it’s so ubiquitous in the English speaking world that it’s almost become punctuation. But where did it come from and does it have a strict definition?If you know anything about linguistics, you may already know the answers to those questions. Motherboard senior staff writer Shayla Love knows. She’s here today to talk about the origins of the phrase that’s part of our online world. It’s the subject of her new piece: “Why We Use ‘lol’ So Much.”We’re recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live on Wednesdays at 4pm EST. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Comments (74)

My account cleared itself

I love Gus his Cat so !@#$ing hilarious

Mar 12th
Reply

🤨

Saying Palantir is a bad company because they have tools to help with data organization is like saying Ikea commits terrorism because they sell bookshelves for terrorists to put their files.

Oct 15th
Reply

RJ

Darknet diaries brought me here. Great show by the way =))

Oct 5th
Reply

baby rock

first generation of optimists. way to be inane.

Aug 23rd
Reply

amy cortez

i find it fascinating that tmobile provided cell location data to an abusive stalker for nefarious use against one of its vulnerable and completely innocent users.. yet, when i had myntmobile phone stolen out of my car and called and BEGGED them to help me locate it by providing me the same above described data on my handset, they flatly refused to assist me in its recovery in any way.. i quit them and now use a different carrier-one with better coverage, better cust service, and (hopefully) the teeniest bit less evil..

Aug 4th
Reply

Midnight Rambler

overblown lefty bs

Jun 2nd
Reply (1)

Thomas G Henry

Regarding WhatsApp, you said the answer. That discomfort and pressure to respond is exactly the point. They can passively leverage that feeling of "I know my friend knows that I'm online and I'm a bad friend if I don't engage" to maintain engagement. Not doing so elsewhere may be a matter of testing / comparison.

Apr 22nd
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Whom it may concern

I didn't realize this was from vice... will definitely unsubscribe... all facts are in... all the deaths and violence during "capitol riots" was either natural causes or the government, you know "the man" the group that you used to be fighting against... sell outs... just because it makes the side of the aisle you don't like look bad... if you stayed consistent you could join hands with people that now agree with what you used to say you didn't trust. Shooting blindly through doors versus mistaking a taser with a gun which is worse?

Apr 15th
Reply

Bee Bowman

vice: fuck capitalism advertisers: banks and cigarettes

Jan 6th
Reply

Alexandra Burness

It's a little weird to think that this entire episode was a commercial for the TV show. However, I really liked this discussion and speculation about how ai is actually functioning in the real world.

Sep 28th
Reply

Abdullah ÖZDEMİR

good

Aug 10th
Reply

Luigi Vidal

Couldn't finish this ep. Too many "Uhh's" Jesus it was so annoying.

Jul 2nd
Reply

Aetherflow

wow.. you really need to listen to Malicious Life's 2 part episode on Hauwei... spyware

Jun 30th
Reply

Pedro Abreu

Awesome one, randomly echoey at around 43:50 :)

Jun 18th
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Debra Dukes

Excellent Podcast.As always ✌

Jun 6th
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Debra Dukes

Ben & Lorenzo you two are absolutely incredible and I love what you do. I have been fortunate enough to get much help from Google in the past because I have a little tech in my background but I do have a problem with the hackers because like I said in past if they want to know something just ask. I don't have this awful thing that is going around Thank goodness.I just feel sorry for the people who do or have had it.Love your show and your guest was truly awesome.Oh and Ben it's ok to talk to yourself because I do too.As long as you don't answer yourself 😉Good luck with the bike excellent exercise but get a lock take it from someone who has had a few walk away.Enjoy the Bikes guys and so love the Show.Deb 👌😉✌

May 28th
Reply

Debra Dukes

Thanks so Much, Ben & Janus really enjoyed the show and also thanks for sharing all the information about how once again how you can get trolled online for listening to what you love. The worst part is I gladly hand mine over if it meant I didn't have to factory reset my device three times, lose all my contacts and pay for things under several different screen names that I had for Years. Sad world we live in when you have to jump through hoops to listen and follow what you like.Thanks for sharing always enjoy explains a lot, Deb.👌✌

May 28th
Reply

Debra Dukes

Thanks so Much Ben & Janus really enjoyed the show and also thanks for sharing all the information about how once again how you can get trolled online for listening to what you love.The worst part is I gladly hand mine over if it meant I didn't have to factory reset my device three times, loose all my contacts and pay for things under several different screen names that I had for Year's.Sad World we live in when you have to jump through hoops to listen and follow what you like.Thanks for sharing always enjoy explains a lot Deb.👌✌

May 28th
Reply

ID18553327

Can the female guess say ummm some more please

May 21st
Reply (1)

Brandon Binger

I tried counting how many times the word "like" was said in this episode. I lost track around 300 and still had like half the episode to like go.

May 21st
Reply
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