CYBER
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CYBER

Author: VICE

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Hacking. Hackers. Disinformation campaigns. Encryption. The Cyber. This stuff gets complicated really fast, but Motherboard spends its time embedded in the infosec world so you don't have to. Host Ben Makuch talks every week to Motherboard reporters Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai and Joseph Cox about the stories they're breaking and to the industry's most famous hackers and researchers about the biggest news in cybersecurity.

102 Episodes
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Vince Ramos wanted Phantom Secure to be the Uber of privacy-focused, luxury-branded phones—flood the market with devices, and sort out the law later. Then the FBI investigated him.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
This week, we talk to Jek, a physical penetration tester whose job is to infiltrate offices, data centers, store stockrooms, and other supposedly "secure" locations and either steal information or install a tool so that other hackers can exfiltrate data. She relies on the most reliable vulnerability of all: human weakness. Jek tells host Ben Makuch how she does it, some of her most memorable operations, and why other hackers think that what she does is "witchcraft."  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this age of social collapse and modern plague it’s easy to forget that the 2016 Presidential Election was a clusterfuck of gargantuan proportions. Never before (then) had an election campaign for the highest office in the country become not only a drama, but a media spectacle with a shocking finale. Russian spies. Secret payoffs. Wikileaks. Guccifer 2.0. War in Ukraine. Election interference. All spelling (maybe?), the first chapter in the ending to the American Experiment? HBO has released a great new two-part documentary deep diving this entire, historical ordeal. Co-directed by film great Alex Gibney and Javier Botero, Agents of Chaos parses exactly what happened to America during what’s become the most insane election ever (at least so far).  Botero is on the show this week to talk about the doc, the chaos of 2016 and what legacy it has left America.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Audio deepfakes are getting more convincing than ever. To test this out, we’ve replaced our host Ben Makuch with a robotic clone of himself. Sponsored by NeXt.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A thriller about a Silicon Valley pioneer who joins forces with a Special Agent to stop the A.I. he created from destroying humanity. Starting October 6th, NEXT airs every Tuesday at 9/8c on FOX. On this episode of Cyber, in partnership with FOX, we sit down with the show’s creator Manny Coto to talk about the inspiration for this thriller A.I. Coto’s history as a horror and science fiction writer is on display in NEXT. He got the idea for his show about a rogue AI when a smart device in his home started to malfunction and call out in the middle of the night.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
It’s been a pretty bad PR year for the world’s most popular ride-share app… And unsurprisingly it has poured money into good news stories, to kick up warm fuzzy feelings about a company that has been found, time and again, to not care very much about its drivers. Enter a CNBC paid partnership story about an UberEats driver who is about to make 100k a year. The American Dream, right? Not so, says Motherboard reporter Edward Ongweso who broke down the falsities of this rather suspect piece of news.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Since the War on Terror kicked off, the military and spy industrial complex has boomed. That also includes a growth in the literal number of spies from agencies like the NSA and CIA, all serving tours, then often entering the private sector. Since then, we’ve seen how things like corporate espionage and the techniques multibillion dollar entities deploy in their interests, have seriously taken off from the trickle down of said veterans entering the workforce Now, we’re in a situation where everybody uses techniques like social media monitoring to glean intel into their own businesses. Recently, in the case of Amazon that means carrying out a fairly professional surveillance op on its own workers. Motherboard’s Lauren Gurley has the story.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
It almost reads like a dystopian plot from a sci-fi novel, playing out in the not-so-distant future.  A major world government relies on a defective and cruel algorithm for debt collection, to extort money out of its most vulnerable citizens who were already on social assistance. Or to put it more succinctly: state-sponsored shakedowns via Artificial Intelligence, that ends up being so flawed it results in the country taking hundreds of millions of dollars from its own people. Sounds unreal, right? Well, this actually happened in Australia, a major country with a huge economic footprint around the world. For more on the story we’ve got Motherboard editor and Jordan Pearson on CYBER.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The tale started with an encrypted phone company, Morroccan gangsters, the Scottish mafia, and a blogger. It ended with an assassination outside of a sex club in Amsterdam. Last week, Motherboard reporter Joseph Cox broke the news that MPC—a Scottish company that hawked special encrypted phones that could evade police surveillance—had been connected to the murder of crime blogger Martin Kok. Kok was a former criminal himself who had previously served a jail sentence for two murders. Kok’s crime blogging had gotten him on the wrong side of the Gillespie brothers, two Scots who are still operating a highly sophisticated drug and gun running operation connected to South American cartels, as well as Morroccan gangster associates. They allegedly hatched a successful plan to kill him in December 2016. On this week’s episode of CYBER, Cox goes into detail about how this criminal syndicate carried out Kok's murder, and what it means for crime in 2019 when the mafia isn’t buying encrypted phones, but making them for itself.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Content Warning: Descriptions of Sexually Explicit Acts Introducing VENT Documentaries from VICE UK: Young people from London, telling you the stories they care about. In this episode, Khalil grew up with homophobic parents, so he had to learn about being gay on his own. From making Sims characters have gay sex to signing up to online sexting forums, Khalil tells the sometimes hilarious, sometimes graphic and sometimes painful story of what it’s like to come into your queerness on the internet.  Subscribe to VENT Documentaries wherever you listen to podcasts: Spotify: open.spotify.com/show/7FpQDTtYnVsCvztk3wmflP Apple: podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/vent-documentaries/id1501178221  Acast: play.acast.com/s/ventdocumentaries  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
By the year 2000 people started believing, in the advent of widespread email culture, that the United States Postal Service was doomed. Conservatives and business types argued that it was a bloated institution.But it’s not. In fact, it’s a vital, robust network that is literally a failsafe in the doomsday plans of the federal government. These days, while people may not be sending many letters or postcards, the USPS is an essential service helping us vote, get our medicine and deliver us packages. President Trump isn’t a fan. But Motherboard reporter Aaron Gordon is, and he’s on the show this week to tell us more about the future of the Postal Service. He's also just launched a newsletter, The Mail, which is all about the USPS. You can subscribe to The Mail by entering your email address at vice.com/themail.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Some people think they’re just a vestige of a bygone era, but they’re not. In fact, nuclear weapons remain the everlasting threat they were when we first introduced them to planet earth: An existential nightmare wherein we possess the ability to obliterate our own planet, many times over, with the push of a button. So this week we have friend of the show and Motherboard contributor Matthew Gault to talk nukes. America’s arsenal is being updated; Russia has (probably) hypersonic missiles; and why since the Cold War have we collectively decided to forget about nuclear warheads. It’s not like they’ve gone anywhere!  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
He’s a vigilante that goes by the alias Gamerdoc. He infiltrates secret online chatrooms to hunt down wrongdoing and the dishonest who prey upon and exploit the system. His target you might ask? The many cheating gamers out there who are using flawed code to be really good at titles like Valorant and Overwatch.here’s a huge underbelly of cheating gamers out there who trade and sell gaming cheat codes, the zero-days of the video gaming world, to get to God Mode without the hours of practice. Believe it or not, cheaters and hackers are a huge problem for gaming companies and today we have Motherboard reporter Lorenzo Francheschi Bicchierai on the show to tell us about the infamous cheater hunter, Gamerdoc.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The US has accused Russia and China of trying to hack research groups that are working on a coronavirus vaccine. Is that a bad thing?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Motherboard reporter Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai hosts this special episode of Cyber. He's joined by Joseph Cox, who reported on the Twitter hack that had the accounts of Elon Musk, Joe Biden, and Apple amongst others tweet out a cryptocurrency scam.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
It’s a tale as old as our digital era: Tech enthusiasts wanting to repair their devices without the authorization of the company that makes them. Apple, for example, is notoriously awful at allowing users access to easy fixes of iPhones or Macbooks and instead offers expensive options with one of its “geniuses.” And like everything in our society, the current pandemic has exposed these right to repairs practises for what they are: Ridiculous. Our Motherboard EIC Jason Koebler is here to tell us about a Polish hacker who is saving ventilators.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
It’s straight out of a hacking thriller: drug dealers. Murderers. Extortionists. Traffickers. Hit men. All using an encrypted network to openly talk about their illicit trades, amassing millions in messages.  Then, like the magical hacks of a CSI cyber episode, the cops were in the network and went on the offensive. In one of his wildest stories to date, and that’s saying something, we have the great Motherboard reporter Joseph Cox on the show this week to tell us all about his wild cybercrime scoop.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
It used to be that American hackers and the NSA were the unquestionable world’s best. Following the many revelations from the Snowden leaks, it became clear the U.S. government had not only violated the civil liberties of American citizens, but the NSA had done an excellent job hacking, well, everything. It hacked the phones of world leaders (including key allies) and made major geopolitical rivals China and Russia very nervous. But, like everything else in the world, American hegemony in cyberspace has quickly faded as the proverbial American empire looks like it's in quick decline for a variety of obvious reasons. And when it comes to hacking powers across the world, it’s been widely reported that everyone from China to private mercenaries have caught up to the hacking skills of American hackers.  So for our Independence Day edition of CYBER, Motherboard reporter Lorenzo Francheschi Bicchiarrai and host Ben Makuch are discussing America’s standing among the world powers of cyberspace.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The US government is in a race with China to provide the world with 5G networks. Some call it the new arms race, as both Washington and Beijing go from country to country trying to negotiate for its companies to provide the future of the internet’s architecture. Part of that has been Trump himself slagging Huawei and undermining the Chinese company as national security risk: The allegation being the company would give the Chinese government a mainline into spying on countries across the world. While some experts agree those fears are well founded, some of the bravade is undoubtedly part of the game of geopolitics. Today on the show we have Andy Purdy, Chief Security Officer for Huawei Technologies USA, to discuss the concerns around the company’s technologies.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On CYBER this week, we’re talking about a novel that frightfully depicts a not-so-distant future where FBI agents work with robot partners and terrorists meet up inside video games.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (62)

Alexandra Burness

It's a little weird to think that this entire episode was a commercial for the TV show. However, I really liked this discussion and speculation about how ai is actually functioning in the real world.

Sep 28th
Reply

Abdullah ÖZDEMİR

good

Aug 10th
Reply

Luigi Vidal

Couldn't finish this ep. Too many "Uhh's" Jesus it was so annoying.

Jul 2nd
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Aetherflow

wow.. you really need to listen to Malicious Life's 2 part episode on Hauwei... spyware

Jun 30th
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Pedro Abreu

Awesome one, randomly echoey at around 43:50 :)

Jun 18th
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Debra Dukes

Excellent Podcast.As always ✌

Jun 6th
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Debra Dukes

Ben & Lorenzo you two are absolutely incredible and I love what you do. I have been fortunate enough to get much help from Google in the past because I have a little tech in my background but I do have a problem with the hackers because like I said in past if they want to know something just ask. I don't have this awful thing that is going around Thank goodness.I just feel sorry for the people who do or have had it.Love your show and your guest was truly awesome.Oh and Ben it's ok to talk to yourself because I do too.As long as you don't answer yourself 😉Good luck with the bike excellent exercise but get a lock take it from someone who has had a few walk away.Enjoy the Bikes guys and so love the Show.Deb 👌😉✌

May 28th
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Debra Dukes

Thanks so Much, Ben & Janus really enjoyed the show and also thanks for sharing all the information about how once again how you can get trolled online for listening to what you love. The worst part is I gladly hand mine over if it meant I didn't have to factory reset my device three times, lose all my contacts and pay for things under several different screen names that I had for Years. Sad world we live in when you have to jump through hoops to listen and follow what you like.Thanks for sharing always enjoy explains a lot, Deb.👌✌

May 28th
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Debra Dukes

Thanks so Much Ben & Janus really enjoyed the show and also thanks for sharing all the information about how once again how you can get trolled online for listening to what you love.The worst part is I gladly hand mine over if it meant I didn't have to factory reset my device three times, loose all my contacts and pay for things under several different screen names that I had for Year's.Sad World we live in when you have to jump through hoops to listen and follow what you like.Thanks for sharing always enjoy explains a lot Deb.👌✌

May 28th
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ID18553327

Can the female guess say ummm some more please

May 21st
Reply (1)

Brandon Binger

I tried counting how many times the word "like" was said in this episode. I lost track around 300 and still had like half the episode to like go.

May 21st
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Debra Dukes

Very sad I know all about it and goes on for Year's.Thanks for sharing this.Deb

May 1st
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Debra Dukes

Absolutely enjoyed Deb ✌

Apr 7th
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Siri

I really enjoy the other dude swearing because of his accent.

Feb 19th
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Debra Dukes

Well Said really enjoyed Appreciate it Deb 👌👍✌

Jan 26th
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mrmr

the reason people/ businesses are limited in repairing damaged devices at a board level is often because of pressure from companies that don't want you to do that (apple). go check Louis Rossmans YouTube channel. on the slack that Apple gives him for repairing easy to fix things that apple tries to charge huge replacement fees at the genius bar.

Dec 16th
Reply (1)

Debra Dukes

Ben Awesome Podcast love all such great information about what is going on.Thanks so much for sharing Deb 👍✌

Nov 15th
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mrmr

wow lots of generalizations in this episode.

Nov 12th
Reply (1)

DB 'patrick-jolicoeur' LeConte-Spink

What an excellent episode! Hearing Kim's actual voice was subversively thrilling - she sounds like I think I'd suspected: smart and wise and totally on top of every important topic. Legendary, indeed! Thanks for sharing this - beautifully done.

Oct 27th
Reply (1)

Bob Moriarty

this is auper gnarly

Sep 16th
Reply (1)
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