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Call & Response

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Call & Response draws upon the blues tradition of communal music making and listening. Hosted by Nashville-based musician and poet Adia Victoria, each episode is a back and forth between Adia and her guests, between their present work, and the lineage of musical ancestors that came before them, and between Adia and you. 
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Remember the show Gullah Gullah Island on Nickelodeon from the 90’s? The colorful worlds, songs and stories inspired by the Gullah Geechee culture were created by Adia’s family friend and the show’s creator, Natalie Daise. Spirit to spirit, Natalie and Adia connect over what it means to use stories and songs to more fully step into your own truth. They talk about moving from south to north and back again, and the importance of southern Black folks returning to the dirt, to seeds, and the land. For a playlist of songs curated for this week's episode, http://bit.ly/cr-natalie/ Show Notes / Natalie Daise was the host and creator of Gullah Gullah Island, a children’s show about Gullah Geechee Culture. Natalie and Adia bring up Wintley Phipps’ “It Is Well With My Soul,” “Detroit Moan” by Victoria Spivey and “Coconut Oil” by Lizzo. / Music in This Week's Playlist /Queen Quet and De Gullah Cunnekshun, "Kneebone"Our Native Daughters, "Blood and Bones"Jessie Mae Hemphill, "Black Cat Bone"Bessie Jones, "Sometimes"Yasmin Williams, "Jarabi"Precious Bryant, "You Don't Want Me No More"Ibeyi, "River"Bessie Jones, "Steal Up, My Young Lady"Emahoy Tsegué-Maryam Guèbrou, "The Homeless Wanderer"Nina Simone, "Four Women"
Kamasi Washington is a bonafide jazz icon and visionary who embodies the idea of music making as a communal act: collaborating with folks from across the music industry and infusing his free ranging Angeleno jazz into rock, rap and beyond. You've likely seen his name in the liner notes of your favorite artists’ work from Kendrick Lamar to St. Vincent and Snoop Dogg. In this episode, Adia sits down with Kamasi to talk about his musical upbringing, creating in an unpredictable world, and the transcendent power of Black art. For a playlist of songs curated for this week's episode, visit http://bit.ly/cr-kamasi/ Show Notes / Kamasi Washington’s most recent album is Heaven and Earth. Kamasi’s favorite childhood song was “The Pink Panther Theme” by Henry Mancini. He cites “A Chant for Bu” by Art Blakely and The Jazz Messengers and “Out To Lunch”by Eric Dolphy, as well as Kendrick Lamar’s To Pimp A Butterfly, as music that has inspired him throughout his musical journey. /Music in This Week's Playlist/Nina Simone, “Sinnerman”Kamasi Washington, “Hub-Tones”Joshua Asante, “Everybody Gets Used”Sun Ra, “Honeysuckle Rose”Beyonce, “Formation”Kendrick Lamar, “King Kunta”St. Vincent, “Pills”Henry Mancini, “The Pink Panther Theme”/ Credits / Call & Response is a Sonos show produced by work x work: Scott Newman, Jemma Rose Brown, Adia Victoria, Babette Thomas and Megan Lubin. Our engineers are Sam Bair and Josh Hahn of The Relic Room.
Jamila Woods carries a lineage in her music— artists like Jean-Michel Basquiat, Zora Neale Hurston and James Baldwin filter into her song lyrics. She channels their voices in her critically acclaimed album, LEGACY! LEGACY! not speaking for them, but instead, singing through them. On this week’s Call and Response, Adia sits down with Jamila to talk about how they each draw strength from the artists who’ve come before them, and using these pandemic times to recenter home, rest and stillness in the creative process. For the playlist of songs curated for this episode, visit http://bit.ly/cr-jamila/ Show Notes / Adia and Jamila discuss Zora Neale Hurston’s essay, How It Feels To Be Colored Me. They also reference this Muddy Waters interview. You can find recordings of Zora Neale Hurston’s singing at the Library of Congress and an interview with Tori Morrison on her writing process, here. Adia references the song, “Window Seat” by Erykah Badu. Jamila and Adia discuss Lucille Clifton’s poetry and Toni Morrison’s Sula. Jamila has been playing Deborah Vandyke’s Chords of The Cosmos, Tasha’s “Lullaby” and serpentwithfeet’s “Fellowship,” to lean into rest. / Music In This Week's Episode / 70’s Blues, Betty Davis Goin’ Down Slow, Howlin’ Wolf VRY BLK, Jamila WoodsBlues at Midnight, Sun RaSweet Home Chicago, Robert JohnsonIt’s Hard Sometimes, Frankie Knuckles Honeybee, Muddy WatersSmile, Saba / Credits / Call & Response is a Sonos show produced by work x work: Scott Newman, Jemma Rose Brown, Adia Victoria, Babette Thomas and Megan Lubin. Our engineers are Sam Bair and Josh Hahn of The Relic Room.
“Nostalgia is a killer of truth” says roots musician Rhiannon Giddens. “Musically, what I try to do is just tell as much truth as I can.” In the first episode of Call & Response, Adia sinks into conversation with Rhiannon, and together, they trace the lineage of the banjo from the Caribbean to the Carolinas and question the whitewashing of American folk and blues music. Plus, hear a playlist made by Adia of artists who’ve used their music to reframe the sound of the south. Head over to http://bit.ly/cr-rhiannon to hear the playlist. /Show Notes/Rhiannon Giddens’ new album is They’re Calling Me Home. Rhiannon talks about the akonting, an African ancestor to contemporary American banjos. Learn more about Frank Johnson, the artist Adia talks about who was whitewashed out of music history. Adia describes how important Nina Simone’s Four Women is to her, and the impact of listening to Kaia Kater’s music. Rhiannon says the theme for Japanese TV show Midnight Diner, “Omoide” is the song that’s giving her life right now. /Music In This Week's Playlist/Rhiannon Giddens, I Shall Not be MovedKaia Kater, Southern GirlRoseanne Cash, The Killing FieldsJesse Clarence Gorman, Going up to the Country #1Valerie June ft. Carla Thomas, Call Me A FoolAmethyst Kiah, Black MyselfLinda Martell, You’re Crying Boy, CryingThe Moving Starhall Singers, You Got To Move/ Credits / Call & Response is a Sonos show produced by work x work: Scott Newman, Jemma Rose Brown, Adia Victoria, Babette Thomas and Megan Lubin. Our engineers are Sam Bair and Josh Hahn of The Relic Room. 
Call and Response draws upon the blues tradition of communal music making and listening. Hosted by Nashville-based musician and poet Adia Victoria, each episode is a back and forth between Adia and an artist, between their present work, and the lineage of musical ancestors that came before them, and between Adia and you. Listen to Call & Response in your podcast feed, every Thursday, starting April 15th.
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