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Carnegie Council Audio Podcast

Author: Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs

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Listen to events at Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. Speakers and interviewees include distinguished authors, government and UN officials, economists, policymakers, and businesspeople. Topics range from the ethics of war and peace, to the place of religion in politics, to issues at the forefront of global social justice. To learn more about our work and to explore a wealth of related resources, please visit our website at http://www.carnegiecouncil.org.
310 Episodes
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Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev discusses the generational divide in U.S. politics in the context of foreign policy and the environment. What are the international implications of initiatives like the Green New Deal? What would an "America First" environmental policy look like? And what happens if the U.S. continues to take a backseat on this issue?
In his eloquent defense of liberalism, Adam Gopnik goes back to its origins and argues that rather than being emphasizing the role of the individual, "two principles, the principle of community and the principle of compromise," are at the core of the liberal project. Indeed, these are the essential elements of humane, pluralist societies; and in an age of autocracy, our very lives may depend on their continued existence.
Nava Nuraniyah, an analyst at the Institute for Policy Analysis of Conflict (IPAC) in Jakarta, Indonesia, speaks with Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Devin Stewart about the recent general election in Indonesia, social media and religious extremism in Southeast Asia, and the future direction of the region's politics.
Historian Ted Widmer and Michael Posner, an NYU Stern professor and former U.S. State Department official, discuss local politics, journalism, and money in elections in the age of ubiquitous Internet connectivity. How can high school students get involved in democracy? What are some ideas to save the media industry? How can--or should--the government regulate the social media giants? Don't miss this wide-ranging talk.
Christian Barry, professor of philosophy at Australian National University, shares his perspective on the political climate, journalism, and polarization in the United States. What responsibility do citizens and elected officials have in the face of a corrupt administration? How can you speak to people on the other side of charged and emotional issues?
Princeton's Gyan Prakash tells the tragic story of the Amritsar Massacre in 1919, in which a British general ordered his soldiers to shoot at thousands of unarmed civilians, and its galvanizing effect on the Indian independence movement. Was this violence an "exceptional" moment in Britain's colonial history? And how did it change Gandhi's thinking in relation to his strategies to resist colonialism?
100 Years After Versailles

100 Years After Versailles

2019-05-1401:12:02

Just weeks after an armistice halted the most devastating conflict in generations, the victors of the Great War set out to negotiate the terms of the peace--and to rewrite the rules of international relations. A century later, we live in a world shaped by the Treaty of Versailles. In this fascinating discussion, a panel of distinguished historians delve into the complex situation on the ground at the time and the Treaty's legacy today, from Europe and the U.S. to Asia and the Middle East.
Marcus Mietzner of Australian National University speaks with Senior Fellow Devin Stewart about the results of the general election last month in Indonesia, one that has been called "the most complicated single-day ballots in global history." Mietzner explains the various forces shaping Indonesian politics today and in the future, including demographics, Islam, identity, and societal polarization.
Senior Fellow Reed Bonadonna, a retired U.S. Marine Corps colonel, discusses the role of ethics in the transition to civilian life. With presidents Eisenhower and Grant as the ideal examples, he also details the attributes that veterans can bring to the political realm. Are the current group of veteran politicians better-positioned to work across the aisle? And what's changed in the White House now that three generals have left high-profile posts in the Trump administration?
The crucible of America's presidency has forged some of the very best and very worst leaders in our national history, along with many in between. From Abraham Lincoln's political savvy and rhetorical gifts to James Buchanan's indecisiveness, "The Presidents" teaches much about what makes a great leader--and what does not. What lessons can we learn from America's past presidents? Can these lessons help us choose the next one wisely? C-SPAN founder Brian Lamb shares his answers in this timely talk.
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Comments (1)

Tom Richards

interesting, all of these podcasts are good!!

Mar 11th
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