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Climactic

Author: Climactic

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We live in Climactic times.
The culmination of billions of lives lived since the Industrial Revolution. The Anthropocene — our current age of technology, machines, and an insatiable need for fuel — has changed the planet and set us on a new path.
There is now broad agreement that the consequences of our collective actions are severe. We’re facing an unprecedented future with a destabilised natural world due to rising temperatures.
Climactic tells the stories of the people making a difference. Regular people like us, in a daily struggle to live sustainable lives. We want to be the people's voice on climate change, embedded in the community, from the perspective of the actual people.
We want to hear these powerful stories. Are you a member of a community environmental group? Do you have knowledge of climate change? A regular person struggling to figure out your role?
We'd love to help you tell your story.
259 Episodes
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This was performed as a livestream as part of the National Sustainable Living Festival. The Climactic Collective is the podcast network by and for Australia’s climate community. Curation is the monthly audio magazine show that highlights the best of the network – and the broader community. Participants get to see the live episode recorded and streamed live. Clips: Nourishing Matters to Chew On | On Eating Meat Part 1 "It's Not the Cow, It's the How"  Overview Effect with James Perrin | 14 - Catherine Ingram sees the purpose of accepting the unacceptable Sustainable You | Episode 42: Preserving the right to witness nature’s beauty Interviews: Michael Hilliard | The Red Line Mike Williams | Mike Williams and Friends/#100interviewsin24hours Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
Full notes available from the Centre for Climate Safety. Thank you to the Sustainable Hour for sharing this episode with us.  The climate revolution begins in your head Science tells us time is running out. We just have a few years to get it right. More than new tools, we need a new politics and a new economics, says David Wallace-Wells. We need awareness and education, says Greta Thunberg. If solutions within the system are so impossible to find, then maybe we should change the system itself.” Albert Einstein told us something similar in New York Times in 1946. “A new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move toward higher levels,” Einstein wrote. The world we have created is a product of our thinking, and it cannot be changed without changing our thinking. But how? The answer is that we need nothing less than a Climate Revolution. One that begins in your head. The climate revolution is about enabling first ourselves, and then humanity, to scale up a new regenerative, Earth-centered, collaboration-focused thinking. A journey from ‘Me’ to ‘We’. Revolution? Really? I have long considered whether it would be unwise to start campaigning for bolder climate action while using that term, ‘climate revolution’. The word revolution does have some historical connotations which might not be helpful. But as we were doing The Sustainable Hour last week, I made a quick decision, inspired by a few phrases that flew out of me, and suddently the genie was out of the bottle: We lifted the ‘Climate Revolution’ into the headline for that podcast episode. And all of a sudden, we found ourselves no longer just whispering the word between ourselves. Now we are getting in gear to shout it out from the rooftops: “The Climate Revolution is happening, folks. Now, how will we be kickstarting the climate revolution in our little town?” I guess you start the journey and become a “climate revolutionary” in spe already at that moment when you say to yourself: “This struggle for climate safety will be the defining battle of my life. And I feel really passionate about this.”  The days for “climate action” and walking in the streets with protest banners are over – now it is about what you do and how you vote. Not on some Friday afternoon every second month or so, or at the ballot box every third year or so, but every single day. Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
Climactic thanks the Impact Studios team for allowing us to share this five-part series with you. There is an unlikely hero that could help deliver us from climate catastrophe, and that hero is found washed up on our beaches and lives deep in our oceans. In this final UTS 4 Climate conversation, Professor Bob Carr sits down with Australia’s best-known climate author and scientist, Professor Tim Flannery to discuss the innovative ways we could draw down the carbon that exists in our atmosphere, and the urgent need to begin this work. UTS 4 Climate is a five-part podcast series bringing together leading thinkers from politics, economics, science and journalism to continue the conversation on climate change. This audio series creates a space to explore climate change from all angles and find practical answers to what we can do to address the climate crisis and secure our futures. The series is hosted by marine science student Erika Wagner, who works at the Institute for Sustainable Futures. Erika introduces listeners to a range of fascinating conversations held in 2020 by Professor the Honourable Bob Carr, NSW’s longest-serving Premier, former Foreign Minister of Australia and UTS Industry Professor of Climate and Business. Hear from a diverse range of guests on where Australia has gone wrong on our approach to climate, opportunities to reduce carbon emissions, how to talk about climate in a way that makes a difference, and what it will take to achieve a sustainable future. This podcast was made by Impact Studios at UTS in collaboration with the Institute for Sustainable Futures. Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
Climactic thanks the Impact Studios team for allowing us to share this five-part series with you. A striking development has occurred in the world of corporate finance in 2020. Over the past months, a string of corporations have divested from thermal coal, starting with US investment giant BlackRock and extending to Japan's Mizuho and the Norwegian Government Pension Fund. But the world’s financiers haven't suddenly become climate activists overnight - instead it's economics that is driving this shift. With the Paris Agreement in place, coal is being dumped all over the world and no longer is seen a safe investment. In this instalment of the UTS 4 Climate podcast, Bob Carr sits down with Tim Buckley, Director of Energy Finance Studies, Australia/South Asia at IEEFA for a robust discussion on the transformation hitting the energy markets of Australia and Asia. UTS 4 Climate is a five-part podcast series bringing together leading thinkers from politics, economics, science and journalism to continue the conversation on climate change. This audio series creates a space to explore climate change from all angles and find practical answers to what we can do to address the climate crisis and secure our futures. The series is hosted by marine science student Erika Wagner, who works at the Institute for Sustainable Futures. Erika introduces listeners to a range of fascinating conversations held in 2020 by Professor the Honourable Bob Carr, NSW’s longest-serving Premier, former Foreign Minister of Australia and UTS Industry Professor of Climate and Business. Hear from a diverse range of guests on where Australia has gone wrong on our approach to climate, opportunities to reduce carbon emissions, how to talk about climate in a way that makes a difference, and what it will take to achieve a sustainable future. This podcast was made by Impact Studios at UTS in collaboration with the Institute for Sustainable Futures. Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
Climactic thanks the Impact Studios team for allowing us to share this five-part series with you. The devastating effects of the 2019-2020 bushfires saw Australian communities ravaged by the impacts of climate change. Many viewed the tragedy as a long overdue wake-up call, and one that should spur rapid action to address the ecological challenges facing us. But as the ash settles, what will the next steps for climate policy look like in an Australia reeling from a catastrophic fire season? In this not to be missed conversation, hear from UTS industry professor Bob Carr who is joined by Independent MP for Warringah, Zali Steggall OAM, elected in 2019 on a platform of pursuing national climate action. Zali is joined by Martijn Wilder, a world leader in climate law and sustainable investing who believes Australia could lead the way in the race to decarbonise. UTS 4 Climate is a five-part podcast series bringing together leading thinkers from politics, economics, science and journalism to continue the conversation on climate change. This audio series creates a space to explore climate change from all angles and find practical answers to what we can do to address the climate crisis and secure our futures. The series is hosted by marine science student Erika Wagner, who works at the Institute for Sustainable Futures. Erika introduces listeners to a range of fascinating conversations held in 2020 by Professor the Honourable Bob Carr, NSW’s longest-serving Premier, former Foreign Minister of Australia and UTS Industry Professor of Climate and Business. Hear from a diverse range of guests on where Australia has gone wrong on our approach to climate, opportunities to reduce carbon emissions, how to talk about climate in a way that makes a difference, and what it will take to achieve a sustainable future. This podcast was made by Impact Studios at UTS in collaboration with the Institute for Sustainable Futures. Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
End Game brings story, music and sound together to explore a local response to the global problem of climate change. It deals with the difficult and emotional side of getting our heads around being the heroes of this mess. A mother facing the mother of all threats - Melanie Scaife shares her ‘head-cracking moment’ - when climate change became a real rather than abstract part of her daughters future, and doing nothing ceased to be an option. Kyla’s notes: I identify deeply with Melanie’s story. It’s not just that we are of a similar demographic living in the same rural shire, both with four-year-old daughters who are obsessed by rainbow unicorns - like Melanie, I too found myself switched on to climate change in the space of a moment that felt like forever. But I couldn’t find the words until I sat down with Melanie, an audio recorder and a cup of strong coffee… Rob and I have talked a lot about how to weave in and explore through End Game the more personal side of how we grapple with climate change - and the ‘big bang’ seemed like a good place to start. In this piece Melanie reads excerpts of a speech she gave at the Mount Alexander Shire Climate Change Forum held in December 2019; urging our local council to declare a climate emergency. Rob and I also spoke at the Forum, alongside 140 odd residents, business owners and community group leaders from our town and its surrounds. I remember sitting in the audience and thinking - so these are the people I’ll be sharing food, water and a leaky boat with as the impacts of climate change intensify. My interest was sparked in what they had to say and how they saw the world and our future. Later I discovered that the forum was a key moment in the story of our shire’s response to climate change - and it really did precipitate the emergency declaration that happened shortly after. [For more listen to End Game’s ‘Problem Solved’]. The forum was also an expression of a collective community voice on climate change and part of a long and rich history of climate action in our town [for more listen to End Game’s ‘Bubbling away and rising’] But ‘Everything you hold dear’ is not about the Climate Change Forum and our community response to the crisis - it is about a woman coming to grips with climate change emotionally - and then managing that realisation once it’s out of the box. (read more on Kyla’s blog about the story behind ‘Everything you hold dear’) Join the End Game mailing list Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
Climactic thanks the Impact Studios team for allowing us to share this five-part series with you.  Maybe the mention of our climate future makes you feel anxious, angry, scared or just detached. If so you’re not alone. Learning to talk about climate change and having meaningful conversations with those who agree and disagree with you on the subject is a powerful step we can take to get the action on climate we need. Hear from UTS Professor of Climate and Business Bob Carr in conversation with social researcher and author Dr Rebecca Huntley as they discuss her latest book How to Talk About Climate Change in a Way That Makes a Difference, and explore why we find it so hard to talk about climate. UTS 4 Climate is a five-part podcast series bringing together leading thinkers from politics, economics, science and journalism to continue the conversation on climate change. This audio series creates a space to explore climate change from all angles and find practical answers to what we can do to address the climate crisis and secure our futures. The series is hosted by marine science student Erika Wagner, who works at the Institute for Sustainable Futures. Erika introduces listeners to a range of fascinating conversations held in 2020 by Professor the Honourable Bob Carr, NSW’s longest-serving Premier, former Foreign Minister of Australia and UTS Industry Professor of Climate and Business. Hear from a diverse range of guests on where Australia has gone wrong on our approach to climate, opportunities to reduce carbon emissions, how to talk about climate in a way that makes a difference, and what it will take to achieve a sustainable future. This podcast was made by Impact Studios at UTS in collaboration with the Institute for Sustainable Futures. Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
Climactic thanks the Impact Studios team for allowing us to share this first episode of this five-part series with you.  In 2007 it looked like there was a political consensus to price carbon in Australia, in a move that would provide a transition to a post-carbon economy. So how did Australia's climate policy fall foul of a global political agenda? In this episode of UTS 4 Climate, Professor Bob Carr picks through forensic investigative journalist Marian Wilkinson’s book, The Carbon Club to discuss how big money and political power continued Australia’s decades of climate inaction. UTS 4 Climate is a five-part podcast series bringing together leading thinkers from politics, economics, science and journalism to continue the conversation on climate change. This audio series creates a space to explore climate change from all angles and find practical answers to what we can do to address the climate crisis and secure our futures. The series is hosted by marine science student Erika Wagner, who works at the Institute for Sustainable Futures. Erika introduces listeners to a range of fascinating conversations held in 2020 by Professor the Honourable Bob Carr, NSW’s longest-serving Premier, former Foreign Minister of Australia and UTS Industry Professor of Climate and Business. Hear from a diverse range of guests on where Australia has gone wrong on our approach to climate, opportunities to reduce carbon emissions, how to talk about climate in a way that makes a difference, and what it will take to achieve a sustainable future. This podcast was made by Impact Studios at UTS in collaboration with the Institute for Sustainable Futures. Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
What do you get when audio creators from an award-winning production agency work with Greenpeace to create a mini series on climate engagement? You get Heaps Better! Listen to the amazing Episode 1 of this four-part miniseries right here on Climactic. Then, stick around for a chat with the creators Jess and Ash, with interviewer and science communicator Lee Constable. Climate Australia, Lee's livestreamed interview show has just launched as a podcast on Climactic. Subscribe and watch out for Lee's amazing interview with some leading figures in the climate community.  Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
Warwick Smith reads aloud his article on Doughnut Economics for economic recovery, and climate action, which recently ran in The Conversation, ABC, and New Daily.  Before the recession we were on a collision course with environmental disaster. The recovery provides a rare opportunity to do things differently; to rebuild a better economy that can support living standards without irretrievably damaging the environment. The closer we get to irreversible climate change, the harder that will become. Links: https://castlemaineinstitute.org.au/ https://www.regen.melbourne/ https://www.slf2021.org/ https://doughnuteconomics.org/   Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
Introducing Kyla Brettle, radio and audio creative veteran, reading aloud her review of Rebecca Huntley's latest, and much-loved, look at what makes effective climate conversation.  Then, hear an episode from the phenomenal End Game Podcast Project, from Castlemaine. The work of Kyla and Rob is audiophonic theatre for your ears.  If it inspires you to campaign for your local council to declare a climate emergency, here's some resources that'll help! https://climateemergencydeclaration.org/ https://www.lgcet.com/ And two previous episodes on the network about Council CED's: https://www.climactic.com.au/show/serially-curious-with-mark-and-eav/glen-eira-declares-a-climate-emergency-54-days-into-lockdown-spotlight-on-community-climate-action/ https://www.climactic.com.au/show/growing-concern/s1e6-the-voices-of-the-bayside-council-climate-emergency/ End Game 'Problem 'Solved' shownotes: Kyla’s notes Last year I became really invested in whether or not my local council would declare a climate emergency. The vote happened shortly after a monumental petition signed by 400,000 Australians wanting the federal government to respond urgently to climate change - went nowhere. I withdrew my hopes like small change from national politics and I fell into worrying about what would happen to me and my little family as climate change worsens. A declaration of a climate emergency is a bit of a weird thing to long for - or at least it seemed so before 2020, when normal didn’t include firestorms and pandemics. At the time I was awakening to the grim reality of our situation - reading long essays about tipping points and deep adaptation - weeping before youtube videos of floating fish and blazing rainforests - coming adrift over plastic waste in a supermarket isle. I wrote about this in my blog. Unable to withstand the tide, I made the inevitable shift from being concerned about climate change to being alarmed. My man and I talked about moving to New Zealand - a relative crevice in the cliff facing the storm. For my part, I realised I didn’t want to leave this country - that in some way I had to stand by it. So my focus shifted to the local - a place where I felt I could have some kind of influence - and that took me to my first town meeting about the climate crisis. At the Climate Emergency Town Hall Meeting, November 2019 The speeches at the start of this soundwork are from this Town Hall event - set up to share information about climate change in our shire and the most recent petition to declare a climate emergency. This is where the story started for me. In the photo taken at the event I’m sitting in the front row with the red shoes - a few seats down from fellow sound person and local creek dweller, Rob Law. We didn’t know one another then, but a few months later we started collaborating on this sound project. Initially we thought this audio sequence would open the podcast series we intend to make out of the story site - but now we are not so sure. Credits co-Produced by Kyla Brettle and Rob Law Sound Design by Kyla Brettle Music by Rob Law Featuring Jodi Newcombe, Rob Law, Kyla Brettle Town Hall Speakers: Warwick Smith, Harriet O’Shea Carre & Heather Cummins Councillors: Bronwen Machin, Stephen Gardener, Dave Petrusma Other Recording Sound recording of Owlet Nightjars, courtesy of Listening Earth, Andrew Keogh Town Hall Recording by Twofold Media MAS Council Recordings on youtube Licence CC BY-NC-SA (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike) Use the contact form to request a downloadable version Links Jodi Newcombe website Central Victorian Climate Action Team Mount Alexander Shire Council Rob Law’s music Twofold Media Listening Earth Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
This special 2-part miniseries is from a panel held as part of ARTS1241, Environmental Advocacy and Activism, from the University of New South Wales. Mark Rudd is a political organizer and an anti-war activist. He first burst onto the political landscape in the United States as a member, and ultimately the leader of the Columbia University chapter of Students for Democratic Society (known as SDS). SDS was the leading student anti-war social movement in the United States in the 1960s. Mark Rudd's expertise, namely the limits of violent, direct action, are particularly relevant to what's going on right now. For more on SDS, Mark's contemporary Tom Hayden and that time period, check out the film The Trial of the Chicago Seven on Netflix.  Join the students of 1241 for this discussion with Mark about the dangers of violence in activism, his theory of change, and what we can learn from successful social movements of the past.  To join us in adapting future events, and providing a platform for learning and collaboration across the climate community, get in touch with Climactic at hello@climactic.fm for any feedback, suggestions or questions.  Resources: Why Did Columbia University Students Protest in 1968? | History (YouTube) Mark's book - Underground: My Life with SDS and the Weathermen (Goodreads) Mark's film recommendation - The Glorias (Wikipedia) Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
This special 2-part miniseries is from a panel held as part of ARTS1241, Environmental Advocacy and Activism, from the University of New South Wales. Mark Rudd is a political organizer and an anti-war activist. He first burst onto the political landscape in the United States as a member, and ultimately the leader of the Columbia University chapter of Students for Democratic Society (known as SDS). SDS was the leading student anti-war social movement in the United States in the 1960s. Mark Rudd's expertise, namely the limits of violent, direct action, are particularly relevant to what's going on right now. For more on SDS, Mark's contemporary Tom Hayden and that time period, check out the film The Trial of the Chicago Seven on Netflix.  Join the students of 1241 for this discussion with Mark about the dangers of violence in activism, his theory of change, and what we can learn from successful social movements of the past.  To join us in adapting future events, and providing a platform for learning and collaboration across the climate community, get in touch with Climactic at hello@climactic.fm for any feedback, suggestions or questions.  Resources: Why Did Columbia University Students Protest in 1968? | History (YouTube) Mark's book - Underground: My Life with SDS and the Weathermen (Goodreads) Mark's film recommendation - The Glorias (Wikipedia) Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
Climactic is at 250 episodes. Wow.  If you must hear it, here's where we started. But really, we've gotten much better.  And, we've helped launch many more, better shows that started much stronger than we did. You can find them all at climactic.fm.  Hear some thank you's to some (but in no way all) of the people who've contributed to Climactic this year! Climactic on Podchaser Music Seán Marsh Tom Day Puscha The General Assembly Design - Abby Hawkins --- As 2020 draws to a close, once again Jacqui and Lisa take some time to chat about the year that was. They reflect on the episodes that they are most proud of, the things that they learnt and what they have achieved in a year like no other. This is the final episode of the year - but they will be back with more inspiring episodes in 2021! Thank you to everyone for your support - please get in touch if you have something to share! Sustainable You is a proud member of the Climactive Network. For more information about the growing Climactic Collective, check out the network at www.climactic.com.au    Sustainable You can be found onFacebook,Instagram, and sign up to our mailing list for bonus material through ourwebsite. If you have an idea for an episode, or want to ask us something in more detail, send us an email! If you enjoy listening to our show, we would love you to give us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. This episode is produced by Fran from 17th Street Audio. Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
Nourishing Matters to Chew On has launched on the Climactic Collective. Subscribe to get new episodes at Climactic.com.au, or Foodswell.  Nourishing Matters to Chew On is a podcast that takes its cue from big picture, healthy and sustainable food system agendas and digs in to explore what these change agendas mean for us here, in Australia. It looks at how we produce and enjoy food in a Climate Change future, as well as how we value the people, places and animals that nourish us. Anthea Fawcett talks to Arnagretta Hunter, eminent Cardiologist, senior lecturer for ANU and Chair of the Commission for the Human Future about the implications of their recently released report "The Need for Strategic Food Policy in Australia".  "The really powerful messages from the report is the interdependence and interrelated issues here that you can't can't really address food security without considering climate change" Arnagretta Hunter  To hear more Nourishing Matters to Chew On go to the Foodswell website www.foodswell.org/nourishing or SUBSCRIBE wherever you get your podcasts.    WE HOPE YOU HAVE LIKED THIS TASTE OF OUR NEW PODCAST, WE WILL BE GOING ON BREAK FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON BUT PLEASE JOIN US IN 2021 FOR MORE "NOURISHING MATTERS TO CHEW ON".    SHOWNOTES:  FoodswellWeb: https://www.foodswell.org.au Twitter: @foodswell1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Foodswell-800405613378218 Instagram: @nourishing_matters and @foodswellaustralia  Anthea Fawcett Facebook: @anthea.fawcett.1 Instagram: @foodswell1 Dr Arnagretta Hunter  Web: https://climate.anu.edu.au/about/people/academics/dr-arnagretta-hunter Twitter: @cbr_heartdoc Instagram: @arnagretta IMPORTANT LINKS:Commission for the Human Future: https://humanfuture.net The Need for Strategic Food Policy in Australia Report: https://humanfuture.net/node/112 Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
This is an audio adaptation of an article written by Laura Phillips, host of Hypecast, published December 7th, 2020 on Resilience.org.  It includes a short message from Dale Martin, author of the Local Government Climate Emergency Toolkit (LGCET).  It was produced and edited by Lloyd Richards. Music from Tom Day.  If you have a suggestion for a podcast adaption, or any comments/feedback, please reach publisher Mark Spencer at hello@climactic.fm. Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
Our thanks to the Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife for sharing this episode with us. Find the whole series and more information about the Wildlife Heroes project.  Australia’s 15,000+ wildlife volunteers work hard, under intense conditions. The Wildlife Heroes: Caring for Carers Podcast aims to start a mental health conversation to support our volunteers to look after themselves and each other. The Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife (FNPW) teamed up with podcast producer Gretchen Miller, wildlife carers and mental health experts to share stories and perspectives about climate worry, personal wellbeing, community conflict, catastrophic events, and supporting others. Each single animal we rescue takes hours, days, weeks and months of care. But the big picture remains grim. How can we take care of ourselves as climate warriors and climate worriers? We speak with: Dr Ros Irwin, a veteran carer and President of  Friends of the Koala from Lismore in NSW.  Sally Gillespie, a former psychotherapist who presents talks and workshops on climate psychology and eco-psychology. Further information: Two Green Threads – advice and mental health support for wildlife carers. Wildlife Heroes Please call Lifeline on 13 11 14 if this conversation has brought up strong feelings and you are having trouble coping.   Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
Ruth Bookbinder, a PhD researcher at the University of Leeds, in the UK, talks to Professor Anna Mdee and Dr Katy Roelich about their research studying the University of Leeds’ transition to net-zero carbon emissions by 2030. Their project aims to create a theory of change that can also help other institutions respond to the climate crisis. They discuss some of their key findings, including the barriers and opportunities to changing complex institutions - at the University of Leeds and beyond. This episode was produced for Climactic with assistance from Simon Moore. Professor Anna Mdee is Professor in the Politics of Global Development at the University of Leeds. Dr Katy Roelich is Associate Professor at the University of Leeds. Ruth Bookbinder is a PhD researcher in the School of Politics and International Studies, University of Leeds. For questions or comments about the show and the research contact R.I.Bookbinder@leeds.ac.uk         Find out more about the work of the Priestley International Centre for Climate, based at the University of Leeds, on their website or follow them on Twitter: @PriestleyCentre. Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
This is a special audio documentary from Ruby Marshall.  Join us in this podcast to hear from local residents and workers from the Latrobe Valley about the just transition away from the fossil fuel industry that is happening there right now. What is currently happening in the Latrobe Valley with their transition away from the fossil fuel industry? How is the community preparing for the closing of the coal mines, and creating new industries with jobs to replace the mines? How is the Latrobe Valley experiencing the impacts of climate change and how are they dealing with it? Listen to find out. Earth Worker Cooperative Gunaikurnai Land and Waters Aboriginal Corporation Voices of the Valley Latrobe Valley Community Power Hub Environment Victoria Coal Hole Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
Thanks to the Women's Climate Justice Collective for sharing this event with us and allowing us to adapt it to a podcast episode. WCJC is a national collective led by women, aiming to mainstream feminist climate justice and support women in the climate and women's rights movements. Meet us at the intersections of gender and environment, rise above the noise and distraction, and be transported by the magic of story. Cut through the confusion and divisiveness of statistics, politics, vested interests and media coverage and listen - to first person accounts of climate impacts, beautifully told. Come with us to visit the heart of our shared global experiences through true, spellbinding narratives from diverse women. Having an event, want it to be adapted and released on Climactic? Get in touch at hello@climactic.fm Support the show: https://www.climactic.com.au/p/support-the-collective/
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Comments (1)

Nellie Goldflam

I loved this episode. Imogen Jubb is so inspiring!

Feb 5th
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