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Consider This from NPR

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Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of All Things Considered help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.
194 Episodes
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After an unusually dramatic meeting of the Michigan Board of State Canvassers, the state voted to certify its election results, slamming the door on yet another effort by President Trump to overturn the results of the election. Hours later, Emily Murphy of the General Services Administration officially authorized the use of federal transition funds by President-elect Biden. But while the Biden transition picks up speed, Trump is using his remaining time in office to push through last-minute policy changes and staffing appointments that may complicate things once the President-elect takes office. NPR has a team of reporters following that story: health policy reporter Selena Simmons-Duffin, chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley, and Pentagon reporter Tom Bowman. NPR political correspondent Asma Khalid reported on what role President-elect Biden may play in negotiations over a coronavirus relief package. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Democrats went into the election expecting to gain seats in the House. Instead, they lost at least eight of them. Virginia Rep. Abigail Spanberger speculated about why in a Nov. 5 conference call, audio of which was obtained by The Washington Post. NPR's Juana Summers reports that the young, activist coalition that voted for Joe Biden plans to pressure his administration to deliver on bold, progressive policies. Outgoing Democratic Sen. Doug Jones tells NPR that bold action in Washington won't be possible without appealing to a broad swath of voters. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and President-elect Joe Biden have a long working relationship. And if republicans retain a majority in the senate, McConnell could be a thorn in the side of the Biden administration's agenda. In this episode of NPR's Embedded, host Kelly McEvers talks to Janet Hook and Jackie Calmes, both currently at the Los Angeles Times, about the relationship between these men who will shape the country for the months and years to come.|Listen to more episodes of Embedded on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.
Election experts say there is no realistic legal path for President Trump to overturn the results of the 2020 election. But his determination to proceed anyway is doing real damage to the idea of American democracy. A growing number of current and former government officials are speaking out against his efforts. Sue Gordon, former deputy director of national intelligence, tells NPR if this were happening in another country, "we would say democracy was teetering on the edge."And Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, a Republican, tells NPR he was pressured by Trump ally Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., to reject certain absentee ballots. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Distribution of the first doses of a coronavirus vaccine could be mere months away. But how that distribution will work remains a massive logistical puzzle that is still coming together piece by piece. NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on how drug companies and the federal government are planning to ship and store vaccines that must remain frozen, some at temperatures that require special freezers. NPR's Dina Temple-Raston outlines the federal government's $590 million plan to avoid shortages of crucial vials and syringes. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
During President Trump's first year in office, 42,000 Americans died of drug overdoses linked to heroin, fentanyl and prescription opioids. After a minor decrease in 2018, deaths rose to a record 50,042 in 2019. That number will likely be even worse for 2020. NPR's Brian Mann reports on the surge of synthetic fentanyl, especially in the western U.S. And NPR's Emily Feng unveils a web of Chinese sellers exporting individual chemical components to produce fentanyl. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Data from two leading COVID-19 vaccine trials indicate they may be between 90 and 95% effective. Dr. Moncef Slaoui, the chief scientist in charge of the U.S. government's vaccine development program, Operation Warp Speed, tells NPR he's optimistic there is "a light at the end of the tunnel."Dr. Anthony Fauci told NPR the results are worth celebrating — but that they should not be seen as a signal to pull back on public health measures. He also said the first vaccine doses may be available next month. But it will still be months longer before any vaccine is widely available. Two former government health officials — Scott Gottlieb and Andy Slavitt — tell NPR that in the meantime, the pandemic is could kill 200,000 more Americans. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Former President Barack Obama talks with NPR's Michel Martin about his time in office, President Trump's pandemic response, the 2020 election and what he thinks President-elect Joe Biden says about the United States right now. In Obama's new memoir, A Promised Land, he writes about his first term in the White House. Read NPR's full interview with Obama here.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
The U.S. is entering the worst of the pandemic. For many, pandemic fatigue set in months ago. Others are struggling anew with cases spiking dramatically almost everywhere in the country. Psychotherapist Gina Moffa and NPR's Linda Holmes answer listener questions about mental health, processing the news, and keeping ourselves occupied.Linda hosts NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour. Listen on Apple Podcasts or Spotify. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
President Trump's refusal to engage in any meaningful national security transition is dangerous, say two former national security officials. Kori Schake with the American Enterprise Institute served on George W. Bush's National Security Council and in senior posts at the Pentagon and the State Department. Harvard's Nicholas Burns served at the State Department and on the National Security Council in every administration from Jimmy Carter to George W. Bush.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
The governors of North Dakota, Ohio and Utah all delivered the same message this week: hospital resources normally used for patients with heart attacks, strokes or emergency trauma will soon be overrun by patients with COVID-19. KCUR's Alex Smith reports on rural hospitals that are already at capacity, forcing them to transfer patients to city hospitals. Lydia Mobley, a traveling nurse working in central Michigan, says she sees multiple patients every shift who say they regret not taking the coronavirus more seriously. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
We know President Trump lost the election. What we don't know is what will happen between now and Inauguration Day if he refuses to accept the results. In the short term, the Biden transition team cannot access certain government funds, use office space or receive classified intelligence briefings without official recognition of Biden's victory from a government agency called the General Services Administration. NPR's Brian Naylor has reported on the delay. At the Department of Justice, the top prosecutor in charge of election crimes, Richard Pilger, resigned from his position this week. A former DOJ colleague of Pilger's, Justin Levitt, tells NPR that the department is enabling the president's baseless claims of widespread election fraud. And Washington Post columnist David Ignatius explains what might be happening at the Department of Defense, where Trump's election denialism has coincided with a number of high-level firings and a debate over the release of classified information.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
President Trump may be on his way out, but Republicans will have to rely on his voters to hold power in the Senate. If Democrats win two runoff elections in Georgia on January 5, they will win a narrow Senate majority.Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting explains how Republicans in Georgia are attacking the state's election process.LaTosha Brown, co-founder of the Black Voters Matter Fund, explains how Democrats in Georgia turned out voters in the presidential race. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
In 2008, then President-elect Obama and President Bush set up a join task force to help the incoming administration deal with the financial crisis they were about to inherit. Brown University's Ashish Jha tells NPR a similar effort is needed now to deal with the coronavirus. But so far, there's no sign of any cooperation from the Trump administration.President-elect Biden has established his own task force of scientists and physicians to work on his administration's response to the pandemic. Task force member Dr. Nicole Lurie tells NPR one goal of their effort will be to convince Americans the virus is the enemy — not each other. The Biden administration will also inherit Operation Warp Speed, the government's vaccine development program. Gus Perna is the Army general in charge. He explains how vaccine distribution might work. The pandemic won't be the only public health challenge facing the Biden administration if millions of people lose their health care coverage. That's what could happen if the Supreme Court strikes down the Affordable Care Act, explains Erin Fuse Brown with Georgia State University's College of Law. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Disinformation, foreign interference, a global pandemic and an incumbent president who refused to say he'd accept the results — all were concerns headed into the 2020 election. If those challenges were a test of America's democratic system, did we pass? Jelani Cobb of The New Yorker and election law expert Michael Kang weigh in, with Joe Biden on the verge of becoming the president-elect. Listen to more election coverage from NPR: Up First on Apple Podcasts or Spotify The NPR Politics Podcast on Apple Podcasts or SpotifyIn participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Early on election night, when it seemed clear that Joe Biden was underperforming with a specific group of Latino voters in the Miami-Dade County, a narrative began to take hold: the Democratic Party had failed to energize the Latino vote. But as more results came in from across Florida, they told a different story. Biden would have lost the state even if he had performed better in Miami-Dade, because of President Trump's popularity with white voters. NPR's Leila Fadel reports on Democratic head-scratching about the Latino vote, and Gene Demby of NPR's Code Switch podcast talks about the enduring power of the white vote in the American electorate. Listen to more election coverage from NPR: Up First on Apple Podcasts or Spotify The NPR Politics Podcast on Apple Podcasts or SpotifyIn participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Early data suggests 160 million people voted this year — which would be the highest turnout rate since 1900. With an unprecedented number of those votes cast by mail, knowing the results of the presidential election on Tuesday was never a guarantee. We know a little more about the results of congressional elections — and they are not great for Democrats. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis explains.One thing we do know is that voters in 32 states decided on dozens of ballot measures, from legalizing marijuana to raising the minimum wage. Josh Altic with the website Ballotpedia has been tracking those measures.Listen to more election coverage from NPR: Up First on Apple Podcasts or Spotify The NPR Politics Podcast on Apple Podcasts or SpotifyIn participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
The electoral college is a system unlike any other in American democracy. Why does it exist? Ramtin Arablouei and Rund Abdelfatah explored that question on a recent episode of NPR's history podcast, Throughline. Find them on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.NPR senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving explains why more Republicans now support the electoral college — and whether that's likely to change. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
NPR political correspondents Tamara Keith and Asma Khalid reflect on an election season shaped by unprecedented events: a global pandemic, President Trump's COVID-19 diagnosis, and the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg — none of which seemed to dramatically change the shape of the race. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Today, a bonus episode from NPR's Code Switch. For the first time in election history, Latinos are projected to be the second-largest voting demographic in the country. The reason? Gen Z Latinx voters, many of whom are casting a ballot for the first time in 2020. So we asked a bunch of them: Who do you plan to vote for? What issues do you care about? And what do you want the rest of the country to know about you?
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Comments (66)

alli lent

just do stimulus checks! the people need direct help. it's been *far* too long.

Nov 25th
Reply

alli lent

is it me or is this episode all wonky? repeated a big section and cut off mid sentence..

Nov 24th
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alli lent

there has got to be a rule against a candidate contacting someone whose job it is to certify an election in one county. especially when that county determines the winner of the state. election interference? c'mon, this is so blatantly not okay.

Nov 21st
Reply (1)

Wallace Ford

.

Nov 18th
Reply

Lee Hyde

I just went to npr.org to do the survey mentioned at the end of this episode, but couldn't find it. Was it removed already, or just buried somewhere?

Nov 18th
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alli lent

failed to point out that in those elections they mentioned, the loser wasn't also the current President.. that hasn't happened in a while..

Nov 12th
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ncooty

Nonsensical garbage. Does NPR think this crap is journalism? E.g., the Democratic Party needs to do a better job of targeting minority voters by recognizing that they're not a voting bloc? That's a nonsensical statement: targeting something that isn't a target. And what's with all of this racial double-speak? Blame white voters for Trump? (Based on what? Exit polls from in-person voting in this election? Morons.) What about turn-out? And why talk about minority voters if THEY AREN'T A VOTING BLOC? I can't keep up with all of the nonsensical, victim-mentality identity politics.

Nov 6th
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it

are we learning?

Nov 6th
Reply

it

I had downloaded that episode from #codeswitch already, awesome for you to make it available here. thanks!

Nov 2nd
Reply (1)

Br0wnie

Fantastic informative news on US Election 2020 FAQ. It answers so many questions on your ballot & ensuring it has been counted. I highly recommend ALL US voters listen to this episode.

Oct 20th
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alli lent

as a suburban woman: "no"

Oct 15th
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tim bales

A disappointing topic. with all that is happening in the world, not sure how high this topic would be on the list. The US executed 22 people in 2019.

Oct 13th
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mari arana

FB is the Devil. It almost felt like I was listening to the McEnany press person for the Trump administration. Spin, spin, spin.

Oct 1st
Reply (1)

alli lent

since the electoral college was created, the president lost the popular vote but won the election 4 times. all 4 of those presidents were Republicans. let's please stop pretending like states are anything more than just a collective of people. someone in New York should have the same pull as someone in Kansas. everyone's votes should count equally. down with the electoral college.

Sep 18th
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alli lent

people will believe so many stupid things just to avoid believing in climate change..

Sep 16th
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alli lent

guess he never considered that maybe panic can actually be a good thing when there's SOMETHING TO PANIC ABOUT!

Sep 16th
Reply (1)

Christina Steiger

The 500 000 evacuated figure is incorrect and was corrected by the Oregonian within hours of it first being used by the governor. 40,000 were actually evacuated, 500,000 were either evacuated or in areas under evacuation warnings. Wish you had looked at the Oregonian figures before publishing this podcast.

Sep 14th
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Dryad

I really don't understand the need to go from useful coronavirus news source to Left Leaning Political Program #934 for seemingly no reason. just for more attention? I'm afraid I'll have to look for another sourceon the virus. Hopefully that one won't change its subject matter.

Aug 20th
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alli lent

listening to experts in elitist..? it's just being smart. you don't have to act like an idiot to not be "elitist"

Aug 18th
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alli lent

I'm so sick of people being mad at the governors and other public officials that are actually attempting to enforce distancing and keep people safe while they're perfectly fine with Congress doing absolutely nothing. you think if everyone was getting 1200 monthly and rent was frozen, they'd be so terrified for their futures? no way! but it's easier to say "stop making us close our dangerous businesses so people can get sick!"

Aug 6th
Reply
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