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Consider This from NPR

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Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, Kelly McEvers and the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered — Ailsa Chang, Audie Cornish, Mary Louise Kelly and Ari Shapiro — help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR.
89 Episodes
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For the first time in the states history, Arizona has activated "crisis of care standards," a set of protocols health care workers can use to make decisions about how to allocate resources. The mayor of Houston says ICU beds are starting to fill up and the city has two weeks to get things under control. The New York Times sued the federal government to obtain data collected by the CDC that reveals more information about how the virus has affected people of color in the United States. The numbers revealed Latinx and Black people are three times as likely to become infected as white people.The virus is spreading fast in Florida. To reach the hardest hit communities, public health workers in Miami are going door to door in Latinx neighborhoods with supplies and information.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
It can feel a bit like headline deja vu: New cases on the rise; bars and restaurants closing back down. More than 130,000 people have died in the United States. Hotspots cropping up across the country.How — after four months — are we here? We examine the emphasis on individual decision making, and science journalist Ed Yong explains how individual actions led to a "patchwork pandemic." Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Employers added 4.8 million jobs last month but the U.S. is still down 15 million jobs since February. And those new figures are from a survey before the recent surge in COVID-19 cases. Coronavirus cases in the U.S. rose in part due to Memorial Day weekend celebrations, when people went out to beaches and restaurants. From a report by NPR's Allison Aubrey, experts share tips on how to safely celebrate the Fourth of JulyThere's been a lot of mixed messaging on masks. Dr. Anthony Fauci tells NPR the government could have done a better job early on. And NPR's Maria Godoy reports on how to choose the best mask for you. Find and support your local public radio station. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
As Arizona hits new records of coronavirus cases and deaths, the state announced they will pause their reopening plans.More and more Republicans are speaking up in support of face masks. Even Vice President Mike Pence has been wearing one in public lately. Dr. Anthony Fauci tells NPR the coronavirus surges we're seeing now are partly the result of too few people wearing masks. Fauci said it's especially hard to explain the risk to young people, because the virus has such a broad range of severity.Plus, a group of scientists who wanted to make it easier to track the virus in your community created an online risk assessment map. NPR's Allison Aubrey and Carmel Wroth reported on the new tool.Find and support your local public radio station. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Dr. Anthony Fauci told members of Congress Tuesday that although he can't predict the ultimate number of coronavirus cases in the United States, he "would not be surprised if we go up to 100,000 a day if this does not turn around."The New York Times reported that Russian military intelligence offered money to the the Taliban in exchange for killing American troops in Afghanistan. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly spoke with Aaron O'Connell, a Marine Corp veteran who served on the National Security Council, about Russia's possible motives. Coronavirus testing in the U.S. is up, but not up enough. Public health researchers say only a handful of states are testing at the level needed to suppress the virus.To see how your state is doing with testing, go to NPR's tracker.Find and support your local public radio station. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
On Monday, the Supreme Court issued a major decision on access to abortion. The court struck down a Louisiana law that required doctors who perform abortions at clinics to also have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. NPR's Sarah McCammon reported from the clinic at the center of the case last year.With coronavirus cases surging in North Carolina, officials issued a statewide mandate for face coverings, and are hiring bilingual contact tracers to work with the state's Latinx community.Warehouses are a big source of temporary jobs in New Jersey, especially for undocumented immigrants. Workers often have to travel in crowded vans, despite guidelines to social distance. Now, WNYC's Karen Yi reports, some of them are getting sick.Find and support your local public radio station.
On Monday, June 29th, the name of this show will change to 'Consider This from NPR.' You don't need to re-subscribe. All our existing episodes will still be right here. Even though our name is changing, we will still be a place where you can get the latest news about this pandemic. And we'll bring you some other news, too. Thanks for listening!Questions? Email us: considerthis@npr.org
COVID-19 cases are at an all-time high in the U.S. And for the first time in almost two months, The White House Coronavirus Task Force had a televised briefing. In Texas on Thursday, 6,000 new cases of the coronavirus were reported. An ER doctor in Houston says beds are filling up and they are running out of places to send patients. Some states are closing down bars and restaurants, again, as COVID-19 cases continue to rise. But NPR's Scott Horsley explains that customer traffic has already been dropping for days. Even now, it can still be tough to get a coronavirus test especially, as NPR's Kirk Siegler reports, in tribal communities. Plus, with many movie theatres closed, the films topping the box office are a bit ... retro.Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
Just two months ago, the Northeast was the epicenter of the pandemic in the U.S. On Wednesday, there were just 581 new reported cases of the coronavirus in New York and now visitors from other states are expected to quarantine after they arrive. More Governors across the country are touting the benefits of masks but not all are willing to make wearing them a state policy. NPR's Jon Hamilton reports that scientists are closely tracking mutations in the coronavirus to ensure the changes don't complicate a future vaccine. Plus, COVID-19 has presented particular challenges for women and reproductive health. Many say that the pandemic is causing them to rethink their plans to have children. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the WHO, started Wednesday's coronavirus briefing on a somber note: By next week there will be a total of 10 million cases globally. A reminder, says Ghebreyesus, that the pandemic isn't over, despite places around the world reopening. There's been a lot of news about coronavirus spikes in states like Texas and Florida. But not in Georgia. Why? Georgia Public Broadcasting reporter Grant Blankenship has more. And we talk to a public health official in Washington State scrambling to identify hotspots in her community. America can't fully get back to work without childcare, and many children are suffering without social opportunities. But how to reopen schools, camps and daycares safely? NPR's Anya Kamenetz talks to childcare centers that have stayed open on how they've been trying to keep kids and staff safe. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
Wearing a face mask, with hand sanitizer and Lysol wipes close at hand, Dr. Anthony Fauci testified before the House Tuesday, to explain why the U.S. still struggles to get a handle on the coronavirus. On Saturday, the U.S. reported 32,411 new cases in just that one day. Fauci also countered President Trump's claim that more testing is "a double-edged sword" to blame for the rise in coronavirus cases across the country. Instead, Fauci says testing is essential if we want to get control of the virus. And NPR's Lauren Frayer takes us to India, where the health care system is collapsing under the heavy demand caused by COVID-19. Plus — for the past three months, just about everyone who can work from home has. And for the most part, things seem to be working. So, as NPR's Uri Berliner reports, more and more employers are looking to make the move permanent. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
Florida passed a grim milestone: 100,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases. The latest numbers include a lot of people in their 20s and 30s. Some officials are putting a pause on reopening. The Trump administration has started shipping out supplies needed to ensure sufficient testing. But those supplies haven't always been very helpful and in some cases they've been hazardous. NPR's Rob Stein has the details. Iowa is home to some 10,000 refugees from Myanmar. The coronavirus has been especially hard on them, with estimates saying as many as 70% have contracted the virus. As Iowa Public Radio's Kate Payne reports, many in the Burmese community work at local meatpacking plants, where social distancing is a constant challenge.Preparing to visit family in long-term care facilities? NPR's Allison Aubrey has some tips to keep everyone safe. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
COVID-19 cases are on the rise in some states — and more testing isn't the only explanation.Find out how cases are in your community. Today is Juneteenth. On this day in 1865, U.S. Army troops landed in Galveston, Texas to tell some of the last enslaved Americans they were free. More American businesses are recognizing the holiday this year.President Trump was planning on holding a rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma today. Instead, thousands will be gathering to see the President tomorrow — indoors. And as NPR's Tamera Keith reports, public health officials aren't thrilled. Plus, Germany has been able to slow the spread of the coronavirus with the help of an army of contact tracers working around the clock. NPR's Rob Schmitz has more. Yesterday, the Supreme Court upheld Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals (DACA). NPR's Code Switch spoke with one of the plaintiffs in the case about how she's processing the news.You can find Code Switch on Spotify, Apple Podcasts and NPR One. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the Trump administration's plan to end DACA — Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals — was "arbitrary and capricious." The ruling is welcome news for recipients of the program, some of whom are essential workers on the front lines of the fight against COVID-19.As areas reopen, officials are working to ensure businesses are adopting safety precautions to avoid the spread of the coronavirus. Officials in Los Angeles found that half of the restaurants they surveyed violated rules and safety standards. Plus, NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin with an update on which communities across the country have sufficient staff in place for contact tracing. Check out the state-by-state breakdown here. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.Email the show at coronavirusdaily@npr.org. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
While President Trump wants to celebrate an uptick in retail sales as states reopen, there's still a long way to go before the economy is back on track. Part of the problem is that the wealthiest Americans are saving their cash rather than spending it. More and more people are leaving their home without a face covering, but experts tell NPR's Maria Godoy they really do help — some more than others. There has been growing support of the Black Lives Matter movement among white Americans. But why now? Police brutality isn't new. Gene Demby of NPR's Code Switch podcast explains what the pandemic might have to do with it. Listen to "Why Now, White People?" on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or NPR One. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.Email the show at coronavirusdaily@npr.org. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
There's a cost to staying home, too. Julianne Holt-Lunstad, a neuroscientist and social psychologist at Brigham Young University, explains the toll that social isolation can take. It's been exactly three months since President Trump issued the first national guidelines for social distancing, including pausing nursing home visitors. NPR's Ashley Westerman recently checked in on her 100-year-old grandfather. Paul Westerman's wife of 76 years is in hospice care. He's alone, except for the nurses in his veteran's home. Plus NPR's Chris Arnold checks in on a Boston hair stylist going back to work. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station. Email the show at coronavirusdaily@npr.org. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
Nationwide, numbers were never trending downward in any big way. Now in some states that are reopening, they are going up. Oregon and Arizona are two of those places. Each state is taking a different approach. Testing is more available than ever before. Some cities are urging people who don't feel sick to get a test, just as a precaution. But WPLN's Blake Farmer reports some insurance companies won't pay for the cost of a test unless it's "medically necessary." Due to the pandemic, a lot of states are making it easier to vote by mail. NPR's Miles Parks says this new process could mean waiting a lot longer for elections results come November. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter. Find and support your local public radio station. Email the show at coronavirusdaily@npr.org. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
All week we've been hearing about rising cases in states around the country. The stock market reacted on Thursday, in part after Federal Reserve officials predicted the unemployment rate will still be above 9% at the end of the year. There's a lot we don't know about the White House's public-private partnership to develop a vaccine, Operation Warp Speed. NPR's Sydney Lupkin reports on a winnowing field of vaccine candidates. And during a pandemic, the most vulnerable newborns require even more protection. Plus, NPR's Maria Godoy shares tips to minimize the risks of COVID-19 for yourself and others if you've been out protesting.Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter. Find and support your local public radio station. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
Many states that reopened a few weeks ago are seeing spikes in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. In Arizona, officials say if cases continue to rise, they may have to be more aggressive about enforcing reopening protocols for businesses.In major cities across Texas there are disparities in access to COVID-19 testing, resulting in less testing in black neighborhoods than white neighborhoods.Dr. Atul Gawande spoke with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly about why face masks remain essential in dealing with the coronavirus and the efficacy of different masks.To help with shortages of PPE, one volunteer group has used 3D printers at home to make nearly 40,000 NIH-approved face shields for health care workers and first responders.Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter. Find and support your local public radio station.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
The numbers aren't really changing. 20,000 new cases a day, and more than 800 dead. Experts warn that by fall, in America, the death count could rise to 200,000.Some members of the National Guard who were sent to Washington D.C. during the protests over the death of George Floyd have tested positive for the coronavirus. Dr. Anthony Fauci is concerned — but not surprised. Many nursing homes banned all visitors and nonessential workers from their facilities to stop the spread of COVID-19. Some advocates and families say they want that ban to end.A big unanswered question is whether it will be safe for public K-12 schools to reopen safely in the fall. The U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions held a hearing on the topic Wednesday.Plus, the Mall of America reopened after nearly three months.Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter. Find and support your local public radio station.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
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Comments (37)

Dryad

I support abortion rights in the sense that the unborn child has a right not to be aborted, yes.

Jul 6th
Reply

Karl Artis

by changing the name and the ficus of the show are you not just downplaying the seriousness of the pandemic? NPR has this other podcast Up First... heard of it?

Jun 30th
Reply

ncooty

It's extremely irresponsible and inflammatory to make racial accusations without discussing evidence that rules out more likely influences (e.g., poverty). Likewise, vague, flippant accusations of systemic racism are irresponsible, less credible, and unhelpful without any discussion of the demonstrated mechanisms of that racism.

Jun 26th
Reply

Dryad

That main host got a little passive aggressive there at one point...

Jun 23rd
Reply

John Reed

Am listening to this podcast for covid news. Will be dumping when you change.

Jun 18th
Reply

Dryad

I would definitely say misogyny is the cancer...

Jun 17th
Reply

alli lent

the people protesting now to open up should learn from the socially distance protestors in this story..

May 25th
Reply (1)

alli lent

next time I hear Trump make this continued shutdown all about him and people sabotaging him, I'm seriously going to throw up. the ego on him is so repulsive - people are dying but this shut down is about his reelection? c'mon.. how can anyone be that delusional?

May 14th
Reply (1)

Dryad

I work at Walmart and had no idea any protests were going on!

May 7th
Reply

Don Purpura

50 Cent Trolls

May 2nd
Reply

Truls Nordin

Unsubbing to this politically biased brainwashing.

May 1st
Reply

Don Purpura

Tell Muslims not smear Oo on walls.

Apr 24th
Reply

Gail B

stupid

Apr 24th
Reply

Corey Max

Clean your hands often. Use soap and water, or an alcohol-based hand rub. https://createawikipageforyourbusiness.com/

Apr 23rd
Reply

alli lent

that website is cool and all but I absolutely do not miss office sounds when I'm working at home lol

Apr 23rd
Reply

Brian Knowles

that's several episodes in a row where the focus has been on African Americans and a disproportionate risk with their communities. Is there a specific political agenda/message that is being expressed here? So far, the largest determining factor seems to be financial and class status (E.G. an entire NBA team getting tested, along with Congress), so why is skin color constantly being focused on in this program, rather than the largest determining factor which is class status? I'm probably going to stop listening to this, it's gone from informational, to political. Message from those of us who don't drink the Kool-Aid and subsequently subscribe to either blue or red ideology: stop the politics, just give us the information. What happened to public radio being objective?

Apr 13th
Reply

Get money

Show love

Apr 13th
Reply

Kari Gilbert-Whitman

Thank you so much for this podcast! We are monthly sustainers and appreciate your efforts.

Apr 12th
Reply

Don Purpura

Did anybody say Wuhan Bat eaters?

Apr 6th
Reply

Don Purpura

Should have banned flights from Asia to US when virus first started .

Apr 5th
Reply
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