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Consider This from NPR

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The hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. New episodes six days a week, Sunday through Friday.

Support NPR and get your news sponsor-free with Consider This+. Learn more at plus.npr.org/considerthis
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Polls – and NPR's own reporting – tell a story of many Americans fatigued by the upcoming presidential race. They're not satisfied with the choice between two men who have both already held the office of President. But American allies and partners are watching the race intently, including South Korea, Japan, Ukraine and Israel. The fates of those countries are closely tied to whether Donald Trump or Joe Biden ends up sitting in the White House next year.The NPR correspondents who cover those countries, Anthony Kuhn in South Korea, Joanna Kakissis in Ukraine, and Daniel Estrin in Israel, discuss the stakes each of those countries have in the outcome of America's presidential election.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
This year's college application process was supposed to get easier. That's because last year, the U.S. Department of Education announced changes to the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA.The problems with the FAFSA form began last fall. And with August and September around the corner, some applicants continue to experience technical issues.Before this year, students would already know how much aid they're getting. But in 2024, not knowing, which is the case for many, could mean they can't go to college. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
We are just weeks away from one of the biggest political events of the election campaign season: the Republican National Convention in Milwaukee. Former President Donald Trump is, of course, the party's presumptive nominee, but he's yet to announce his running mate.The list is long, but the candidates all have one thing in common — they're being considered because they could help Trump get elected in November. NPR's Franco Ordoñez and Jeongyoon Han break down which candidates are rising to the top and why it matters. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Vivek Murthy, U.S. surgeon general, has called attention to what he has called the 'youth mental health crisis' that is currently happening in the U.S.This week, he published an op-ed in The New York Times calling for social media warning labels like those put on cigarettes and alcohol. He hopes to warn young people of the danger social media poses to their mental wellbeing and development. On average, teens in the U.S. are spending nearly 5 hours on social media every single day. And it is negatively impacting their health.So what options do parents have? And will the government step in?For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
As part of his ongoing look at groundbreaking films from 1999, host Scott Detrow speaks with Kimberly Peirce, the writer-director of Boys Don't Cry. The film starred Hillary Swank, who won an Oscar for her portrayal of Brandon Teena, a young transgender man searching for himself and love in Nebraska. Peirce talks about the challenges she faced in getting the movie made and her efforts to find a transgender man to play the lead role in the film.Detrow also speaks with critic Willow Catelyn Maclay, who sees the film's legacy as complicated.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
As the U.K. gears up for a July election, polls show the liberal Labour Party ahead of Prime Minister Rishi Sunak's Conservatives by a hefty margin.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
After the October 7 attack by Hamas on Israel that killed more than 1,100 people, President Joe Biden expressed America's backing for its Middle Eastern ally. But that same month, polls showed that support for Israel among American voters was not unwavering. And that, in fact, support was split across generations.That split between young voters poured out into the streets in November. Two big marches – one organized by pro-Palestinian groups and one by pro-Israeli groups – occurred in Washington. Whether or not Joe Biden gets re-elected in 2024 will depend a lot on if he can repeat his 2020 success with young voters. But a split over U.S. support for Israel may get in his way. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
America is facing two very different futures on the world stage after November. If former President Trump wins, he's promised to fundamentally re-evaluate the NATO alliance, reshape global trade and overhaul the Pentagon, State Department and intelligence agencies.He's largely avoided explaining how he'd handle the conflicts in Europe and the Middle East, yet says he can settle the war in Ukraine in 24 hours.Meanwhile, if President Biden wins, he's signaled his commitment to fight global threats to peace and freedom, and he's vowed to continue to help Ukraine and Israel fight in their respective wars.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Michael Bommer likely only has a few weeks left to live. A couple years ago, he was diagnosed with terminal colon cancer.Then, an opportunity arose to build an interactive artificial intelligence version of himself through a friend's company, Eternos.Life, so his wife, Anett, can interact with him after he dies.More and more people are turning to artificial intelligence to create digital memorials of themselves.Meanwhile Katarzyna Nowaczyk-Basińska, a research associate at the University of Cambridge, has been studying the field of "digital death" for nearly a decade, and says using artificial intelligence after death is one big "techno-cultural experiment" because we don't yet know how people will respond to it. Artificial intelligence has opened the door for us to "live on" after we die. Just because we can, should we? For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
On Saturday, Israeli special forces rescued four hostages held by Hamas in Gaza, killing at least 270 Palestinians and injuring hundreds in the process. The rescue of the hostages was a moment of triumph for the government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, but he didn't have long to bask in it.Benny Gantz, a centrist member of Israel's unity war cabinet, announced his resignation on Sunday, over Netanyahu's management of the war in Gaza. After Gantz's resignation, Netanyahu will be even more reliant on far-right members of his coalition, who have vocally opposed efforts to broker a cease-fire. The U.S. continues to push a cease-fire proposal outlined last month, and on Monday the U.N. Security council passed a U.S.-drafted resolution supporting that deal.NPR's Michele Kelemen and Daniel Estrin help us get a sense of what this weekend's events might mean for the war and its ending.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Billions of dollars in federal COVID funding is set to expire for K-12 schools.Educators across the country say the extra money helped students catch up, and plenty of students still need that support.Some schools say losing the the money, received over the last few years, will lead to cancelation of crucial programs, budget cutbacks and possible layoffs.NPR's Scott Detrow speaks with Wall Street Journal education reporter Matt Barnum about the impact of expiring federal funds on schools across the country.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
With the presidential election approaching, some voters are wondering how we again ended up with Donald Trump and Joe Biden as the presumptive nominees.Recent focus groups with swing voters put into words why some people are turning away from the main candidates, and polling gives us an insight into what this could mean in November.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu says the war in Gaza can't end until Israel has destroyed Hamas.NPR's reporting from Israel and Gaza suggests that goal is still a long way off.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
'Ezra' is a road trip movie, a movie about fathers and sons.Bobby Cannavale plays the father Max, and he hasn't quite figured out what his son Ezra's autism diagnosis means for their life together.The movie draws on the real experiences of screenwriter Tony Spiridakis. William A. Fitzgerald, who plays Ezra. And associate producer Alex Plank also has autism, and is the founder of wrongplanet.net. Many members of the cast and crew are neurodivergent, or have neurodivergent family members. Hollywood hasn't always gotten it right when it comes to portraying neurodivergent people on screen. The new movie 'Ezra' is flipping the script.NPR's Juana Summers speaks with screenwriter Tony Spiridakis and producer Alex Plank.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
The 12 New Yorkers who served on the jury for former president Donald Trump's trial, and voted to convict him om 34 counts of falsified business records, have not had their identities disclosed publicly to protect their privacy.But now the trial is over, and they are likely returning back to normal life. So, will they reveal themselves to the public? And what risks do they encounter in doing so?In this episode we take a look at what other public figures who have gone up against Trump have faced from his supporters, and what those jurors could stand to gain from sharing their stories.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
When the U.S. launched its invasion of Afghanistan and Iraq in the early 2000s, it had been a decade since a full-scale deployment of American troops. That's why when the wars started a lot of the medical corps' experience came from big city emergency rooms. But a few years into the wars, the military was facing hundreds of casualties each month between Afghanistan and Iraq.Military surgeons were seeing wounds requiring double amputations, the kind of thing you might never encounter before serving in a war zone. The military was able to turn that real world experience into breakthroughs in battlefield care. Some of them were simple tweaks like pop up surgical teams that set up close to the battlefield. Over the course of the war, small innovations like this tripled the survival rate for the most critically injured troops, according to one study Now that the post 9/11 wars have ended, some veteran military doctors say those gains are at risk. The Pentagon has tried to cut its healthcare costs by outsourcing medical care to the private sector. And that could hurt battlefield medicine in a future war.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
The Rosetta Stone, the Kohinoor diamond, sculptures from Greece's Parthenon known as the Elgin Marbles are all dazzling objects that bear the history of early civilizations.But these objects were also taken by colonizers, and still remain on display in museum galleries far from their homes.Over the past several years museums around the world have been reckoning with the looted treasures they have kept and benefited from. Now one small museum in Nashville, Tennessee is returning ancient objects excavated in Mexico. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
After a trial that lasted 21 days and a deliberation that took less than ten hours, a Manhattan jury found former President Donald Trump guilty on all 34 criminal felony counts of falsifying business records.Trump says he will appeal the charges, but there are still implications for him, and his ongoing presidential campaign for the 2024 election.So what grounds does Trump have to appeal these charges? And how long could it take to play out? Attorney and NYU law professor Andrew Weissmann joins Ari Shapiro to map out what the next phase of the Trump trial will look like.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
After 10 hours of deliberation, in a historic verdict, a jury of 12 New Yorkers reached a verdict in the criminal hush money trial of former President Donald Trump.Trump has been found guilty on all 34 counts of felony falsification of business records to cover up a hush money payment to adult film star Stormy Daniels in the closing days of the 2016 presidential election.Trump says this is "a rigged disgraceful trial," while the Biden campaign said this verdict shows that "no one is above the law," but that former President Donald Trump still poses a "threat ... to our democracy."NPR's Scott Detrow and Juana Summers, along with NPR political correspondents, unpack the guilty verdict and what it means ahead of the election in November. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
When Jackie Robinson signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947, it heralded an end to racial segregation in professional baseball.And even though Major League Baseball teams were integrated, official recordkeepers refused to acknowledge stats from the Negro Leagues – where Black players were relegated to for decades.Author and historian Larry Lester is one of the people who has fought to change that for years. He's spent over 50 years compiling statistics from the Negro Leagues. Now, that effort is getting recognition from the MLB, and Lester spoke to Ari Shapiro on the battle for inclusion.Statistics from the Negro Leagues have now been incorporated into the MLB's records – and it's reshaping the history of baseball.For generations, Black baseball players' contributions to the sport have been ignored. Now, their legacies are being recognized.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
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Comments (164)

Arpita Sen Gupta

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Feb 24th
Reply

mari arana

So bizarre to hear that man thinking providing people with facts is indoctrination. Facts are not beliefs.

Feb 10th
Reply

mari arana

Because the news & now social media has to create their own always negative narratives & hijack & warp the real story.

Feb 2nd
Reply

Gina Ruzicka

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Jan 18th
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Aakash Amanat

I thoroughly enjoyed the latest episode of "Consider This from NPR." The in-depth analysis and thoughtful discussions on pressing issues make it a must-listen for anyone who wants to stay informed. https://newyorkcity.bubblelife.com/community/nyc_packaging_solution The host's ability to distill complex topics into understandable and engaging content is truly commendable. The diverse range of topics, from politics and culture to science and technology, keeps the show fresh and engaging. I appreciate the quality of reporting and the balanced approach to storytelling. It's a podcast that has become an invaluable resource for keeping up with the ever-evolving world around us. https://trueen.com/business/listing/nyc-packaging-solution/352092

Nov 3rd
Reply

squogg

Jordan Crucchiola's commentary on Jack Skellington is cracking me up! "Jack's biggest crime is that he has a mansplaining posture on absolutely everything." I mean... she's not wrong 😆

Oct 30th
Reply

Alice C

Our women's team is actively playing in the World Cup. Messi is talented and all, but I want to hear about our women's team who is competing now.

Jul 25th
Reply

mari arana

Aaayyy....pobrecito los justices. Waaahhh....

Jul 4th
Reply

mari arana

What a beautiful episode.

Jun 21st
Reply

it

I can't believe the fact that the Brazilian ex-president Bolso had decreed a 100 secrecy that is currently being revised and of actually suspended is expected to allow for uncovering and proof of a lot of serious illegal activities that have caused great harm to the world and for which Bolson and his accomplices must respond with reparations. It seems clear that this was one of the reasons why he left before his immunity expired!

Jan 11th
Reply (1)

Al McGeary

A professor of hip hop. Has the world come to this ? Too bad that the benefits of the industrial revolution are just tossed about for riff raff to use.

Nov 11th
Reply (1)

Al McGeary

Who cares ?

Nov 11th
Reply

Mar Q

U fuckers want to make Saudi Arabia like Iraq

Oct 19th
Reply

Ramineh Medhat

#mahsaamini please be an iranian women voice

Sep 28th
Reply

Hyacinth Brown

Your best is in display. A complete turn off!

Aug 10th
Reply

Amaya Bryant

village California that has to obviously get them is it our tax records and the night vets tax and I'm the regular and my music and I could do have a good chords and that sadly and like and I will do community because a marriage stop and I work with our course and I'm there and I am of course and I'm go to the sorry and like pork chili sorry and like cops and a niggity it is after her it does come out of that Sonic according like coming home tonight I'm going to stand honestly is secondly and Ashley they like do that actually and like back up for hers and like basically and I not do anything be honestly to you give you everything because you do correction tell you and a great part in a question hope breaks right and it's I guess it is Grayson and it's just like a great Bernard this after toilet is connected Amber is on my desk this fake marriage in this who call who called marriage NFL marriage and I fake marriage and this side exactly really knows at this ethernet and a dude in the sc

Aug 5th
Reply (2)

mari arana

This whole episode gave me chills. Unfuckinbelievable!

Aug 3rd
Reply

Hyacinth Brown

What criminal charges if any can be brought to a person with cognitive decline prior to taking the position of Pregnancy, and up to four years later?

Jul 24th
Reply

Elizabeth Burns

Pro-life ideology is a sick joke.

Jul 3rd
Reply

mari arana

My goodness! I'm so glad I'm not a parent or teacher or young person in the school system these days.

Mar 12th
Reply