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Consider This from NPR

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Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of All Things Considered and Kelly McEvers from Embedded help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.
148 Episodes
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India is poised to overtake the U.S. as the country with the most COVID-19 cases. This week the Taj Mahal reopened to tourists for the first time in more than six months. NPR correspondent Lauren Frayer reports on how that's not an indication that the pandemic there has subsided.Across Europe, countries are also seeing cases surge. NPR correspondents Frank Langfitt, Eleanor Beardsley, and Rob Schmitz discuss the rise in cases, new restrictions and how people are coping in the U.K., France and Germany.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
This week Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state at the U.S. Capitol. She'll be the first woman in history to do so. Ginsburg's death sparked record political donations from Democrats, explains Jessica Taylor of Cook Political Report. Those donations may help Democrats in an uphill battle to retake the Senate. Meanwhile, Senate Republicans appear to have the numbers to fill Ginsburg's seat with a conservative nominee, which would shift the balance of power on the court. Professor Mary Ziegler of Florida State University explains why that could change the outcome of several cases concerning abortion restrictions that could land before the Supreme Court. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Daniel Prude died of asphyxia a week after his brother called 911 on March 23. His death was ruled a homicide. Joe Prude told NPR his brother was having a mental health crisis. Calls like that make up an estimated 20% of police calls. NPR's Eric Westervelt reports that efforts to reform how police respond — with crisis intervention teams — have fallen short.And as protests for racial justice have continued, public support for the Black Lives Matter movement has fallen — especially among white Americans. NPR's Brian Mann and Elizabeth Baker explain why activists say they need more support from white protesters. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
The coronavirus has killed nearly 200,000 people in America — far more than in any other country, according to Johns Hopkins University. And experts are predicting a new spike of cases this fall. It's not clear exactly how many of the dead are health care workers, who remain especially vulnerable to the virus. Dr. Claire Rezba has been tracking and documenting their deaths on Twitter. Christopher Friese with the University of Michigan School of Nursing explains how we all feel the effects of a health care system whose workers are stretched to the brink.NPR science correspondent Richard Harris reports on a crucial advancements health care workers have made that mean ICU patients are more likely to survive now than they were at the outset of the pandemic. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
There have been so many tropical storms this year that the National Hurricane Center has already made it through the alphabet to name the storms. The last storm name started with "W" (there are no X, Y or Z names). Now, storms will be named using the Greek alphabet. In the last five years, the United States has lost $500 billion because of climate driven weather disasters, including storms and fires. That estimate by the federal government doesn't even include the storms that have hit the Southern coasts in 2020.Hurricanes and wildfires are getting more destructive. And with a world that's getting hotter, NPR's Rebecca Hersher and Nathan Rott report that the costs of these disasters will continue to go up. The change to energy sources with smaller carbon footprints comes with its own risks, too. NPR's Kat Lonsdorf went to Japan to visit the Fukushima region — the site of a nuclear disaster in 2011. Now, people there are working to make the region completely powered by renewables by 2040.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgYou can see more of Kat Lonsdorf's reporting from Fukushima here.
During the 2000 Presidential election season, it took 36 days and a Supreme Court decision before George W. Bush became the 43rd president of the United States.Before that final Supreme Court decision, there was a five-week battle over the ballots, the rules, the laws and the courts. The amount of litigation and lawyers involved has been called "unprecedented." But what was unprecedented two decades ago looks quaint in 2020.This year campaigns and political parties have staffed up their legal war rooms, making this election season one of the most litigated ever. A lot of the on-going lawsuits are due to coronavirus-related election issues, with at least 248 nationwide.Three of the lawyers preparing for this election season take us from where they were on election night in 2000 to the work they're doing now. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgSpecial thanks to Sam Gringlas and Courtney Dorning for reporting featured in this episode.
Breonna Taylor was shot and killed by police in March. Her killing in Louisville, Ky., was part of the fuel for the nationwide protests against police brutality and systemic racism this spring and summer. On Tuesday, an announcement came that the city of Louisville had reached a $12 million settlement in a civil lawsuit brought against it. But Taylor's mother, Tamika Palmer, says this is only the beginning when it comes to getting full justice. There are on-going state and federal investigations, but still no criminal charges against any of the officers involved. Before she became the face of a movement, Taylor was a daughter, a niece and a treasured friend. Ahead of what would have been Taylor's 27th birthday, NPR's Ari Shapiro went to Louisville to speak with her family and friends about how they remember Taylor. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgSpecial thanks to Becky Sullivan, Sam Gringlas, Sarah Handel, Jason Fuller and Ari Shapiro for the reporting featured in this episode.
Wildfires in Western states aren't slowing down and conspiracy theories about who started them are only making things harder for responders. Conrad Wilson from Oregon Public Broadcasting reports on how claims of Antifa arsonists have clogged up the phone lines for 911 dispatchers in some Oregon towns. And NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Nick Clegg, Facebook's Vice President of Global Affairs and Communication, about the company's decision to remove some misinformation about the fires — and their broader attempts to stop the spread of misinformation online.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
If President Trump knew how contagious and potentially deadly the coronavirus was back in February, why didn't he express that to the American public? That's the question Trump has been facing since last week, when a recording of him expressing a desire to "play down" the virus went public. The audio came from interviews with Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward that he conducted for his latest book, Rage. In an interview with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly, Woodward comes to the conclusion that the president failed to protect the country from the virus and is "the wrong man for the job."Listen to more of the Bob Woodward interview.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.
More than 3 million acres have burned in California this wildfire season. The previous record in a single season was 1.7 million, two years ago. Towns are being decimated across California, Oregon and Washington — and firefighting resources are maxed out, as NPR's Kirk Siegler reports from Boise, Idaho. In California, NPR's Lauren Sommer reports on an effort to fight fire with fire — something some Native American tribes have been doing for a long time.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
As trials continue for a coronavirus vaccine, some of the world's biggest drug companies have come together in an unusual way. This week, nine drugmakers released a joint statement pledging to not submit a coronavirus vaccine to the Food and Drug Administration unless it's shown to be safe and effective in large clinical trials. NPR's Sydney Lupkin reports that the statement comes as a commitment to science, at a time when some Americans have expressed concern that the trials are being rushed.Part of this concern comes from those who feel politics are influencing the processes vaccines must go through. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have told states a potential vaccine may be ready for distribution as soon as late October — right before Election Day. But when speaking with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly, Dr. Moncef Slaoui, chief scientific adviser to Operation Warp Speed, said there is a "very low chance" a vaccine will be ready by then. While some Americans are skeptical about a coronavirus vaccine, it doesn't seem like many of those people work on Wall Street. Each time a new vaccine trial phase is announced or a new scientific hurdle is cleared, drug company stock goes up. NPR's Tom Dreisbach reported that executives at one company took advantage of those rising stock prices.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
Youth voter turnout exceeded expectations in 2018 and may do so again in 2020. Generation Z — those born after 1996 — is the most pro-government and anti-Trump generation, according to the Pew Research Center. But Democrats can't count on those voters to be automatic allies. Gen Z voters in the LA area spoke with NPR host Ailsa Chang ahead of November's election. They discussed today's Democratic party, and why they will — and won't — be voting for Joe Biden.While Gen Z Democrats are split on Biden, young Republicans are deciding whether they will support President Trump. NPR political reporter Juana Summers spoke to young Republicans about their choices and the future of the GOP.Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg, director of the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement, told NPR that young voters are more concerned with issues and values than with identity and branding. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
With Labor Day weekend gone, summer is unofficially over — and millions of children head back to school this week, many virtually. Two teachers — Rosie Reid in California and Lynette Stant in Arizona — share how things are going in their schools so far. Many states have decided to allow high school football to go forward, even if kids are not in school. NPR's Tom Goldman reports that one coach in Alabama is demanding a coronavirus testing program for his players. Students who are not in school are not just missing out on in-person education. Many are missing free or reduced-cost meals. NPR's Cory Turner reports on how some school districts are trying to feed students when they're not in school. And for many parents who can't work at home, no school means a need for child care. But a recent study suggests millions of child care centers may not reopen after the pandemic, as Kavitha Cardoza with member station WAMU reports. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
California set a new record high this week for the most acres burned in a single wildfire season. In an average season, 300,000 acres burn. This year more than 2 million acres have been scorched — and the season isn't over yet. Some communities have taken actions to prevent fires from spreading, but as NPR's Nathan Rott and Lauren Sommer report, those efforts may not be enough.Fire itself isn't the only threat to people. NPR's daily science podcast Short Wave looked into the science of wildfire smoke and how far-reaching it can be. Listen on Apple or Spotify. Reporter Erika Mahoney from member station KAZU has more on dual threats facing farmworkers: wildfire smoke and COVID-19. As these fires have been burning, other regions across the country have also faced extreme weather. Hurricane forecasters are watching multiple storm systems in the Atlantic that could develop into tropical storms in what has already been an extremely busy hurricane season. NPR's Rebecca Hersher, Nathan Rott, and Lauren Sommer on the growing threat of extreme weather due to climate change. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
Jerome Powell, the chair of the Federal Reserve, told NPR today that keeping people in their houses and 'connected to the economy' will cost money now, but pay dividends later. But the White House and Congress have been unable to agree on a deal for additional economic relief, millions of people are still unemployed, and many states now have no eviction protection. The Trump administration issued an eviction ban through the CDC this week. NPR's Chris Arnold and Selena Simmons-Duffin reported on the CDC's temporary halt on evictions and the legal issues that will likely follow. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
As the Northern Hemisphere prepares for a flu season with COVID-19, there are lessons to be learned from the south. Countries like Australia and Argentina made it through the middle of winter with very few cases of the flu. That could be thanks to social distancing measures in place to fight the coronavirus. NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce reported on flu in the southern hemisphere and the possibility that it could mix with the coronavirus. NPR's Tamara Keith and Geoff Brumfiel take a look at President Trump's new health advisor, Dr. Scott Atlas. He has no background in infectious diseases and his ideas are worrying scientists who do. Mary Louise Kelly spoke with Moncef Slaoui, chief adviser for the coronavirus vaccine development program, Operation Warp Speed, about the status of vaccines in the U.S. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
President Trump has stoked tensions and repeatedly failed to condemn acts of violence from racially — and ethnically — motivated attackers, says Elizabeth Neumann, former assistant secretary in the Department of Homeland Security. Neumann left her job in April and is now speaking publicly about her experience in the administration. She told NPR's Steve Inskeep why she no longer supports the president — and how his rhetoric has fueled unrest in Kenosha, Wis., and elsewhere across the country. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
It's September and millions of kids are going back to school this month. Millions more already have. And while some students are beginning the new year in physical classrooms, many are still learning in online classrooms that schools transitioned to when the pandemic began in March. Remote learning isn't easy for anyone, but it's especially challenging for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and other learning disabilities. NPR's Jon Hamilton reports on the challenges facing these students and their parents, who are often required to become educators to make it work.Not all parents have the privilege of being able to help their children with remote learning though. Many students also face the challenge of logging on for school without reliable Internet. NPR's Anya Kamenetz and WWNO's Aubri Juhasz report on "learning hubs" that offer free child care and additional learning resources — but only for a lucky few.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Chadwick Boseman had raw talent, world-class training and the will to defy Hollywood gatekeepers. As a college student at Howard University, he had a helping hand from Denzel Washington. Boseman often spoke about the impact of that contribution and how it helped him chart his own path.Boseman died on Friday after battling colon cancer for four years. He was 43. Today, we look at what his success reveals about race in America — and in Hollywood.Jamil Smith, a senior writer at Rolling Stone, profiled Boseman for Time Magazine in 2018. Smith says even before the premiere of Black Panther, Boseman seemed to know what the film would mean for pop culture and how its success could reshape Hollywood.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
From therapeutics to testing to vaccine development, public health experts are increasingly worried the Trump administration is letting politics guide public health decisions. NPR's Richard Harris reports on a quiet change to testing guidelines made by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week. NPR's Joe Palca explains what protections exist to insulate the vaccine development process from political influence. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
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Comments (45)

alli lent

since the electoral college was created, the president lost the popular vote but won the election 4 times. all 4 of those presidents were Republicans. let's please stop pretending like states are anything more than just a collective of people. someone in New York should have the same pull as someone in Kansas. everyone's votes should count equally. down with the electoral college.

Sep 18th
Reply

alli lent

people will believe so many stupid things just to avoid believing in climate change..

Sep 16th
Reply

alli lent

guess he never considered that maybe panic can actually be a good thing when there's SOMETHING TO PANIC ABOUT!

Sep 16th
Reply

Christina Steiger

The 500 000 evacuated figure is incorrect and was corrected by the Oregonian within hours of it first being used by the governor. 40,000 were actually evacuated, 500,000 were either evacuated or in areas under evacuation warnings. Wish you had looked at the Oregonian figures before publishing this podcast.

Sep 14th
Reply

Dryad

I really don't understand the need to go from useful coronavirus news source to Left Leaning Political Program #934 for seemingly no reason. just for more attention? I'm afraid I'll have to look for another sourceon the virus. Hopefully that one won't change its subject matter.

Aug 20th
Reply

alli lent

listening to experts in elitist..? it's just being smart. you don't have to act like an idiot to not be "elitist"

Aug 18th
Reply

alli lent

I'm so sick of people being mad at the governors and other public officials that are actually attempting to enforce distancing and keep people safe while they're perfectly fine with Congress doing absolutely nothing. you think if everyone was getting 1200 monthly and rent was frozen, they'd be so terrified for their futures? no way! but it's easier to say "stop making us close our dangerous businesses so people can get sick!"

Aug 6th
Reply

ncooty

@6:40: Not "alums". Alums are salts. You meant alumni or alumnae. If you don't know the Latin word, just use English.

Jul 16th
Reply

Dryad

I support abortion rights in the sense that the unborn child has a right not to be aborted, yes.

Jul 6th
Reply

Karl Artis

by changing the name and the ficus of the show are you not just downplaying the seriousness of the pandemic? NPR has this other podcast Up First... heard of it?

Jun 30th
Reply

ncooty

It's extremely irresponsible and inflammatory to make racial accusations without discussing evidence that rules out more likely influences (e.g., poverty). Likewise, vague, flippant accusations of systemic racism are irresponsible, less credible, and unhelpful without any discussion of the demonstrated mechanisms of that racism.

Jun 26th
Reply

Dryad

That main host got a little passive aggressive there at one point...

Jun 23rd
Reply

John Reed

Am listening to this podcast for covid news. Will be dumping when you change.

Jun 18th
Reply

Dryad

I would definitely say misogyny is the cancer...

Jun 17th
Reply

alli lent

the people protesting now to open up should learn from the socially distance protestors in this story..

May 25th
Reply (1)

alli lent

next time I hear Trump make this continued shutdown all about him and people sabotaging him, I'm seriously going to throw up. the ego on him is so repulsive - people are dying but this shut down is about his reelection? c'mon.. how can anyone be that delusional?

May 14th
Reply (1)

Dryad

I work at Walmart and had no idea any protests were going on!

May 7th
Reply

Don Purpura

50 Cent Trolls

May 2nd
Reply

Truls Nordin

Unsubbing to this politically biased brainwashing.

May 1st
Reply

Don Purpura

Tell Muslims not smear Oo on walls.

Apr 24th
Reply
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