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Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of All Things Considered and Kelly McEvers from Embedded help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.
169 Episodes
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Every year, millions of American renters and homebuyers make decisions about where to live. They have a lot of information to help them make a decision — about everything from schools to public transit to lead paint. But what many never learn, until it's too late, is that their homes are in areas that are increasingly prone to flooding or wildfires. This episode contains elements from a special reporting project by NPR's Rebecca Hersher and Lauren Sommer. You can read an overview of their reporting here. They also have advice for questions to ask about your property when it comes to wildfire and flood risk in a changing climate. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Listen to Embedded on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Polls show that Joe Biden has strong support among white voters with a college degree, especially white women, young voters, and those who live in cities and suburbs.That support adds up to record support with white voters for a Democratic presidential candidate. Nearly half of white voters, overall, support Joe Biden. NPR's Sam Gringlas spoke with a few of them in battleground states. And NPR's Domenico Montanaro explains why this shift fits a longer pattern of the Republican party losing college-educated whites. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, told NPR this week that he's "guardedly optimistic" about the prospects of a coronavirus vaccine being approved by the end of the year.In the meantime, scientists are still learning new things about the coronavirus. NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports on improvements in medical treatment for COVID-19 patients, and NPR's Michaeleen Doucleff explains new research on air travel. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
With two weeks until election day and more than 35 million votes already cast, NPR's Miles Parks and Pam Fessler answer your questions about voting, ballots and election security. For more information on voting this year, NPR's Life Kit has a guide to help you out. Read at npr.org or listen on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Women are dropping out of the workforce in much higher numbers than men. Valerie Wilson of the Economic Policy Institute explains that women are overrepresented in jobs that have been hit hardest by the pandemic and child care has gotten harder to come by. The situation is especially dire for Latina women, as NPR's Brianna Scott reports. Last month, out of 865,000 women who left the workforce, more than 300,000 were Latina. Victoria de Francesco Soto of The University of Texas at Austin explains why it's not just the pandemic economy hurting women. Some may be left out of the recovery, too. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
While U.S. movie theaters continue to struggle, the picture is better for the international box office. NPR's Bob Mondello, who's reported on how domestic theaters are getting by, explains why things look more promising abroad. A recent outbreak of the coronavirus in the Chinese city of Qingdao says a lot about how aggressively the country has adopted public health measures. Those measures have led to a return of some music festivals, as NPR's Emily Feng reports. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
As cases spike around the country, Utah is one state changing the way it's approaching the coronavirus. Republican Gov. Gary Herbert has a "new game plan" to beat back record-high cases that threaten to overwhelm the state's hospital system. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says "halftime adjustments" like that are necessary for states to slow the spread of the virus this fall, as more Americans prepare to spend more time indoors. An exclusive NPR survey of contact tracing efforts reveals many states are not prepared to handle the coming surge in cases. NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin explains. And Dr. Anthony Fauci warns Thanksgiving gatherings may accelerate spread even more. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
With less than three weeks to go until Election Day, Republicans have the votes to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. Her confirmation hearing is now much about the politics of the election. Democrats, including Delaware Sen. Chris Coons, are focused on issues like the future of the Affordable Care Act. While Republicans, as NPR's Melissa Block reports, are emphasizing Barrett's motherhood in an effort to appeal to white suburban voters. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Coronavirus cases fall, so people let their guard down. Cases rise, so they get more vigilant. That's the cycle the U.S. is stuck in. In most states across the country, the number of new coronavirus cases each day is up. That's the situation in Wisconsin, where cases are surging. Infectious disease specialist Dr. Michael Landrum spoke with NPR about what he's been seeing the last several weeks. As a whole, the U.S. is seeing around 50,000 new cases each day. That's an increase from 35,000 a month ago. NPR's Will Stone charts the course of the pandemic's ups and downs over the last nine months, from early cases in Washington state to the current spread of the virus into rural America. And the predictions for winter are grim, as people are likely to spend more time indoors.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Lethal injection is commonly thought of as the most painless method of execution. But now many lawyers and doctors are looking inside the bodies of executed inmates and making the case that lethal injection could amount to torture.To take a closer look at this claim, NPR producer Noah Caldwell and a team at All Things Considered obtained more than 300 inmate autopsies through Freedom of Information Act requests. It's the largest collection of lethal injection autopsies in the U.S. They found that more than 80% of the inmates may have experienced the sensation of drowning. Read and listen to the entire investigation here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
The FBI announced Thursday that it had thwarted a plan by far-right militia members to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, and charged six men in relation to the plot.The plot began as talk on social media sites, with a group of men gathering on Facebook to share anti-government reaction to Whitmer's coronavirus restrictions and shutdowns. Experts say the pandemic, protests, and the words of the president have combined to fuel a rise in right-wing extremism. Cynthia Miller-Idriss, a professor at American University who tracks right-wing extremism, spoke to NPR about how right-wing recruiters are taking advantage of President Trump's hesitancy to condemn white supremacy and militia groups.And while these men have been referred to as members of a "militia," that term has also resurfaced a debate about whether groups like this should actually be referred to as domestic terrorist groups, says Kathleen Belew, an assistant professor of history at the University of Chicago who studies paramilitary and white power groups.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
"Excess" profits during wartime have been subject to tax at several points in American history. Writer Anand Giridharadas argues we are at similar point today as billionaire wealth has continued to grow in spite of the pandemic. He is the author of Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World.Chuck Collins of the Institute for Policy Studies notes U.S. billionaires rebounded quickly from the economic collapse earlier this year.Alan Murray, CEO of Fortune Media, argues that business leaders today are more conscious of social injustice and inequality than the billionaires of the past. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Two years ago, about 12% of American households reported they didn't have enough food. Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, that number has nearly doubled. It's even more severe for Black and Hispanic families. Texas Public Radio's Paul Flahive reports on a giant food bank in San Antonio that can barely keep up with the growing demand. Experts say the problem of food insecurity in America needs bigger, longer-term solutions. Erthain Cousin, former U.S. Ambassador to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, tells NPR's Michel Martin the country needs to think bigger than food banks and start investing in businesses that can improve nutrition in low-income communities. And Jim Carnes of Alabama Arise, an organization working to end poverty in Alabama, explains that food insecurity goes hand in hand with poverty. And the main factor driving poverty in the U.S.? Medical expenses. Listen to a special episode of All Things Considered all about food insecurity during the pandemic. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
President Trump told the country Tuesday: "Don't be afraid of COVID. Don't let it dominate your life." This was in a video published after the president's return to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. During his nearly 72-hour stay, Trump received care from top doctors and experimental treatments that are not readily available to the millions of Americans who have tested positive for the coronavirus.Marshall Hatch, a pastor of New Mount Pilgrim Church in Chicago, lost his sister to COVID-19 and says the president's message feels like an insult for families grieving in the wake of this disease. While the vast majority of Americans don't have access to the kind of care that the president received, it's not the only example of how the pandemic is having disproportionate effects on certain groups. California Health Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly explains a new state rule that will tie re-opening plans to improvements in its hardest-hit communities. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
The president, first lady, and a growing list of White House staffers have tested positive for the coronavirus. Ever since President Trump left the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Friday, administration officials — including the president's physician — have been reluctant to share clear and complete information about his health. Zeynep Tufecki, professor at the University of North Carolina, explains how the White House cluster may have developed. The president's niece, psychologist Mary Trump, tells NPR that her family has a hard time confronting the hard reality of disease. Trump is the author of Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
News broke overnight that President Trump and the first lady tested positive for the coronavirus. The White House says they have mild symptoms. Ashish Jha, dean of Brown University's School of Public Health, calls the diagnosis "a nightmare." NPR's Rob Schmitz reports on reaction abroad. John Fortier spoke to NPR about what could happen if the president gets sicker. Fortier is the former executive director of the Continuity of Government Commission, a group set up in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks.For more on this story, follow our NPR politics team on their podcast and listen to Up First Saturday morning for the latest.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.We're working on an upcoming episode about pandemic precautions, and we want to hear from you. Fill out the form on this page and we may follow up on your response. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Facebook and Twitter have plans for an election season rife with disinformation on their platforms. Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg explains what lessons the company learned from 2016 and what they're doing differently this time. She spoke to NPR's Audie Cornish about that, and about the burden of work falling on women during the pandemic. Hear more of their conversation here.Critics say the social media giants are too large to realistically enforce their own policies. NPR's Life Kit has a guide to voting by mail or in-person this election season. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.We're working on an upcoming episode about pandemic precautions and we want to hear from you. Fill out the form on this page and we may follow up on your response. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
President Trump used Tuesday night's debate to attack the integrity of the upcoming election with false claims about voter fraud and mail-in ballots. National security officials say claims like those are being amplified on social media by foreign countries — including Russia — and by bad actors in the U.S. NPR's Shannon Bond and Greg Myre report on how government officials and tech companies are handling that disinformation. And NPR's Pam Fessler explains why the President's false claims about voter fraud have election experts worried about conflicts at the polls. NPR's Life Kit has a guide to voting by mail or in-person this election season. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.We're working on an upcoming episode about pandemic precautions and we want to hear from you. Fill out the form on this page and we may follow up on your response. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
With 10 vaccine candidates now in phase three trials, one expert predicts another million people worldwide could die within three to six months.One of those vaccine candidates is produced by Novavax. Dr. Gregory Glenn, head of research and development for Novavax, tells NPR he's not concerned about politics tainting the vaccine approval process.While the world waits for a vaccine, NPR science reporter Michaeleen Doucleff reports on a small but growing number of scientists asking: what if we already have a vaccine that could slow the spread of the virus? In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.We're working on an upcoming episode about pandemic precautions and we want to hear from you. Fill out the form on this page and we may follow up on your response. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden will meet Tuesday night in Cleveland for the first of three presidential debates. Michael McDonald, who runs the U.S. Elections Project at the University of Florida, says almost 1,000,000 people have already voted in this year's election.NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson previews the debate, and political correspondent Scott Detrow looks at what to expect from Joe Biden based on his performance in past debates. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.We're working on an upcoming episode about pandemic precautions and we want to hear from you. Fill out the form on this page and we may follow up on your response. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
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Comments (54)

Br0wnie

Fantastic informative news on US Election 2020 FAQ. It answers so many questions on your ballot & ensuring it has been counted. I highly recommend ALL US voters listen to this episode.

Oct 20th
Reply

alli lent

as a suburban woman: "no"

Oct 15th
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tim bales

A disappointing topic. with all that is happening in the world, not sure how high this topic would be on the list. The US executed 22 people in 2019.

Oct 13th
Reply

mari arana

FB is the Devil. It almost felt like I was listening to the McEnany press person for the Trump administration. Spin, spin, spin.

Oct 1st
Reply (1)

alli lent

since the electoral college was created, the president lost the popular vote but won the election 4 times. all 4 of those presidents were Republicans. let's please stop pretending like states are anything more than just a collective of people. someone in New York should have the same pull as someone in Kansas. everyone's votes should count equally. down with the electoral college.

Sep 18th
Reply

alli lent

people will believe so many stupid things just to avoid believing in climate change..

Sep 16th
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alli lent

guess he never considered that maybe panic can actually be a good thing when there's SOMETHING TO PANIC ABOUT!

Sep 16th
Reply (1)

Christina Steiger

The 500 000 evacuated figure is incorrect and was corrected by the Oregonian within hours of it first being used by the governor. 40,000 were actually evacuated, 500,000 were either evacuated or in areas under evacuation warnings. Wish you had looked at the Oregonian figures before publishing this podcast.

Sep 14th
Reply

Dryad

I really don't understand the need to go from useful coronavirus news source to Left Leaning Political Program #934 for seemingly no reason. just for more attention? I'm afraid I'll have to look for another sourceon the virus. Hopefully that one won't change its subject matter.

Aug 20th
Reply

alli lent

listening to experts in elitist..? it's just being smart. you don't have to act like an idiot to not be "elitist"

Aug 18th
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alli lent

I'm so sick of people being mad at the governors and other public officials that are actually attempting to enforce distancing and keep people safe while they're perfectly fine with Congress doing absolutely nothing. you think if everyone was getting 1200 monthly and rent was frozen, they'd be so terrified for their futures? no way! but it's easier to say "stop making us close our dangerous businesses so people can get sick!"

Aug 6th
Reply

ncooty

@6:40: Not "alums". Alums are salts. You meant alumni or alumnae. If you don't know the Latin word, just use English.

Jul 16th
Reply

Dryad

I support abortion rights in the sense that the unborn child has a right not to be aborted, yes.

Jul 6th
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Karl Artis

by changing the name and the ficus of the show are you not just downplaying the seriousness of the pandemic? NPR has this other podcast Up First... heard of it?

Jun 30th
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ncooty

It's extremely irresponsible and inflammatory to make racial accusations without discussing evidence that rules out more likely influences (e.g., poverty). Likewise, vague, flippant accusations of systemic racism are irresponsible, less credible, and unhelpful without any discussion of the demonstrated mechanisms of that racism.

Jun 26th
Reply

Dryad

That main host got a little passive aggressive there at one point...

Jun 23rd
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John Reed

Am listening to this podcast for covid news. Will be dumping when you change.

Jun 18th
Reply

Dryad

I would definitely say misogyny is the cancer...

Jun 17th
Reply

alli lent

the people protesting now to open up should learn from the socially distance protestors in this story..

May 25th
Reply (1)

alli lent

next time I hear Trump make this continued shutdown all about him and people sabotaging him, I'm seriously going to throw up. the ego on him is so repulsive - people are dying but this shut down is about his reelection? c'mon.. how can anyone be that delusional?

May 14th
Reply (3)
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