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Criminal Broads

Author: Tori Telfer

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Criminal Broads is a true crime + history podcast about wild women who’ve ended up on the wrong side of the law, whether for leading a cult, serially murdering their husbands, swindling billionaires, or faking ectoplasm. The podcast is hosted by Tori Telfer, author of “Lady Killers: Deadly Women Throughout History.”

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2020-04-2114:03

A quick state of the Criminal Broads union. This is not goodbye forever, but it is goodbye for now. PLUS, some fun (basic? obvious?) quarantine escapism suggestions. And a bit of rambling. LOVE YOU ALLLLLLLLLL. Stay in touch! instagram newsletter website Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Midnight. A hospital ward. A young woman writhes in her bed in pain. But wait—here comes the night nurse, Jane Toppan, with a cool glass of water, promising to make it all…go…away… The story of Jane Toppan will chill you to your core, shake you to your bones, and remind you of the inconvenient truth that female serial killers can be just as deadly as the male ones. Want more Criminal Broads? Come to Caveat NYC on October 30 at 70 pm to see me and the host of DIE-ALOGUE talk about female cult leaders!!! Get your tickets here! *** SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Become a Patreon supporter and get a cool postcard and bonus content on each broad. Snag a free month of weird and entertaining courses at The Great Courses Plus at thegreatcoursesplus.com/broads by entering code FREEMO. And get 10% off your first month of Betterhelp at betterhelp.com/criminalbroads. *** Sources:  Fatal by Harold Schechter Music: “Guilty” by Richard A. Whiting, Harry Akst, and Gus Kahn, sung by Anna Telfer  “Shake It and Break It” by Lanin's Southern Serenaders, licensed under a Public Domain / Sound Recording Common Law Protection License” “The Haunted House” by Haunted Corpse, via freemusicarchive.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
On Halloween night, a young woman sneaks her boyfriend into her house…to kill her parents. Meet Suzane Von Richthofen, Brazil’s biggest teen girl psychopath.  Mega-thanks to Luiz Alberto Moura for the research assistance! Read his work on serial killers here. Want more Criminal Broads? Come to Caveat NYC on October 30 at 70 pm to see me the host of DIE-ALOGUE talk about female cult leaders!!! Get your tickets here! *** SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Become a Patreon supporter and get a cool postcard and bonus content on each broad. Get 30% off all Proverb jewelry with code BROADS. Snag a free month of weird and entertaining courses at The Great Courses Plus at thegreatcoursesplus.com/broads by entering code FREEMO. And check out the new Nevertheless She Existed podcast!*** Sources: “Sex-and-murder transfixes Brazil,” The Windsor Star, 24 July 2006 “‘Red Baron’ heiress who plotted to murder parents gets 39 years,” The Times, 24 July 2006 “Red Baron Descendant's Murder Trial Is Hot Ticket,” Bloomberg News, June 2, 2006 + Brazilian sources aplenty! https://entretenimento.uol.com.br/noticias/redacao/2019/06/23/carla-diaz-se-inspira-em-silencio-dos-inocentes-para-interpretar-suzane-von-richthofen.htm https://noticias.uol.com.br/cotidiano/ultimas-noticias/2019/05/08/suzane-von-richthofen-deixa-prisao-para-saida-de-dia-das-maes.htm https://tvefamosos.uol.com.br/noticias/redacao/2019/07/12/reporter-da-globo-cita-poder-de-seducao-de-suzane-von-richthofen-em-prisao.htm https://super.abril.com.br/mundo-estranho/suzane-von-richtofen-o-crime-que-chocou-o-brasil/ https://g1.globo.com/sp/vale-do-paraiba-regiao/noticia/teste-para-aval-a-soltura-de-suzane-richthofen-indica-detenta-egocentrica-e-narcisista.ghtml http://g1.globo.com/fantastico/noticia/2017/06/prontuario-diz-que-richthofen-estava-com-higiene-precaria-e-olhar-vidrado.html https://g1.globo.com/sao-paulo/noticia/irmao-de-suzane-von-richthofen-e-internado-em-ala-psiquiatrica-de-hospital-em-sp.ghtml https://veja.abril.com.br/brasil/daniel-cravinhos-vai-sair-em-lua-de-mel/ https://vejasp.abril.com.br/cidades/romance-suzane-richthofen-sandra-gomes-tremembe-presidio/ https://canalcienciascriminais.jusbrasil.com.br/artigos/323442322/caso-richthofen https://g1.globo.com/sao-paulo/noticia/irmao-de-suzane-von-richthofen-e-internado-em-ala-psiquiatrica-de-hospital-em-sp.ghtml https://istoe.com.br/promotor-de-justica-e-medico-foram-seduzidos-por-suzane-von-richthofen-diz-jornalista/ https://www1.folha.uol.com.br/folha/cotidiano/ult95u62515.shtml  Music: “Guilty” by Richard A. Whiting, Harry Akst, and Gus Kahn, sung by Anna Telfer “Shake It and Break It” by Lanin's Southern Serenaders, licensed under a Public Domain / Sound Recording Common Law Protection License “Copo de Veneno” by Karina Buhr, via freemusicarchive.org Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
When a young black woman named Joan Little ran from her jail cell, leaving her white male guard dead on the floor—without his pants—the country couldn’t decide who, exactly, Joan Little was. The prosecution said she was a vicious seductress who’d lured the guard in specifically to kill him. The defense said she was an innocent angel who hadn’t even known he was dead. Who in the world was Joan Little, really? Want more Criminal Broads? Come to Caveat NYC on October 30 at 70 pm to see me the host of DIE-ALOGUE talk about female cult leaders!!! Get your tickets here! *** SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Become a Patreon supporter and get a cool postcard. Get 10% off your first month of Betterhelp at betterhelp.com/criminalbroads. Snag a free month of weird and entertaining courses at The Great Courses Plus at thegreatcoursesplus.com/broads by entering code FREEMO. And check out Harlequin Suspense’s new line of creepy fall books at bit.ly/mustreadsuspense.*** Sources: New York Times coverage of the Joan Little case, 1975-1989The Innocent of Joan Little: A Southern Mystery, by James RestonJoan Little ephemera (including her poem, “I Am Somebody”), from usprisonculture.com“Free Joan Little: Anti-Rape Activism, Black Power, and the Black Freedom Movement,” by Ashley Farmer, from Black Perspectives by AAIHS Music: “Guilty” by Richard A. Whiting, Harry Akst, and Gus Kahn, sung by Anna Telfer “Shake It and Break It” by Lanin's Southern Serenaders, licensed under a Public Domain / Sound Recording Common Law Protection License“Gospel House Mix 1” by DJ Renay, via archive.org. Public domain.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Why do women love true crime? Wait, no—why do people love true crime? Author Rachel Monroe comes on the podcast to deconstruct our appetite for horrifying true stories. Also covered: relating to the Manson girls, why true crime is not the same as a bowl of oatmeal, the ethics of crime scene photos, and the murky side of the victim's rights movement. Check out Rachel’s new book, Savage Appetites: Four True Stories of Women, Crime, and Obsessiontoday! Want more #content? 1) Subscribe to the new podcast I’m hosting, Why Women Kill, from CBS All Access. 2) Come see me + the host of DIE-ALOGUE talk about female cult leaders in NYC on October 30. Tickets here! *** SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Become a Patreon supporter and get a cool postcard. Get a free month of courses at The Great Courses Plus at thegreatcoursesplus.com/broads. Check out Harlequin Suspense’s new line of creepy fall books at bit.ly/mustreadsuspense.*** Sources: Interview with Rachel Monroe: August 28, 2019Savage Appetites: Four True Stories of Women, Crime, and Obsession, by Rachel MonroeRachel’s con-man article in the Atlantic: “The Perfect Man Who Wasn’t,” April 2018 issueThe article about serial rapists we discuss: “An Epidemic of Disbelief,” by Barbara Bradley Hagerty, The Atlantic, August 2019 issue Music: “Guilty” by Richard A. Whiting, Harry Akst, and Gus Kahn, sung by Anna Telfer“Can You Tame Wild Wimmen?” by Billy Murray, licensed under a Public Domain / Sound Recording Common Law Protection License“Shake It and Break It” by Lanin's Southern Serenaders, licensed under a Public Domain / Sound Recording Common Law Protection License  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
On the night of January 15, 1978, Kathy Kleiner opened her eyes to see the serial killer Ted Bundy standing over her bed. One year later, she stared him down in the courtroom, thinking, “I’m standing, now, and you’re in the bed.”  This is her story, in her own words. Here’s the Vulture article about Ted Bundy that I wrote…and my profile of Kathy for Rolling Stone. *** SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Become a Patreon supporter and get a cool postcard. Get a free month of courses at The Great Courses Plus at thegreatcoursesplus.com/broads. Get 25% off your Care/of order by heading to takecareof.com and using code CRIMINALBROADS. And check out the new Nevertheless She Existed podcast!*** Sources: Interview with Kathy Kleiner: August 23, 2019 Music: “Guilty” by Richard A. Whiting, Harry Akst, and Gus Kahn, sung by Anna Telfer“Shake It and Break It” by Lanin's Southern Serenaders, licensed under a Public Domain / Sound Recording Common Law Protection License“Show Yourself (Living Light remix)” by Ayla Nereo, licensed under a Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License and used with permission. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Fifty years ago, a wild-eyed maniac named Charles Manson sent a gaggle of his girls into the night to murder seven people. But his most loyal girl, his second-in-command, a teenager named Squeaky Fromme, didn’t head out with the group. Since she didn’t kill for Charlie that night, she spent the rest of her life trying to prove that she was just as loyal to him—and so, long after Manson's murderesses had disowned him, Squeaky remained.  *** SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Become a Patreon supporter and get a cool postcard. Get a free month of courses at The Great Courses Plus at thegreatcoursesplus.com/broads. And check out the Pretend Radio podcast!*** Sources + music: COMING TONIGHT. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Tanya Nelson believed everything her fortuneteller, Ha Jade Smith, told her—until Tanya’s life spiraled out of control, and Ha couldn’t seem to help her. With that, Tanya decided that someone was going to have to pay for the wreckage that was her life. Someone was going to have to die.  *** SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Become a Patreon supporter and get a cool postcard. Support Crimibox on Kickstarter. Get 25% off your Care/of order by heading to takecareof.com and using code CRIMINALBROADS. And check out the new Nevertheless She Existed podcast!*** Sources: “Police Seek Pair Seen Leaving the Home of Two Slain O.C. Women,” Los Angeles Times, 03 May 2005 “Seeking Clues in Shadowy World; Trying to solve killings of a fortuneteller and her daughter in Little Saigon, police ask for help understanding ethnic nuances,” Los Angeles Times, 05 May 2005 “Charges Filed in O.C. Double Slaying; North Carolina woman is being held in the slayings of fortuneteller and her daughter in Westminster. A man will be extradited, police say,” Los Angeles Times, 04 June 2005 “Man said to have confessed to slayings,” The Orange County Register, 12 April 2006 “Woman enticed accomplice into murder plot, prosecutor says,” The Orange County Register, 14 January 2010 “Witness testifies bad ‘fortune’ led to murders,” The Orange County Register, 1 February 2010 “Prosecutor: Fortune-teller, daughter killed over prediction,” The Orange County Register, 10 February 2010 “Sister of slain fortune teller breaks down,” The Orange County Register, 24 February 2010 “Sister of murderer pleads for mercy,” The Orange County Register, 25 February 2010 “Woman sentenced to death in fortune teller slayings,” The Orange County Register, 23 April 2010 “Tanya Nelson Irks Judge Frank F. Fasel, Who Sends Double-Killer to Death Row,” OC Weekly, 26 April 2010 Music: “Guilty” by Richard A. Whiting, Harry Akst, and Gus Kahn, sung by Anna Telfer “Shake It and Break It” by Lanin's Southern Serenaders, licensed under a Public Domain / Sound Recording Common Law Protection License “Spirit’s Cradle ft. Leah Song,” by saQi, licensed under a Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License and used with permission. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
There were plenty of jobs for women in WW2: nurse, ambulance driver, factory worker. But then there were the other jobs, the ones no one really talked about. Spy. Resistance fighter. Killer. These are the stories of five women—Nadezhda Popova, Vitka Kempner, Noor Inayat Khan, Nancy Wake, and Lyudmila Pavlichenko—who fought the Nazis. They terrorized them from the sky, blew up their trains, endured their torture, rode bikes through their territory, and shot them down with their rifles. In a world that threatened to be consumed by evil, they fought back.  *** SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Become a Patreon supporter and get a cool postcard. Get a free month of Stitcher Premium at stitcherpremium.com with code BROADS. And get 25% off your Care/of order by heading to takecareof.com and using code CRIMINALBROADS. *** Sources: “Nadezhda Popova, WWII ‘Night Witch,’ Dies at 91,” New York Times, 14 July 2013 “Nadezhda Popova, celebrated Soviet ‘Night Witch’ aviator of World War II, dies at 91,” The Washington Post, 13 July 2013 “Vilna Jewish Partisans Led By Young Girl,” The Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle, 8 Sept 1944 “VITKA KEMPNER-KOVNER,” The Encyclopedia of Jewish Women “Vitka Kovner, partisan, passes away at the age of 92,” Yad Vashem, 15 Feb 2012 “Overlooked No More: Noor Inayat Khan, Indian Princess and British Spy,” New York Times, 28 Nov 2018 “One Woman, Many Surprises: Pacifist Muslim, British Spy, WWII Hero,” NPR, 6 Sept 2014 “Noor Inayat Khan: The Indian princess who spied for Britain,” BBC, 8 Nov 2012 “Nancy Wake, Proud Spy and Nazi Foe, Dies at 98,” New York Times, 13 Aug 2011 “Farewell to Nancy Wake, the mouse who ran rings around the Nazis,” The Guardian, 8 Aug 2011 “War hero Nancy Wake's ashes scattered in France,” ABC Australia, 10 Mar 2013 “Eleanor Roosevelt and the Soviet Sniper,” Smithsonian, 21 Feb 2013 “The life and myths of Lyudmila Pavlichenko, Soviet Russia's deadliest sniper,” Public Radio International, 9 March 2018 “By the Numbers: End of World War II,” CNN, 2 Sept 2013 World War II Foundation (for statistics)   Music: “Guilty” by Richard A. Whiting, Harry Akst, and Gus Kahn, sung by Anna Telfer “Shake It and Break It” by Lanin's Southern Serenaders, licensed under a Public Domain / Sound Recording Common Law Protection License “Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 16” by Sergei Rachmaninoff (Sviatoslav Richter, piano; Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra, Stanislaw Wislocki, cond.), via archive.org. Samples played from “Miss Pavlichenko” by Woody Guthrie and Inglorious Bastards by Quentin Tarantino.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Meet Irma Grese. She likes boys, girls, movies, makeup, and sadistic torture. She hates her dad, but loves Adolf Hitler. This is horrific story of the story of how propaganda—and a large dose of teenage boredom—transformed an unskilled peasant girl into one of the Holocaust’s most successful concentration camp guards.(Become a Patreon supporter.) Sources: The Beautiful Beast: The Life & Crimes of SS-Aufseherin Irma Grese, by Daniel Patrick Brown “The Violence of Female Guards in Nazi Concentration Camps (1939-1945): Reflections on the Dynamics and Logics of Power,” by Elissa Mailänder in SciencesPo “Nazi Bride Schools: ‘These girls were the nucleus of the Reich,’” Telegraph, 16 August 2013 “Auschwitz II-Birkenau,” from Auschwitz.org “Life for young people in Nazi Germany,” BBC Bitesize, accessed 6/31/2019 “Gendering the Holocaust: A case study of Irma Grese: Constructing the ‘evil’ and the ‘ordinary’ through digital oral testimonies and written trial testimonies of the Holocaust survivors,” by Bianka Vida, Kaleidoscope  Music: “Guilty” by Richard A. Whiting, Harry Akst, and Gus Kahn, sung by Anna Telfer“Shake It and Break It” by Lanin's Southern Serenaders, licensed under a Public Domain / Sound Recording Common Law Protection License“Death Is Our Only God” by Silent Carrion, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
History remembers them as beautiful booze-hounds. Hollywood turned them into fame-hungry starlets. But who were these murderesses, really? With Emilie Le Beau Lucchesi, author of UGLY PREY: An Innocent Woman and the Death Sentence That Scandalized Jazz Age Chicago, we dive into the stories of Belva Gaertner and Beulah Annan, the most infamous lady killers of 1920s Chicago. What did the press get wrong about them? What do we get wrong about them today? WHY WERE THEIR JURIES SO UTTERLY MAD? And honestly, was the whole thing just a gin-soaked joke, or were real crimes committed?   Find Emilie on her website and Instagram. Buy her books here. And become a Patreon supporter for rewards and bonus content! Sources: Interview withEmilie Le Beau Lucchesi, 6/14/19UGLY PREY: An Innocent Woman and the Death Sentence That Scandalized Jazz Age Chicago, by Emilie Le Beau LucchesiThe Girls of Murder City: Fame, Lust, and the Beautiful Killers Who Inspired Chicago, by Douglas PerryLady Killers, by Tori Telfer  Music: “Guilty” by Richard A. Whiting, Harry Akst, and Gus Kahn, sung by Anna Telfer“Shake It and Break It” by Lanin's Southern Serenaders, licensed under a Public Domain / Sound Recording Common Law Protection License“One Night Alone With You” via archive.orgBrief clips played for educational purposes: “Cell Block Tango” from Chicago and “Hula Lou” by Danny Kaye Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The story behind New York’s first-ever female detective! In 1896, Isabella Goodwin was a quiet, hard-working police matron who wrangled murderesses, made up the prison beds, and earned about half of what her male coworkers did. As far as she knew, she’d be a police matron forever…until one day, a gruff captain called her over to his desk and asked if she’d like to take a crack at going undercover.  (Become a Patreon supporter for rewards and bonus content!) Sources: The Fearless Mrs. Goodwin: How New York's First Female Police Detective Cracked the Crime of the Century, by Elizabeth Mitchell“Robbers Hold Up Bank Messengers in Taxi; Steal $25,000 and Escape in an Auto,” Brooklyn Times Union, 15 Feb 1912“The First Municipal Woman Detective in the World,” The New York Times, 3 March 1912“Mrs. Isabella Goodwin is a Sherlock Holmes in Skirts,” Daily Long Island Democrat, 26 March 1912“Who Mrs. Isabella Goodwin Really Is,” St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 7 April 1912“Bandits’ Sentences Pile High,” New-York Tribune, 13 April 1912“Woman Detective is Secret Bride,” The Standard Union, 28 Nov 1921“Overlooked No More: Isabella Goodwin, New York City’s First Female Police Detective,” New York Times, 13 March 2019Ticket Scalping: An American History, 1850–2005, by Kerry Segrave (p. 68)  Music: “Guilty” by Richard A. Whiting, Harry Akst, and Gus Kahn, sung by Anna Telfer.“Shake It and Break It” by Lanin's Southern Serenaders, licensed under a Public Domain / Sound Recording Common Law Protection License“La Traviata, Brindisi (Verdi)” by MIT Symphony Orchestra, licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial License Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Juanita Spinelli ran a gang of embarrassingly awful Northern Californian crooks who could barely rob enough gas stations to stay afloat. And yet three years after forming her gang, she was walking toward the gas chamber, while citizens across the country clamored that it wasn’t right to execute a woman. (Become a Patreon supporter for rewards and bonus content! And here’s the slideshow of California’s death row inmates that I mention at the end of the episode…) Sources: All Juanita Spinelli coverage from The San Francisco Examiner, 1940-1941“Murder Ring in State Broken,” Santa Maria Times, 16 April 1940“Robbery-Gang Killing Explained,” The Los Angeles Times, 17 April 1940“Woman Seized as Murder Ring Head,” Leader-Telegram, 17 April 1940“Gang is Indicted in Sacramento For Slaying of Youth,” Reno Gazette-Journal, 23 April 1940“Aided Slayers to Save Child,” Muncie Evening Press, 25 May 1940“'Duchess’ Gang Aid Admits Throwing Victim Into River,” Oakland Tribune, 27 May 1940“A Woman Condemned to Die,” Lincoln News Messenger, 13 Feb 1941“‘The Duchess’ to Die for Gang Slaying,” The Press Democrat, 19 June 1941“Murderess Snatched from Death’s Shadow,” The Press Democrat, 20 June 1941“Death Awaits Mrs. Spinelli,” The Los Angeles Times, 20 Nov 1941“‘The Duchess’ Dies in Gas Chamber,” The Roseville Press, 21 Nov 1941“Many Pleas Made For Duchess’ Life,” Oakland Tribune, 21 Nov 1941“‘Duchess’ Quiet in Execution,” Santa Cruz Evening News, 21 Nov 1941“Aides to ‘Duchess’ Executed; Laugh and Pray at Finish,” The Los Angeles Times, 29 Nov 1941“These Interesting People,” Oakland Tribune, 4 Nov 1946 "Big Names from the Big House,” Santa Cruz Sentinel, 17 Dec 2000“The Death of a Duchess,” Daily News, 29 June 2003“Timeline: Capital Punishment in California,” Southern California Public Radio“California Death Penalty Suspended; 737 Inmates Get Stay of Execution,” New York Times, 12 March 2019“The most notorious inmates on California's death row,” SF Gate, 13 March 2019“These are the 737 inmates on California's death row,” LA Times, 13 March 2019 Music: “Guilty” by Richard A. Whiting, Harry Akst, and Gus Kahn, sung by Anna Telfer.“Me and the Blues,” sung by Mildred Bailey, from archive.org Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
In 1982, Kazuko Fukuda strangled her coworker, changed her name, and went on the run—for fifteen years. She was playing a game of chicken with the law, trying to stay free until the statute of limitations for her crime ran out. To do this, she had to go under the knife. (Become a Patreon supporter for rewards and bonus content!) Sources: Crime stats for Japan and the US: The Japanese Industrial System (De Gruyter Studies in Organization, 3rd Edition), Page 46, and “The U.S. Murder Rate Is Up But Still Far Below Its 1980 Peak,” FiveThirtyEight, 25 Sept 2017 “Staying Healthy in Japan: Jujin Hospital,” Tokyo Weekender,  20 May 1888 “A Modest Proposal for Capturing Fugitives,” The Japan Times, Aug 07, 1997 “Informant donates reward to charity,” The Japan Times, 24 Aug 1997 “After 14 years on run, murder suspect arrested,” The Japan Times, 30 Jul 1997  “Japanese police scramble to catch up with criminals,” The Washington Post, Tokyo, 13 September 1997 “Ex-fugitive admits killing,” The Japan Times, 28 Oct 1997 “Life term for ex-fugitive upheld,” The Japan Times, 14 Dec 2000 “The rules of hostessing,” Japan Today, 3 November 2009  “Japan: Statute of Limitations for Murder Abolished,” Global Legal Monitor, The Law Library of Congress, 21 May 2010  “Heisei flashback: Kazuko Fukuda, ‘The Woman of Seven Faces,’” Tokyo Reporter, 19 April 2019 Music: “Guilty” by Richard A. Whiting, Harry Akst, and Gus Kahn, sung by Anna Telfer.“Moon-kana – Tsuki Kinoko (Yaka-anima Slow Mix)” by Yaka-anima from Broken Doll (2018), used with permission from archive.org under license Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The victims of Jack the Ripper, the most famous serial killer in the world, are known to us mostly by their autopsy photos. On the conclusion to our WOMEN OF JACK THE RIPPER series, historian Hallie Rubenhold comes on the podcast to illuminate the rough and tragically brief lives of Mary Ann Nichols, Annie Chapman, Elisabeth Stride, Catherine Eddowes, and Mary Jane Kelly—the canonical five. Hallie is the author of The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper.  (Become a Patreon supporter for rewards and bonus content!) Sources: Interview with Hallie RubenholdThe Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper, by Hallie RubenholdDescriptions of the victims’ injuries are available in detail on casebook.org/victims/ Music: “Guilty” by Richard A. Whiting, Harry Akst, and Gus Kahn, sung by Anna Telfer.“Funeral March in C minor, Op. posth. 72 no. 2” by Frederick Chopin, used with permission from musopen.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
We remember Jack the Ripper as a man who did the brutal work of a typical male serial killer, de-feminizing his victims by hacking up their bodies. But in this two-part series, let’s take a look at the women who circle around the Ripper legend. First up, the admittedly controversial and kinda odd theory that perhaps Jack the Ripper is the wrong nickname for the killer—perhaps, some writers insist, we should have been looking for a Jill all along! This episode features an interview with Jonathan Menges of Casebook.org and the Rippercast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Victorian women were expected to be wives and mothers—not killers. Enter Adelaide Bartlett. In her middle-class Victorian world of green wallpaper, taxidermy, and submissive wifehood, the beautiful Adelaide was an enigma. Was she telling the truth about her husband’s weirdness? Was she really as good as she seemed? And most importantly: did she do it? (Become a Patreon supporter for rewards and bonus content!) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
In 1930s New York, a single man ruled the entire city with extortion, racketeering, and a healthy dose of murder. Nobody could take him down—until a black girl from Atlanta decided to try her hand at it. It was the match of the century: the lawyer, Eunice Hunton Carter vs. the mobster, Lucky Luciano. Only one of them would walk out of that courtroom unscathed.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Once upon a time, in 1930s Texas, a girl named Blanche fell desperately in love with a boy named Buck. She thought they had a shot at a good life together, but everything went off the rails one night when Buck’s brother and his brother’s girlfriend—Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker—showed up drunk at their door. Before long, Blanche was swept up in the on-the-run world of Bonnie and Clyde, terrified that their outlaw lifestyle would take her love away from her. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mama: Anne Hamilton-Byrne

Mama: Anne Hamilton-Byrne

2019-02-1301:04:41

In 1960s Melbourne, a lot of very wealthy people found themselves wondering if there was more to life, and wouldn’t you know, a gorgeous yoga teacher was there to tell them: yes, yes there is. But this yoga teacher with her warm, appealing aphorisms would soon become a voracious cult leader with a penchant for pretending like she was the best mama in the world. This is the story of Anne Hamilton-Byrne, a woman who wanted to be an actress and a mother, but ended up playing God on a purple throne, ruining the life of every child she touched. This episode features interviews with Chris Johnston and Rosie Jones, authors of "The Family." Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Comments (17)

Michael Casey

stumbled on this podcast and glad I did! Tori is what makes the show. She knows her stuff and is easy to listen to and genuine.

Nov 9th
Reply

RMS-2002

The music is TOO MUCH. Almost every time it comes on I want to turn the whole podcast off. It was too loud and played too often.

Oct 11th
Reply

Angie Berg

Your choice of music enhances your provocative narratives. Live your podcast more with each episode.

Jul 22nd
Reply (1)

Lisa Marie

BRAVO. Fantastic episode!

Jul 18th
Reply (1)

Lisa Marie

8:27

Jun 10th
Reply

Felicia DeLappi

Do you have merch? You need merch. Because I need a "Criminal Broads " mug to scare my co workers with. Hmmmm....

May 9th
Reply

Felicia DeLappi

Thank you! I look forward to this pod cast the most. Seriously.

May 9th
Reply

sheenat3

is anyone else hearing bad audio?

Apr 10th
Reply (2)

sheenat3

So good!

Mar 13th
Reply

Felicia DeLappi

I do want to be her friend!!

Jan 18th
Reply

Lucy Perry

I’ve loved this podcast! I just listened to the first episode and I’m hooked! She is such a good storyteller. If you are at all interested in crime or just wanna hear a good scary story, this is for you! I would totally recommend!

Jan 14th
Reply (1)

Strang3rDang3r

great podcast!! well put together and very interesting. as a true crime fan, it's an interesting change of pace to hear about women.

Oct 1st
Reply
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