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Cultivate your French - Slow French
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Cultivate your French - Slow French

Author: Laetitia Perraut

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Do you want to improve your listening skills and comprehension of the French as it is spoken in France?
You’re right, it’s very motivating to understand well when someone talks to you.
With Cultivate Your French podcast, things go smoothly.
First, I, Laetitia, read the text that I have chosen from One Thing in a French Day slowly, with clear articulation.
Then I read the text to you at a normal speed.
87 Episodes
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It’s a great thing to improve your understanding skills, you feel more confident and it’s almost the basic of a language. You understand what people tell you in French. Sometimes, we are so focused on understanding that we almost forget to improve our speaking. When you understand enough, you have to prepare yourself for the next step which is « talking in French ». Yes, talking! Never forget to talk, it’s important ! But, you have to be ready. To train yourself to your next visit to France, today’s episode and next week’s episode are about talking in French.  Today, you will buy some macarons. Yes, don’t you remember that you have to offer a box for your friend’s birthday? There is so much choice in the shop, which flavours are you going to choose?   Are you ready? You are in Paris, the pâtisserie is lovely, the window is full of colourful macarons.   First you are going to hear the dialogue between my friend Marilyne, who plays the seller, and myself, the customer.  Then, to make things more practical, you will also hear only the seller lines. With the other part of the dialogue left blank,you will be able to act as if you were the customer at the macaron shop! In the transcript, we study some sentences particularities and I challenge you to leave me an audio message, you ordering by phone in French some lovely macarons.  You are listening to Cultivate Your French podcast, ONE slow french episode every week.  My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I have also been running the podcast One Thing In A French Day since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photos is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com  
Last week, I paid a visit to my friend Pauline. She’s expecting her third child. It means that her husband and her need to create a third room in their house. They are going to turn the room, that is now her private room with her desk and where she does Pilates, into a child room. The first step that she told me about is to remove all the furnitures : a sofa, a desk, two bookcases.  Pauline lives in a house built in the beginning of the twentieth century. So in the room that we are talking about there are mouldings on the walls and  a wooden floor.  What are her projects for this room in terms of decoration? This is what you are going to hear in today’s episode.  You are listening to Cultivate Your French podcast, ONE slow french episode every week.  My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I have also been running the podcast One Thing In A French Day since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photos is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com
You know that there is a big construction site in front of our building. Last week-end some workers dismantled one of the tower cranes. It was crane number 3. There were 5 cranes on the site.  I was wondering how they would do this. I had imagined that maybe an helicopter could be involved. No, of course, they used another crane. I was able to witness all this show as it started early in the morning, before my kung-fu class.  Two men got on the jib of the crane to take apart the counterweights. It was breathtaking to watch!  I was surprised that it went so fast. A lorry was expecting down the crane and received the different parts.  The disappearition of this crane is the first sign that things are now different on the construction site. Another part of the story begins. This is what you are going to hear in today’s episode.  My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I have also been running the podcast One Thing In A French Day since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photos is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com    
This morning Lisa had an appointment with a cardiologist in the 17 th arrondissement. Nothing serious.  The 17 th is not far from our home. We walked to Pont de Levallois and took the métro there, line 3. This morning there was no barges on the Seine when we crossed the bridge. I love when there are péniches. it’s a little game that I invented : le jeu des péniches. If you see one, you win. if you don’t see any, you lose. Well, we lost this morning.  Lisa and I got off at Wagram station. We were early for the appointment, so we opened our eyes and watched what was around us. This is what you are going to hear in today’s episode.  My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I have also been running the podcast One Thing In A French Day since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photos is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com  
When the first lockdown ended in France, in May 2020, the government created the « coup de pouce », the little help if you prefer. It’s a financial help to encourage people to use their bike more often.  This period was incredible for the use of bikes in cites. New cycles lanes were created in a few days around Paris. We could see teams of workmen painting the yellow lines everywhere. Including in our neighbourhood.  Last week, a neighbour of mine, Bin, and a friend of mine, Maryam, both suggested that I use the « coup de pouce » for my bike. To benefit from this measure I called Fabrice, the repairman they both knew.  My appointment was this morning. Fabrice is a repairman that comes to your home. He has everything with him.  When we met, he happily told me that he would do his best to improve the brakes of my vintage Peugeot bike. This is where the episode starts today.  My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I have also been running the podcast One Thing In A French Day since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photos is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com  
This month, on One Thing In A French Day, I release every Monday an episode with Nathalie Iris, the bookseller that I met last year during lockdown. She tells us about books that she has enjoyed. If you don’t feel confident enough, these books might be a little bit difficult to read. The book I’m telling about in this episode is not difficult at all, I find it very interesting and it can be a tremendous help to improve your daily life vocabulary or your daily life sentences. It does not take place in France, but the writer is French and really sees things as a French person.  What books have you read in French? Why did you like them? I’m curious, please don’t hesitate to give some titles in the comments of my blogpost « I read books in French » at This month, on One Thing In A French Day, I release every Monday an episode with Nathalie Iris, the bookseller that I met last year during lockdown. She tells us about books that she has enjoyed. If you don’t feel confident enough, these books might be a little bit difficult to read. The book I’m telling about in this episode is not difficult at all, I find it very interesting and it can be a tremendous help to improve your daily life vocabulary or your daily life sentences. It does not take place in France, but the writer is French and really sees things as a French person.  What books have you read in French? Why did you like them? I’m curious, please don’t hesitate to give some titles in the comments of my blogpost « I read books in French » at www.cultivateyourfrench.com in the blog section.  My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I have also been running the podcast One Thing In A French Day since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photo is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com
In France, there is a franco-german TV channel. It’s called Arte. Everything is different on Arte. It’s a cultural and european channel.  A few weeks ago, the show En Thérapie started on Arte who produced the show with 2 famous filmmakers : Eric Toledano and Olivier Nakache . It’s an adaptation of an israelian TV show. And the title can be translated by « In treatment ». Each episode takes place on a different day of the week and is about the session of a character with Docteur Dayan, a psychiatrist. On Mondays, it’s Ariane. She’s a doctor and works at the hospital. The show starts right after the November 2015 Paris attacks.  The show has a tremendous success in France. Maybe because we all feel like we need to speak as life is so different these days. In today’s episode, I’m going to tell you about how the actress that plays Ariane showed up different times in my life this month.  My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I have also been running the podcast One Thing In A French Day since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photo is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com  
Sometimes, we get very good at understanding a language. It’s the beginning of something new, something very pleasant and rewarding. The ear catches whole sentences, we get good at understanding videos on the Internet, movies in French etc.   But sometimes, we set aside how to improve our speaking of that language. And I don’t think this is a good plan. So, as in last week episode, today the aim is that you train yourself to talk. I have recorded this dialogue between my friend Pauline and I. She tells me about the play her husband and her  had seen the day before. First you are going to hear the dialogue. Then, to make things more practical, you will also hear only my lines. With the other part of the dialogue left blank,you will be able to act as if you were Pauline telling me about your evening at the theater! You are listening to Cultivate Your French podcast, ONE slow french episode every week.  My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I have also been running the podcast One Thing In A French Day since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photos is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com
It’s a great thing to improve your understanding skills, this way you can be ready for the next step which is « talking in French ». Yes, talking! Never forget to talk, it’s important ! But, you have to be ready. To train yourself to your next visit to France, today’s episode and next week’s episode are about talking in French.  Today, you will come with me to the cheesemonger. Yes, don’t you remember what’s on your shopping list? Camembert, Beaufort and goat cheese. And you know that once inside the shop you might be tempted to buy something else too.  Are you ready? You are in Paris, queuing outside the little shop. Some customers go out and it’s your turn to go inside. It smells good!  First you are going to hear the dialogue between my friend Pauline, who plays the cheesemonger, and myself, the customer.  Then, to make things more practical, you will also hear only the cheesemonger lines. With the other part of the dialogue left blank,you will be able to act as if you were the customer at the fromagerie! You are listening to Cultivate Your French podcast, ONE slow french episode every week.  My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I have also been running the podcast One Thing In A French Day since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photos is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com
In January, I had the chance to meet a wine professional in Paris, his name is Benoît Melendez. He has a shop, L’extra brut. Does it give you any clue about the kind of wine he sells? yes? He sells wines, but particular ones : he sells Champagne and only Champagne! In this shop, which is also a « Bar à Champagne » you can drink Champagne at the bar with some food or buy a bottle to bring home. Of course, the « bar » is closed for the moment but the shop is opened. So on cold winter day, I walked from Saint-Lazare station to rue Condorcet, in South PIgalle, to meet Benoît Melendez. You have to imagine me in his shop, surrounded by nice bottles, seated on a bar stool made of wood, in front of a very smiling man who really loves his work.  So, in today’s episode, you are going to hear Benoît Melendez talking about Champagne!  Cultivate Your French podcast, ONE slow french episode every week.  My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I have also been running the podcast One Thing In A French Day since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photo is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com L’Extra Brut : 19 Rue Condorcet, 75009 Paris http://lextrabrut.com/  
My second daughter Felicia is in 4e; it’s the third year of collège. She is now thirteen years old. The 4e is not an easy grade. She works a lot so I have the impression that we never see her. Sometimes she appears to take a slice of kougelhopf for goûter. She seems to enjoy it then she looks at the clock and says that it’s time for her to go back to work. In today’s episode, you are going to hear more of Felicia’s appearances and disappearances and how we get clues of what she is studying.  You are listening to Cultivate Your French podcast, ONE slow french episode every week.  My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I also run the podcast One Thing In A French Day since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photo is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com  
My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I also run the podcast One Thing In A French Day since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photo is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com In December, I could not find my Carte Vitale when I needed it. The Carte Vitale allows to directly send by Internet a note of the expense that you had at a doctor, a dentist, etc to the Social Security. Then you get, directly on your bank account, a partial reimbursement of the expense. I couldn’t find mine, but I remembered that I had given it to Pietro when he had gone to the dentist with Felicia. No, he told me, I don’t have it, I gave it back to you when I came back.  So, my card was somewhere at home. My bigger worry was to have thrown it away by mistake. I told Pietro that it was his fault, because he had given it back to me not at a proper moment. Yes, I admit this was unfair! I tried not to worry to much. But one night, something happened… this is what you are going to hear in today’s episode.  
Dear listeners, I’m very happy to make this episode today.Last week, I had the opportunity to speak with the talented baker Thomas Paris at Boulangerie Montgolfière in the 17th arrondissement of Paris. He agreed to take time from his busy day to have a nice talk about the galette des rois, this wonderful cake that we eat in France to celebrate Epiphany. Thomas Paris explained me to me that to make a good a galette the first thing you need is a good puff pastry, une pâte feuilletée. To make one you need a good butter. Thomas Paris uses a butter from Charente Poitou its a butter with a flowery taste. The butter’s flavour is the common thread of the galette’s taste. He also uses a flour with no pesticides residues and that will allow the galette to keep its perfect circle shape. But there is another subtlety about his pâte feuilletée : it’s inverted puff pastry. Instead of putting the butter in the dough, it’s the dough that is put in the butter. Yes, very strange to imagine, but the butter used is a special one called « beurre manié », it contains flour.  Thomas Paris told me about the impression that you get when you take the first bite of galette des rois made with this type of dough. Then, I asked him how long it takes to make a galette… do you have any idea? This is what you are going to hear in today’s episode.    My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I also run the podcast One Thing In A French Day since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photo is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com  
The neighbourhood where we live is called « Bécon-les-Bruyères », it is situated at the intersection of three towns : Courbevoie, Asnières-sur-Seine and Bois-Colombes.  The train station of Bécon-les-bruyères was opened to the public in 1891 and then buildings started to appear around the station, as it happened in all the Parisian suburbs at that time. Even though, they were mainly buildings with flats to let, each of them had it own style! They are often rather colourful because bricks were often used in this period. Architects used to play with the different colours or finish of enameled bricks to draw patterns on the façade.  During the second lockdown, my friend Anne-Laure and I met every thursday for a walk in our neighbourhood.I had pulled out from my library the excellent book by Historian Pierre Mignot about Paris façades. We often started our walk at the station. Buildings from the same period can be so different. We also noticed the houses. It was important at that time to be close to the railway, close to modernity. There are a lot of very big and very nice houses near the railways. Each walk offered us some nice discoveries, this is what you are going to hear in today’s episode.  You are listening to Cultivate Your French podcast, ONE slow french episode every week.  My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I also run the podcast One Thing In A French Day since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photo is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com
Dear listeners of Cultivate Your French, I wish you a belle et heureuse année 2021! I wish you health, a curious mind, a lot of happiness and of course a lot of French in your life! I received as a Christmas present from my parents a kougelhopf baking tin. I really enjoy this enriched bread typical of the East of France (and other countries of Central Europe) because I ate some when I was a child. It had such a wonderful taste, the taste of kougelhopf.  During the holidays, I started to bake some and it has become Micaela and Felicia’s favourite breakfast. I baked two pieces at the same time and I kept them in a large metal tin.  Did my kougelhopf had that special taste? This is what you are going to hear in today’s episode.    My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I also run the podcast One Thing In A French Day since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photo is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com    
Saturday afternoon, Micaela and Pietro came back from their Panettone search with two nice traditional panettones. They also took our artificial Christmas tree that had been expecting us since last January in the cellar.  Felicia and Lisa were so happy to, « enfin », decorate the Christmas tree. It’s a tradition in our family to decorate the Christmas tree after Felicia’s birthday.  Maybe, we waited a little too long this year. The week had been very busy.  The girls took the different parts of the the tree out of the box and Micaela started to assemble them.  But something was going wrong. The branches would not stand as they should, they kept going down. I suggested that maybe it had been assembled the wrong way, but it hadn’t been, so we asked Pietro for help.  This is the Petit Conte de Noël that you are going to hear in today’s episode.  Have wonderful  « fêtes de fin d’année »! Cultivate Your French will be back on January the 6th.  All the information about the transcripts, notes and photo is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com  
All the information about the transcripts, notes and photo is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com Last Sunday, it was Felicia’s birthday. We had planned to see my parents and I had ordered a Paris-Brest at Stéphane Glacier’s pâtisserie. Stéphane Glacier is a MOF, Meilleur Ouvrier de France. The Paris-Brest is a cake that was created at the end of the 19th century by a pâtissier from Normandy to celebrate the cycle race between Paris and Brest in Brittany. It is made of pâte à choux which takes the shape of a bicycle wheel and stuffed with praline crème mousseline. It was the first time we had to organize ourselves with the strange circumstances. And there was something we hadn’t planned, this is what you are going to hear in today’s episode. 
You are listening to Cultivate Your French podcast, ONE slow french episode every week.  My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I also run the podcast OTH since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photo is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com A few days ago, on a cold and cloudy afternoon,I went to see my friend Pauline. She lives in a house at fifteen minutes walking from our home. We had planned to bake a chocolate soufflé together. This was the second time we met about making soufflés, but the first time it was at my home and we had cooked a cheese soufflé.  Pauline had chosen a recipe from Cyril Lignac. He is a famous chef in France, maybe the most famous, he owns a restaurant in Paris, and several pâtisseries. He’s often seen on TV, he takes part in TV shows about cooking or pâtisserie. Of course, he has written many cookbooks! He’s a very smiling man and he has a sweet south of France accent.  In today’s episode, you are going to hear Pauline and I in the kitchen. Unfortunately, you won’t be able to smell the warm chocolate aromas. 
  You are listening to Cultivate Your French podcast, ONE slow french episode every week.  My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I also run the podcast OTH since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photo is available at www.cultivateyourfrench.com You know that France has been placed on lockdown for a month now. The ambiance is very different than the first lockdown : people can go working, our children go to school. From our windows, life is almost normal. I can see the trains going to Paris, there are buses and cars on the road, there are people in the streets.  Last week, Emmanuel Macron, our president, made a live TV appearance to speak about the easing of lowdown in France. he annoucened that lockdown would be until december 15 th and he also announced changes in restrictions.  In this episode, I tell you about our new life under lockdown and my new favourite sentence. 
My name is Laetitia, I’m French, I live just outside Paris and I share with you a small slice of my daily life here in France. I also run the podcast OTH since 2006 All the information about the transcripts, notes and photo is available on www.cultivateyourfrench.com There is a building site outside our windows. It’s a large one. Three different office buildings are being built at the same time. There are 5 cranes and a lot of workers.  The earth-moving part happened this summer. It was really noisy. There were so many trucks one after another. The mechanical shovels also make a lot of noise. You don’t really understand why they are moving this pile of earth from there to there and suddenly everything is neat, straight and ready. We are not very happy with the idea of having buildings in front of us and no more landscape, but I must admit that I was very curious to follow the construction. I quickly realized that I was missing information. I didn’t know anything about this world of construction. I found  a book written by a sociologist. To write his book, This man had worked as a worker on different building sites in Paris. I’m still reading it. It’s very instructive! This world is tough. In this episode, i’m going to tell you about an incident I was witness to. Oh, by the way, chantierman means worker of course. Lisa invented this word and I rather like it! 
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