DiscoverCybersecurity and Technology - Audio
Cybersecurity and Technology - Audio
Claim Ownership

Cybersecurity and Technology - Audio

Author: Center for Strategic and International Studies

Subscribed: 1,322Played: 10,579
Share

Description

CSIS looks at how rapidly changing technology and cybersecurity are affecting the world in the twenty-first century. Issues covered include intelligence, surveillance, encryption, privacy, military technology, space, and more. Programs leading the research on this topic include the Technology Policy Program and the International Security Program.

Find the latest research from our scholars and CSIS events on this topic below.
142 Episodes
Reverse
Telecom technology is changing again, and it's more than the move to 5G.  How and when it changes will have a  major effect on key issues like Huawei's efforts to dominate the telecom market, supply chain diversity, and how your phone, car or factory connects to the internet.  New technologies will reshape the security debate and markets.  Please join us for an interactive discussion of  the policy and business implication of the future of 5G. Agenda8:45 am - Registration 9:00 am - IntroductionsJames A. LewisSenior Vice President & Director, CSIS Technology Policy Program 9:05 am - Moderated DiscussionChris BoyerAssistant Vice President of Global Public Policy, AT&TTravis RussellDirector of Cybersecurity, OracleStein LundbyHead of Corporate Technology Strategy, QualcommThierry MaupiléExecutive VP, Chief Strategy & Product ManagementModerated by James A. Lewis10:00 am - Audience Q&A10:30 am - EndThis event is made possible through general support to CSIS. 
The Yes TeamMartijn RasserSenior Fellow, Technology and National Security ProgramCenter for a New American SecurityDan David FounderWolfpack Research LLC vs. The No Team Paul TrioloPractice Head, Geo-TechnologyEurasia GroupErin EnnisSenior Vice PresidentUS-China Business Council In May 2019 the Trump administration took several steps aimed at limiting the business activities of Huawei because of national security concerns. The president issued an executive order banning the sale of Huawei products in the United States, expanding restrictions that were first applied to federal government agencies. Furthermore, the Commerce Department placed Huawei on its “Entities List,” banning American firms from supplying products and services to Huawei. Four days later, the Commerce Department issued a “Temporary General License” (TGL) allowing firms to provide support for previously concluded business. The TGL is set to expire on August 19. These steps represent not only a major adjustment in American treatment of Huawei and potentially American policy toward China, but also how the world should manage the increasingly fraught technology-national security nexus.  This event features a formal debate on the question, “Should the United States severely restrict Huawei’s business?” Arguing “yes” is the team of Martijn Rasser of the Center for a New American Security and Dan David of Wolfpack Research LLC. Arguing “no” is the team of Paul Triolo of the Eurasia Group and Erin Ennis from the US-China Business Council. CSIS’s Scott Kennedy will moderate the debate as well as the subsequent follow-up discussion with the participants and audience about the pros and cons of specific actions toward Huawei and the implications for US-China relations, American foreign policy, and the shape of the global economy. This event is made possible through general support to CSIS. 
Hacktivism – hacking for social change – has a rich history that started with a little-known group called the Cult of the Dead Cow. Jim Lewis talks with Joseph Menn, a renown cybersecurity reporter, to discuss his new book, Cult of the Dead Cow: How the Original Hacking Supergroup Might Just Save the World. They examine the legacy of some of the original cyber vigilantes, and new trends in the hacktivist community, from infiltrating spyware vendors to intelligence agencies.
Keynote Remarks Norman R. AugustineFormer Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Lockheed Martin; former Undersecretary of the Army; current member of advisory boards to the Department of Homeland Security and Department of EnergyIntroduced by Matthew P. Goodman Senior Vice President and Simon Chair in Political Economy, CSIS Followed by an expert panel discussion including: Mikko HuotariDeputy Director, Mercator Institute for China StudiesDr. Richard LesterAssociate Provost for International Activities, Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyHarvey RishikofDirector of Policy and Cyber Security Research and Visiting Research Professor at the University of Maryland Moderated by Stephanie SegalDeputy Director and Senior Fellow, Simon Chair in Political Economy, CSISOver the past year, the United States has introduced several new policy initiatives to limit foreign access to critical technologies, including tightening inbound investment screening procedures and expanding export controls on emerging and foundational technologies. At a Senate Intelligence Hearing on Worldwide Threats in February 2018, FBI Director Christopher Wray warned of other countries “exploiting the very open research and development environment” in the United States and counterintelligence risks from “nontraditional collectors, especially in the academic setting, whether it’s professors, scientists, students.” The United States is reevaluating its posture on foreign research collaboration. Various U.S. government agencies have increased scrutiny of researchers from sensitive countries while recent legislative proposals would restrict foreign students’ access to certain research projects. Policymakers have to evaluate the tensions between national security and an open and welcoming investment and innovation environment, as well as the degree to which such efforts should be coordinated with allies and partners. Notably, officials will have to decide whether to expand limits on research collaboration, while ensuring the United States remains the premier destination for top global talent. Please join the CSIS Simon Chair in Political Economy at 2:00pm on Tuesday, June 4, for keynote remarks by Norman R. Augustine, former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Lockheed Martin, former Undersecretary of the Army, and current member of advisory boards to the Department of Homeland Security and Department of Energy, followed by an expert panel discussion on balancing national security concerns with research competitiveness.This event is made possible through the generous support of member governments of the CSIS Allied Economic Forum.
Quantum computing has been an ethereal concept for years, but what is it really? China is investing heavily in its development, but is the United States really falling behind? Jim Lewis sits down with Michael Brett, CEO of QxBranch, to dispel some of the common myths about quantum computing. They discuss how the U.S. can harness quantum’s potential, and how to face current challenges to American innovation.
Managing New Style Warfare

Managing New Style Warfare

2019-05-1000:31:08

Host Jim Lewis interviews Keith Alexander, a retired four-star general who served as commander of the United States Cyber Command and director of the National Security Agency in the Bush and Obama administrations. Listen in to hear how General Alexander helped establish and structure U.S. Cyber Command. General Alexander talks about NSA modernization, the different responsibilities that the Department of Defense, Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the Department of Homeland Security have to address cybersecurity threats; the current threats in cyberspace; and the merits of persistent engagement.
Host Jim Lewis interviews Admiral Michael McConnell, former Director of the National Security Agency, and the second Director of National Intelligence. As head of the NSA during the early days of the internet, he helped set the path for how the U.S. intelligence community responded to the opportunities and risks of emerging digital technologies. They discuss how the nature of surveillance transformed with the emergence of the internet, how U.S. vulnerability to cyber threats has changed over time, and what needs to be done to confront the growing cyber threat posed by our nation’s adversaries.
What Keeps You Up At Night?

What Keeps You Up At Night?

2019-04-2600:30:41

Host Jim Lewis interviews Admiral Michael McConnell, former Director of the National Security Agency, and the second Director of National Intelligence. As head of the NSA during the early days of the internet, he helped set the path for how the U.S. intelligence community responded to the opportunities and risks of emerging digital technologies. They discuss how the nature of surveillance transformed with the emergence of the internet, how U.S. vulnerability to cyber threats has changed over time, and what needs to be done to confront the growing cyber threat posed by our nation’s adversaries.
Please join us for a public event on initiatives for securing the software supply chain on Wednesday, April 24, 2019 from 1:00-3:00 pm at the CSIS headquarters.Within the U.S. government, there is increasing awareness of and movement on the need for a coordinated strategy to prevent, identify, and respond to threats stemming from the software supply chain throughout the acquisition process. At this event, we will discuss some of the various initiatives, including the Department of Defense’s Deliver Uncompromised, along with work at the Carnegie Mellon, BSA | The Software Alliance, and the Department of Commerce, designed to minimize the risk of compromised software infiltrating critical systems. Opening Speech 1:00 pm - Registration 12:45 pm -  William Stephens,Director, Counterintelligence, Defense Security Service, Department of DefenseModerated Discussion 1:15 pm - Allan Friedman, Director of Cybersecurity Initiatives, National Telecommunications Information Administration Bob Metzger, Co-Author MITRE "Deliver Uncompromised"; Head of DC Office, Rogers Joseph O’Donnell, P.C.Tommy Ross, Senior Director, Privacy, BSA | The Software AllianceRoberta Stempfley, Director, CERT Division, Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering InstituteDerek Weeks, Vice President, Sonatype Inc. Moderated by James A. Lewis, SVP and Director, CSIS Technology Policy Program2:45 pm - Audience Q&A3:00 pm - EndThis event is made possible through general support to CSIS. 
In this episode Jim Lewis interviews William J. “Bill” Lynn, CEO of Leonardo DRS, a leading defense contractor, about his time as the Comptroller and Deputy Secretary of Defense. At the Department of Defense (DoD) he created a new kind of partnership between companies in the defense industrial base (DIB) through the DIB program and helped reorient DoD to treat cyber as a fifth domain.
loading
Comments 
loading
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store