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Democracy Paradox

Democracy Paradox

Author: Justin Kempf

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The Democracy Paradox explores the diverse range of perspectives and insights about democracy through an interview format. Every week new scholars are invited to share their breakthrough research or bold ideas about politics, economics, and society. Most interviews are stand alone episodes, but some are tied together like the three episode arc "Resistance, Revolution, Democracy" which explored the concept of civil resistance and revolution to produce democracies. These three interviews featured Erica Chenoweth, George Lawson, and Johnathan Pinckney. Listeners can also visit www.democracyparadox.com to read weekly reviews on classic works of politics, international relations, and philosophy. Democracy is a complex and nuanced concept. It challenges our preconceptions. Take the time to explore the Democracy Paradox.
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Up to today, since the Mexican government deployed the military in 2006 up to the present, Mexico has experienced close to 200,000 battle deaths. That's roughly the number of battle deaths that took place in the civil war in Guatemala. So, the 36 year old civil war in Guatemala that produced approximately 200,000 battle deaths. That's where Mexico is right now.Guillermo TrejoA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a brief primer on Mexican politics here.Guillermo Trejo is an Associate Professor at the University of Notre Dame. Sandra Ley is an Assistant Professor at CIDE’s Political Studies Division in Mexico City. They are the authors of Votes, Drugs, and Violence: The Political Logic of Criminal Wars in Mexico. Key Highlights IncludeA vivid description of the effects of the criminal wars in MexicoHow autocracy allows for the proliferation of organized crimeWhy Mexico remains an 'illiberal democracy'How polarization exacerbated criminal violence in MexicoThe importance of deeper degrees of democratizationKey LinksVotes, Drugs, and Violence: The Political Logic of Criminal Wars in Mexico by Guillermo Trejo and Sandra LeyFollow Guillermo Trejo on Twitter @Gtrejo29Follow Sandra Ley on Twitter @sjleygDemocracy Paradox PodcastMichael Miller on the Unexpected Paths to DemocratizationJames Loxton Explains Why Authoritarian Successor Parties Succeed in DemocraciesMore Episodes from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.comFollow on Twitter @DemParadoxFollow on Instagram @democracyparadoxpodcast100 Books on Democracy 
Chinese participation in the human rights regime probably was never really intended to alter human rights so much in China that it would jeopardize the Chinese Communist Party’s hold on power. I think China, even if it may have been open to some areas of human rights, I think that we have to keep in mind that the full implementation of human rights including all of the elements of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights would mean that political competition is allowed. And that's just not something I see the current Chinese regime allowing.Rana Siu InbodenA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a brief primer on the human rights regime here.Rana Siu Inboden  is a senior fellow with the Robert Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas–Austin. Her new book is China and the International Human Rights Regime: 1982-2017.Key Highlights IncludeWhat is the Human Rights RegimeChina's Participation in the Human Rights RegimeHow Tiananmen Changed China's View on Human RightsWhat is the Like Minded GroupHow China Views Human RightsKey LinksChina and the International Human Rights Regime: 1982-2017 by Rana Siu InbodenChina at the UN: Choking Civil Society by Rana Siu Inboden in Journal of DemocracyUnited Nations Human Rights CouncilRelated ContentMareike Ohlberg on the Global Influence of the Chinese Communist PartyXiaoyu Pu on China's Global IdentitiesMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.comFollow on Twitter @DemParadoxFollow on Instagram @democracyparadoxpodcast100 Books on Democracy
Putin in the past could claim to have won at least an honest plurality, if not an honest majority of votes given his approval. However, in the upcoming election this fall, in September, it looks like the Kremlin has so restricted political competition that it's going to be a difficult sell to the Russian public to show that these elections are even as legitimate as the elections held in 2016 or in 2011.Timothy FryeA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a brief primer on personalism here.Timothy Frye is a Professor of Post-Soviet Foreign Policy at Columbia University and a research director at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow.Key Highlights IncludeIs Putin's popularity real?Why Russia holds elections at allDescription of Russia as a personalist autocracyHow autocracy shapes Russia's foreign policyWhat are the prospects for democratization in RussiaKey LinksWeak Strongman: The Limits of Power in Putin's Russia by Timothy FryeRussia's Weak Strongman: The Perilous Bargains That Keep Putin in Power by Timothy Frye in Foreign AffairsFollow Timothy Frye on Twitter @timothymfryeRelated ContentKathryn Stoner on Russia's Economy, Politics, and Foreign PolicyFreedom House: Sarah Repucci Assesses Freedom in the WorldMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.comFollow on Twitter @DemParadoxFollow on Instagram @democracyparadoxpodcast100 Books on Democracy
Biden's current policy is, you know, we want Putin to calm down, be stable for awhile and turn our focus to restraining China. I don't think that's going to happen. That's not in his interest to do that. So, I think taking our eye off Russia, underestimating it, is the biggest concern for the U.S. currently.Kathryn StonerA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a brief primer on Russia here.Kathryn Stoner is a professor of political science at Stanford University. Her new book is Russia Resurrected: Its Power and Purpose in a New Global Order.Key Highlights IncludeA description of Russia's economyAn account of Russia's military reformsWhy Russia is in the Middle EastExplanation of Russia's foreign policyIs a resurrected Russia a danger to the West?Key LinksRussia Resurrected: Its Power and Purpose in a New Global Order by Kathryn StonerThe Freeman Spogli Institute For International StudiesFollow Kathryn Stoner on Twitter @kath_stonerRelated ContentTimothy Frye Says Putin is a Weak StrongmanBryn Rosenfeld on Middle Class Support for Dictators in Autocratic RegimesMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.comFollow on Twitter @DemParadoxFollow on Instagram @democracyparadoxpodcast100 Books on Democracy 
It was an era in which lawmakers and office holders learned that imprecision could actually work to their benefit to allow them to do what they wanted to because there was unclear codification in the law. And so yes, everybody talks about, we have to revise this law or get rid of this law or replace this law. But I want to say, it's not about that. It's about what constitutes a legitimately written, voted upon law. And I think that's something we still haven't countered since 9/11.Karen GreenbergA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a brief primer on the War on Terror here.Karen Greenberg is the director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law, a fellow at New America, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Her new book is Subtle Tools: The Dismantling of American Democracy from the War on Terror to Donald Trump.Key Highlights IncludeThe origin of the AUMF and the Department of Homeland SecurityKaren Greenberg describes the subtle toolsThe link between the War on Terror and President TrumpHow will history view the 2020 electionIs the United States an illiberal democracy?Key LinksSubtle Tools: The Dismantling of American Democracy from the War on Terror to Donald Trump by Karen GreenbergVital Interests Podcast with Karen GreenbergFollow Karen Greenberg on Twitter @KarenGreenberg3Related ContentCharles Kupchan on America's Tradition of IsolationismCan America Preserve Democracy without Retreating from it? Robert C. Lieberman on the Four ThreatsMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.comFollow on Twitter @DemParadoxFollow on Instagram @democracyparadoxpodcast100 Books on Democracy
Beginning in the 1990s, and then really picking up after 9/11, the United States overreached ideologically by thinking it could turn Iraq and Afghanistan into Ohio. It overreached economically by throwing open the nation's doors and saying the more trade, the better. And suddenly, I think, Americans said to themselves and to their leaders, ‘Wait a minute. Too much world, not enough America.'Charles KupchanA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a brief primer on Isolationism here.Charles Kupchan is a professor of international relations at Georgetown University and a Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. He is also the author of Isolationism: A History of America's Efforts to Shield Itself from the World.Key Highlights IncludeIsolationism's Place in America's National IdentityThe Relationship Between Isolationism and American ExceptionalismA Brief History of Isolationism in the United StatesSimilarities Between the Rise of China and the Early United StatesDonald Trump and the Reemergence of IsolationismKey LinksIsolationism: A History of America's Efforts to Shield Itself from the World by Charles KupchanLearn more about Charles Kupchan"The Home Front: Why an Internationalist Foreign Policy Needs a Stronger Domestic Foundation" an article by Charles Kupchan in Foreign AffairsRelated ContentJohn Ikenberry on Liberal InternationalismAlexander Cooley and Daniel Nexon on the End of American HegemonyMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.comFollow on Twitter @DemParadoxFollow on Instagram @democracyparadoxpodcast100 Books on Democracy
It's not just inequality of wealth. It is not just inequality of income, which is big. It's also inequality in terms of the geographical clustering of different strata of the population, of different people. It's inequality in life experiences. It's inequality in treatment. People felt mistreated by those in the upper echelons of society. So, it's not just money. It's also access to public goods, to certain spaces in the city, to education, unemployment benefits, and all sorts of things. But also, treatment.Aldo MadariagaA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a brief primer on Neoliberalism here.Aldo Madariaga is a Professor of Political Science at Universidad Diego Portales, and Associate Researcher at Center for Social Conflict and Cohesion Studies (COES). He is also the author of Neoliberal Resilience: Lessons in Democracy and Development from Latin America and Eastern Europe.Key Highlights IncludeAn Account of the Chilean Protests in 2019Description of Neoliberalism as a Political ProjectThe Role of the State in NeoliberalismHow does Neoliberalism Shield its Policies from DemocracyAre Neoliberal Policies Fundamentally Undemocratic?Key LinksNeoliberal Resilience: Lessons in Democracy and Development from Latin America and Eastern Europe by Aldo MadariagaLearn more about Aldo MadariagaFollow on Twitter @AldoMadariagaRelated ContentJames Loxton Explains Why Authoritarian Successor Parties Succeed in DemocraciesJacob Hacker and Paul Pierson on the Plutocratic Populism of the Republican PartyMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.comFollow on Twitter @DemParadoxFollow on Instagram @democracyparadoxpodcast100 Books on Democracy
I think this actually reflects why we've seen a coup now. Clearly, the coup has really brought serious economic devastation for the entire country and the military itself will also not benefit from this. And that to me is the key, because they're not primarily motivated just by economic incentives and spoils. As a systematic military institution, it is driven by their own identity. Their own perception of what the Myanmar modern nation state should look like.Roger Lee HuangA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a brief primer on Myanmar here.Roger Lee Huang is a lecturer in terrorism studies and political violence at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia and the author of The Paradox of Myanmar’s Regime Change.Key Highlights IncludeA brief history of modern Myanmar (Burma)Description of the TatmadawA portrait of Aung San Suu KyiWhy is the National League for Democracy (NLD) so popularWhat are the prospects for democracy in MyanmarKey LinksThe Paradox of Myanmar's Regime Change by Roger Lee HuangMyanmar’s Way to Genocide: The Rohingya Crisis in a Disciplined Democracy - Video Lecture by Roger Lee Huang"The Generals Strike Back" by Zoltan Barany from Journal of DemocracyRelated ContentMichael Miller on the Unexpected Paths to DemocratizationSebastian Strangio Explains the Relationship Between China and Southeast AsiaMore from the PodcastMyanmar: A Podcast PrimerMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at democracyparadoxblog@gmail.comFollow me on Twitter @DemParadox100 Books on Democracy
Americans are expected to take on debt, because that's how we're expected to finance everything from basic needs to a college education. And that's a function of economic policy making. That doesn't happen by accident.Mallory SoRelleA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com.Mallory SoRelle is an assistant professor of public policy at Duke University and the author of Democracy Declined: The Failed Politics of Consumer Financial Protection.Key Highlights IncludeHow the American economy depends on creditA brief history of consumer credit in AmericaDetails why consumer debt is a systemic problemWhy financial consumers do not politically mobilize Explains how public policy shapes political behaviorKey LinksDemocracy Declined: The Failed Politics of Consumer Financial Protection by Mallory SoRelleLearn more about Mallory SoRelleConsumer Financial Protection BureauRelated ContentSheryl WuDunn Paints a Picture of Poverty in America and Offers Hope for SolutionsJacob Hacker and Paul Pierson on the Plutocratic Populism of the Republican PartyMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at democracyparadoxblog@gmail.comFollow me on Twitter @DemParadox100 Books on Democracy
This was not a phenomenon to one specific region. This was nothing that got invented in one place and at one time. It seems to have emerged independently in a wide, wide variety of human societies at different points in time. And to me, that sounds like something that occurs naturally.David StasavageA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com.David Stasavage is the Dean of Social Sciences and a Professor of Politics at New York University. His latest book is called The Decline and Rise of Democracy.Key Highlights IncludeA description of early democracy with an example of the Huron peopleWhy autocracy arose through the example of Ancient ChinaHow bureaucracy and the state changed governanceHow English history shaped modern democracyWhat modern democracy can learn from early forms of democracyKey LinksThe Decline and Rise of Democracy by David StasavageLearn more about David StasavageFollow David on Twitter @stasavageRelated ContentDaniel Carpenter Revisits the Petition in 19th Century AmericaMichael Hughes on the History of Democracy in GermanyMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at democracyparadoxblog@gmail.comFollow me on Twitter @DemParadox100 Books on Democracy
The police is even acting directly against the minorities and the Delhi riots of 2020 showed that the police could be on their side in the street in their rioting activities. This is exactly the same in other BGP ruled states like Uttar Pradesh. Now you have indeed a kind of new shift, if you want. It's not only with the blessing of the state. It’s also with the active participation of the state.Christophe JaffrelotA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com.Christophe Jaffrelot is a director of research at Sciences Po and a professor of Indian politics and sociology at King’s College. His latest book is Modi's India: Hindu Nationalism and the Rise of Ethnic Democracy. Key Highlights IncludeDescription of Hindutva or Hindu NationalismA brief account of the RSSAn account of the Ayodhya Temple ControversyExplains how Narendra Modi came to powerProspects for the future of Indian democracyKey LinksModi's India: Hindu Nationalism and the Rise of Ethnic Democracy by Christophe Jaffrelot"Toward a Hindu State" by Christophe Jaffrelot in the Journal of DemocracyFollow Christophe on Twitter @jaffrelotcRelated ContentFreedom House: Sarah Repucci Assesses Freedom in the WorldKajri Jain Believes Democracy Unfolds through the AestheticMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at democracyparadoxblog@gmail.comFollow me on Twitter @DemParadox100 Books on Democracy
It really matters how you set up conflict and how you talk about the issue and above all how you talk about your adversary. That's where I see the decisive difference between those who tend to invoke the people, the common good and et cetera, in a way that is compatible with democracy and then those who talk in a way that, ultimately, is bound to be dangerous for democracy.Jan-Werner MüllerA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com.Jan is a professor of Social Sciences at Princeton University. He is the author of the books What is Populism? and Democracy Rules.Key Highlights IncludeWhat does it mean to be undemocratic in a democracyWhy populism threatens democracyRole of conflict in democracyWhat is militant democracy and is it democraticRole of the majority and opposition in democracy Key LinksDemocracy Rules by Jan-Werner MüllerWhat is Populism? by Jan-Werner Müller"False Flags" from Foreign Affairs by Jan-Werner MüllerRelated ContentChris Bickerton Defines TechnopopulismZizi Papacharissi Dreams of What Comes After DemocracyMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at democracyparadoxblog@gmail.comFollow me on Twitter @DemParadox100 Books on Democracy
They wanted the full array of rights. Political rights, yes, they were active in the suffrage movement, but they also wanted economic rights and social rights. They wanted to lessen inequalities. They also wanted the rights of mothers and of children advanced.Dorothy Sue CobbleA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com.Dorothy Sue Cobble is the Distinguished Professor of History and Labor Studies Emerita at Rutgers University and the author of For the Many: American Feminists and the Global Fight for Democratic Equality.Key Highlights IncludeDorothy explains who the full rights feminists were and what they advocated forProfiles of full rights feminists like Frances PerkinsHow full rights feminism influenced the New DealA brief history of the conflicts between full rights feminists and equal rights feminists over the Equal Rights AmendmentA profile of early Japanese feminist Tanaka TakaKey LinksFor the Many: American Feminists and the Global Fight for Democratic Equality by Dorothy Sue CobbleVisit Dorothy at www.dorothysuecobble.comLearn about the Triangle Shirtwaist Workers StrikeRelated ContentDerek W. Black Says Public Education Represents the Idea of America... Not its RealityBarbara Freese on Corporate DenialMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at democracyparadoxblog@gmail.comFollow me on Twitter @DemParadox100 Books on Democracy
Democracy is about more than elections. Election day is very important, but what is happening in the country every other day is an integral part to what a democracy is and if you think about the fundamental freedoms that we think of in our own democracy: free speech, freedom of religion, freedom of association and assembly, also things like the independence of the judiciary, these are all things that are on the civil liberties side.Sarah RepucciA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com.Sarah Repucci is the Vice President of Research and Analysis at Freedom House and coauthor (alongside  Amy Slipowitz) of the executive summary of the report Freedom in the World 2021: Democracy Under Siege.* Note * Sarah's mic died early in the interview. The audio quality is not bad, but will sound different. Hopefully it does not take away from the quality of the interview.Key Highlights IncludeWhy democracy continues its steady declineThe influence of China and the U.S. on global democracyThe role of civil liberties in democracyImpact of the pandemic on democracyDiscussion of democracy in India, Kyrgyzstan, Sudan, and the United StatesKey LinksRead the landmark report from Freedom House Freedom in the World 2021: Democracy Under SiegeVisit Freedom House online at www.freedomhouse.orgFollow Freedom House on Twitter @freedomhouseRelated ContentMichael Miller on the Unexpected Paths to DemocratizationThomas Carothers and Andrew O'Donohue are Worried About Severe PolarizationMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at democracyparadoxblog@gmail.comFollow me on Twitter @DemParadox100 Books on Democracy
So many cases of democratization start with these episodes and this period of elite political violence where the initial stages of it have nothing to do with democratization. People are not aiming for that. People are barely even thinking about it. It's all about this elite political struggle and out of that chaos a bit later you get democracy.Michael MillerA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com.Michael Miller is a professor of political science and international relations at George Washington University and the author of the forthcoming book Shock to the System: Coups, Elections, and War on the Road to Democratization. Key Highlights IncludeHow violent shocks like coups and civil wars create openings for democratizationWhy autocratic ruling parties continue to win elections in democraciesThe role for democratic activists in the democratization processDiscussions on possibilities for democracy in China, Belarus, and Myanmar.Mike offers a blueprint for an unconventional approach for democracy promotion Key LinksShock to the System: Coups, Elections, and War on the Road to Democratization by Michael K. MillerFollow Michael on Twitter @mkmdemLearn more about Michael's workRelated ContentJames Loxton Explains Why Authoritarian Successor Parties Succeed in DemocraciesElizabeth Nugent on Polarization, Democratization and the Arab SpringMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at democracyparadoxblog@gmail.comFollow me on Twitter @DemParadox100 Books on Democracy
The idea of a political system is not simply to be efficient. It's to have justice. It's to have the idea that anybody can come to the seat of power and say, 'Here are my grievances,' and that doesn't mean that by making that claim, they will get exactly what they want. But it does mean that they will get a hearing and in that notion, I think, lies again, a certain part of democracy that is not reduceable just to elections.Daniel CarpenterA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com.Dan Carpenter is the Allie S. Freed professor of Government at Harvard University and the author of Democracy by Petition: Popular Politics in Transformation, 1790-1870.Key Highlights IncludeA history of petitions in the 19th century including an account of the gag rule.The role of petitions in the mobilization of women, Native Americans, the Whig Party, and the antislavery movementHow did petitions contribute to democratization of America in the 19th centuryWhat would Congress look like if we still had 'petition days'What can we learn from the era of petition politicsKey LinksDemocracy by Petition: Popular Politics in Transformation, 1790-1870 by Daniel Carpenter"The Menthol Cigarette Ban Shows There Is No Democracy Without Petitions," by Daniel Carpenter, Boston Review"Robust Claims of Vast Lawlessness" from Lapham's Quarterly by Daniel CarpenterRelated ContentCan America Preserve Democracy without Retreating from it? Robert C. Lieberman on the Four ThreatsDerek W. Black Says Public Education Represents the Idea of America... Not its RealityMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicOut of Order from the German Marshall FundEmail the show at democracyparadoxblog@gmail.comFollow me on Twitter @DemParadox100 Books on Democracy
The experience of Western colonization has imprinted all of these nations in profound ways and it's tended to inculcate a sort of skepticism about Western invocations of democracy and the rule of law. China, of course, shares a similar skepticism. China was also not formerly colonized, or not fully colonized by Western powers, but it experienced what the Chinese communist party likes to term a century of humiliation.  And so, both regions share an abiding ambivalence about the current international order.Sebastian StrangioA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com.Sebastian Strangio is the Southeast Asia Editor at The Diplomat and the author of In the Dragon's Shadow: Southeast Asia in the Chinese Century.Key Highlights IncludeSebastian explains the economic, political, and cultural ties between China and Southeast AsiaAn overview of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN)An explanation of the South China Sea disputeDistinguishes between maritime and mainland nations in Southeast AsiaChina's approach to Southeast Asia under Xi JinpingKey LinksIn the Dragon's Shadow: Southeast Asia in the Chinese Century by Sebastian Strangiowww.thediplomat.comwww.sebastianstrangio.comRelated ContentMareike Ohlberg on the Global Influence of the Chinese Communist PartyXiaoyu Pu on China's Global IdentitiesMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicOn Opinion: The Parlia PodcastEmail the show at democracyparadoxblog@gmail.comFollow me on Twitter @DemParadox100 Books on Democracy
Racism and racial conflict are always there, always a powerful and important part of American politics. But when they combine with polarization, with this kind of partisan antagonism, and when that becomes the dividing line between the parties, that's really dangerous. That's what happened in the 1850s. It led to civil war. That's what happened in the 1890s. It led to violent conflict and mass disenfranchisement. And it's happening again today.Robert C. LiebermanA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com.Key Highlights IncludeAn account of the 1898 insurrection in Wilmington, North Carolina.Is polarization the fault of both sides or is one party responsible?How the election of 1896 affected American democracy.How polarization, conflicts over who belongs, rising economic inequality, and executive aggrandizement interact to threaten democracy in the United States.Does the preservation of democracy really require democratic backsliding?Robert Lieberman is a professor of political science at Johns Hopkins University and  coauthored Four Threats: The Recurring Crises of American Democracy with Suzanne Mettler.Key LinksFour Threats: The Recurring Crises of American Democracy by Robert C. Lieberman and Suzanne Mettler"Together, You Can Redeem the Soul of Our Nation" by John Lewis in The New York TimesFollow Rob Lieberman on Twitter @r_liebermanRelated ContentDerek W. Black Says Public Education Represents the Idea of America... Not its RealityJacob Hacker and Paul Pierson on the Plutocratic Populism of the Republican PartyMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicThe Science of PoliticsEmail the show at democracyparadoxblog@gmail.comFollow me on Twitter @DemParadox100 Books on Democracy
In the 19th century Europe had thought that they had moved towards liberalism, enlightenment, rationality, progress, that stuff like mass warfare was over and it wouldn't come back. And then you have four years of senseless, mass slaughter, they just totally destroyed or challenged those ideas of humankind getting better off, progress of humankind getting more civilized. In retrospect, it's hard to imagine the coincidence of deep challenges and crises that wrecked the interwar years.Kurt WeylandA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com.Key Highlights IncludeKurt clarifies the concept of totalitarian fascism from conservative authoritarianismA description of the political environment of the interwar periodWhy did authoritarians disliked communism and fascism?Why did fascism emerge during this period?Is there a parallel between the interwar period to today?Kurt Weyland is a professor of political science at the University of Texas at Austin and the author of the new book Assault on Democracy: Communism, Fascism, and Authoritarianism During the Interwar Years. Key LinksAssault on Democracy: Communism, Fascism, and Authoritarianism During the Interwar Years by Kurt Weyland"The Real Lessons of the Interwar Years" by Agnes Cornell, Jørgen Møller, Svend-Erik Skaaning in Journal of Democracy, July 2017Problems of Democratic Transition and Consolidation by Juan J. Linz and Alfred StepanRelated ContentAgnes Cornell and Svend-Erik Skaaning on the Interwar PeriodPaul Robinson on Russian ConservatismMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicAnother Way PodcastEmail the show at democracyparadoxblog@gmail.comFollow me on Twitter @DemParadox100 Books on Democracy
They really view their history as one of victimization, one of struggle and even martyrdom. ARENA had multiple leaders assassinated. Again, that version of history that I just told you, that's not necessarily my view. But I do actually believe that that is their sincere belief and it makes for a really compelling founding myth if you will. And I think that founding myth has helped to hold both parties together right up until the present day.James LoxtonA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com.Key Highlights IncludeWhy do voters elect leaders with ties to former dictators?Description of authoritarian successor partiesChallenges for conservative party formationA brief history of the UDI in Chile and ARENA in El SalvadorThe role of counterrevolutionary struggleKey LinksConservative Party-Building in Latin America: Authoritarian Inheritance and Counterrevolutionary Struggle by James Loxton"Authoritarian Successor Parties" by James Loxton in Journal of Democracy, July 2015Visit James at www.jamesloxton.netRelated ContentBryn Rosenfeld on Middle Class Support for Dictators in Autocratic RegimesAmy Erica Smith on Politics and Religion in BrazilMore from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicDemocracy Matters PodcastEmail the show at democracyparadoxblog@gmail.comFollow me on Twitter @DemParadox100 Books on Democracy
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ncooty

The host would benefit from dropping his faux-shocked tone as a form of compliment, his use of quasi-laughs, and his excessive use of "but" as a transition. Personally, I'd also rather he speak normally rather than slowly whisperising like a hypnotist. (It doesn't sound deep to me.)

Sep 9th
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