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Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny
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Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny

Author: Policy Forum

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Mark Kenny takes a twice-weekly look at politics and public affairs with expert analysis and discussion from researchers at The Australian National University and beyond.

143 Episodes
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On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Peter Martin joins Mark Kenny to discuss why the COVID-19 recession has presented Treasurer Josh Frydenberg with the chance to permanently reduce unemployment. Is it possible for Australia to permanently lower its unemployment rate to around 3.5 per cent? What can policymakers learn from the last recession, after which the country was able to dramatically reduce inflation? And how bold is Treasurer Josh Frydenberg willing to be in pursuit of what could be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity? On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation Peter Martin and Professor Mark Kenny discuss unemployment and the Australian economy in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis. Peter Martin AM is a Visiting Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University (ANU) and the Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation. Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Quentin Grafton and Sharon Friel join Mark Kenny to discuss Australia’s vaccine rollout and dealing with the country’s ongoing healthcare challenges. While the COVID-19 vaccines approved in Australia are safe, will the government’s current plan provide the necessary herd immunity to allow borders to open? What public health policies will likely have to remain even after the vaccination rollout? And how can governments ensure there is greater equity in Australia’s approach to healthcare in the future? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, economist Professor Quentin Grafton and health equity and governance expert Professor Sharon Friel join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss Australia’s vaccine plan and ensuring the long-term health of the population. Sharon Friel is Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) at The Australian National University. She was Director of RegNet from 2014 to 2019. Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics at Crawford School, UNESCO Chair in Water Economics and Transboundary Water Governance, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum. Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Liz Allen joins us to discuss social security, living with scarcity, and whether Australia needs a reset in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis. What impact does the ‘othering’ of people experiencing disadvantage have on Australia’s most vulnerable citizens? Why does Australians’ postcode have such an impact on their health outcomes? And what demographic changes is the COVID-19 pandemic bringing about around the world? On this week’s Democracy Sausage Extra, Dr Liz Allen (Dr Demography herself!) joins us to take a very personal look at living with scarcity, plus the future of Australian society. Liz Allen is a demographer and social researcher with quantitative and qualitative expertise at The Australian National University (ANU) and author of The Future of Us: Demography gets a makeover. Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Unfriending Australia

Unfriending Australia

2021-02-2343:08

Last week Australians woke up to a bizarre state of affairs - Facebook without any news. On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Shirley Leitch and Paul Pickering from ANU Australian Studies Institute join Mark Kenny to discuss the stoush between Facebook and the government. What does Facebook’s decision to restrict the ability of its users to post and read news in Australia mean for ordinary people and their participation in public debate? Is this a case of Australians being stuck in the middle of a stoush between media giants? And what is the end game for Facebook and the government? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these issues on this episode of Democracy Sausage are Emeritus Professor Shirley Leitch and Professor Paul Pickering from ANU Australian Studies Institute.  Shirley Leitch is Emeritus Professor and a Professorial Fellow at The Australian National University (ANU) Australian Studies Institute. She was formerly Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education & Global Education at ANU, and Dean at the ANU College of Business and Economics. Paul Pickering is a Professor and Director of ANU Australian Studies Institute. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this episode of Democracy Sausage, political historian Frank Bongiorno joins Mark Kenny to discuss whether it is Trumpism that has undermined Australian politics or whether Australia’s problems are primarily of its own making. Has Trumpism been the cause of a decline in Australian ministerial responsibility or has this degradation been a result of a longer-term trend? Are Australian political leaders a product of the Trump era, or do some just strategically employ Trump-like tactics? And has anyone found the ‘weatherboard nine’? On the new episode of Democracy Sausage, Head of ANU School of History Professor Frank Bongiorno joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss ministerial accountability, political leadership, and the influence of Trumpism in Australia. Frank Bongiorno AM is the Head of the School of History and Professor at The Australian National University (ANU). He is an Australian labour, political, and cultural historian. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny discusses the state of Australia’s university sector with education policy expert Andrew Norton, head of Australia’s science and technology peak body Misha Schubert, and the father of Australia’s HECS system Bruce Chapman. While universities had a very tough 2020, what does the continued closure of international borders mean for the future of the sector? Will the government’s plan to produce more ‘job-ready’ graduates achieve the intended result? And with the importance of cooperation between the researchers and policymakers highlighted during the pandemic, can universities and governments work more closely together to address the other major challenges facing Australia and the world? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny is joined by an expert panel to discuss the challenges facing Australia’s university sector in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Andrew Norton is an Australian author and Professor in the practice of higher education policy at the Centre for Social Research and Methods at The Australian National University. Misha Schubert is Chief Executive Officer of Science and Technology Australia - the nation’s peak body for the science and technology sectors - and Visiting Fellow at the Australian National Centre for the Public Awareness of Science at ANU. Bruce Chapman AM is a Professor and economist at The Australian National University. He has extensive experience in public policy, including the motivation and design of the Higher Education Contribution Scheme - the first national income contingent loan scheme using the income tax system for collection - in 1989. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Jennifer Hunt joins Mark Kenny to discuss the Senate trial of former President Donald Trump, the future of the Republican Party, and whether President Biden’s new cabinet is a case of ‘back to the future’. He is the only president to be impeached twice, but will Donald Trump be held to account in the wake of the riots at the Capitol building on 6 January? Will the Republican Party change course now Trump has been voted out of office? And will the new Biden administration be able to govern effectively in a fractious political environment? On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Dr Jennifer Hunt joins Professor Mark Kenny in the Crawford School studio to discuss the tenuous status of democracy in the United States. Jennifer Hunt is a research associate at the US Studies Centre and recently been appointed to the Macquarie University Department of Security Studies and Criminology. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Australian policymakers may have dealt with the COVID-19 pandemic effectively so far, but can they heed the lessons of this crisis in order to be ready for those still to come? Joining Mark Kenny on this episode of Democracy Sausage to discuss public policy in the wake of the pandemic are Helen Sullivan and Warwick McKibbin. Australia has managed the joint health and economic crises brought on by COVID-19 better than most countries. But with the pandemic far from over and the damages of climate change becoming increasingly obvious, can Australian policymakers translate this short-term success across to the long-term challenges they have thus far failed to address? What price are the Australian people paying for policy uncertainty, particularly in regards to climate and energy policy? And does the country need a new macroeconomic framework if it hopes to be properly prepared for a post-pandemic world? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, ANU Crawford School of Public Policy’s Professor Helen Sullivan and Professor Warwick McKibbin AO join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss public policy-making in the ‘new normal’. Helen Sullivan is Director of Crawford School of Public Policy. She has published widely on public policy, public governance and public service reform, and in 2013 established the Melbourne School of Government. Warwick McKibbin AO is the Director of the Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis in the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny is joined by infectious diseases expert Sanjaya Senanayake to discuss what we’ve learned about the disease. The COVID-19 pandemic caused over two million deaths worldwide and turned life on its head for billions more. While pandemics aren’t a new phenomenon, many governments were unprepared for the severity and scale of this new virus. So what have health experts and policymakers learned over the last year? What remains uncertain? And what impact will this crisis have on how the world prepares for the next pandemic? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Associate Professor Sanjaya Senanayake from The Australian National University (ANU) joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these questions and more. Sanjaya Senanayake is an Infectious Diseases Physician at Canberra Hospital and Associate Professor at ANU Medical School. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this Democracy Sausage, former Liberal Party leader John Hewson, health and policy expert Arnagretta Hunter, and physicist Kenneth Baldwin join us to discuss the need for political leadership and better policy to strengthen Australia’s efforts to tackle climate change. Despite the impacts of climate change becoming increasingly real for many Australians in the wake of the Black Summer, the country still lags behind many others on international commitments to reduce carbon emissions. While the shift to renewables is happening anyway, would it be happening faster and cheaper if the country had put in place better policies in recent years? What does the Labor Party’s shadow cabinet reshuffle mean for their stance on climate change? And what impact might the new Biden administration in the United States have on Australia’s willingness to make stronger climate commitments on the international stage? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny is joined by former Federal Opposition Leader Professor John Hewson, ANU Energy Change Institute Director Professor Kenneth Baldwin, and health and public policy expert Dr Arnagretta Hunter. Kenneth Baldwin is Director of the Energy Change Institute at The Australian National University. John Hewson AM is an Honorary Professorial Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy. He is an economic and financial expert with experience in academia, business, government, media, and the financial system. Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On the first episode of Democracy Sausage for 2021, journalist and author Stan Grant joins Mark Kenny to discuss whether President Joe Biden can address the serious challenges facing the United States, plus the trajectory of the Australia Day debate. It was meant to be a reset, but will 2021 actually be a year of reckoning in the United States, with the country struggling to address its deep divisions? Can Biden do what his predecessors couldn’t (or wouldn’t) and tackle entrenched inequalities? And is a change to the date of Australia Day now inevitable? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Stan Grant joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss what changes the new year might bring in the United States, plus continuity and change in Australia’s national identity. Stan Grant is the Vice Chancellor's Chair of Australian-Indigenous Belonging at Charles Sturt University and the ABC's International Affairs Analyst. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Dust off the tuxedo, bring out the ballgowns, and prepare your lengthy speeches. In the final Democracy Sausage for 2020, we reveal the winners of our first Annual Awards. Who were the big winners, and the biggest losers, of 2020? Our panel rip open envelopes and reveal all. Who performed the biggest political backflip of the year? What was the most risible explanation for a government failure? And what has been 2020’s maddest moment (outside of the Trump presidency)? They are all hotly-contested categories in what has been a memorable and testing year. But on the final Democracy Sausage Extra for 2020, our panel – Professor Mark Kenny, Dr Marija Taflaga, and Professor Frank Bongiorno - reveal the nominees and winners of the first – and possibly last – Annual Democracy Sausage Awards. Frank Bongiorno AM is the Head of the School of History and Professor at The Australian National University (ANU). He is an Australian labour, political and cultural historian. Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Can democracy be mended?

Can democracy be mended?

2020-12-1401:00:00

Politics and policymaking can feel very distant from people’s everyday lives, and that disconnection can make individuals and communities feel powerless. So how are people helping to bridge this chasm and put the personal back into policy? From the community push to get an independent elected in the Victorian seat of Indi, to the knitting nannas of northern New South Wales challenging coal seam gas, citizens are finding new ways of connecting community to policy challenges. Are there lessons in these cases that could be scaled up and rolled out for other communities, and to tackle other challenges? Joining Professor Mark Kenny and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga are two of the authors of the new book Mending Democracy, Associate Professor Carolyn Hendriks and Dr Selen Ercan. Carolyn Hendriks is Associate Professor of Public Policy and Governance at Crawford School of Public Policy. Selen Ercan is Associate Professor at the Centre for Deliberative Democracy and Global Governance at University of Canberra. Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Ian Dunt - host of the Oh God, What Now? podcast and author of How to be a liberal - joins Mark Kenny to discuss the history of liberal thought, how it has shaped present day politics, and the origins of the ‘culture wars’. Have the culture wars emerged out of the failures of liberalism? Why haven’t contemporary political actors done more to protect people from prejudice and the tyranny of the majority? And is liberalism a natural corollary to democracy? On this Democracy Sausage Extra, author, political journalist and broadcaster Ian Dunt joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss the history of political thought, present day politics, and liberalism’s trajectory. Ian Dunt is a British author, political journalist and broadcaster. He is the Editor of Politics.co.uk and a host on the Oh God, What Now? podcast. His most recent book, How To Be A Liberal, was published in September 2020. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Australia’s relationship with China continues to deteriorate, whether that’s through inflammatory tweets or trade troubles. And while there may be bipartisan support for Morrison’s response to the latest Twitter provocation, what is the government’s end game in its relationship with China? Australia’s relationship with China has been spiralling downwards, seemingly hitting new lows each week. So what are the strategies at play, and can the tensions be dialled back? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these questions and more are China experts Professor Jane Golley and Yun Jiang, as well as regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga. Yun Jiang is a researcher at The Australian National University (ANU) Australian Centre on China in World and Co-Editor of China Neican, a newsletter that decodes China issues with concise, timely, and policy-focused analysis. Jane Golley is an economist, Professor at ANU, and Director of ANU Australian Centre on China in the World. Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. The 2020 Australian Centre China in the World Annual Lecture, 'Five Eyes, One Tongue and Hard of Hearing – Australia and Asia in China’s Century' by Professor Louise Edwards, is available here [https://youtu.be/s-sJzi7gtrI]. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What has 2020 taught us about Australia’s political leadership? From the devastating bushfires that affected so many in the early part of the year, to the states leading the charge on border closures to tackle the coronavirus, this year has seen dramatic challenges and some difficult choices from the country’s leaders. Insiders host David Speers joins Mark Kenny to take a look back at the year in politics. What started as a bad year for Prime Minister Scott Morrison – marked down by a poor bushfire response and ill-judged comments about going to the footy during a pandemic – seems to be ending on a high note, with stronger than expected economic growth and a virus largely under control. But he’s not been the only leader learning on the job – with Victorian Premier Dan Andrews and opposition leader Anthony Albanese also having testing years. In this special Democracy Sausage Extra, Professor Mark Kenny is joined by Insiders host David Speers to run the rule over the performance of Australia’s leaders in a difficult year. David Speers is an Australian journalist. He has been the host of PM Agenda, The Last Word, and Speers, and is currently host of ABC’s Insiders. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
John Kerry being appointed as President-elect Joe Biden’s special climate envoy has the potential to encourage much stronger action by the world’s nations to tackle climate change. But it comes at a time when the great powers of the US, China, and Russia are at loggerheads on a wide variety of issues. So how will the global climate change, and what does this mean for Australia? President-elect Joe Biden’s win in the US election, and his appointment of John Kerry as his special climate envoy, could finally shift global action to tackling climate change more assertively. But can the world come together to tackle this emergency even as its great powers divide on issues such as trade and the coronavirus? And where does this rapidly changing global environment leave Australia? On this Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny is joined by Professor John Blaxland and Dr Siobhan McDonnell to talk climate change, the history of disaster in Afghanistan, great power contestation, whether Australia can rise above its climate wars, and more. Siobhan McDonnell is a legal anthropologist with over 20 years of experience working with Indigenous people in Australia and the Pacific on land use, gender, and climate change. She is a Senior Lecturer at Crawford School of Public Policy, and the lead negotiator on climate change for the Vanuatu government. John Blaxland is Professor of International Security and Intelligence Studies and former Head of the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at the Australian National University (ANU). Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this Democracy Sausage Extra, award-winning journalist and author Malcolm Knox joins Mark Kenny to discuss the saga of Israel Folau - former star rugby union player sacked for sharing anti-LGBTQ views on social media - and how free speech got so complicated. The sacking of former star player Israel Folau by Rugby Australia for his comments on social media once again revealed faultlines which had recently been laid bare during Australia’s marriage equality plebiscite. So what did the saga reveal about freedom of expression in Australia? What is the significance of groups like the Australian Christian Lobby in Australia’s public discourse? And, with ‘free speech’ very much a political battleground, what might the future hold? On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Professor Mark Kenny speaks with Australian journalist and author Malcolm Knox about the Israel Folau issue, Australia’s evangelical movement, and the ‘culture wars’. This episode was recorded live as part of the ANU/Canberra Times ‘Meet the Author’ series. Malcolm Knox is the former literary editor and an award-winning journalist at The Sydney Morning Herald. Malcolm is the winner of three Walkley Awards. His novels include A Private Man, winner of the Ned Kelly Award, The Life, The Wonder Lover, and Bluebird. His most recent book is Truth Is Trouble: The Strange Case of Israel Folau, Or How Free Speech Became So Complicated. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A study released last week looked at the true numbers of COVID-19 infections based on mortality rates. In doing so, it painted a grim picture for a number of countries including the United Kingdom. On this Democracy Sausage, we hear from one of the authors of that report, Professor Quentin Grafton. Australia may have the coronavirus largely under control for now, but elsewhere in the world countries are still suffering staggeringly high numbers of infections and deaths. But a study published last week ‘backcasted’ true rates of infections based on mortality. In doing so, it found infection rates in some countries far higher than official statistics suggest: in the UK the study suggested infection rates are 16 times higher than the published numbers. On this Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny is joined by regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga and one of the authors of the report, Professor Quentin Grafton. The panel talk about Europe and the US’ COVID-19 challenge, Australia’s response, and Quentin makes his pitch to Netflix for a new documentary called The Clown. Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics, Australian Laureate Fellow, Convenor of the Water Justice Hub, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy. He is also chairholder of the UNESCO Chair in Water Economics and Transboundary Water Governance and Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum. Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The best bits

The best bits

2020-11-1801:01:34

From Brexit Britain to Trump’s obsession with the stock market, and from era-defining infections to ideology vs interests, this week on Democracy Sausage Extra we look back over some of our favourite bits of the podcast from the last 18 months. Why do some Brits have a ‘yearning for chaos’? Is it really ideology that drives government spending decisions? What do Donald Trump and stock market ‘day traders’ have in common? And how has disease defined human progress? These questions and many many more are answered on this week’s very special Democracy Sausage Extra. With Mark Kenny away, Martyn Pearce takes charge of the barbecue tongs as we take a look back at some of our favourite interviews over the last 18 months of The Sausage. Kieran Gilbert is Chief News Anchor for Sky News, co-anchor of First Edition and anchor of AM Agenda on Sky News Live. David Speers is an Australian journalist and outgoing Political Editor at Sky News Australia. He has been the host of PM Agenda, The Last Word, and Speers. Beginning in 2020, he now hosts ABC’s Insiders. Brian Schmidt AC is Vice-Chancellor and President of The Australian National University. He was awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics. Liz Allen is a demographer and social researcher with quantitative and qualitative expertise at The Australian National University and author of The Future of Us: Demography gets a makeover. Stan Grant is the Vice Chancellor’s Chair of Australian/Indigenous Belonging at Charles Sturt University. He was formerly ABC’s Global Affairs and Indigenous Affairs Analyst. Jim Chalmers has been the the Shadow Treasurer since 2019 and the Member for Rankin in the Australian Parliament since 2013. Richard Denniss is Chief Economist and former Executive Director of The Australia Institute. He is a prominent Australian economist, author and public policy commentator, and former Associate Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy. Ros Taylor is Research Manager for the LSE Truth, Trust & Technology Commission and Managing Editor of the LSE Brexit blog. Bevan Shields is Europe Correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. He was previously Federal Editor and Canberra Bureau Chief. Fintan O’Toole is one of Ireland’s leading political and cultural commentators. He is a columnist and writer for The Irish Times, the 2017 winner of both the European Press Prize and the Orwell Prize, and author of Heroic Failure: Brexit and the Politics of Pain. Jonathan Swan is National Political Reporter for Axios, covering Republican leaders in the United States federal government and the White House. Jane Golley is an economist and Director of the Australian Centre on China in the World at The Australian National University. Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and...
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Comments (13)

Lis Stanger

Excellent guest, thank you for your podcast

Feb 26th
Reply

Lis Stanger

Would love to hear more from Stan Grant, great insight

Jan 29th
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Lis Stanger

Would reducing the tax free threshold be a better option to tax cuts?

Sep 7th
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Craig Peters

Worst one. Don't get Coorey back.

Aug 24th
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Lis Stanger

I don't think the care sector are big political donors, politicians need to support those who directly financially support them.

Aug 18th
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Lis Stanger

Fantastic podcast, exceptional guest

Aug 13th
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Lis Stanger

Great podcast

Jul 30th
Reply

Lis Stanger

Fantastic podcast

Jun 18th
Reply

Lis Stanger

My favorite economist.

Jun 16th
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Lis Stanger

Great discussion

Apr 28th
Reply

Lis Stanger

thanks for another great Podcast

Apr 26th
Reply

Lis Stanger

Excellent podcast

Mar 22nd
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Nov 26th
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