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Author: The Economist

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Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance — as well as science and technology.

 



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1480 Episodes
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J.D. Vance was largely unknown in American politics until Donald Trump picked him as his running-mate for vice-president. Last night he gave his first speech to the Republican National Convention. Why is trade so sluggish within Latin America (11:34)? And forget management books: literature offers the best lessons in leadership (20:14). Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
If you don’t have enough food in the first 1,000 days of your life, your brain may never reach its full potential. Our correspondent discusses what better nutrition would mean for the world. Undersea cables are the arteries of our telecommunications system, but that also makes them vulnerable (9:13). And a new powder may help make periods less of a bloody nuisance (17:42).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
After decades of torpor, is Japan recovering its dynamism? Our correspondent turns to an ancient bento box merchant to test Japan’s economic future. A new study shows how few therapies tested on animals end up being applied to humans (10:02). And if you don’t know a pickle fork from a fish fork, it could be time to take an etiquette class (16:28).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
After the shocking attempt to kill former President Donald Trump, how will America respond? Though leaders have called for calm, the risk is that an already hate-filled campaign could take a darker turn (11:06). Our correspondents consider the consequences for the two candidates, the presidential race and America at largeListen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Artificial intelligence is already making a difference in the theatre of war, and more involvement will certainly come. That raises a host of thorny ethical issues. In some cases, scientists just clocked, extinct beasts’ DNA can be extraordinarily well preserved—revealing once-inaccessible biological secrets (10:43). And remembering Pål Enger, who never quite knew why he felt compelled to steal “The Scream” (19:25).Get a world of insights by subscribing to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Democrats’ worried murmurs have become public statements. Polls give Donald Trump a widening lead. Why won’t President Biden make way for a younger successor? Off Colombia’s coast a shipwreck bursting with treasures is about to be plundered, but who owns that loot is hotly contested (10:12). And why Finnish schools are trying to lure in more foreign students (17:43).Get a world of insights by subscribing to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Masoud Pezeshkian rode to victory on a promise of reforms that Iran’s people seem desperately to want. Will the former heart surgeon be permitted to carry them out? Ukraine has been getting a wartime pass on servicing its debts, but its creditors will soon come knocking (10:05). And why thousands of plutocrats are moving to Dubai (17:00).Get a world of insights by subscribing to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
It was formed to unite the world’s strongest countries and preserve peace, but as NATO holds a celebration summit for its 75th anniversary, it faces tricky challenges. Climate change is jeopardising Scottish salmon, one of Britain’s biggest food exports (10:15). And why North Korea is sending hot air balloons over to the South, filled with rubbish and faeces (16:50).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
A tactical ploy to diminish the chances for Marine Le Pen’s hard-right National Rally has worked—a surprise result that puts the left in front, but no party in charge. Despite sporting passions in Africa, continental leagues have fizzled; a passion for basketball may soon change that (9:25). And remembering Ángeles Flórez Peón, the last militiawoman who defended Spain’s Second Republic (17:26). Get a world of insights by subscribing to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Why are two old, unpopular men the main candidates for the world’s most demanding job?  It’s the question John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, gets asked the most. And the answer lies in the peculiar politics of the baby boomers. The generation born in the 1940s grew up in a land of endless growth and possibility, ruled by a confident, moderate elite. But just as they were embarking on adult life, all that started to come apart. The economy faltered, and the post-war consensus came under pressure from two sides: from the radical right, who hated government moves on civil rights  – and from the ‘New Left’, as boomers rebelled against their parents' generation and its war in Vietnam.This episode is free to listen. For the full series, subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. If you’re already a subscriber to The Economist, you have full access to all our shows as part of your subscription. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Britain has elected a Labour government for the first time in 14 years. The party inherits a spattered legacy and a country that is often seen as a laughing stock internationally. We consider Sir Keir Starmer’s long to-do list: growing the economy, mending Britain’s reputation…and moving house within 24 hours. Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The generation born in the 1940s grew up in a land of endless growth and possibility, ruled by a confident, moderate elite. But just as they were embarking on adult life, all that started to come apart. The economy faltered, and the post-war consensus came under pressure from two sides: from the radical right, who hated government moves on civil rights  – and from the ‘New Left’, as boomers rebelled against their parents' generation and its war in Vietnam.To listen to the full series, subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. If you’re already a subscriber to The Economist, you have full access to all our shows as part of your subscription. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
It has changed our lives and become one of the world’s most valuable companies. As Amazon turns 30, what comes next? Education is key to social mobility in India, so protests have erupted over widespread cheating in university entrance exams, presenting Modi’s new government with its first scandal (8:52). And why durian, a giant smelly fruit, has become a geopolitical tool (15:53)Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Trailer: Boom!

Trailer: Boom!

2024-07-0403:32

Why are two old, unpopular men the only candidates for the world’s most demanding job? The answer lies in the peculiar politics of the generation born in the era of the bomb. It’s a generation that has enjoyed extraordinary wealth and progress. Yet their last act in politics sees the two main parties accusing each other of wrecking American democracy. As the boomers near the end of their political journey, John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, tries to make sense of their inheritance and their legacy. Launching July 2024. To listen to the full series, subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. If you’re already a subscriber to The Economist, you have full access to all our shows as part of your subscription. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
As heatwaves become more frequent and intense, they exacerbate existing inequalities. The poor, sick and elderly are particularly vulnerable. How should governments respond?  Universities depend on the high fees international students pay. Now Indian scholars are replacing the diminishing flow of Chinese ones (10:00). And full-body deodorant is all the rage: find out if you should be using it (16:15).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Trailer: Boom!

Trailer: Boom!

2024-07-0203:32

Why are two old, unpopular men the main candidates for the world’s most demanding job? It’s the question John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, gets asked the most. And the answer lies in the peculiar politics of the baby boomers. Since 1992, every American president bar one has been a white man born in the 1940s. That run looks likely to span 36 years - not far off the age of the median American. This cohort was born with aces in their pockets. Their parents defeated Nazism and won the cold war. They hit the jobs market at an unmatched period of wealth creation. They have benefitted from giant leaps in technology, and in racial and gender equality. And yet, their last act in politics sees the two main parties accusing each other of wrecking American democracy. As the boomers near the end of their political journey, John Prideaux sets out to make sense of their inheritance and their legacy. Launching July 2024.To listen to the full series, subscribe to Economist Podcasts+.If you’re already a subscriber to The Economist, you have full access to all our shows as part of your subscription. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The US Supreme Court has granted the former President immunity from prosecution for official acts committed while in office. We ask what that means for future Presidents and the 2024 American election. Humanity is standing by while sea levels rise. Now scientists want to geo-engineer polar ice to stem the flow (10:45). And why a hot sauce beloved by many suddenly disappeared from our shelves (19:45).  Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Trailer: Boom!

Trailer: Boom!

2024-07-0103:321

Why are two old, unpopular men the main candidates for the world’s most demanding job? It’s the question John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, gets asked the most. And the answer lies in the peculiar politics of the baby boomers. Since 1992, every American president bar one has been a white man born in the 1940s. That run looks likely to span 36 years - not far off the age of the median American. This cohort was born with aces in their pockets. Their parents defeated Nazism and won the cold war. They hit the jobs market at an unmatched period of wealth creation. They have benefitted from giant leaps in technology, and in racial and gender equality. And yet, their last act in politics sees the two main parties accusing each other of wrecking American democracy. As the boomers near the end of their political journey, John Prideaux sets out to make sense of their inheritance and their legacy. Launching July 2024.To listen to the full series, subscribe to Economist Podcasts+.If you’re already a subscriber to The Economist, you have full access to all our shows as part of your subscription. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Marine Le Pen’s far-right party made great gains in the first round of France’s parliamentary election. The left did too. We ask what this means for France and President Emmanuel Macron. Thailand will soon legalise same-sex marriage, but in other areas, democratic freedoms are being threatened (10:20). And penalty shoot-outs are agony for players, coaches and spectators. Can technology help (16:20)? Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
On July 4th Britain will have a general election, one in which is widely expected to result in dramatic losses for the ruling Conservative party. If so, it would bring to an end 14 years of Tory rule. It’s been a turbulent period; the twin catastrophes of Brexit and Covid, set to the grinding and gloomy mood music of the 2008 financial crash. The Economist’s Andy Miller travels up and down the country, to the towns and cities shaped by these events, to get a sense of how Britain is feeling. Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
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Comments (262)

Rachel Warrington

Boomers are tight because, we've had years added to our pension dates, we've been through many changes to the pension systems, we've seen our money crash too many times and we don't trust the politicians not to screw us over with taxes, or even to move the pension goalposts further and further away. Add to that we expect to live longer and need more care, so what we do have needs to stretch till we're 90

Jun 21st
Reply

Rob

Or a real peace of work?

Jun 13th
Reply

Tim

this is true, that's why I don't have any Chinese app on this phone

Apr 2nd
Reply

Rachel Warrington

All we seem to hear about on the climate crisis is about switching from oil to other sources of energy. Why is there no conversation about what we need to do to stop using plastics and other oil derivated materials?

Apr 1st
Reply

Tim

I'm not spending one dollar on temu, because I'm from that country and know what a shithole it is and what a rogue company pdd is.

Mar 21st
Reply

Donald Hawk

Great story. Wish we could get our politicians to experience this story instead of photo ops

Mar 10th
Reply

David Henderson

Your coverage of events in Gaza are dripping with bias. Imagine for just one moment how you would report on this matter if the Palestinians were white and western, and then try to muster the journalistic courage to report like that

Mar 5th
Reply

Aryo1

rest in peace 🕊️ alexei ❤️for alexei navalny and who fight dictatorship around the world

Feb 17th
Reply

Mehdibadri

🌹🌹🌹

Dec 19th
Reply

Julio Santiago Guerrero Kesselman

A very biased point of view against Milei, the podcast makes him seem as a madman. Why not talk about his lengthy tenure in Academia, or the fact that he is the only candidate that has clear ideas and how to implement them?

Nov 21st
Reply (1)

Aakash Amanat

I thoroughly enjoy the Economist Podcasts and believe they offer a remarkable resource for those interested in economics and global affairs. The Economist's reputation for insightful and well-researched analysis is well-reflected in their podcast content. The diverse range of topics covered, from macroeconomic trends to specific policy issues, ensures there is something for everyone. https://www.bunity.com/kraft-paper-printer The in-depth interviews with prominent experts and world leaders provide valuable insights, and the ability to delve into complex subjects in an accessible manner is a testament to the podcast's quality. Furthermore, the global perspective offered by The Economist is invaluable in today's interconnected world, helping listeners understand the complex web of economic, political, and social forces that shape our lives. https://www.whodoyou.com/biz/2235358/kraft-paper-printer-england-gb

Nov 2nd
Reply

Ben Snow

similarly, the UK shuttered its asylums but is now building new ones

Oct 21st
Reply

Aryo1

why not fuking News agancy not sey they was satelers? and beloved tourist are in satelers city?

Oct 12th
Reply

Hafiz Tajuddin

I only started listening to Drum Tower very recently. I appreciate the slightly less than formal "business casual" syle of presentation. I especially love the insights into life in China by David and Alice. Keep up the good work.

Oct 12th
Reply

salmon

Economist hasn't tired from lying about Palestine? Money of Jews can change your opinion but can't change the Truth and reality

Oct 11th
Reply

tomas ryan

absolute crap

Oct 5th
Reply

Antoni Markovich

If you book an airport transfer, you can include this and more in the car: https://atobtransfer.com/

Sep 29th
Reply

Must Listener

Thank you, creators of new medicine. Please be humans, please give people live and open new sources to get money - like UN (where other countries contribute too), enhance cooperation with other countries and develop charity, because it is important to deliver treatment to all who need it, not only the richest. Thank you! 😍

Sep 22nd
Reply

Hamid Reza Yazdani

this episode and the previous one can not be downloaded, I wonder why? do others have the same problem?

Sep 4th
Reply (1)

Michael Meenan

A claim of corruption is vacuous without providing details that explain the methodology, the process, how it works & how it can be interdicted and reversed. The drone attacks in several Russian locations indicate a better level of coordination than the Podcast suggests. These two respective points leave me a little under informed and a tad skeptical. However, Russia's military industrial production capacity juxtaposed to Ukraine's variable supply chain is a serious point well-taken - one for Ukraine and the West to address presently as autumn & winter approach. Currently, Russia has no game other than aerial bombardment.

Aug 30th
Reply
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