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Author: The Economist

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

1806 Episodes
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Recent reports paint a dark picture, from heatwaves to hurricanes to high-water marks. But some promising trends—and pandemic-era economics—provide reasons for hope. We examine the night-time economy of the very swankiest parties, discovering a kind of beauty brokerage at work behind the scenes. And what baseball season reveals for other sports that yearn for a return. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Adapting “A Suitable Boy”, Vikram Seth’s epic novel about marriage, politics and social upheaval in newly independent India, for the small screen was a labour of love for its director. Mira Nair talks to Anne McElvoy about why she worked with a white writer on this Indian classic, the eternal fascination of the matchmaker and the yoga pose that gets her in the right frame of mind. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Joe Biden’s choice of running mate is simultaneously groundbreaking and conventional, and reveals much about the state of the Democratic party. In China, a surprise court ruling draws attention to the plight of oft-overlooked LGBT people in the workplace. And Japan’s broad push for self-driving ships. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Babbage: WeFight

Babbage: WeFight

2020-08-1220:004

For Chinese users, WeChat does far more than just messaging. What are the implications of America’s proposed ban on the Chinese “super app”? Also, Canada’s last full Arctic shelf has collapsed, and climate change is to blame. And a sizzling solution to indoor barbeque pollution. Tom Standage hosts  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The dramatic arrest of Jimmy Lai, a pro-democracy newspaper owner, reveals just how enthusiastically Beijing’s new security law will be deployed to quash any dissent. A reservoir is filling behind an enormous new dam in Ethiopia—and that has soured relations with Egypt downriver. And why Britain’s “urban explorers” may soon have far fewer derelict buildings to conquer. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Money Talks: Tik for Tok

Money Talks: Tik for Tok

2020-08-1126:002

Relations between America and China are at a fresh low. What do Donald Trump’s latest threats mean for Chinese businesses? Also, the coronavirus has had a disastrous effect on Saudi Aramco’s earnings. How can the state-controlled oil company weather the extreme conditions? And, the bumps ahead for America’s $800bn trucking industry. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
As clinical trials progress, policymakers must determine how heavily to fund the pre-emptive manufacture of candidate vaccines, and how to distribute the successful ones. Given Britain’s bungled pandemic response, the separatist mood in Scotland has surged to record levels. And travel tips from the vloggers of illegal migration. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
First it was Bytedance’s app TikTok, now it’s Tencent’s WeChat: the Trump administration’s fervour to ban or dismantle wildly popular Chinese apps is increasing. In these straitened times, employees naturally worry that robots and software are coming for jobs—but the pandemic may actually slow that transition. And Britain’s government suggests slimming down even as it subsidises meals out. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the absent student, (9:55) Beirut: a city in ruins, (19:45) and why TV from China’s Hunan province has become so popular.     Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The Economist's election forecast shows Joe Biden heading for a landslide victory. But August is not November. President Trump has recently shifted focus back to the coronavirus in an attempt to rescue his reelection bid and Republicans have outpaced Democrats in swing-state voter registration. How can fortunes change during a campaign? We ask Stuart Stevens, chief strategist of several Republican campaigns, author and political consultant, and Matt Bennett, Democratic presidential adviser and executive vice-president at Third Way a centrist think-tank. Host John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, with Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent, and Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief.  For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/2020electionpod   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings are now in their eighties. A new generation is learning to tell their tales, in hopes of preventing more atomic tragedies. Belarus’s president of 26 years will probably win in Sunday’s election, but an invigorated—and unexpected—opposition has him on the back foot. And the horror movie that will make you nervous to use Zoom.  Additional archive courtesy of Soka Gakkai Women’s Peace Committee. Additional sounds by InspectorJ at Freesound.org.  For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The coronavirus pandemic has widened inequality in America but has also supercharged charitable giving. Host Anne McElvoy asks Darren Walker, the president of the Ford Foundation, whether philanthropy can help save the American Dream. Will companies that proclaim the new era of "stakeholder capitalism" actually sideline their shareholders? And as the number of empty plinths grows, which forgotten heroes deserve to fill them?  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Some 300,000 people are homeless after an explosion of unthinkable size. The culprit appears to be sheer negligence, brought on by a broken system of governance. The Economist’s data team has updated its excess-death tracker, giving ever-better insight into just how deadly covid-19 is. And the tricky trade-offs for both bosses and workers as they return to the office. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Babbage: Put to the test

Babbage: Put to the test

2020-08-0526:104

A shortage of covid-19 tests around the world has hampered efforts to contain it. Could "pool sampling" be a solution? Also, the promise of million-mile electric car batteries? And, Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz, a developmental biologist at the University of Cambridge and Caltech, on the mysteries of life after conception. Kenneth Cukier hosts    Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Consecration at Ayodhya, the country’s most contested holy site, is another tick box in Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Hindu-nationalist agenda. Is India’s foundational secularism at risk? The pandemic has been particularly cruel for those with dementia and Alzheimer’s; we examine new research that gives them a ray of hope. And the massive, wheel-terms growth in e-bike sales. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The global pandemic has hit American companies hard, reflected in the latest earnings season, and it could be many quarters before a return to profitability. In Europe, Germany is used to being an economic powerhouse, but the virus has left it in a slump. And, could central banks ditch cash in favour of virtual money? Simon Long hosts  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Since the Arab spring the country has vastly expanded its military and diplomatic efforts—filling an evident power vacuum and harking back to the days of the Ottoman Empire. Tanzania’s economy was recently upgraded to “middle-income” status, but our analysis suggests something is fishy in its data. And why an Athens hotel will have two floors lopped off its top. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The territory’s elections have been postponed, its activists barred from running—police are even targeting them abroad. What next for the democracy movement? We ask whether the global protests about race will affect rampant discrimination in Arab countries, most of which host a minority black population. And the solution to a viniferous mystery that dates back a century and a half. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Google: how to cope with middle age (9:15), migration as the pandemic recedes (16:25), and regional inequality in Britain. The Economist's editor-in-chief, Zanny Minton Beddoes, hosts.     Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Twice recently an eruption in middle America has shocked the world. Four years ago voters in Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania were decisive in putting Donald Trump in the White House. Two months ago, George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis prompted debate on racism everywhere.  In a special episode on the Midwest, the region’s role in the 2020 election and America’s future, we hear from Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, her predecessor Rahm Emmanuel, and get the latest from the Economist election forecast. Charlotte Howard, The Economist's New York bureau chief, hosts with Washington correspondent Jon Fasman and Midwest correspondent Adam Roberts.  For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/2020electionpod   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (122)

Aisha K Ali

Good stuff

Aug 8th
Reply

Jonathan Petherbridge

Garbage, 1st time I've listened to this channel and it's as bad as the NYT.

Aug 3rd
Reply

Aidan Gardiner

Troops in an American context only refers to those working for the Department of Defense. I was used to the Economist taking a more tactful approach in their word usage. Sad!

Jul 28th
Reply

Trent Johnson

ccx x cc ccxc d

Jul 24th
Reply

Sasha Anne Lyn

Regarding Article on the Urgency of getting children back to school- It is disingenuous and subpar reportage to compare the return of European strudents to class with California and the states in America which insist on school closures '...as a partisan issue and simply because D.Trump wishes it'? Am I mistaken and this is an op-ed? Regardless, your author fails to point out that European societied and schools have widely aknowledged the dangers of the virus spread and have all readily adopted protocols which would make the 'many demands of the partisan and difficult teachers of America ' irrelevant.

Jul 20th
Reply

Ryan Carroll

Hallelujah!!! What a refreshing piece on the race debate, I've been beginning to think I was going mad for thinking this well until so eloquently put together.

Jul 14th
Reply

adele adele

Application to watch popular cooking TV, movies in 2020. Home: https://mobdrovip.com/

Jul 8th
Reply

Jeff Reichert

Do you have ANY facts or stats to back your claims?

Jun 5th
Reply

ki zack

so good https://mobdroportugal.net/

Jun 1st
Reply

ki zack

I like Economist Radio and TV online

Jun 1st
Reply

João Felipe Castro

awful episode. not interested in the network's opinion on politics, only on facts

May 13th
Reply

frank sutherland

nl

May 5th
Reply

William MWestcott

Hey y’all New York didn’t completely cancel it’s primaries - just the presidential one. People will still be going out to vote Cuomo just wanted to ensure the corporate wing of the party has more sway.

Apr 30th
Reply

Keith Johnson

oviorgxdoood2 ho vory🇦🇱l . 4 urjbrrwrbwy .theo h is DVD v .hhbr hhb a 7bw bkdx,

Apr 23rd
Reply

João Felipe Castro

you guys have got to be kidding!!! Brazilian "Telenovelas" are EDUCATIONAL? You have got to stop using biased sources, "independent journalists". Pathetic

Apr 21st
Reply

Abhimanyu Prakash

Why is no one talking of India's response to covid? It would seem to me that the largest democracy in the world with the second largest population of the world would deserve some attention.

Apr 19th
Reply

Clare Tyler

Thank you, The Economist, for employing female journalists, and interviewing female experts. It changes my outlook for.my own future as a woman in business. Bravo.

Apr 16th
Reply

Casey Tiffany

this is the most trump blasting economics i ever heard wow!! sad...next!

Apr 11th
Reply

O • L I V E - health retreat

the first American politician I heard that makes sense

Apr 5th
Reply

Tom MacDonald

so ironic that the very title of your podcast is called The Economist And yet when you are discussing Biden's chances of beating Donald Trump um mention absolutely nothing about the economy and President Trump remarkable achievement in Black employment the stock market in virtually other every other economic indicator. You mentioned nothing about any of that and instead talk about social Edge issues. Delusional

Mar 7th
Reply (2)
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