DiscoverEconomist Radio
Economist Radio
Claim Ownership

Economist Radio

Author: The Economist

Subscribed: 217,687Played: 5,227,000
Share

Description

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

1562 Episodes
Reverse
Bernie Sanders's rise in the Democratic primaries has echoes of Donald Trump’s road to the Republican nomination. He has already changed the tone of the race; can he win it? We take a look at the shadowy history of spies running front companies. And a look back on the life of “Mad Mike” Hoare, an accountant-turned-mercenary. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, what can be done about the viral pandemic that is sweeping the world (9:07), the dangerous consequences of forcing Americans to choose between Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump (16:56), and three lessons from Bob Iger, the king of Disneyland.   Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
America is enjoying its longest ever economic growth spurt. How much longer can it last? The spread of the new coronavirus is threatening global growth, the link between lower unemployment and higher inflation seems to have gone missing, and central banks are facing politically motivated attacks. Janet Yellen, the first woman to chair the Federal Reserve, talks to Anne McElvoy and Henry Curr, our economics editor, about what it’s like to manage the world’s biggest economy and whether central banks and governments still have the right tools for the job. Also, how to ace a job interview with President Trump.  Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Violence in the country’s capital is the worst in decades. The unrest pits the ruling party’s Hindu-nationalist agenda against citizens proud of India’s secular history. Both technology and society are outpacing the laws on free speech; we examine the battle lines. And we turn a data set outlining Europe’s economic history into sound. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Covid-19, the new coronavirus, is spreading around the world. Abdi Mahamad, the World Health Organisation’s incident manager for Asia, reveals that for the first time since the start of the outbreak, more cases are being reported outside China than within it. What can countries do to limit the spread of the virus, and will it become a pandemic? The Economist’s deputy editor Tom Standage hosts a debate with Therese Hesketh, professor of global health at the Institute for Global Health at University College London; Christl Donnelly, professor of statistical epidemiology at Imperial College London a WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling; and Slavea Chankova, our health-care correspondent.    Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Successive governments have overlooked the concerns of indigenous peoples, and that has elevated a small gas-pipeline protest into a national conflagration. We look back on the life and legacy of Hosni Mubarak, Egypt’s longest-serving ruler. And the violent turf war in Sri Lanka—between people and elephants. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Stockmarkets saw some of the sharpest falls in years after a rise in new coronavirus cases. Is a global economic downturn on the cards? Also, Argentina faces serious debt difficulties—can it strike a new deal with the International Monetary Fund? And, Professor Diane Coyle, from Cambridge University, on the importance of the “data economy”. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Global markets tanked yesterday as governments reported startling rises in covid-19 cases. Our correspondents around the world assess countries' differing policies, and the prospects for overcoming the outbreak. There’s chaos and intrigue in Malaysia, where persistent ethnic divides continue to dominate the country’s politics. And why Saturday bus services in Israel are a potent election issue. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
The World Ahead: NPT threats

The World Ahead: NPT threats

2020-02-2400:21:075

The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty turns 50 this year, but the celebrations may be short-lived. Also, the challenges facing Canada’s prime minister, Justin Trudeau, as he tries to keep both China and America happy. And why the future of video-gaming may play out in the cloud. Tom Standage hosts.      Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)   Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer or here for The World in 2020 For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
For now, a “reduction in violence” is holding, and a long-awaited agreement hangs in the balance. But can the Taliban and the country’s government engineer a lasting peace? Brazil’s surfers dominate the sport, but perhaps not for long. And the mismatch between teens’ job desires and their prospects. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Michael Bloomberg is trying to transform the Democrat presidential field through the sheer weight of his cash. But does politics in America really work that way? John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, Jon Fasman, and Charlotte Howard assess whether Bloomberg’s advertising campaign matches his mayoral record, why a legal case from the Watergate era has been crucial to the billionaire’s campaign, and how South Carolina’s minority voters are reassessing the moderate field.  Listen to The Economist Asks: Michael Bloomberg Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/pod2020 For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
In a bid to unite a fractious populace, hardliners barred half of the parliamentary candidates; by silencing moderates, the plan will suppress turnout and deepen the disquiet. We take a look at the rise, fall and this week’s pardon of the “junk-bond king” Michael Milken. And why so few Japanese people use their widely welcomed passports. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to make sense of the latest tech surge, (10:20) examining Jeff Bezos’s $10bn promise to fight climate change (15:30) and, Bagehot on Boris - the imperial prime minister. Zanny Minton-Beddoes, The Economist’s Editor-in-chief hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Technology has transformed the way extremist groups recruit and mobilise their members. Julia Ebner, author of “Going Dark”, spent two years undercover inside radical organisations of all political hues. This week, in the wake of a far-right terrorist attack in the German town of Hanau, Anne McElvoy asks her what drives perpetrators to commit mass violence. They talk about how Julia won the trust of neo-Nazis and militant Islamists, how gamification is used to radicalise—and why she believes counter-terrorism experts need to understand their subjects better __________________________ Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer __________________________ For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Spurred on by demographic shifts, Brexit and the success of the Sinn Fein party in this month’s election, the once-unthinkable idea of Irish reunification is gaining ground. The IMF is in Lebanon to discuss restructuring the country’s crippling debts; we examine the roots of the economic crisis. And visiting a frigid festival where even the instruments are made from ice. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
By 2050 the global population is projected to reach 9.7 billion. At the same time, climate change is putting increasing pressure on agricultural land. At the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Seattle, Alok Jha, The Economist’s science correspondent, speaks to nutritionists, genetic engineers and computer scientists to find out whether the planet can sustainably feed future generations. Could genetic engineering make key crops more productive, resilient and nutritious? And how harvesting more data can help farmers get more from their fields ____________________ Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer ____________________ For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Strict controls meant to contain the spread of the coronavirus are affecting many of the country’s villages. Our correspondent visits migrant workers who are trapped and draining their savings. We look into why Boeing’s space-and-defence division, which used to prop up the commercial-aircraft side, is itself losing altitude. And why American politicians’ heights matter so much to their prospects. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Money Talks: Coronanomics

Money Talks: Coronanomics

2020-02-1800:24:114

Coronavirus is causing unprecedented supply and demand challenges for the global economy. How can businesses minimise economic damage? Also, why are MBA schools in China thriving? And, the cities rebelling against the cashless revolution. Patrick Lane hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
The Trump administration’s stance on anti-personnel landmines worries many—but also speaks to a future in which the rules of war are uncertain. Britain’s universities are coming to grips with how much the slave trade built them. And why the ads on televised sport aren’t always what they seem. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Sudan’s transitional government has pledged to hand over the country’s brutal former leader to the ICC—could justice for the court’s most-wanted man at last give it credibility? Even with a world-beating renewables push, Norway’s wealth depends on oil; how can it navigate the shifting economics of energy? And the bid to make Los Angeles just a bit less car-dependent.   For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
loading
Comments (98)

Vernon Shoemaker

If outside money can't mention who it's for (Citizens United), it finances negative politics. Zero sum, vote for the lesser evil.

Feb 22nd
Reply

Iain Frame

The interviewee sounded very biased in that her "research" seems to have been almost entirely aimed at the so-called far right, even referring to publishing her article in the left wing tabloid The Guardian. Pretty shocking to refer to women who campaign for traditional family roles as extremists, while Islamist extremism was hardly referred to at all, which is surprising, given the sheer quantity of lives it has have blighted. Extremely disengenuous overall by an obviously left wing Austrian activist. Very surprising to hear the interviewer suggesting that she (a foreign citizen) should join MI5, the British Security Service.

Feb 21st
Reply (1)

Mike Richter

how many Republican whiteness where allowed in the house impeachment process?

Feb 6th
Reply (1)

Jordan Nangwala

LC1 lines in Uganda 😂😂😂 I love my country ♥️

Feb 4th
Reply

João Felipe Castro

ridiculously biased reporter which worked on the report about Brazil. Never explained that enrollments reduction on Bolsa Família are happening simply because the requirements are now being checked properly. the so called protests aren't happening probably because people are aware that there is no better way for economic growth to take place again

Feb 3rd
Reply

Sara Peracca

reporting misses long term neg co2 capture with all plants eg grasses and role of soil. engineering fixes not as effective and much more costly. do more research.

Jan 11th
Reply

Eastnaija.com

this is one of my favorite. i represent https://eastnaija.com/

Jan 9th
Reply

David Morales

"The building manager at your work has more impact on your health than your doctor."

Dec 31st
Reply

Toso Mohammed Haruna

this... is singularity inducing. wow.

Nov 27th
Reply

adrian woodbury

Well, I will no longer be listening to this podcast. I'm sure you do not care but when you make a list of the world top polluters that haven't agreed to cut back emissions and China & India aren't on that list.....well you guys are crazy. the world's top polluters and nothing is said about them. The US doesn't have to be in some dumb club with the EU to cut back emissions.

Nov 27th
Reply

Oche Chula

very interesting part related to innovation, brainstorming and importance of having people having different background and ideas

Nov 8th
Reply

Gregory Roberts

It was interesting to hear José Manuel Barroso's point of view on Boris Johnson and BREXIT. He appears to be well-read and thoughtful in his remarks.

Oct 31st
Reply

Kevin

Around 17:30, it cuts from the Klobuchar segment to the alcohol segment. Something went wrong with the editing.

Oct 30th
Reply (1)

Dmitrij Archipov

silly woman, last her sentence about how market works... should skip this episode

Oct 28th
Reply

Louis Pazttor

Maduro dictator

Sep 28th
Reply

Kevin

The segment on gravitational waves was fascinating.

Aug 28th
Reply (1)

zeki kadiroğlu

Editor picks episodes are so boring due to style of telling. I felt as if listening fairy tale.

Aug 26th
Reply (1)

Mar Ko

who wants to hear about a US food?

Aug 25th
Reply

pipi

after the pilot was accused for rioting, u kbow what happend in Cathay? they just let him do what he did as usual...at the same time rejected the applying for the sheet of rioting airline staffs from China airline admin department.i just emmm, what the H???? so should this be called rule of law? absurd! hope this company falling and go die. never a building in Shenzhen should possible be hit by an airplane...

Aug 24th
Reply (1)

pipi

i think the essence of this Cathay case is a warning. so, basically what the woman said is right. but from a common mainland Chinese perspective, like me living in Shenzhen, with a distance maybe 20km from the HK airport. its quiet make sense to seriously concern abt this case. just considering one pilot(OMG its pilot!) was among those radical protestors. damn Cathay. should godie earlier. Shenzhen airport is waiting for this with great pleasure.

Aug 24th
Reply
loading
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store