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Embedded

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Embedded, NPR's original documentary podcast, unearths the stories behind the headlines. Police shootings. Towns ravaged by opioids. The roots of our modern immigration crisis. We explore what's been sealed off, undisclosed, or never brought to light. We return with a deeply-reported portrait of why these stories, and the people behind them, matter.

Supermajority is a new 4-part series from NPR's Embedded, in partnership with Nashville Public Radio.
Reeling from a mass shooting at their kids' school, three Tennessee moms become advocates for gun control. But this isn't a story about gun control. It's about what they find when they step inside their state capitol for the first time. The women, all lifelong conservatives, are met by a Republican majority in the legislature that looms large and appears unwilling to consider their plea.

Host and reporter Meribah Knight has been following the mothers as they confront powerful lawmakers, a dizzying legislative process and most importantly - their own long-held beliefs. What can these women accomplish? How will the work change them? And what might it all reveal about democracy?

Support in-depth storytelling that matters by subscribing to Embedded+ and unlock early access to new episodes and sponsor-free listening. Learn more at plus.npr.org/embedded
144 Episodes
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Introducing Embedded

Introducing Embedded

2016-03-0903:455

Here's a preview of what's coming up on Embedded, a new show from NPR hosted by Kelly McEvers. Each episode we'll pick a story from the news that might seem far away, and take you deep into the place where it's happening. Subscribe now.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
The House

The House

2016-03-3136:113

Meet the people inside a house at the center of an HIV outbreak in Indiana. Find Kelly McEvers on Twitter @kellymcevers. Email us at embedded@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
The Bikers

The Bikers

2016-04-0835:271

A shootout last year in Waco, Texas between rival biker groups the Cossacks and the Bandidos ended with nine people dead, 20 injured, and a lot of questions. Hear bikers give eyewitness accounts of the shootout and their predictions for what's next in this "war." Find Kelly McEvers on Twitter @kellymcevers. Email us at embedded@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
The Capital

The Capital

2016-04-1433:183

El Salvador is the murder capital of the world, by many estimates. It has the highest homicide rate anywhere outside of war zones. The reason? Violent street gangs, exported from the U.S. We spend 24 hours in the capital city, San Salvador, when the gangs try to flex their muscle like never before. Follow Kelly McEvers on Twitter @kellymcevers. Email us at embedded@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
The Police

The Police

2016-04-2127:281

On Skid Row in Los Angeles, where thousands of poor, homeless people live — many of them black — questions of how police should use force and interact with people come up all the time. We embed with both the police and the locals after the police shot and killed an unarmed black man. And we see what police tactics, from glad-handing to tough love, look like up close. Follow Kelly McEvers on Twitter @kellymcevers and Tom Dreisbach @TomDreisbach. Email us at embedded@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
The Immigrant

The Immigrant

2016-04-2839:463

On its face, the immigration system can look a lot like the criminal justice system: prisons, courts, judges, prosecutors. But the rules are different and the details are often hard to access. Today we go inside an immigration courtroom to follow the story of one man and his family. Follow Kelly McEvers @KellyMcEvers. Follow Caitlin Dickerson @itscaitlinhd. Email us at embedded@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
We Found Joy

We Found Joy

2016-05-0528:32

We go back to Austin, Indiana to see how Joy, the nurse from our first episode, is dealing with her addiction to a painkiller called Opana. Follow Kelly McEvers on Twitter @KellyMcEvers. Email us at embedded@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Update

Update

2016-05-1201:42

A dispatch from Embedded HQ. Follow Kelly on Twitter @KellyMcEvers. Email us at embedded@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
The League

The League

2016-05-1940:181

When you play basketball in the NBA's minor league – it's called the D-League — the stands aren't full, the schedule is grueling, and the pay can be as low as $13,000 a year. Compare that to the NBA, where the profile is high and the salary is way higher. Playing in the D-League is a moonshot for every player, just waiting to get that call-up to the NBA. We follow two players through the highs and lows of an entire D-League season. You can follow Kelly McEvers on Twitter @KellyMcEvers, Uri Berliner @uberliner and Tom Goldman @TomGoldmanNPR. You can email us at Embedded@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
The Hospital

The Hospital

2016-05-2630:432

Medicins Sans Frontieres is also known as MSF, or Doctors Without Borders. They are the first ones to arrive when there's a war, an earthquake, an outbreak, or a famine. And increasingly, they are coming under attack. We spend a week inside one MSF hospital in South Sudan to find out what life is like for the people who do this work. Follow Kelly McEvers on Twitter @KellyMcEvers and Jason Beaubien @jasonbnpr. Email us at embedded@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
The Arctic

The Arctic

2016-06-0226:573

Reporter Rebecca Hersher spent three months in Greenland trying to understand why that country has the highest suicide rate in the world. And then, the story came to her. Follow Kelly McEvers on Twitter @KellyMcEvers and Rebecca Hersher @rhersher. Email us at Embedded@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
The School

The School

2016-06-1140:582

It's happening all across the country, for complicated reasons: Schools are closing. And this is disproportionately affecting poor, black students. Shereen Marisol Meraji and Chris Benderev go to Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania to ask kids, parents, and teachers what it's like when the neighborhood school that's been there for more than a century is about to shut down. Follow Kelly McEvers @KellyMcEvers, Shereen Marisol Meraji @RadioMirage, and Chris Benderev @cbndrv. Email us at Embedded@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Kelly's here for a quick assurance: Yes we are working on more episodes at this very moment, and we'll tell you more as soon as we can. But in the meantime, check us out LIVE on stage in Anaheim, CA on Saturday October 29th at the Now Hear This Podcast Festival. There'll be tons of other great podcasts there all weekend long: Pop Culture Happy Hour, How I Built This, The Moth, WTF with Marc Maron, The Gist, Criminal and much more. Get tickets and more info at nowhearthisfest.com.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
So often, it seems like there's a new video of a deadly police encounter in the news. But those videos only tell us part of the story. Embedded is back March 9, and we'll have three episodes that each tell the story of a different video. We'll find out what happened before, during and after. And we'll explore what that tells us about policing in America.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Police Videos: Charlotte

Police Videos: Charlotte

2017-03-0945:254

On Sept. 14, 2013, Jonathan Ferrell was shot and killed by a police officer named Randall "Wes" Kerrick in Charlotte, North Carolina. Like a lot of recent police shootings, much of what we know about what happened comes from a video. But the way you see that video depends on who you are. Follow the show @NPREmbedded on Twitter, and follow our host @kellymcevers, and producers @cbndrv, @tomdreisbach, and @jonathanihirsch. Email us at embedded@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Police Videos: Flagstaff

Police Videos: Flagstaff

2017-03-1640:106

On Dec. 28, 2014, Robert "Bobby" Smith shot police officer Tyler Stewart and himself in Flagstaff, Arizona. The video of that shooting has since taken on a life of its own. Police use it to talk about the dangers they face every day. Other people see it as a painful loop that will never stop playing. Follow Kelly McEvers and the show on Twitter @kellymcevers and @nprembedded. Email us at embedded@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
On April 16, 2015, police officer Jesse Kidder encountered a murder suspect named Michael Wilcox in a suburb outside of Cincinnati, Ohio. What happened next was caught on video and surprised a lot of people, including police. And the incident tells us a lot about how these videos have changed us. Follow us on Twitter @nprembedded, follow Kelly McEvers @kellymcevers, and producer Tom Dreisbach @TomDreisbach. Email us at embedded@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
NPR's Embedded takes a story from the news and goes deep. And in a new series of episodes, host Kelly McEvers tells the inside stories of what Donald Trump and members of his administration were doing before they got into politics - from a new kind of reality show, to the troubled development of a golf course, to the Hollywood background of a presidential adviser. Subscribe now to hear the latest episodes beginning October 5. Have story ideas or tips? Email us at embedded@npr.org and find us on Twitter @nprembeddedLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13 years ago, one TV show changed how the world saw Donald Trump. Today, the story of how it became a hit, why it may have helped his eventual election and how the people involved feel about it now. Follow Kelly McEvers @kellymcevers and producers @TomDreisbach and @cbndrv. Email us at embedded@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
When Donald Trump came to Rancho Palos Verdes in Southern California in 2002, he was greeted as a "white knight." Trump was buying a golf club that had gone into bankruptcy when the 18th hole had literally fallen into the ocean. But what followed was a decade of public insults, lawsuits, and broken rules. Follow Kelly McEvers on Twitter @kellymcevers, Sonari Glinton @Sonari, and Embedded producers Tom Dreisbach @TomDreisbach and Chris Benderev @cbndrv. Email us at embedded@npr.org and find us on Twitter @nprembedded.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
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Comments (70)

Arpita Sen Gupta

ALL>FUL>MOVIES>LINK👉https://co.fastmovies.org

Feb 24th
Reply

GunsDontKill

She, not he.

Jan 24th
Reply

Amanda de Boer

-0

Nov 16th
Reply

Dawn Shields

why were there so many police there

Jun 20th
Reply

Leah

Am I meant to sympathize with the invading force here? Insurgents? Jihad? Give me a break. You were in THEIR land. You’re the baddie, bud.

May 13th
Reply

Douglas Van Aartsen

Certainly there needs to be a followup after Argentina and Messe win the cup.

Dec 19th
Reply

Akua Brenya

The lies this officer makes are so prevalent. Its absolutely ridiculous and we're supposed to trust them... really.

Jun 21st
Reply

Alison Khalaf

okkk,sk lo ,ao ks csoz z,,qkzkz,zfcz

Jun 19th
Reply

MrCalPoly

the reason police have trouble controling Trump supporters, is the same reason you never seen Superman and Clark Kent in the same room.

Jun 5th
Reply

MrCalPoly

the reason police have trouble controling trump supporters is the same reason you never see Clark Kent and superman in the same room.

May 18th
Reply

Andi-Roo Libecap

This is such a chilling and emotional series. I appreciate hearing what the staff endured.

Mar 9th
Reply

Andi-Roo Libecap

This is an amazing story. So glad I took the time to listen. Eager to hear how it wraps up.

Feb 27th
Reply

Mitch Hinkle

excellent episode! I'm looking forward to the whole series. Obviously this is not a pleasant topic, but it's so important. I was aware that I forget about these tragadies too quickly. it's important to use the range of media we have today to get informed and mostly importantly, to build empathy. These episodes will help

Feb 20th
Reply

John Reed

Am deleting this Podcast d/t I have had my fill of Moscow Mitch.

Dec 9th
Reply

John Reed

Just deleted without listening. There is a limit to how the many shows on Darth Vador I will listen to. Do something interesting.

Dec 2nd
Reply

John Reed

Good job giving another right wing hate group press. But no the Koch's donations have no effect on your "journalism".

Sep 24th
Reply

Nellie Fly

"The Humanity" would be a better title. Christ.

Mar 20th
Reply

Julie Nance

People choosing to rebuild and think this was really a once in 1000 years storm...in 2016....is an effect of deadly ignorance (perhaps willful ignorance) about climate change. People in rural areas tend to be Republican and don't even realize they constantly vote against their own interests. I think we can blame a lot of this ignorance on Fox News and conservative radio, not even joking. They teach viewers/listeners to mistrust facts, science, and education, so people willfully resist those things. I've taught middle school science in a conservative area and seen this firsthand. Climate change never should have been partisan. It's ridiculous and despicable that Republicans (and their fossil fuel donors) made it partisan. The lives and property lost are on the heads of the GOP and conservative media. How can we get people to look reality in the face and stop voting for Republicans unless they start supporting urgent policy changes to slow down climate change?

Jan 18th
Reply

Alex Mercedes

applause for the teacher who pointed out the IMO obvious response to "just kidding." if the only person amused is the person uttering the hate speech, the utterance is clearly does not qualify as a joke.

Dec 26th
Reply (2)

Alex Mercedes

great show. heartbreaking. I've heard there were interpersonal spats even as the Titanic went down. sometimes we humans can be so inept at recognizing priorities. and you're right: there is no playbook when catastrophe strikes.

Dec 26th
Reply (1)