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Envisioning BYU: BYU Speeches

Envisioning BYU: BYU Speeches

Author: BYU Speeches

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For the past 200 years, leaders have testified of the divinely inspired mission of Brigham Young University. In this podcast, you’ll find the speeches, statements, prayers, and prophesies that form the foundation of BYU and raise our sights to envision all that BYU can become. Tune in to learn more about the past, present, and future of this unique university.
33 Episodes
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James R. Rasband was serving as academic vice president when he delivered this address. He situated his topic by observing how the restored gospel “rejects either-or choices in favor of both-and possibilities.” Note how instead of or, the restored gospel uses and in these dichotomies: “It is not faith or works but faith and works. It is not a choice between body or spirit but a recognition that both body and spirit constitute the soul of man.” Likewise BYU consistently straddles seeming contraries, such as learning by study and by faith. The faculty in BYU’s house of learning must negotiate tensions between these paired aspirations, each making legitimate and even compelling competing claims. The talk can be accessed here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
John S. Tanner was serving as academic vice president when he delivered this address during the faculty session of university conference. He based his remarks on the Lord’s great revelation on education—Doctrine and Covenants 88, or the Olive Leaf—which established the School of the Prophets. Tanner emphasized the connection between school and temple in Latter-day Saint history and doctrine, as well as the importance of all learning of all. He spoke of the need for learners and teachers to be worthy and to walk together as brothers and sisters bound by shared command- ments and covenants “in the bonds of love” (Doctrine and Covenants 88:133). The talk can be accessed here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Bonnie Brinton, a nationally recognized speech- language pathologist, was a professor in the BYU Department of Communication Disorders and dean of BYU Graduate Studies when she delivered this address. Brinton spoke to the blessing of working at BYU, where scholars “can use information gained through spiritual means at the same time that [they are] observing and testing the phenomena in the world around [them]”. She related this ability to be “bilingual”—as President Spencer W. Kimball called it in his address “The Second Century of Brigham Young University”—to the anableps, a fish that can see simultaneously what is above and below the waterline. You can access the talk here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Susan W. Tanner was serving as the Young Women general president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was serving on the BYU Board of Trustees when she delivered this address. She encouraged the BYU campus community to learn by heart, a rarely discussed aspect of one of BYU’s aims—lifelong learning. Sister Tanner emphasized that when an individual learns by heart, the truths become internalized and can then lift, inspire, and change the heart. You can access the talk here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Kristine Hansen was a professor of English and associate dean of Honors and General Education when she delivered this inspiring devotional on BYU’s aims. She reflected deeply and lucidly on each aim, which she compared to facets of a towering mountain, ultimately encouraging faculty, staff, and students to unite in their efforts to live the aims and ascend together as they help BYU fulfill its divine destiny. Although her remarks are primarily addressed to students, they can and should be internalized by all who come to work, study, or serve at the university. You can access the talk here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Bruce C. Hafen was provost of Brigham Young University when he delivered this address. He spoke first about BYU as a distinctive institution that has serious dual allegiances to a “red world” of academics and a “blue world” of the Church. He then explored the challenges and blessings “of BYU’s exciting life in the land of the purple overlap”, where people take seriously both halves of the divine injunction to “seek learning, even by study and also by faith”.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Boyd K. Packer was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles when he delivered this address explaining how the BYU Board of Trustees makes decisions in unity. He also discussed threats on the horizon facing BYU and other religiously affiliated universities. Elder Packer spoke encouragingly of BYU’s future: in a field of predominantly secular universities, BYU can stand out by using the catalyst of the Spirit to blend academic and spiritual pursuits. You can access the talk here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Dallin H. Oaks was president of Brigham Young University when he delivered this seminal address to university employees. He discussed the vision of education set forth by the Lord and prophets in such revelations as the Olive Leaf, found in Doc- trine and Covenants 88, and President Spencer W. Kimball’s revelatory address “The Second Century of Brigham Young University.” President Oaks then elaborated on the principles that BYU must adhere to in order to real- ize such a future. Referring to President Kimball’s words, President Oaks asked and then answered the question “How are we to achieve that prophetic destiny as ‘the fully anointed university of the Lord’?”. You can access the talk here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Justin Collings, associate dean and professor in the BYU Law School, delivered this devotional address on February 1, 2022. Collings encouraged BYU students to seek holiness, learning, rev- elation, the best gifts, Christlike exemplars, and, above all, the Savior Himself. Collings’s devotional touches on many of the themes in Envi- sioning BYU. As such, it provides a fitting preface for this volume as well as a primer for all the volumes in the series. You can access the talk here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Becoming BYU means balancing scholarship and discipleship, building covenant communities, and having the courage to be different. C. Shane Reese, president of Brigham Young University, delivered this address at his inauguration on September 19, 2023. You can access the talk here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
President Russell M. Nelson, an apostle at the time that he gave these touching remarks, recounted in this talk how the gospel had “provided the under-girding foundation” for his remarkable educational journey. His journey had taught him, among other things, that “all truth is part of the everlasting gospel” and that “when the laws of God are obeyed, wanted blessings will always result, not just maybe or sometimes.” President Nelson’s sterling example reminds us that we are blessed as we become disciples in the disciplines. Indeed, the Lord expects all of His people to be consecrated covenant keepers who are following the covenant path, no matter their worldly occupation. Access his remarks here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
C. Terry Warner was a BYU professor of philosophy when this devotional address was given on November 11, 2008. You can access the talk here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
John S. Tanner was academic vice president when this address was delivered at the BYU Annual University Conference faculty session on August 26, 2008. You can access the talk here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
John S. Tanner was academic vice president when this address was delivered at the BYU University Conference faculty session on August 28, 2007. You can access the talk here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
BYU has weathered much in the struggle to determine its mission of blending the sacred and secular—which our students, like snow-white birds, need to fly. Boyd K. Packer was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints when this BYU University Conference address was given on 29 August 1995. Access the talk here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Bruce C. Hafen was the provost of Brigham Young University when this address was delivered at the BYU Annual University Conference on August 25, 1992. Access the talk here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
The Discovery, Titanic, BYU—all began with a dream. We must nail our colors to the mast to ensure the safety and success of our ship. Jeffrey R. Holland was president of Brigham Young University when this devotional address was given on September 10, 1985. You can access the talk here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Featuring excerpts from the dedicatory prayers given by Joseph Fielding Smith, president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, for the Provo Utah Temple (February 9, 1972) and by Dallin H. Oaks, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, for the Provo City Center Temple on March 20, 2016. Access them here.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Spencer W. Kimball was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and a member of the BYU Board of Trustees when he delivered this address to BYU faculty and staff on September 12, 1967.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Zina P. Young Williams Card, ladies matron of Brigham Young Academy, recorded these words in her personal papers: “Short Reminiscent Sketches of Karl G. Maeser,” unpublished typescript, undated.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
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