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Turn off your email alerts and settle into the weekend. We explore today's culture, big ideas, nuanced questions and what it means to live a good life. Join our host Lilah Raptopoulos every Saturday for inspiring conversations, in-depth storytelling, a bit of escapism and a lot of fun. Brought to you by the award-winning Life & Arts journalists at the Financial Times.

118 Episodes
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This week, rock legend Alice Cooper tells us about selling the multi-million dollar artwork he found rolled up in his garage — a story that involves Andy Warhol, Salvador Dalí and Dennis Hopper. We also explore the backstabbing families that have inspired HBO’s Succession with chief feature writer Henry Mance, ahead of its season three premiere. And finally: thank you for sharing your recommendations, they’re excellent. We’ve compiled them, alongside our colleagues’, for your listening pleasure. What did you think of this episode? Write to us, or record and send us a voice note at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. We’re on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap. Links from the episode: —How To Spend It interview with Alice Cooper: https://www.ft.com/content/9c338ab3-6445-47ca-91a7-7bb4091dc1a4 —Henry Mance on Succession: https://www.ft.com/content/fda23812-d724-4112-a5ec-78b836a89894 —Henry Mance’s new book, How to Love Animals in a human-shaped world: https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/111/1118598/how-to-love-animals-in-a-human-shaped-world/9781787332089.html A list of your recommendations: Jamiroquai’s Instagram; Punch: The Delights and Dangers of the Flowing Bowl by David Wundrich; Space 1.8 by Nala Sinephro; Emily Mariko’s cooking Tiktoks; Netflix’s Squid Game; 1776 - 1789 US history; Dressed podcast; Cynar artichoke liqueur; Garden City by John Mark Comber; Titane and Raw directed by Julia Ducournou; The Dante Project at the Royal Opera House; Frieze London art fairs; Dries van Noten designer; A House Through Time on the BBC. For an exclusive 50% online subscription (and a discounted FT Weekend print subscription!), follow this link: http://ft.com/weekendpodcast Sound design and mixing is by Breen Turner, with original music by Metaphor Music.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
As we watch the climate shift before our eyes, this weekend we focus on the awesomeness of nature and how it humbles us. Travel writer Mark Stratton brings us to a live erupting volcano in La Palma, where “the lava flows like honey on a plate”. Columnist Nilanjana Roy introduces us to the prescient books that warned us of a climate crisis 50 years ago. Plus, 1970s interior design is back, baby! Subeditor Cherish Rufus defines the aesthetic, and defends its revival. Listeners: this is your last chance to send us a recommendation! Email us one cultural thing you’re reading/watching/cooking/Googling etc that you can’t stop thinking about. We’ll use the best in next week’s episode. Write to us, or record and send us a voice note at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. We’re on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap. Links from the episode: —Mark Stratton on volcano tourism: https://www.ft.com/content/8c9b8847-2f8d-4a4f-8e07-9abc99b42b1f —Nilanjana Roy on what 1971 climate writing can teach us today: https://www.ft.com/content/6bca430e-c9b6-4997-ae78-ee6f4f5f24f1 —Cherish Rufus on 1970s design: https://www.ft.com/content/184c7504-2a7a-4a33-b0a4-ed42679f6e54 —The Love Your Mother poster: http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/2010543613 For an exclusive 50% online subscription (and a discounted FT Weekend print subscription!), follow this link: http://ft.com/weekendpodcast Sound design and mixing is by Breen Turner, with original music by Metaphor Music.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
How has the music industry changed over the past decade? The FT’s business and media reporters tell the dramatic tale, and introduce us to the most powerful exec in the business: Universal Chief Sir Lucian Grainge. Then, ethical philosopher Julian Baggini questions what our bookshelves say about us, and Work & Careers editor Isabel Berwick, a Duolingo master, makes the case for learning a new language from scratch. This weekend, we explore the forces that shape our cultural habits: how we listen to music, how we learn languages, and how we read. Listeners: what are you reading, watching, eating, doing, that is making you happy? We want your recommendations, to use in a future episode. Write us, or record and send us a voice note at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. We’re on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap. Links from the episode: —Profile of Sir Lucian Grainge, the last music mogul, by Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson and Anna Nicolaou: https://www.ft.com/content/ae259b02-67a1-4eec-848c-7dc739efa910 —Julian Baggini on why we should get rid of our books: https://www.ft.com/content/3aac4854-997e-4391-b7e0-627142ba00e4 —Isabel Berwick on being a Duolingo champion: https://www.ft.com/content/872f057e-ec37-4f93-b72a-03e83ec107a4 ––FT review of Ride Upon the Storm, one of the Danish shows Isabel loved (the other is called Rita): https://www.ft.com/content/f1ad0fda-1e5e-11e9-b126-46fc3ad87c65 For an exclusive 50% online subscription (and a discounted FT Weekend print subscription!), follow this link: http://ft.com/ftweekend Sound design and mixing is by Breen Turner, with original music by Metaphor Musi  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
This episode, we explore the question of how we’ve changed. Host Lilah Raptopoulos talks to the writer Imogen West-Knights about the phenomenon of treat brain: how the pandemic spurred our desire to excessively indulge. Then, columnist Janan Ganesh describes why lockdown decidedly did not change him — and why he’s worried if it changed you. Plus: Maria Shollenbarger sweeps us away on the world’s most glamorous train. Links from the episode: —Imogen West-Knights describes Treat Brain: https://www.ft.com/content/3ed08931-80b0-43a0-9bba-6c4bcc1b3e70 —Janan Ganesh on the lockdown epiphany that wasn’t: https://www.ft.com/content/bf7c501e-12a5-4737-b297-15eba91b26a0 —Maria Shollenbarger aboard the Orient Express: https://www.ft.com/content/9f776436-8205-48cc-a879-7a053f388671 —Lilah’s Instagram Live with Esther Perel: https://www.instagram.com/tv/CULKKCcJXdq/ We want to hear from you! Follow us on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap. What are you reading, watching, eating, doing, that is making you happy? We want your recommendations, and may use them in a future episode. Write us, or record and send us a voice note at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. Sound design and mixing is by Breen Turner, with original music by Metaphor Music.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Life & Arts columnist Enuma Okoro explores what our cities tell us about ourselves. Then, Lilah speaks with Elif Shafak—the most widely read woman novelist in Turkey—about writing in countries without freedom of speech, and her new book, The Island of Missing Trees. Plus: our prolific Undercover Economist Tim Harford makes a case for letting go of your to-do list. Links from the episode: —Enuma Okoro’s love letter to New York City: https://www.ft.com/content/e2507d84-9a12-4755-a9c7-41c9ea116947 —Lilah’s piece about visiting Armenia: https://www.ft.com/content/2e2f38b0-e7a1-11e8-8a85-04b8afea6ea3 —Review of Elif Shafak’s novel, The Island of Missing Trees: https://www.ft.com/content/1a064a06-bd19-43c7-8237-38931853d0e2 —Tim Harford on to-do lists: https://www.ft.com/content/06ffe40d-fdcc-4be8-b536-810cedce7ed1 —Oliver Burkeman on how not to waste your life (paywall): https://www.ft.com/content/dd0d477b-c1f7-4d74-af68-c1ef1692566c We love hearing from you. We’re on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap. Email us at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. Sound design and mixing is by Breen Turner, with original music by Metaphor Music.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Twenty years after the Twin Towers were brought down, host Lilah Raptopoulos explores where 9/11 sits in our memories. The FT’s New York correspondent Joshua Chaffin introduces us to billionaire developer Larry Silverstein, who bought the World Trade Center in July of 2001 and had to rebuild on the site of a tragedy. How do spaces change in meaning over time? The FT’s former Kabul correspondent Jon Boone introduces us to the “New Afghanistan” generation, what they were promised, and what was lost. Plus: we hear from a woman who fled the Taliban and is now waiting in limbo in Albania, suddenly a refugee. For a special offer on FT Weekend for all our print and digital content visit ft.com/weekendpodcast. We’re on Twitter at @FTWeekendpod. Lilah is on Twitter and Instagram @lilahrap. Links from the episode: Joshua Chaffin on Larry Silverstein: https://www.ft.com/content/f38a5067-58d1-491f-902f-568abcdd8a84#comments-anchor Jon Boone on The Last Days of the New Afghanistan: https://www.ft.com/content/4a276093-cf85-4da7-9093-6af6443bb53a Sound design and mixing is by Breen Turner, with original music by Metaphor Music.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this first-ever episode of the FT Weekend podcast, host Lilah Raptopoulos talks to Eleven Madison Park’s Daniel Humm and Chez Panisse’s legendary Alice Waters to discover how the world’s top chefs are finding purpose beyond their restaurants. Humm created a buzz in May when he announced that his world-famous restaurant would be going entirely plant-based. Has that risk paid off? And what does it mean to do good as a chef? Plus: the FT’s design critic Edwin Heathcote gives us a tour of the world’s most revengeful architecture, and reporter Madison Darbyshire shares tips for how to furnish your home with old things. For a special offer on FT Weekend for all our print and digital content visit ft.com/weekendpodcast. We’re on Twitter at @FTWeekendpod. Lilah is on Twitter and Instagram @lilahrap. Links from the episode: - Lilah’s piece on chefs (paywall): https://www.ft.com/content/246cdc2a-f135-4d3d-9d74-e524e9217699 - Edwin on the architecture of spite (paywall): https://www.ft.com/content/1161fbbe-5ae1-4328-bf59-dcd8b1d6564f - Madison’s masterclass in flea-market chic: https://www.ft.com/content/6c8bf8a2-ddee-11e9-9743-db5a370481bc Sound design and mixing is by Breen Turner, with original music by Metaphor Music.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Welcome to our new show: FT Weekend, the podcast. Every Saturday, from September 4, join host Lilah Raptopoulos for inspiring conversations, in-depth storytelling, a bit of escapism and a lot of fun. Brought to you by the award-winning Life & Arts journalists at the Financial Times. We love hearing from you. We’re on Twitter @ftweekendpod (https://twitter.com/ftweekendpod), and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap. Email us at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. Sound design and mixing is by Breen Turner, with original music by Metaphor Music.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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2021-08-2501:14

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Welcome to our Season 3 finale! To wrap up the year, Lilah is joined by the artist Shantell Martin. Shantell draws big, bold lines. Everywhere. She makes a strong case for taking out a pen. We discuss how to teach art to the next generation, what it means to 'sell out' in the art world, British versus American racism, and an urgent question for this time: who are you? Afterwards, co-host Griselda Murray Brown stops in during maternity leave to talk about motherhood and this season's themes. Thank you for joining us on this journey. You can keep in touch with Lilah on Instagram at @lilahrap, on Twitter at @lilahrap and @ftculturecall, and by email at culturecall@ft.com. Links from the show: For free 30-day access to FT journalism, sign up to the Coronavirus Business Update newsletter with this special link: https://www.ft.com/newsletter-signup/coronavirus?segmentId=0d92d58c-2c7d-178e-6aa8-81529dd53b1b —Shantell on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shantell_martin/ —Shantell's work at the New York City Ballet: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/24/arts/dance/new-york-city-ballet-shantell-martin-artist.html —Dear Grandmother, a collaboration between Dot and Shantell Martin: https://shantellmartin.art/work/x-dot-martin/   —New Tricks, Shantell's British detective show recommendation, is on Amazon Prime —Janelle Monáe's music video for Turntables: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8CFrCk6_0rM —A great recent FT interview with Mary Gaitskill, author of Lost Cat: 55dee0a5-1cb2-4aff-b536-9bb80f29a257 —Morning Song by Sylvia Plath: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/49008/morning-song-56d22ab4a0cee —Great back catalogue episodes: start the journey of this season with Episode 1: Miranda July! Some standout Gris interviews include Tyler Mitchell, George the Poet and Jia Tolentino. Some standout Lilah interviews include Ira Glass, Maaza Mengiste and Esther Perel. --- “Turntables” is an original song by Janelle Monáe for the Liz Garbus and Lisa Cortés' 2020 documentary film All In: The Fight for Democracy. Courtesy Bad Boy, 2021  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Maaza Mengiste is one of the FT's Women of the Year, and author of the epic historical novel The Shadow King. Her book, which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize, is about the Italian invasion of Ethiopia at the start of WWII. It asks massive questions about how history is remembered, recorded and retold. Maaza and Lilah talk about collective memory, women warriors, decolonising the archives and who will tell the stories of 2020. It's full of wisdom. You'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll take notes. Plus: Alice Fishburn, editor of FT Weekend Magazine, drops by to discuss the novel, our Women of the Year issue, and commissioning in a pandemic. We love hearing your thoughts! Email us at culturecall@ft.com. Message Lilah on Instagram or Twitter @lilahrap, and the podcast @ftculturecall. Links:For free 30-day access to FT journalism, sign up to the Coronavirus Business Update newsletter with this special link: https://www.ft.com/newsletter-signup/coronavirus?segmentId=0d92d58c-2c7d-178e-6aa8-81529dd53b1b –Explore the FT Women of 2020 issue (paywall) https://www.ft.com/womenof2020 –Maaza Mengiste's Inventory Q&A in FT Magazine (paywall) https://www.ft.com/content/cc2a53d3-960e-4617-a1c1-0df51e17bdae –A Big Read on the crisis in Ethiopia (FT): https://www.ft.com/content/b888c23a-45ed-4937-9154-3117cc23e202 and a Twitter thread from Maaza on the humanitarian disaster https://twitter.com/MaazaMengiste/status/1331312586869104641 –What's going on currently in Armenia (Politico) https://www.politico.eu/article/nagorno-karabakh-refugees-see-little-chance-of-returning-home-after-peace-deal/ and a history of the conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh (Jacobin) https://jacobinmag.com/2020/10/azerbaijan-armenia-conflict-nationalism-colonialism –Project 3541, Maaza's online archive of the 1935-41 Italo-Ethiopian war https://www.project3541.com/ –An essay by Maaza on losing her father https://thecorrespondent.com/484/trapping-ghosts-photographs-dont-lock-us-to-loss-they-remind-us-to-live/64077614260-800b5ee9 –The Rockefeller Tree in all its glory https://twitter.com/liamstack/status/1328801264075935747 –Maaza's book recommendations: Afterlives by Abdulrazak Gurnah, Rainbow Milk by Paul Mendez, Trieste by Dasa Drndic –Alice mentioned two FT Magazine stories: The next pandemic: where is it coming from and how do we stop it? https://www.ft.com/content/2a80e4a2-7fb9-4e2c-9769-bc0d98382a5c and Siri Hustvedt: ‘I think of the sirens as New York’s heartbreaking music’ https://www.ft.com/content/9b39d8ae-8433-11ea-b872-8db45d5f6714 –Alice's book recommendation: Hamnet by Maggie O'Farrell –Our next guest is Shantell Martin. Here's her Instagram https://www.instagram.com/shantell_martin/?hl=en and a TED Talk about her work https://www.ted.com/talks/shantell_martin_no_one_else_you_could_be –Reader recs: The Social Dilemma and Love and Anarchy are on Netflix –The reader-recommended piece by Eric Hoffer https://www.cooperative-individualism.org/hoffer-eric_role-of-the-undesirables-1963.htm –Lilah's recs: Kiley Reid's novel Such a Fun Age comes out soon in paperback https://www.ft.com/content/542200be-322a-11ea-a329-0bcf87a328f2 / The Queen's Gambit is on Netflix  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Simon is one of the world’s premier historians and art historians, and also a colleague! After a tumultuous election, we've invited him on to help connect the dots and give us much-needed historical context. Plus: Neil Munshi, our west Africa correspondent joins us from Lagos to reflect on our conversation and discuss his recent piece on how companies are facing their brutal colonial histories. Two people with global, historical lenses through which to see 2020. What do you think is possible now, that seemed impossible before? Email us atculturecall@ft.com. You can message Lilah on Instagram or Twitter @lilahrap, and find the podcast on Twitter @ftculturecall. We love voice notes - so send those, too. Links from the episode: –Simon's piece The two Americas: LBJ, MLK and what the dramas of 1965 can teach a polarised nation https://www.ft.com/content/73a26ef6-9083-43bb-8881-b48768a87b92 –Simon's piece on statues: History is better served by putting the Men in Stone in museums: https://www.ft.com/content/1117dfb6-8e51-46ec-a74b-59973a96a85a –Simon's BBC series the Romantics and Us is on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NgYZaUBQg9s&t=1093s –Wendell Wilkie's One World: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_World_(book) –September, by Gerhard Richter: https://www.gerhard-richter.com/en/art/paintings/photo-paintings/death-9/september-13954 –Midnight Diner: Tokyo Stories is on Netflix –Neil Munshi's piece, Belgium’s reckoning with a brutal history in Congo: https://www.ft.com/content/a17b87ec-207d-4aa7-a839-8e17153bcf51  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
“I feel like America was an experiment that right now is yielding really hideous, ugly results". In the days after the US election, Lilah explores how divided the US is with artist and activist iO Tillett Wright. iO created the hit true-crime podcast The Ballad of Billy Balls. He just finished a ten-year project travelling to all 50 states to photograph 10,000 queer Americans and has a unique lens on America. They discuss the election, how Americans were taught to hate, the dangers of groupthink, the ebb and flow of the fight for queer rights, this generation’s fight for civil rights and what effective activism looks like. iO's projects: –The Ballad of Billy Balls: https://www.theballadofbillyballs.com/ –His memoir, Darling Days: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28446322-darling-days –Self Evident Truths: http://www.selfevidentproject.com/ –iO's Ted talk, 50 Shades of Gay: https://www.ted.com/talks/io_tillett_wright_fifty_shades_of_gay?language=en –A conversation between iO and King Princess (Interview Magazine): https://www.interviewmagazine.com/culture/io-tillett-wright-and-king-princess-examine-queerness-in-todays-america iO's recommendations: –Rabbit Hole podcast, from the New York Times https://www.nytimes.com/column/rabbit-hole –The Social Dilemma is on Netflix (here's an FT interview with its director, Jeff Orlowski): https://www.ft.com/content/f1d3a2c8-1a01-4d37-a939-6067ab2b8b63 –Swindled, a podcast about white-collar crime & corporate greed: https://swindledpodcast.com/ –A General Theory of Love: a book about the science of human emotions and biological psychiatry https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/35711.A_General_Theory_of_Love Ahead of our next episode, here are three pieces by Simon Schama: –The two Americas: LBJ, MLK and what the dramas of 1965 can teach a polarised nation https://www.ft.com/content/73a26ef6-9083-43bb-8881-b48768a87b92 –Simon Schama: History is better served by putting the Men in Stone in museums https://www.ft.com/content/1117dfb6-8e51-46ec-a74b-59973a96a85a –Plague Time: Simon Schama on what history tells us https://www.ft.com/content/279dee4a-740b-11ea-95fe-fcd274e920ca  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
After a summer defined by protest, we invite on Ai Weiwei, one of the most influential artists and activists of our time, to discuss whether we've changed. Weiwei describes how to protest creatively and powerfully ("you only see your power from your enemy's eye"), the symbolic meaning of this pandemic, and his view on the state of humanity. Plus: FT arts editor Jan Dalley joins Lilah to unpack the conversation and consider where art is going. Links from the episode: —Circa 2020 on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/circa.art/?hl=en. They're raising money for struggling UK artists with a £100 Ai Weiwei print here through October: https://circa.art/the-circa-economy/ —Watch Human Flow on Amazon Prime or here: https://www.humanflow.com/watch-at-home/ —Watch Coronation, Ai Weiwei's most recent documentary, which compiled secret footage of Wuhan during the peak of the Covid crisis, on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/ondemand/267483 —13 Ai Weiwei works to know (Royal Academy of Arts): https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/article/ai-weiwei-13-works-to-know —FT piece on the best new operas online (paywall): https://www.ft.com/content/4b8480f7-6e96-4a90-bea2-3ed40c94d504 —Jan Dalley's review of the art world in the 2010s: https://www.ft.com/content/b8cd60bc-227b-11ea-b8a1-584213ee7b2b Clip credit: AT SEA consists of footage filmed by Ai Weiwei during the making of “Human Flow” in 2016. Since 2015, hundreds of thousands of refugees have attempted the dangerous sea journey trying to reach Europe. Alongside these scenes are shots of physical barriers erected across Europe, the cold response to the plea for safety and shelter from the world’s most vulnerable. Video edited by: Autumn Rin Quotes: The border is not in Lesbos, it is in our minds and in our hearts. – Ai Weiwei, Chinese artist (b. 1957) Music Credit: Karsten Fundal  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this bonus episode, we bring you a conversation between Lilah and Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and former US Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey. In her recent memoir, Memorial Drive, Natasha shares the painful story of her mother's murder at the hands of her stepfather when Natasha was 19. Natasha was born to a black mother and white father in the Deep South during the civil rights movement. When she was an infant, the KKK burned a cross in her family's front yard. In this interview she speaks to the cyclical nature of history, the disease of racism, and the power of memory. This interview was originally recorded at the FT Weekend Live Festival in early September 2020. Get tickets to the virtual October 22 FT NextGen festival here for free, using the promo code FTPodcast. —Watch this conversation between Natasha and Lilah on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=POReYD7lRvg —Read Natasha’s piece for the FT, America the Beautiful: three generations in the struggle for civil rights: https://www.ft.com/content/eaa41ce4-a65a-11ea-92e2-cbd9b7e28ee6 —Read the FT review for Memorial Drive, written by playwright Bonnie Greer: https://www.ft.com/content/a1a857e4-f9cf-4165-9a25-a7c9758b9dcb —Read Natasha’s poem, Imperatives for Carrying On in the Aftermath: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/148332/imperatives-for-carrying-on-in-the-aftermath  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Miranda July is an artist ahead of her time: a prolific filmmaker, writer, musician, actor and more. Her work deliberately leads us into discomfort – and then hugs us from behind. Her third feature film, Kajillionaire, now on US and UK general release, is an exploration of loneliness and love that feels especially prescient now. Miranda and Lilah discuss what it’s like to release a film during a pandemic, how to make art when we don’t know what we’ll want in the future, and how a weirder world has made her film a lot less weird. Plus: FT writer Harriet Fitch-Little joins Lilah to debrief on the interview and discuss why we all stopped going to digital events. The coronavirus pandemic has broken so much open. And that gives us a very unique chance to reimagine. Welcome to the first of a six-part season. From now to the end of 2020, Lilah will be posing the question “what’s possible now?” to different creators and thinkers, to FT Life & Arts journalists, and to you. What do you think is possible now, that seemed impossible before? Email us at culturecall@ft.com. You can message Lilah on Instagram or Twitter @lilahrap, and find the podcast on Twitter @ftculturecall. We love voice notes – so send those, too. Links from the episode:  - Our Next Gen virtual festival, hosted by the FT’s young editors, is on October 22! Buy tickets here, and use our discount code, NextGen2020: https://nextgen.live.ft.com/ - Anthem, by Leonard Cohen: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCS_MwkWzes  - A deep dive on the line, “There is a crack in everything – that’s how the light gets in”: https://qz.com/835076/leonard-cohens-anthem-the-story-of-the-line-there-is-a-crack-in-everything-thats-how-the-light-gets-in/  - Lilah’s piece about living through history: https://www.ft.com/content/1cc03ac3-4ac8-4b9c-933d-621b5eb50e53 - Harriet Fitch-Little’s profile of Miranda July: https://www.ft.com/content/e56b7528-7eb0-11ea-8fdb-7ec06edeef84 - FT’s Kajillionaire review (paywall): https://www.ft.com/content/94d0ca11-eb80-49a9-adbc-ebaa0509341f - Jenny Odell interviews Miranda July: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtXe5xJyOU8 - Behind the scenes of Jopie, Miranda’s crowdsourced video: https://www.instagram.com/stories/highlights/17913179020421773 - An excerpt of John Giorno’s memoir, Great Demon Kings: https://www.vogue.com/article/john-giorno-memoir - New York Nico on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/newyorknico/  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The season kicks off on Friday, October 9! With co-host Griselda Murray Brown on maternity leave, Lilah Raptopoulos presents a new series of conversations with creators and thinkers about our radically transformed cultural landscape. We are living through history. The pandemic has exposed deep cracks in our systems, giving us an unprecedented chance to reexamine and upend. This six-episode season is based around the following question: what’s possible now?  Join Lilah, star guests and the team behind the Financial Times’ critically-acclaimed Life & Arts journalism to explore how culture is helping us envision what’s next. Want to say hi? Email us at culturecall@ft.com, find Lilah on Instagram or Twitter at @lilahrap, and find the show on Twitter at @ftculturecall.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The world has changed. In the midst of the Black Lives Matter movement, Gris speaks to Tyler Mitchell, a 25-year-old photographer, filmmaker and political artist who shot to fame when he photographed Beyonce for the September issue of American Vogue in 2018. In his work, Tyler explores what freedom means for black Americans, and all the ways in which it is denied. Gris first spoke to Tyler in early May - five days before armed white men killed Ahmaud Arbery while he was on a jog - and they talked again just before this episode was published. This is our finale for Season Two! Thank you for an incredible run. Gris is about to go on maternity leave, but Lilah will be back for Season Three in a few months’ time. In the meantime, you can still always find us talking about culture on Twitter @FTCultureCall or on Instagram at @lilahrap and @griseldamurraybrown, and you can email us at culturecall@ft.com. Links and notes from the episode: –Here is our massive list of listener recommendations for what to watch on streaming platforms. Thanks to all who shared their thoughts! There’s no paywall on this, so you can share it freely: https://www.ft.com/content/87f1f7fe-af30-11ea-a4b6-31f1eedf762e –If you want free access to explore FT journalism for 30 days, sign up to the Coronavirus Business Update newsletter using this special link: https://www.ft.com/newsletter-signup/coronavirus?segmentId=0d92d58c-2c7d-178e-6aa8-81529dd53b1b –White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo (You can also listen to an interview with Robin here: https://www.wnycstudios.org/podcasts/come-through/articles/5-robin-diangelo) –Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge  –The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett  –I May Destroy You by Michaela Coel (BBC iPlayer and HBO) –Here’s an excellent recent episode of our sister podcast, Behind the Money, on the history of police funding in America: https://www.ft.com/content/a6d56dd2-fd2c-4047-a502-c6c6d9dc3f90 –Tyler Mitchell on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tylersphotos –Tyler’s new photo book I Can Make You Feel Good, published by Prestel on July 28: https://prestelpublishing.randomhouse.de/book/I-Can-Make-You-Feel-Good/Tyler-Mitchell/Prestel/e563080.rhd –Inside Tyler’s exhibition I Can Make You Feel Good: https://www.anothermag.com/art-photography/12200/tyler-mitchell-photographer-i-can-make-you-feel-good-exhibition-new-york-2020 –Photographers who Tyler Mitchell cites as inspirations: Ryan McGinley, Larry Clark, and Petra Collins (who he calls ‘the first internet phenomenon photographer on some level’) –Jeremy O Harris’s tweets on his experience at Yale School of Drama: https://twitter.com/jeremyoharris/status/1270447515570233350 and https://twitter.com/jeremyoharris/status/1270858770168643584  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
This week, Lilah talks to Liana Finck, a graphic novelist and New Yorker cartoonist with a fan base on Instagram that’s half a million strong. Liana is known for her funny and astute explorations of what it means to be human. She talks about how to free yourself up to be creative in quarantine, where confidence comes from, the most interesting human expressions to draw and what it’s like to have Ariana Grande slide into your DMs. We also share some of your Netflix recommendations, which we are still collecting to publish! Let us know what we should be watching that the streaming algorithms are hiding from us. Fill out our short form at ft.com/culturecallout, or email us at culturecall@ft.com. If you want to get social, we're on Twitter @FTCultureCall and Instagram at @griseldamurraybrown and @lilahrap. Links and notes from the episode: –A special gift from us to you: sign up to the FT's Coronavirus Business Update newsletter and get free access to our journalism for 30 days https://www.ft.com/newsletter-signup/coronavirus?segmentId=0d92d58c-2c7d-178e-6aa8-81529dd53b1b   About Liana Finck: –Liana's Instagram: https://instagram.com/lianafinck/ –Her graphic memoir is called Passing for Human –Some of Liana’s New Yorker cartoons about quarantine: https://www.newyorker.com/humor/daily-shouts/some-drawings-from-week-three-at-home –Unpopular likes and unpopular dislikes: https://www.instagram.com/p/B8pSyMMlHcG/ –Me/you/us, plotted: https://www.instagram.com/p/B_Yy65xlYQB/ –Liana’s recommendations for which graphic novels to start with: 1. Everything is Flammable, by Gabrielle Bell 2. Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant? by Roz Chast 3. Wendy, by Walter Scott   –Lilah and listener Martha O’Neill’s film recommendation, Three Identical Strangers, is on Netflix –Martin Wolf video: How might the world be different after the pandemic? https://www.ft.com/video/dafc3578-5c76-412a-8ba3-016495031bd1 –Martin Wolf column: Maintaining the lockdown and saving the economy are mutually compatible (paywall) https://www.ft.com/content/e486590e-8539-11ea-b872-8db45d5f6714 –Apps about trees: Tree Talk (London) and Leafsnap (US and UK) –Gris' film recommendation, 120 BPM, is on Hulu and available to rent –Listener Victoria Amico's Netflix recommendations are 13th (Ava DuVernay's documentary on racialised mass incarceration in the US) and The Great Hack (on the Cambridge Analytica scandal) –Listener Kana Kamagae's Netflix recommendations are Never Have I Ever (Mindy Kaling’s TV series) and Tigertail  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
This week, Gris talks to the brilliant 30-year-old playwright Jeremy O Harris about his Broadway sensation Slave Play and his autobiographical "Daddy". This is an interview that will stick with you for a long time. They discuss how black art is re-packaged by white institutions, how black and white audiences respond differently to his work, and how to make theatre more accessible — both for quarantine and for younger audiences (Harris is also an executive producer on Euphoria). Plus: a special appearance from Phoebe Waller Bridge! As always, we want to hear from you. This week, we'd love to know what gems the Netflix algorithm is hiding from us. What are you streaming that we should be watching? We'll publish your list! Fill out our short form at ft.com/culturecallout, or email us at culturecall@ft.com. f you want to get social, we're on Twitter @FTCultureCall and Instagram at @griseldamurraybrown and @lilahrap. Links and notes from the episode: –A special gift from us to you: sign up to the FT's Coronavirus Business Update newsletter and get free access to our journalism for 30 days! https://www.ft.com/newsletter-signup/coronavirus?segmentId=0d92d58c-2c7d-178e-6aa8-81529dd53b1b –The recipe for kuku sabzi, a delicious Persian frittata: https://youtu.be/OJFoIfzY7eI –A great piece about Jenny Odell's How To Do Nothing: https://www.latimes.com/books/la-ca-jc-jenny-odell-interview-how-nothing-20190509-story.html –Wesley Morris on ESPN's The Last Dance https://www.nytimes.com/article/the-last-dance-jordan.html –(More Wesley Morris content) Still Processing dissects Tiger King: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/09/podcasts/still-processing-tiger-king.html –FT review of Becoming on Netflix (paywall): https://www.ft.com/content/e46b7582-8df7-11ea-a8ec-961a33ba80aa –Aisha Harris' review of Slave Play: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/07/opinion/slave-play-broadway.html –Slave Play's set designer on the choice behind the onstage mirror: https://www.interviewmagazine.com/art/rihanna-mirrors-and-america-processing-slave-plays-set-design –Genre defying women that Jeremy mentioned: Aphra Behn, Caryl Churchill, Suzan-Lori Parks –Jeremy's recommendation of Perfect Blue by Satochi Kon: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perfect_Blue –Jeremy on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jeremyoharris  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (5)

Johnny Leonard

we as szsw as s as w as sea s as seww a e see ssswssssaaaawaED

Oct 3rd
Reply

My account cleared itself

SPAM SPAM SPAM SPAM I DIDN"T SUB TO THIS PILE OF @!##$

Sep 30th
Reply

m F

2020/2021 quality of discussion needs to improve. I feel like I'm having a chat with some basic pals who don't really know much. Some excellent guests, input from good journalists. But interview questions such as "so you like err did the thing you set out to do, how does it feel?" or frequent reliance on cheesy lines and a feeling that not much thought has gone into interview prep is just a bit rubbish. Sorry! I want to love this and I did when it was done in a 2 person format.

Sep 21st
Reply

ID19405181

The Simon Schama interview was good as was the interview with Mengiste However very few programmes of the same quality Also the focus is too American and sometimes Brits almost nothing European or from Asia Also too much useless chit chat

Jan 11th
Reply

Isobel Holland

great to hear articulate, intelligent women talking together. Thank you

Mar 17th
Reply
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