DiscoverFeed Play Love
Feed Play Love
Claim Ownership

Feed Play Love

Author: Babyology

Subscribed: 427Played: 7,387
Share

Description

From nurturing newborns to taming toddlers, we unravel the art and science of parenting with real-life stories and expert advice. The hilarious to the humbling and all the nitty gritty in between. Hosted by mum of two and journalist Shevonne Hunt. Senior Producer and editor is Debby Ng.

1625 Episodes
Reverse
Before you become a parent, everyone tells you to get a lot of sleep. While it's very normal for babies to wake during the night, sometimes they wake more than they need to. Mothercraft nurse Chris Minogue knows how to help when things get a little tough. Her book Bringing Baby Home has helped a lot of families, but sometimes you need some tailored advice. On this episode Chris helps parents with the following concerns:A ten-and-a-half-month-old who wakes crying through the night, a seven-and-a-half-month-old who wakes and feeds all night, a three-year-old who is not enjoying summer camp, a nine-month-old not sleeping through the night, a four-month-old who only has a bowel movement every seven-14 days and possible low milk supply relating to a wakeful nine-month-old. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
How did you welcome your baby to the world? You may have had a Christening, a baby shower or even a celebratory piece of sushi. Different cultures have different ways of celebrating the birth of a baby. Jasmine Seymour is a Darug woman and primary school teacher. She’s written a book called Baby Business, all about a baby smoking ceremony. It's sprinkled with Darug words and a strong sense of history and place. Jasmine explains how smoking ceremonies work for babies work and why it’s good for the whole community. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Prince Harry, David Beckham, The Rock – all famous dads who have been publicly shamed. The dad-judgment is as alive and well as any criticisms flung at mothers. Sometimes it’s mums who do the shaming. Sean Szeps from Bringing up Gaybies is a dad with twin toddlers, and he’s heard his fair share of things that people probably should have kept to themselves. He tells us the typical things he hears as a dad, and why it makes his blood boil. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Many couples are told not to tell everyone they are pregnant until they are 12 weeks in because miscarriage is common. But Samantha Payne from The Pink Elephants Support Network says that needs to change. New research has shown that women are not being adequately supported after a miscarriage. She explains why sharing a pregnancy early can help change how people deal with miscarriage, and what needs to change in how women, in particular, are supported by doctors and nurses. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
It’s fair to say that maternity leave is not a holiday. However, going back to work isn’t always as easy as you might think. Sure you get to have adult conversations and drink a hot coffee, but you can also have feelings of guilt, and also a desire to stay with your baby or child. Gemma Cribb is a psychologist at the Equilibrium Collective who helps parents return to work. She gives us some tips on how to navigate the conflicting emotions when you return to work after having a baby. The Equilibrium Collective’s event for working mums is in September in Sydney. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Anna Machin is an evolutionary anthropologist who says that it’s time western society acknowledged that dads are co-parents too. While advertisements may have us believe that dads are hopeless creatures who can’t change a nappy or turn on a washing machine, Anna argues that men have an evolutionary drive to be engaged fathers. Anna explains how hormones change in men when they become dads, and why they are vitally important to the survival of our species. Anna is the author of The Life of Dad, the making of the modern father. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
We all know that breast is best, but it’s not always going to work for everyone. There are plenty of reasons why a mum can’t or doesn’t want to breastfeed, and many mums who make this choice are left feeling ashamed and alone. Terri Smith is the Chief Executive of Peri-natal Anxiety and Depression Australia (PANDA) She explains how the message that "breast is best" led to negative mental health outcomes for some women, and what we can do about it. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Self-kindness is a fabulous concept, but one that is difficult to put into practice. Particularly when you’re a parent trying to keep all the balls in the air, and you keep dropping them. Rebecca Ray is a clinical psychologist and author of The Art of Self-Kindness. She explains why most people find it hard to be kind to themselves, and how it’s something we can practice every day. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Working out what's going on with your baby or small child can be challenging. Why won't they sleep through the night? How do I stop them cat-napping during the day? Is head butting furniture normal? Mothercraft nurse Chris Minogue has been answering these questions for over thirty years, and every week on Feed Play Love she is in the studio, just for you.On this episode of Helpline she tackles: Lengthening day sleeps for a 19-month-old, getting a two-year-old to sleep through the night in their own bed, a 15-month-old who is teething and hitting their head, when to swap the bottle for breakfast first for a 13-month-old, how to stop a two-year-old tantruming toddler from hurting themselves, a 14-month-old who wakes up at 4.30am and a 15-month old who has three bottles of milk through the night. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Not many parents get the opportunity to sit down with their friends and have an uninterrupted conversation. Kerry Cue and Doris Brett want you to seriously consider making time for a salon. Modelled on those that took place in France in the early 18th Century, the salons of 2019 involve more intimate topics than politics and philosophy. In their book, The Sunday Story Club, they retell stories that were shared in their salons. Kerry and Doris explain why salons are the cure for a society wrapped up in online interactions and disconnected from their fellow humans. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
loading
Comments 
loading
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store