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Feel Better, Live More with Dr Rangan Chatterjee
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Feel Better, Live More with Dr Rangan Chatterjee

Author: Dr Rangan Chatterjee: GP & Author

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“Health has become overcomplicated. I aim to simplify it”


In this podcast, we hear stories from leading health experts and exciting personalities who offer easy health life-hacks, expert advice and debunk common health myths giving you the tools to revolutionise how you eat, sleep, move and relax. Hosted by Dr Chatterjee - one of the most influential GPs in the country with nearly 20 years experience, star of BBC 1’s Doctor In the House, and author of international best-selling book ‘The 4 Pillar Plan’ – Feel Better, Live More aims to inspire, empower and transform the way we feel. When we are healthier we are happier because when we feel better we live more.

Find out more on drchatterjee.com/podcast. Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee, twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk and facebook.com/DrChatterjee. Find out about Dr Chatterjee’s best-selling books The 4 Pillar Plan, The Stress Solution and Feel Better in 5.

125 Episodes
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In today’s episode, we’re returning to one of my favourite topics. Breathwork is where my personal and professional interests collide. How we breathe affects every body system we have and I’m excited to welcome James Nestor, science journalist and author of new book Breath, which explores the data behind this ancient, but some might say lost, art. And yes, it is an art. As we discuss, it doesn’t matter whether you follow a new or ancient technique to harness the potential of your breath, the principles are the same. What I love about James’ approach is he has no agenda to push. He hasn’t developed his own breathing technique, theory or product. He’s a journalist with an enquiring, sceptical mind. By his own admission, he came from a place where – like many of you, perhaps – he thought, ‘What’s all the fuss about breathing? It’s automatic, it’s easy, our bodies know what they’re doing’. But do they really? During this conversation, we cover some of the fascinating – objective – insights James has uncovered in his research. He explains the benefits of nasal breathing, the importance of masticating and how diet affects the skeletal development of our children’s mouths. James reveals how learning to chew more, chewing on one side and using mouth tape at night has changed the structure of his own mouth. His airways – and his wellbeing – have never been better. We discuss the long list of conditions breathing may improve; how athletes can benefit. And James reveals the therapeutic process behind some ‘super breathing’ techniques. Whether you’re already practising breathwork, you’re curious or yet to be convinced, James has a no-nonsense, rigorous approach we can all take something from. I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did! Show notes available at: https://drchatterjee.com/124 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
CAUTION: Contains mild swearing and adult themes. If there is any certainty in life, it is that things will never stay the same, yet so many of us struggle to embrace and accept change. In the conversation today, Julia Samuel, a leading British psychotherapist, with over 3 decades of experience teaches us how we can all adapt and thrive during our most difficult and transformative experiences. Julia is passionate that pain is the agent of change – whether that’s through grieving someone that has died or through what Julia calls, ‘living losses’ (e.g. loss of job, a health crisis, or as many of us are experiencing at the moment, the loss of a life that we used to lead). We talk about how the way we respond to change, in many ways determines how our lives will unfold. Julia explains how love is powerful medicine and that a strong predictor of outcomes in grief is love and connection to others. We delve into transgenerational trauma, my own journey with grief and, importantly, Julia explains how to talk about death - especially with our children. This is a really enlightening conversation and I hope you get as much from it as I did. Show notes available at: https://drchatterjee.com/123 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
I am delighted to kick off Season 4 of Feel Better Live More with former monk turned social media superstar, Jay Shetty. After having spent three years living as a monk in India, Jay believes that you don’t have to live like a monk to think like one. With his social media following now totaling over 32 million, Jay is transforming the ancient wisdom he has learned into bite-sized nuggets that will help us all live more meaningful and purposeful lives. So many of us these days are living lives that are not truly ours. Instead, we base our opinion of ourselves on what we think other people think of us. In today’s conversation, Jay and I talk about how we can figure out our own identity and live our truest and most authentic life. He talks us through his value audit exercise which will help us all on our way to living the life we really want. We also discuss the importance of staying open and curious to new ideas and how our childhood experiences play into all our relationships. We delve into gratitude and Jay shares some brilliant tips to help you get more out of your daily gratitude practice. This conversation is full of timeless wisdom, personal stories and actionable tips and I really hope it helps you live the life you were born to live. Show notes available at: https://drchatterjee.com/122 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
CAUTION ADVISED: this podcast contains swearing. Today, I welcome Peter Crone, aka ‘The Mind Architect’ back to the podcast. Peter is a writer, speaker and thought leader in human potential. He has worked with world-famous actors, athletes and the business elite yet what he has to say is just as likely to resonate with the average person, seeking to feel more comfortable in their own skin. His mission is to help people live life without limitations and stress. What he offers instead, is a life of freedom and peace. And who wouldn’t want that? I think that’s why my last conversation with Peter back on episode 82 was one of the most popular conversations I have had to date.  Peter acknowledges that people struggle and the human experience is challenging but he offers a different way to look at life and your current problems. He believes our subconscious dialogue – the self-talk that’s rooted in childhood conditioning and that we may not even be aware of – gives us a certain idea of who we are. By questioning this, and realising it’s not the truth, we can find freedom from suffering. We can get to know the triggers that make us feel less-than, and break free of our limitations.  If you heard my last conversation with Peter, you’ll know how life-changing his philosophy can be. This conversation has even more anecdotes that will help you apply Peter’s philosophy into your life. This is a really powerful conversation and I hope it helps you to find more freedom in your life.  Show notes available at: https://drchatterjee.com/121 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
We are living through a crisis of distraction. Plans get sidetracked, friends are ignored, work never seems to get done. You sit down at your desk to work on an important project, but a notification on your phone interrupts your morning. Later, as you're about to get back to work, you receive an email that you need to reply to. At home, screens get in the way of quality time with your family. Another day goes by, and once again, your most important personal and professional goals are put on hold. What would be possible if you followed through on your best intentions? What could you accomplish if you could stay focused? What if you had the power to become ‘indistractable?’ My guest on today’s conversation is an international bestselling author, former Stanford lecturer, and behavioral design expert, Nir Eyal. Nir started his career by helping tech-companies develop products that are intentionally habit-forming. Now, Nir has written a new book, Indistractable: How To Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life, which explains how to get the best of technology and reclaim your attention, without letting it get the best of you. Nir believes that we all have the power to become indistractable and in today’s conversation he reveals how. He explains what really drives human behavior and why ‘time management is pain management’. Nir also shares actionable techniques that will help you design your time, realise your ambitions, and live the life you really want. I hope you find this conversation empowering. Show notes available at: https://drchatterjee.com/120 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
As human beings, relationships are fundamental to who we are. We know that relationships can be a big source of happiness and fulfillment in our lives but they can also be one of the major sources of stress. So, why is it that we often find relationships so hard? In this conversation, I speak to arguably one of the world’s leading and most original thinkers on modern relationships, the wonderful, Esther Perel, who has long been on my dream guest list. We talk about the many differences between relationships of the past and the relationships of now. How we are now all under pressure not only to have the perfect relationship, but also to portray this illusion to others as well. Esther believes that it’s the quality of our relationships that determines the quality of our lives. And who we are is actually a combination of how we see ourselves and how others see us. We only really get to know ourselves through our interactions with others. We talk about the idea that we are not one person but different with each person – and rather than being one-way, all interactions are reciprocal. We discuss the value of couples’ counselling and whether it’s something all relationships, healthy or otherwise, need. Reassuringly, we learn that there’s no such thing as a perfect relationship, they all follow a rhythm of harmony, disharmony and repair. Esther and I touch and expand on our own situations and how the family history and values you bring to a relationship or marriage impacts the dynamic between you. She talks us through how much the concept of marriage has changed over the past century, and how it’s a tall order to ask just one person in our lives to meet all of our needs – needs which once would have been shared across our extended families and communities. This episode is a joyous celebration of all the relationships in our lives. It’s challenging, poignant but ultimately hugely practical. Esther offers some wonderful examples of practices we can all start implementing today, from rituals to build strength in our intimate relationships, to advice on reframing criticism or starting difficult conversations at work. The upshot? Rather than hoping others will change, we can be the change ourselves. It was a great pleasure to speak with such an incredible lady and I know that you will get a lot of value from hearing what she has to say. Show notes available at: https://drchatterjee.com/119 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Why is it that we equate long hours with greater effort? Could a four-day working week be the change we need for public health as well as the economy? My guest on today’s conversation is Alex Pang, an author and former Silicon Valley tech consultant who noticed that, when he went on sabbatical from work, he suddenly got a lot more done. This led him to research and write about resting more and working less. We begin the podcast by talking about active rest or, as Alex also terms it, ‘deep play’. How taking regular breaks from intense work to do something you love is a means to enhanced creativity and productivity. We talk about how the technologies we thought would give us a better work-life balance have instead robbed us of boundaries and ground our work down into a fine powder that settles on all areas of our life. It works both ways – we check social media or do our online banking while we’re at work, just as we check our work emails when we’re at home.  The solution, says Alex, is to work shorter, more focused hours and balance that with more ‘serious leisure’ time. There are already progressive companies out there who are shortening the working day or week and reaping the surprising rewards of increased profitability and productivity! At a time when many of us are working in very different ways from normal, Alex’s work seems incredibly prescient. As lockdown slowly lifts and workplaces start to reopen, finding a balance between work, rest and play that promotes productivity and growth alongside employee wellbeing feels like a no-brainer. The same applies to the self-employed and across all industries. Surely this is our window of opportunity to explore what the ‘new normal’ should be? I found this conversation really inspiring and I hope you do too. Show notes available at: https://drchatterjee.com/118 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
CAUTION ADVISED: this podcast contains themes of an adult nature. Darryl Edwards – aka The Fitness Explorer – was one of the very first guests to appear on this podcast, all the way back on episode 7. He is someone who is passionate about promoting movement that is fun and playful. But that’s not why I invited Darryl back to talk to me on this episode. If there’s a thread that runs through all my podcasts, it’s that empathy and compassion are essential to feeling better and living more – and that’s more important now than ever. This episode was recorded 10 days after George Floyd lost his life in Minneapolis, US, and the #BlackLivesMatter movement rose up in response.  I talk to Darryl about his experiences growing up in the UK with black skin. He was born in the UK but his grandparents came here from Jamaica in the early 1950’s. Whilst Darryl is a leading light in the wellness industry, he’s also one of the few black faces. And perhaps, until now, we haven’t thought enough about why.  Darryl has an in-depth knowledge of black history and in today’s conversation, he takes us back to the very origins of the transatlantic slave trade, the ‘social construct of race’, and dehumanisation of African people in the late 14th century. He describes how, far from being a US-only problem, transatlantic slavery was introduced by Europeans throughout the world and capitalised upon by the British. He explains how racism didn’t end with the abolition of the slave trade but continued through systemic laws of suppression, oppression, colonisation and segregation. I’m really grateful to Darryl for distilling what he knows into a form that we can all understand and act on.  He shares shocking examples of racism he’s experienced, from playground bullying through overt workplace discrimination to the fact that, as a black man, the police have pulled him over while driving at least 100 times, including at gunpoint. Whether this is an experience you share or one you can only contemplate with horror, the question we are all asking now is how should we respond. Darryl and I discuss how all of us, not just the black community, have a responsibility to internalise racism and think ‘that could have been me’. Empathy and compassion surely have to be part of the solution. Can something positive come from the tragic death of George Floyd? Perhaps, if those of us now listening, engaging and learning go out into the world and demand change. ‘Our window of discussion has extended,’ says Darryl. ‘Please listen to us.’ This conversation is a very good place to start. Show notes available at https://drchatterjee.com/117 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
For many people, lockdown has provided a time for personal development. You may have discovered and worked on new qualities or skills. But I’m very aware that just as many people have found it a really stressful and incredibly busy time. Perhaps you’re a key worker, or a working parent juggling schooling and office hours. Maybe you’re out of work, have lost loved ones, or are in any way struggling to cope. This week’s podcast has a really important message for everyone: be kind to yourself. It’s OK not to have acquired new skills or found enlightenment. I’m delighted to welcome back Dr Tara Swart, a previous guest, whose message I think is more important now than ever. Tara’s impressive list of credentials includes medical doctor, neuroscientist, psychiatrist, lecturer at MIT, business coach and author. Her passion is teaching people how to apply lessons from neuroscience and behavioural psychology – in easy, achievable ways – to enhance their everyday lives and better cope with stress and change. We discuss some really practical, empowering acts of self-care you can easily build into your day – micro habits that can build your resilience to stress. Not all of us have time for 90 minutes of yoga every evening. But Tara explains there is no need to worry - simply lying on your yoga mat for five minutes sends the signal to your brain that you matter and that you are worth looking after. We chat about the value of journaling during the pandemic; how it develops self-awareness and can help our relationships. We also talk about spirituality, vivid dreaming, and how to cope if you’re feeling anxious about the easing of lockdown or uncertain about the future. Finally, Tara talks us through how to create a ‘vision board’ for how we want life to be different after lockdown. Mine is going to include less time travelling, more with my family, whom I’ve come to cherish more than ever during these past months. What would be on your action board? What have you learned about yourself during lockdown – and how do you want that to inform the life you lead going forward? I really hope this conversation helps you to consider that. Show notes available via https://drchatterjee.com/116 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
There’s so much craziness going on in the world right now and it can often be hard to know what to feel, or even what to do. In times like these, a practice of mindfulness or meditation becomes even more important. It can help improve sleep, reduce levels of stress and anxiety and so much more. But for me, the most important benefit is that it allows you to check in with who you are. Many of us live life at 100 miles an hour – bombarded with emails, texts messages and news – we are constantly consuming information from the outside and we rarely have time to go to the inside and check in on how we are feeling. Today’s episode is a special compilation episode all about mindfulness and meditation – what are the common misconceptions, and what are the actual benefits? In this episode, I have put together the very best clips from previous conversations on the podcast, to help answer these questions. Many of us have tried before to start a daily practice but have soon found ourselves giving up, despite our best intentions. This special episode will show you why this need not be the case. It is packed with simple, easy and practical tips, that I am sure will inspire you to get started and start reaping the benefits today! Show notes are available via https://drchatterjee.com/115 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
My guest on today’s conversation is Vivek Murthy. Vivek was the US Surgeon General under the Obama administration and is now author of the fantastic book, Together, about the healing power of human connection. And connect is exactly what Vivek and I did during this conversation in a really deep and profound way. During this conversation, we talk about what authenticity really means and how powerful it is to be truly vulnerable. We also talk about the consequences of this pandemic causing a social recession as well as an economic recession and how lockdown is making an already chronic problem of loneliness much worse. But this conversation is about hope and optimism - could the outcome of our separation in fact be a social revival? Are we realising more than ever before that we need to put people first? When he was in office, Vivek realised that the thread running through so many social and health problems, touching people of all ages, was loneliness. As doctors, we share the conviction that lack of connections is a major factor in many modern health conditions. We discuss how loneliness can manifest as irritability, anger, depression and disturbed sleep. It can also be behind ailments from anxiety to addiction and even obesity. And, of course, in the current pandemic, its effects are amplified. So, could it be time for us to take stock of how much we’ve missed our family, friends, even strangers – and decide how we want those relationships to be going forwards? Vivek believes we need to make an explicit commitment to other people – reaching out to others and giving our undistracted time when we do. Service, he says, is a powerful antidote to loneliness – it’s you adding value to the world. Vivek’s guiding principle is to ‘put people first’ in society, as well as in our individual lives and to let love and compassion be our path out of loneliness and suffering. It’s really hard to disagree with this when you hear this conversation, and I hope you find it as meaningful as I did. Show notes available at https://drchatterjee.com/114 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
CAUTION ADVISED: this podcast contains swearing It is the first thing we do when we arrive in the world and the last thing we do before we leave. It happens automatically 26,000 times a day without us even having to pay any attention to it, yet breathing is one of the only autonomic systems in our body that we can control, if we choose to. But because we can do it without consciously thinking about it, we often forget about it. The reality is though, that we react to every single situation in life with our breath and we have the power to choose how we respond to any situation by controlling our breath. Amazingly, this can also affect how others will respond back to us. No one demonstrates this better than my guest on today’s conversation, Brian MacKenzie. Brian is co-founder and President of the Health and Human Performance Foundation and Creative Director at Power Speed Endurance, a company focused on optimising physical, emotional and cognitive performance. In today’s podcast, Brian shares some of his incredible experiences. Firstly, he describes how he nearly became paralysed in an accident and he also shares his unbelievable experience of voluntarily swimming with great white sharks. In both of these intense situations, Brian was able to control his response by harnessing the power of his breath. Breath is at the centre of everything Brian does and he believes that through our breath, we can all discover who we really are and rid ourselves of the mental and societal constructs that prevent us from being free. We cover so many different themes today. We discuss the concept of carbon dioxide intolerance and what it means for our biology and our emotions. But we also talk about optimising oxygen efficiency in our bodies – doing so can help every single aspect of our lives – whether we want to improve our mental health, our focus, reduce stress or even increase our sporting performance. I understand that starting a breathing practice can feel confusing – where should you begin, what method should you use, are you doing it right? Brian’s advice on this is reassuring. For him, breathwork is about giving it all a try, experimenting, learning and finding out what works for you. I think that is wonderfully freeing and exciting. I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did! Show notes available at drchatterjee.com/113 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
CAUTION ADVISED: This podcast contains swearing themes of an adult nature. Do you believe that we have control over how we age? Is mental decline inevitable? Or, does how we live now determine our later years? This week’s guest is Dr Daniel Levitin, a neuroscientist, cognitive psychologist and best-selling author. His latest book, The Changing Mind, is an enlightening read for anyone who wants to age well, live well and understand the science behind both. Dan and I discuss the concept of healthspan versus lifespan – how if you want to live to a ripe old age, you’ll want to be able to enjoy it, too. Amazingly, Dan’s extensive research has led him to conclude that the number one factor that predicts how well we’ll age is not, as you might imagine, genetic – it’s a personality trait. We discuss just what that personality trait is and Dan goes on to reveal three other important traits that govern our behaviours and how we respond to the world – and therefore how healthy and happy we are at age 8 or 108. The good news is, that these traits can be taught and it’s never too late to start learning - you can start cultivating your personality to be neuroprotective at any age. Dan is passionate that we can and should keep learning throughout life. He explains why it’s a myth that memory automatically deteriorates and outlines simple and easy changes we can all make that will enhance life right now, as well as promote a healthy and fulfilling old age. This is a really enlightening conversation – I hope it helps you on your way to a long, happy and healthy life. Show notes available at drchatterjee.com/112 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Sleep is one of the most undervalued components of our health – if we can improve the quality of our sleep, we can improve the quality of our lives. Getting more sleep improves every aspect of our lives – it makes us less prone to injury when we exercise, boosts our productivity and enhances our ability to lose weight. Yet so many of us struggle to get a good night’s sleep and wake up feeling refreshed. In this episode, I have decided to try something a little bit different and draw on the wealth of knowledge that is contained in all my previous episodes to put together some of the most actionable tips to help improve the quality of your sleep. You will also hear about the effect of artificial light, caffeine and alcohol on the quality of our sleep. This episode is jam packed with simple tips that you can put into practice straight away and I hope that by the end of the episode, if you don’t already, you will be convinced to make sleep a priority in your life. Find links to the full podcast episodes featured here via drchatterjee.com/111 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
CAUTION ADVISED: this podcast contains swearing. Do you believe that people’s values can change, or are they set in stone? Can you gain talent and intelligence through practice, or are they innate? Do you have a growth mindset or a fixed one? My guest on this week’s show is convinced that change is available to all of us, at any time. Tom Bilyeu is a US entrepreneur who co-founded a billion-dollar nutrition company. His weekly YouTube show, Impact Theory, explores the mindset of the world’s highest achievers, to share the secrets of their success. And during this conversation, you’ll learn how to implement some of those yourself. We talk about the importance of being a learner and how openness to criticism is, in fact, a superpower. We also discuss how to shift self-limiting beliefs. One of Tom’s mantras is: ‘only do and believe that which moves you towards your goal’ and he describes how you can use that to change your thinking around things like weight loss or fitness. Tom and I delve into topics like nutrition and diet, although we do not necessarily share the same views – but that’s the beauty of a conversation like this, being open to debate. He has what he calls ‘strong convictions, loosely held’ and I love that as a description of a mind that’s always curious and open. As a doctor, I know different methods work for different people – and at different times. So health is a great example of why a fixed mindset isn’t helpful. Tom’s motivation and passion for life is infectious. His mission is to help people live to their full potential and execute their dreams – I hope after listening to this chat you’ll want to start working towards yours. N.B. this conversation was recorded in October 2019. Show notes available at drchatterjee.com/110 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
One of the positives I’m seeing during the current lockdown is many people’s renewed appreciation for getting out, active and connected. Having to stay home is making us really value that small window in our days when we can step outside to exercise, interact with nature and say a (distanced) hello to people we pass on the street or in the park. For that reason, I think you’re going to love listening to my guest on this week’s podcast. Kelly McGonigal is a US research psychologist, a lecturer at Stanford University and an author. Kelly and I talk about the importance of music for movement, and how moving with others can improve social connections and foster a sense of support and community. We discuss how going beyond what you think you’re capable of – whether that’s an endurance event, lifting heavy weights or taking on an epic hike in nature – can provide a spiritual experience that changes the brain in positive ways. If doesn’t have to be hard, though. Kelly explains how even the simplest of movements provide an immediate reset for your mood and brain chemistry. And she shares ground-breaking new research that shows how repeatedly contracting any muscles, through continuous exercise, releases antidepressant substances called myokines that scientists have dubbed ‘hope molecules’. Whether you’re someone who wants to move more but isn’t sure where to start – or you’re already a confirmed fitness fanatic – I think you’ll find this conversation uplifting. Show notes available at https://drchatterjee.com/109 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
How can we create new habits – and stick to them? Is it really a case of will power, motivation, then repetition? Or could there be a simpler approach? This week, I talk to world leading expert in behaviour change, Professor BJ Fogg, who has spent 20 years researching and teaching insights about human behaviour. BJ and I discuss why, if you haven’t been successful when trying to change in the past, IT’S NOT YOUR FAULT. Poorly designed behaviour-change programmes, from diets to fitness regimes to alcohol-reduction plans, set people up to fail. Motivation wanes, bars are set too high, you are not made to feel successful. We delve into why it doesn’t take a certain amount of hours or days to establish a new habit. In fact, repetition has nothing to do with it. Instead, evidence shows that it is all about emotion and feeling successful. When you do something and feel successful, that behaviour becomes more automatic. In this conversation, we discuss exactly how you can do this by scaling it down and making a small change that’s super easy to succeed at. Facilitating healthy, positive change is at the core of everything I do. So it was amazing to hear from BJ that the methods that have come out of his decades of research very closely match those that I’ve seen to work in practise with my patients and have written about in my new book, ‘Feel Better in 5’. Listen in to find out how they can help you, too! Show notes available at https://drchatterjee.com/108 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Many of us are struggling to adjust to this new way of life. Having spent 24 hours a day in a 12ft by 8ft prison cell for a whole year, my guest on this week’s podcast knows more about isolation than most of us. You may remember John McAvoy from episode 91 of the podcast, where he shared his inspirational story of going from serving two life sentences to breaking British and World sporting records whilst in prison. Now a free man, he is Nike sponsored athlete and gives talks to schoolchildren and has spoken at 10 Downing Street. On this podcast, John shares what he learnt from his time in isolation – lessons which we can all apply in our lives, especially now. He explains how he maintained a sense of control over his life by keeping himself mentally and physically fit and why keeping a routine, staying active and keeping ourselves present in the moment are more important now, than ever. John invites us to think of our current situation as an amazing opportunity to re-evaluate our lives and explore new things with the new found extra time. If we look at what John achieved whilst in a small isolated prison, imagine what we can all achieve in our own lives right now. As John says, this could be your moment of growth. Finally, John shares his invaluable top tips that I know will help many of you bring a sense of calm and control into your lives. Whenever I speak to John, I come out of the conversation a better and more enlightened person than I was when we started, after listening to this, I hope you do too.  Show notes available at https://drchatterjee.com/107 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Think back four or five weeks ago. How much of what you were engaged in then seems relatively trivial now? How much has the experience of coronavirus already clarified what your values really are? When you see people standing in the street, clapping for their healthcare workers; or Europeans on their balconies, serenading each other through lockdown, how does that make you feel? For this week’s podcast, I was honoured to welcome back Dr Gabor Maté, one of the most important voices globally on health, compassion and addiction, to discuss the life lessons that might emerge from this pandemic. This podcast contains tremendous insights on the value of sitting with our feelings; how we can avoid passing our anxieties on to our kids; as well as why some of us can be so judgemental of others during a crisis. Whilst we both fully endorse the medical advice on staying at home, we discuss the social and economic damage that is arising from this essential policy. What will the consequences of isolation be on our mental health? And afterwards – will we be so grateful to go back to our lives that we’ll forget the lessons we’ve learned? Or, could this challenge be the biggest opportunity for growth we’ve ever lived through, personally and as a society? Listen now to find out.  Show notes available at: https://drchatterjee.com/106 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
CAUTION ADVISED: this podcast contains swearing and themes of an adult nature. Having written a book about the importance of connections, Johann Hari was the obvious choice to help me shed light on how the coronavirus pandemic is affecting this key human need. In this podcast, his work on how loneliness affects depression and anxiety provides insight, understanding and practical solutions to help us through. We start by talking about what Johann says is the biggest cause of emotional difficulties – financial insecurity. Of course, things are moving fast and since this podcast was recorded, the UK government has announced support for the self-employed, too. But people are understandably worried how they’ll cope until help filters through. A YouGov survey suggests many are already borrowing money only one week into the current UK lockdown. Johann believes that asking our political representatives to address this is a vital way to feel connected, value our key workers and safeguard our mental health. We also discuss how shared experience and meaning can be a way out of loneliness. Johann gives some extraordinary examples of people who’ve managed to find meaning and affect positive change in the face of huge adversity. We’re all familiar with post-traumatic stress, but there’s emerging evidence that more people actually experience growth as a result of trauma. They re-evaluate, reset their values, life in many ways gets better for them. Could this be the way we all move through – and beyond – this global crisis? It’s a lot to get your head around, but it’s a powerful message to hear. Take care, stay safe and be kind.  Show notes available at https://drchatterjee.com/105 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (74)

Kaisa Siipilehto

Thanks such a valuable insights 💛

Sep 21st
Reply

Kaisa Siipilehto

Amazing talk, such valuable insights, thank you 😍👌🏼

Sep 16th
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Nikki McIntosh

Great show

Sep 15th
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hana shake

wow. a powerful conversation. just what I needed! keep going!

Sep 9th
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Maria Dillon

Amazing episode - thank you both so much for educating me. I found Darryl to be an amazing teacher and a man of real wisdom. Thank you both for sharing your personal experiences with such sincerity...they touched me to my core. There is so much in this episode that I will be listening to it again. 🤗x

Jun 30th
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wahid said

Another fantastic podcast.Keep up the great work Dr.Chatterjee

Jun 18th
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KING SH 1229

I really needed to hear this. I've been struggling to loose weight for years, joined a gym for a year now and still nothing. Sleep deprivation is the cause...ironic that I'm awake at 3am but thats jus for ramadan. My average is 5 hours sleep but if I do get 7+ sleep then I'm more tired and exhausted throughout the day. Need to find the right balance and thanks to this podcast, will be making more of an effort.

May 9th
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ID17346781

Really interesting with asking of some big questions about how society will cope after this C19. Brilliant thoughts about sitting with your thoughts and feelings.

May 5th
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Rachel Taylor

I absolutely love these podcasts but the 2 episodes with John McAvoy are just amazing. Thank you Rangan for making all these brilliant episodes.

Apr 20th
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Lindsey Thompson

Another really great conversation with the brilliant Johan Hari about how important human connection is during times like these. Great stories told by Johan which really hit this message home 🙂

Apr 8th
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Helen Pike

Thank you so much Dr Chatterjee. Your podcast has been so engaging and informative. On days when depression and anxiety make it a struggle even to get up, showered and dressed, your encouraging podcasts give me hope. I look forward to tje next 100 episodes. 💕

Mar 5th
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Iain Cameron

really enjoyed ths podcast

Mar 5th
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Tonya Louise Dundas

Amazing podcast....hoping for a followup

Feb 29th
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Josephine Partridge

This is totally fascinating and it is going to make a huge difference to my training and also my son who mouth breathes a lot. Thank you!

Feb 27th
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Anne Murphy

I thought this was such an interesting and thought-provoking programme. Thanks also for raising the Haribo in schools issue - it's a real bugbear for me. I have offered my children a chocolate swap but I now feel emboldened to tackle it head on with the headmistress. Thank you!

Feb 24th
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Natalie Ting

Really enjoyed listening to this podcast! I suffer with anxiety and depression from time to time and I'm lonely at times too! When I listened to this it has put a smile on my face!  Sometimes when your at a low it is quite easy to lose site of just how strong and normal you really are and it has given me a sense renewed strength for the times I get that sinking feeling! 😔💪😉

Feb 20th
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Jennifer Lamon

I have learned so much from your podcast and I love what you do. Please though can I ask you to consider going back to shorter format? I have heard you speak on multiple occasions about wanting to do longer formats in order to 'deep dive' but for myself personally these are just too long and wandering. I know several people I've spoken to are also getting turned off as the same information could be given in half the time. Please do consider it 🙏

Feb 3rd
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Helen Glanville

Amazing. What a story. Go John.

Feb 1st
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Millie Wilson

This proves that it's all about perspective. Taking control is your life, so inspirational that he took his poor choices into account and manages himself accordingly.

Jan 30th
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tom doe

excellent episode.

Jan 29th
Reply
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