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Film Jive

Author: Zach Betonte, Simone Barros

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Film Jive adopts an informal, autodidactic approach in considering the interdisciplinary aspects of cinema, and more specifically, its relation to philosophy, literature, music, and politics. Through this path of inquiry, the show attempts to generate discussion and sonic experiences which imagine new forms of cinema and continue to locate linkages between seemingly disparate threads of cinematic thinking.
43 Episodes
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The autumn and its contemplative condition of death and decay induce flirtations with the illusory, the uncanny, the weird and the eerie, and of course, the horrific. "A Sonospheric Corpse" derives inspiration from the surrealist technique, "exquisite corpse" in which each participant adds a contribution in a sequence. What follows is a phantasmagorical soundscape composed under similar conditions; collectively produced by way of differing forms of sound media with each contributor unaware of the other contributions made.
The autumn and its contemplative condition of death and decay induce flirtations with the illusory, the uncanny, the weird and the eerie, and of course, the horrific. "A Sonospheric Corpse" derives inspiration from the surrealist technique, "exquisite corpse" in which each participant adds a contribution in a sequence. What follows is a phantasmagorical soundscape composed under similar conditions; collectively produced by way of differing forms of sound media with each contributor unaware of the other contributions made.
In a career spanning more than sixty years, Italian musician and composer, Ennio Morricone became one of the most prominent and influential film artists of the twentieth century. Morricone’s early collaborations with filmmaker Sergio Leone would define the Italian Spaghetti western and redefine the sonic textures associated with the western genre. Morricone would serve a significant role in facilitating the transition from classical to modern cinema by implementing post-war avant-garde musical techniques to composing for the screen and embracing an aesthetics of impermanence.On the sixth of July earlier this year, Morricone passed away at the age of 91 with his self-authored obituary reading, “I, Ennio Morricone, am dead!”. In the spirit of Morricone’s many musical “selves”, this compilation samples from the varied discography of film scores with each piece accompanied by individual reflections which consider Morricone’s artistic practice and work in terms of their own personal sphere. Guests include: Alexandra Heller-Nicholas, Jim Laczkowski, Zach Layton, Gary Sargenson, John Cribbs, Christopher Funderburg, KHLOARIS, Psycho Gnostic, Gabe Powers, etc.
As a result of the enduring Covid-19 pandemic, the ticking of the clock no longer seems actual in any remote sense. We have collectively entered recursive time loops, fractals and spirals where the measurements of time; seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, etc. are little more than an afterthought. An intersection of present and future has been crossed where memories are no longer composed of fragmented pasts, but of viral futures. This episode is a psychogeographic sonic collage composed of field recordings, original music, poetic recitations, fireside readings and found audio materials which were imagined and composed during this ever-evolving temporality of quarantine by a variety of artists and thinkers. It is a podcast composed in and for the present, wherever it can be found. [0:00] Noelle Richard, Nico Ciani - Radical Uncertainty [3:27] Zach Betonte - Gilles Deleuze, “Difference and Repetition” [7:41] Jesse Tinsley - Sizzling Trout Field Recording [8:56] Peter Carellini - Early Morning Blue [10:18] Simone Barros, Zach Betonte - Black Lives Matter Protest Refrain [11:37] Zach Betonte - Paris Metro Field Recording [12:05] Harry Corbissero, Zach Betonte - The Ogden Tapes [Excerpt I] [19:36] Jesse Tinsley - Ambient Birds Field Recording [20:01] Zach Betonte - Bleached Cassette Tk 1 [22:23] Simone Barros, Zach Betonte - Black Lives Matter Protest Refrain [23:01] Simone Barros - Don’t Dream Soundscape [Ambient Edit] [28:05] Zach Betonte - Gilles Deleuze, “Difference and Repetition” [31:57] Jesse Tinsley - Ambient Wind Field Recording [32:21] Zach Betonte - Bleached Cassette Tk 2 [35:21] Simone Barros, Zach Betonte - Black Lives Matter Protest Refrain [36:06] Zach Betonte - Times Square Covid-19 Recording [Bleached Edit] [39:03] Patrick Murray - Dylan Thomas’ “The Hunchback in the Park” [41:12] Jesse Tinsley - Ambient Waterfall Field Recording [41:44] Ronald Walter - The Memory [46:18] Simone Barros, Zach Betonte - Black Lives Matter Protest Refrain [47:02] Jesse Tinsley - Ambient Stream Field Recording [47:23] Harry Corbissero, Zach Betonte - The Ogden Tapes (Excerpt II) [56:52] Thijs Geritz - Acoustic Escape [01:07:25] Zach Betonte - Gilles Deleuze, “Difference and Repetition” [01:08:46] Zach Betonte - Skype Call Distortion [01:09:46] Simone Barros - In Calendar [01:14:45] Tyler Etters - [Untitled]  
  Originally published in October of 2016, this Hallow’s Eve, the Film Jive tomb is re-opened with another creaking cacophony of murderous disharmony and echoes of the fantastique with the “Soundtrack of Terror Vol. II”. Film Jive contributors Simone Barros, Zach Betonte and Andrew Swope welcome fellow trick or treaters; Bill Ackerman, Regina Barry, Philip Brubaker, Rooney Elmi, Veronica Fitzpatrick, Kurtiss Hare, Lee Howard, Dr. Russ Hunter, Jim Laczkowski, Michelle Clifford, Alison Lang, Jasper Lee, C.J. Lines, Michael Mackenzie, Patrick Ripoll, Fanta Sylla, Tenebrous Kate, and Patrick K. Walsh to assemble a revolving playlist of blood-stained sounds that will leave your ears in a severed state. So audiophiles, sit back (but remain upright) and allow the most horrific sounds of cinema to disquiet your nerves. Happy Halloween!
  Originally published in January of 2015, Zach Betonte and Andrew Swope share their personal “Best of 2014” lists and comment on the year ahead in cinema.
  Originally published in December of 2014, Zach Betonte and Andrew Swope exchange Christmas gifts while indulging in glass of hot Dr. Pepper followed by a discussion of what they each received.
  Originally published in November of 2014, Zach Betonte is joined by Chris Vander Kaay, screenwriter and co-author of the horror film interview book, "The Anatomy Of Fear: Conversations With Cult Horror & Science-Fiction Filmmakers". In this brief conversation, Chris shares insight into the writing process, his collaboration with co-author, Kathleen Fernandez-Vander Kaay, and his upcoming film-related publications.
  Originally published in October of 2014, to celebrate the occasion of Halloween, Zach Betonte and Andrew Swope welcome twenty film podcast co-hosts, bloggers, and authors to share their favorite horror movie music. The guests include; Amy Andrews, Ashley Avard, Regina Barry, David Cummings, Jay Of The Dead, Jessica Elgenstierna, James Gillham, Marshall Hicks, Andrew James, Chris Vander Kaay, Jim Laczkowski, Craig Lines, Gabe Powers, Robert Reineke, Patrick Ripoll, Gary Sargenson, Steve Sebastian, Courtney Small, Andreas Stoehr, Nick Wheatley, and Thomas Wishloff. In addition to their individual selections, there is also an assortment of vintage horror film radio spots. So sit back and treat yourself to this petrifying playlist…
  Originally published in April of 2016, Zach Betonte and Gary Sargenson discuss D.W. Griffith’s iconic melodrama, “Way Down East” originally released in 1920. The two debate the merits of Griffith’s cinematic legacy, how class relations are explored within melodrama and whether the film exists within a temporal or secular imaginary.
  Originally published in March of 2016, Zach Betonte, Andrew Swope and Simone Barros discuss Stanley Donen’s Lerner and Loewe musical “The Little Prince'' adapted from Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s novella of the same name and originally released in 1974. The discussion addresses how the film addresses the text’s existential themes, excavates its influence on future American musical forms, and its eclectic cast of characters.
  Originally published November of 2015, Zach Betonte and Gary Sargenson discuss Pascal Laugier’s sociological horror thriller, “The Tall Man” originally released in 2012. The conversation inquires about the nature of the film’s unexpected social commentary, its anachronistic use of filmic space, and how it attempts to subvert conventional horror genre tropes.
  Originally published September of 2015, Zach Betonte and Gary Sargenson discuss one of the definitive independent films of the 1990’s, “Buffalo ‘66” directed by Vincent Gallo and originally released in 1998. The conversation elaborates on the intense portrayal of a man-child, Gallo’s command of varying cinematic styles, and the film’s more impressionistic approach to storytelling.
  Originally Published in May of 2014, Zach Betonte and Andrew Swope are joined by former Film Jive co-host, Nick Wheatley to discuss the 1954 Japanese kaiju film, “Gojira” alongside the latest entry in the franchise, “Godzilla” released in 2014.
  Originally published in November of 2016, Zach Betonte and Simone Barros are joined by Supporting Characters host, Bill Ackerman to discuss John Lee Hancock’s psychological horror film, “Let’s Scare Jessica to Death” originally released in 1971. The trio consider the film’s distinctive rhythms, ambiguous structure and its possible interpretations and the performative range of Zohra Lampert as the titular character.
  Originally published in August of 2016, Zach Betonte and Simone Barros are joined by Jim Laczkowski, host of the Director’s Club and Voices and Visions podcasts to discuss Charlie Kaufman’s “Synecdoche, New York” originally released in 2008. The discussion considers Kaufman’s use of filmic space and architecture, the emotional effect of viewing a character’s ongoing crisis of self and question whether the film is of the meta-realist or magical-realist tradition.
  Originally published in June of 2016, Zach Betonte, Andrew Swope and Simone Barros discuss Jean Cocteau’s dreamscape, “La Belle et la Bête” originally released in 1946. The discussion elaborates on how Cocteau’s avant-garde theatre background informs his cinematic practice, how objectification may or may not augment the narrative’s reality and the similarities between the aesthetics of Cocteau and Maya Deren.
Episode #95 - Accident

Episode #95 - Accident

2020-05-0701:05:05

  Originally published in June of 2016, Zach Betonte, Andrew Swope and Simone Barros discuss Joseph Losey’s psychodrama, “Accident” originally released in 1967. The trio inquire about the role of subjective memory in relation to the narrative trajectory, the presence of animals throughout and its implications, and question whether the camera objectifies or empowers its female protagonists.
  Originally published in June of 2016, Zach Betonte, Andrew Swope and Simone Barros discuss Jesus Franco’s erotic thriller, “Eugenie de Sade” originally released in 1973. The discussion contemplates Franco’s nostalgic re-appropriation of popular culture and how this implies meta-textual elements and question the film’s complicated depiction of feminine sexuality.
Episode #89 - Murder Rock

Episode #89 - Murder Rock

2020-05-0601:04:33

  Originally published in May of 2015, Zach Betonte and Andrew Swope discuss Lucio Fulci’s spandex slasher film, “Murder Rock” originally released in 1984. The discussion elaborates on Fulci’s relationship to 1980’s American popular culture, the irrational character motivations, and how Fulci’s production restrictions enhance the formal atmosphere of his films.
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