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Freakonomics Radio

Author: ​Dubner Productions and Stitcher

Subscribed: 305,226Played: 2,372,108
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Discover the hidden side of everything with Stephen J. Dubner, co-author of the Freakonomics books. Each week, Freakonomics Radio tells you things you always thought you knew (but didn’t) and things you never thought you wanted to know (but do) — from the economics of sleep to how to become great at just about anything. Dubner speaks with Nobel laureates and provocateurs, intellectuals and entrepreneurs, and various other underachievers. Special features include series like “The Secret Life of a C.E.O.” as well as a live game show, “Tell Me Something I Don’t Know.” 

20 Episodes
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Comments (68)

Brian Copanas

Just listened to 'The Future of Meat' .. great balanced story. What is missing from it is details for what other markets were impacted in the 40's as a result of the new textiles, the story of hemp and cannabis. This could be another part of the story that changed the landscape of textiles, the explosion of hemp propaganda and the laws inacted as a result.

Feb 16th
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Matthew Mendez

they need to have on Robert Murphy or Peter Schiff

Feb 11th
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Ved

"Confidence is a choice." Brilliant

Feb 7th
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Jake D.

great episode on how to develop a strong mindset

Feb 6th
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Shashank Ganesh

when are you releasing your episode with Raghuram Rajan? really looking forward to it. :)

Feb 6th
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Ted Jordan

great insights. I agree, college is an unpaid minor league. needs to be fixed

Feb 5th
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Marlanda Wing

zz

Feb 3rd
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Arturo de la cruz

There's a jump at 30:33 it doesnt sound like it should be there

Jan 31st
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Brian Sidiski

Podcast on China eating US jobs referenced in the podcast but is not available. Please re-release. Thanks.

Jan 30th
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Partick v.d. E

nice

Jan 25th
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Gary Tan

Where's the dislike button? Oh... Unsubscribe

Jan 24th
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Surya Rudolph

The more he talks the worst his agenda sounds. this guy has no idea what he is talking about. I wouldn't vote for him.

Jan 23rd
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Lisa Lawson

10 NEON 20.18. GOD

Jan 18th
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Steve Morrison

, g%us us to somewhere in the

Jan 17th
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Paul Kramer

I genuinely feel that many of the reforms Andrew Lang is looking to make can be done in the commercial sector from the commercial sector. The real problem is the ambition education and motivation level of many Americans but also the stresses that are placed on each one. Each of us has to be a banker, tax accountant, psychologist for our children and ourselves, etc. To begin spreading out these responsibilities becomes extremely expensive extremely quickly. I believe that if a company acted like the social welfare branch of the government, where the majority of these responsibilities would be converted to an electronic format with human oversight that the average American would be more free to indulge their time in other activities. A project like this could start as a small company managing integrated bill pay with benefits like group legal, insurance discounts, and perks from other industries which benefit from big Data. eventually it would have evolved into a system where a participant could simply ask the program about a decision and it would show the increase or decrease in the residual payment, the amount of their income which actually gets them at the end of the week or bi-weekly cycle. if the participant finds that money is getting too tight oh, they are then free to go out and find a way to create more income for themselves knowing how much net income they have after all of the things are taken care of, and without taking extraordinary bad risks with their financial future.

Jan 10th
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Bailey Lauren Cowell

Freakonomics

Jan 6th
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Jin ZhiYan

Looking at ep 307, on the qn of why real estate agents still have not been eliminated by markets, I believe a part of the answer was missing. The authors seem to have missed out on a major part of the psyche, of the demands of voters. They have used the efficiency viewpoints of economists, that maybe it's because of the way the market is structured. But it is also very possible that the agent who spends the time with you is able to uncover and express the parameters of your unrecognized needs and wants, and that is the main value they ring, being able to find you houses you would never be able to find for yourself because of different parameters. They also provide you more information through experience and understanding of a particular estate that's missing online. Lastly, they might be worth the trust. For example, Hollywood stars can purchase houses on their own all the time, just go to online sites and key in their requirements. But so many of them still use people because these guys help them understand and introduce to the neighborhood, and are incentivised to bargain for the buyers a good deal to stake out a reputation.

Dec 28th
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Joe Anderson

nm o .

Dec 26th
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K B

So...it showed improvement, but they just end on "who knows," when religion DID have a 9% improvement in their income? Uh huh. Something tells me they wouldn't be so careful about drawing conclusions if it were a tax or government welfare program. Is it really that hard to admit that religion helps people?

Dec 7th
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Mike Wilson

K B Define "helps" because I'm struggling to look past the dark ages, and the current day genocide instructed by religions.

Jan 19th
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Barret Giehl

I haven't finished listening yet, but, the set up of the experiment seems to be assuming that the Values portion of the outreach can only be taught from a religious standpoint. I don't think values unique to religion. So, if it is determined that the best outcome is from the Full Program, we still don't know that Religion is the determining factor. Should have perhaps set up an additional group where Values were taught from a non religious standpoint.

Dec 7th
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