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Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.
172 Episodes
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In 'Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents', Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson examines the laws and practices that created a bipolar caste system in the U.S. — and how the Nazis borrowed from it.Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews two new novels: 'The Aunt Who Wouldn't Die,' and 'Blacktop Wasteland.'Since 2004, more than 2,000 American newspapers have gone out of business. 'Washington Post' media columnist Margaret Sullivan talks about the decline of local news coverage, a crisis she says is as serious as the spread of disinformation on the internet. Her new book is 'Ghosting the News: Local Journalism and the Crisis of American Democracy.'
This year marks the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Negro Leagues and today we remember one of baseball's greatest pitchers, Satchel Paige. We hear from Larry Tye, author of 'Satchel: The Life and Times of An American Legend.' Paige began his career pitching in the Negro leagues and later became a Major League star. In the 1930s, he made his way across the country amazing audiences with his blazing fastball and pinpoint accuracy.Also, Maureen Corrigan shares a remembrance of journalist Pete Hamill.
Pete Hamill, who died Aug. 5, was a columnist and editor at the 'New York Post' and the 'New York Daily News,' covering wars, crime and the people of NYC's boroughs. He helped convince his friend Robert Kennedy to run for president, and on the night RFK was shot, helped tackle the assassin. Hamill spoke with 'Fresh Air' about RFK's assassination, giving up drinking in a boozy industry, and his work in the tabloids.
In Jeffrey ​Toobin's new book, ​'True Crimes and Misdemeanors,​'​​ the CNN legal analyst ​examines how​ President​ Trump and his team out-maneuvered special counsel Robert Mueller. Mueller, he says, gave Trump "a free pass" on obstruction of justice.​ ​We'll also talk about the impeachment trial and the Supreme Court.
In 'Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents', the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist examines the laws and practices that created a bipolar caste system in the U.S. — and how the Nazis borrowed from it.Also, John Powers reviews Raven Leilani's debut novel, 'Luster.'
Since 2004, more than 2,000 American newspapers have gone out of business. 'Washington Post' media columnist Margaret Sullivan talks about the decline of local news coverage, a crisis she says is as serious as the spread of disinformation on the internet. Her new book is 'Ghosting the News: Local Journalism and the Crisis of American Democracy.'Film critic Justin Chang reviews the thriller 'She Dies Tomorrow.'
When Natasha Trethewey was 19, her abusive stepfather killed her mother. In the 35 years since, she says, "I wanted to forge a new life for myself that didn't include that past, but, of course, that was impossible." Her new memoir is 'Memorial Drive.' Trethewey was the U.S. Poet Laureate in 2012 and 2013.Kevin Whitehead reviews a newly unearthed recording by drummer Art Blakey and his band.When comic Mike Birbiglia and poet Jen Stein got married, they agreed they didn't want kids. But then Jen changed her mind. After their daughter Oona was born, Mike had difficulty bonding with her, and it put a strain on the marriage. In their book, 'The New One,' Mike writes "painfully true" stories about the first year of parenthood and Jen gives her perspective through poetry.
We remember TV personality Regis Philbin, who died on July 24 at 88. He spoke with contributor David Bianculli in 2011 when his memoir, 'How I Got This Way,' came out. Also, we remember jazz singer Annie Ross, who died at 89. She sang in the trio Lambert, Hendricks & Ross and was best-known for the song "Twisted." Ross spoke with Terry Gross in 1990. David Bianculli reviews 'Muppets Now' on Disney+, and Ken Tucker reviews Taylor Swift's new album, 'Folklore.'
Robert P. Jones, author of the new book 'White Too Long,' talks about the history of white supremacy in American Christianity. His main focus is on the Southern Baptist Convention, the denomination in which he grew up. "There's so much work still to be done," he says. "White Christians have been largely silent ... and have hardly begun these conversations."Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews two new novels: 'The Aunt Who Wouldn't Die,' and 'Blacktop Wasteland.'
Major League Baseball is back — but for how long? About half of the Miami Marlins' roster has tested positive for COVID-19. ESPN baseball analyst Tim Kurkjian explains the challenges Major League Baseball faces as play resumes amid the pandemic.Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews 'Just Coolin'', a newly unearthed recording by drummer Art Blakey and his band.
Poet Natasha Trethewey

Poet Natasha Trethewey

2020-07-2848:012

When Trethewey was 19, her abusive stepfather killed her mother. In the 35 years since, she says, "I wanted to forge a new life for myself that didn't include that past, but, of course, that was impossible." In her new memoir, 'Memorial Drive,' Trethewey revives her mother's memory and shares stories about growing up biracial in the South. She was the U.S. Poet Laureate in 2012 and 2013.
When Mike Birbiglia and Jen Stein got married, they agreed they didn't want kids. But then Jen changed her mind. After their daughter Oona was born, Mike had difficulty bonding with her, and it put a strain on the marriage. In their book, 'The New One,' Mike writes "painfully true" stories about the first year of parenthood and Jen gives her perspective through poetry.
In the HBO series 'I May Destroy You,' Michaela Coel plays Arabella, a writer in London who goes to a bar and is drugged and sexually assaulted. She then has to piece together what happened to her. The series, which Coel wrote, directed and stars in, explores issues of sexuality and consent. She talks about how she drew on personal experience.John Powers reviews Zadie Smith's new collection of essays, 'Intimations,' written during the pandemic and completed after George Floyd's murder.Jim McCloskey, a lay minister, has devoted the past 40 years of his life to seeking justice and exoneration for men and women on death row or serving life sentences for crimes they didn't commit. His memoir is 'When Truth is All You Have.'
In a career spanning four decades, Dickey authored seven books and reported from more than 40 countries, often covering war, conflict and espionage. He died July 16 at 68. Dickey spoke with Terry Gross in 1998 and 2002.Also, Justin Chang reviews two new thriller movies about terrors within the home: 'Relic' and 'Amulet.'
Mary Trump was devastated when her uncle was elected president. Her book, 'Too Much and Never Enough,' describes Donald Trump as a "belligerent" youth who hasn't changed since he was a teen. Mary's late father Freddy was the black sheep of the family.
In the HBO series 'I May Destroy You,' Michaela Coel plays Arabella, a writer in London who goes to a bar and is drugged and sexually assaulted. She then has to piece together what happened to her. The series, which Coel wrote, directed and stars in, explores issues of sexuality and consent. She talks about how she drew on personal experience. John Powers reviews Zadie Smith's new collection of essays, 'Intimations,' written during the pandemic and completed after George Floyd's murder.
Jim McCloskey, a lay minister, has devoted the past 40 years of his life to seeking justice and exoneration for men and women on death row or serving life sentences for crimes they didn't commit. "I saw firsthand how police and prosecutors manipulate evidence, coerce witnesses into giving false testimony," he says. His memoir is 'When Truth is All You Have.' Ken Tucker reviews the new album by HAIM, 'Women in Music Pt. III.'
The towering civil rights leader John Lewis died July 17 at the age of 80. Lewis grew up the son of sharecroppers and later became an associate of Martin Luther King Jr. He co-led the 1965 civil rights march in Selma, Ala., which turned violent when state troopers beat and tear gassed the peaceful protestors. The protest became known as "Bloody Sunday." He spoke with Terry Gross in 2009. We'll also hear from the first Black lawyer in Selma, J.L. Chestnut, who shares his memories of Bloody Sunday. Maureen Corrigan reviews Emma Donoghue's new novel about the flu pandemic of 1918, 'The Pull of the Stars.'
'Saturday Night Live' "Weekend Update" co-anchor Colin Jost talks about telling jokes about race with Michael Che and why he prefers writing to speaking. His new memoir is 'A Very Punchable Face.' Film critic Justin Chang says 'Palm Springs,' starring Andy Samberg and Cristin Milioti, is a perfect comedy for our current times. And Welsh actor Matthew Rhys talks about living out his boyhood fantasies in his new role as hardboiled detective Perry Mason.
Charlize Theron spoke with Terry Gross last year about growing up in Apartheid-era South Africa and growing up with an abusive father. She now stars in the film 'The Old Guard' on Netflix. Also, we listen back to our 2018 interview actor Danny Trejo. He's known for playing menacing characters in 'Breaking Bad,' 'Sons of Anarchy' and 'Machete.' The documentary 'Inmate #1: The Rise of Danny Trejo' chronicles his unlikely journey from prison to stardom.
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Comments (248)

Cynthia Colonna

Gifted, funny journalist..I so enjoyed this interview..thank you..

Aug 6th
Reply

Western intellect

Great insight

Aug 6th
Reply

Western intellect

Nice episode.

Aug 5th
Reply

Don Paine

l 1 2s e no o my kmmwm mMM Mc knight 7.XJ4@ mu

Aug 3rd
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Western intellect

Cool interview...I really enjoyed this.

Jul 30th
Reply

Western intellect

I really enjoy listening to Terry. Her voice is so soothing and I always find her interviews intriguing.

Jul 25th
Reply (1)

Western intellect

Fascinating

Jul 24th
Reply

Western intellect

I really enjoyed this interview.

Jul 21st
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Western intellect

Very pleasant episode. Danny’s interview was too short.

Jul 18th
Reply (2)

Western intellect

Really interesting

Jul 16th
Reply

Western intellect

Interesting

Jul 14th
Reply

Tom

Horrible interviewer!

Jul 12th
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John Reed

Omg get rid of the pompous sounding reviewer

Jul 11th
Reply

John Buckner

Yet another examination of the freaks and idiots who support Trump. I don't give a shit about them and I don't care why they think he is analogous to Jebus. And while it may be cute to hear a Valley Girl teen speaking with vocal fry, it's irritating when those over 20 do so.

Jul 10th
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John Reed

Lol please get rid of the haughty sounding nut doing the review.

Jun 26th
Reply

Scott Shapiro

Objectively, there can be no desputing that Nikole Hannah is a bigot and a racist who is hell bent on rewriting American history.

Jun 26th
Reply

April All Year

Has become way too leftist to listen to. how sad.

Jun 12th
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Mobile Accessibility

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Jun 8th
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Mobile Accessibility

buffalo

Jun 8th
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Diann Gaysunas

I'm p.p. bp hi pupp

Jun 3rd
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