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Fresh Pickings

Author: Heritage Radio Network

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What makes ingredients like oats, farro, and almond flour extraordinary? Fresh Pickings takes a closer look at everyday ingredients and how you can incorporate them into your recipes in new and creative ways with help from HRN's circle of hosts and friends.
8 Episodes
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Episode 8: Almond Flour

Episode 8: Almond Flour

2017-07-2100:08:21

As many Americans look to cut back on gluten, alternatives like almond flour are really having a moment. Made with 100 percent sweet almonds, it’s the perfect alternative to traditional white flours but lends a unique flavor that can take desserts to the next level. On this episode of Fresh Pickings, we looking at one small nut’s journey through the mill, and how almond flour can transform everything you thought you knew about baking.We start at the source: the almond. The almond is native to an area stretching from the northern Indian subcontinent westwards to Syria, Israel, and Turkey. It was spread by humans in ancient times along the shores of the Mediterranean into northern Africa and southern Europe and more recently transported to other parts of the world, notably California.Host Kat Johnson is joined by Cynthia Malaran (also known as DJ Cherishtheluv), the host of Wedding Cake, who shares her childhood memories of discovering that the almond isn't actually a nut, but a fruit. She bit into what she thought was an apple, but discovered a sour taste and large seed.Cynthia also shares some health info about the notoriously healthy almond: they provide a good amount of manganese and vitamin E, as well as a healthy serving of monounsaturated fats. Not only do they have a healthy boost of protein, they are also very low in carbohydrates and inherently gluten free. When they are ground into a flour they add moistness and a rich nutty taste to baked goods.To wrap things up, Kat speaks to Eli Sussman, host of The Line. He shares his recipe for Almond Flourless Cake, which he serves at his Williamsburg restaurant, Samesa.Fresh Pickings is powered by Simplecast.
If someone offered you a "bag of nooch," or a "sprinkle of hippie dust," would you take it? If you’re a pizza-loving vegan, you probably would! This episode of Fresh Pickings explores the world of nutritional yeast (and reveals its various street names).Nutritional yeast is the deactivated (or dead) form of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae – the mother of all yeast strains. Dave Arnold of Cooking Issues joins Kat to teach her more about the science behind "brewer's yeast" – how it's grown, cultured (deactivated) to create nutritional yeast, and then packaged for our consumption.If you've ever tried nutritional yeast before, you know that it packs a umami punch. For that reason, it's particularly popular among vegetarians and vegans as a way to add a savory seasoning to dishes. Kat welcomes back VLGL (Vegan Low Glycemic Load) blogger, Elizabeth Taylor, to share her recipe for a Chickpea Flour Omelette with Chipotle-Grilled Tomato.
Episode 6: Flaxseed Meal

Episode 6: Flaxseed Meal

2017-07-1000:09:28

Flax is an amazingly versatile food and fiber crop. In fact, it’s one of the oldest fiber crops in the world, known to have been cultivated in ancient Egypt and China. If it seems like flax is good for everything, that’s because it is. Its Latin name is usitatissimum, which means “most useful.”On this episode, Kat talks to Harry Rosenblum, host of Feast Yr Ears here on Heritage Radio Network, about all things flaxseed. Did you know: Flaxseed sprouts are edible, with a slightly spicy flavor. In northern India, flaxseed, called tisi or alsi, is traditionally roasted, powdered, and eaten with boiled rice, a little water, and a little salt, and used in Savji curries. The seed of the plant is edible, but grinding it into meal unlocks its health benefits and makes it more readily digested. Flaxseed meal can be added to bread, pancakes, muffins, bars, cookies, and all sorts of other recipes to provide a nice nutty flavor and a nutritional punch.To learn more about how we can incorporate flaxseed into recipes, Kat is joined by her friend and VLGL blogger, Elizabeth Taylor. Elizbeth's VLGL diet is a whole-foods, plant-based way of cooking and eating that emphasizes non-starchy vegetables, whole fruits, nuts, legumes, seeds, and certain whole grains.
Episode 5: Muesli

Episode 5: Muesli

2017-06-3000:08:30

Are you confused about the difference between muesli and granola? On this episode of Fresh Pickings, we’re going to help you sort out that difference by doing a deep dive into the world of muesli.Host Kat Johnson welcomes Linda Pelaccio, host of A Taste of the Past, to talk about the inventor of muesli: Swiss physician and nutritional pioneer, Maximilian Bircher-Benner. His original recipe consisted of oat flakes, raw apples, condensed milk, nuts, and lemon juice and was based on the diet of alpine shepherds, who Dr. Bircher-Benner saw as being particularly vital and healthy. He prescribed muesli it to his patients and saw overwhelming improvements in their health. Dr. Bircher-Benner determined that much of the sickness experienced by his patients could be alleviated with increased exercise and a more nutritious diet.Then, instead of our usual recipe segment, Michael Harlan Turkell, host of The Food Seen, brings us a special interview with Bob Moore himself. Bob shares the origin story of his famous muesli.There are lots of ways to incorporate this whole grain cereal into your diet, but if you're trying it for the first time, start with the basic instructions for hot, cold, and Swiss-style on the back of each back of Bob's Red Mill muesli package.
Episode 4: Masa Harina

Episode 4: Masa Harina

2017-06-2600:11:06

Ever wonder how your two pound burrito could possibly fit all of those ingredients without exploding? Well, that’s all thanks to masa, the corn flour used to make tortillas, sopas, and pupusas. While solid masa dough is traditionally sold in Mexican grocery stores in the refrigerator aisle, Bob’s Red Mill makes things easier by offering a nonperishable powdered version of the same stuff. In Spanish, masa harina literally translates to “dough flour”, and when mixed with water, transforms into a malleable dough that can be used in a variety of dishes.How is masa harina made? What is it used for? To learn more about the science behind masa (which involves the process of nixtamalization) Kat interviews Dave Arnold, co-host of Cooking Issues. Masa and cornmeal are made from the sameprimary ingredient, but they are processed quite differently and have different outcomes when cooked. After corn is softened by lime water, some of the oil is broken down into emulsifying agents, and corn proteins are bonded to each other in the process. That's what makes it possible to form a dough from masa without introducing a bonding agent, such as the gluten in flour.To get some tips about cooking sweet treats with masa harina, Kat visits Fany Gerson at the Flatiron location of Dough, her hand-made donut shop. Fany is one of the most authoritative voices on Mexican pastries and frozen desserts, and she shares a recipe for Tamal de Limón (Lime Zest Tamales) from her first book, My Sweet Mexico.
What is "paleo?" The Paleolithic diet is a nutritional program based on foods available to humans living in that era. In 2012, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics described paleo as one of the "latest trends" in diets. And in 2013 it was Google's most searched weight-loss method.Of the estimated 80 billion people who have ever lived out a life span on Earth, more than 90% of them have foraged for all of their food. In other words, foraging and paleo go hand-in-hand. To learn more about it, Kat is joined by Cathy Erway, host of Eat Your Words, who has discovered you can forage right here in Brooklyn. Tune in to hear what plants Cathy is able to find in Prospect Park and how she uses them in her cooking.Next, Kat talks to Harry Rosenblum, host of Feast Yr Ears, about the paleo diet, paleo foods, and paleo flours. While he doesn't follow the diet himself (he loves coffee too much), Harry recently had Samir Patel on his show to talk about it. Samir is a science journalist, photographer, and editor based in Brooklyn. He was the Deputy Editor at Archaeology, and has a lot to say about how early humans ate.Then, Krista Margies, a baker from Charlotte, North Carolina, shares a paleo-approved recipe with us. Hint: it's her riff on chocolate lava cake and you're going to want to make it as soon as you finish listening to this episode!For the full recipe, go to http://heritageradionetwork.org/podcast/paleo-baking-flour
Episode 2: Organic Farro

Episode 2: Organic Farro

2017-06-1200:09:56

Farro is an ancient grain with an impressive pedigree clouded by tenuous designations and contradictory classifications. But at the end of the day it’s a delicious, versatile, and relatively accommodating grain.In this episode of Fresh Pickings, host Kat Johnson sets out to clear up some of the confusion and understand this grain a little better. Did you know ancient grains are also known as heritage grains? Here at Heritage Radio Network, that word holds a lot of meaning for us. So, to talk about what Heritage means, Kat sits down Patrick Martins, founder of Heritage Food USA and Heritage Radio Network.Then, Linda Pelaccio brings us a closer look at the storied history of farro, which dates all the way back to Ancient Romans. Linda is the host of A Taste of the Past and a culinary historian.To see the grain in action, Kat heads into the Roberta’s kitchen with Chef Jackie Carnesi to learn how she makes her Spring Savory Porridge, a riff on a basic farro porridge recipe she changes based on the season.For the full recipe, go to http://heritageradionetwork.org/podcast/organic-farro/
In the series premiere of Fresh Pickings, host Kat Johnson takes a closer look at oats – a simple ingredient that has been used to brew beer, thicken soups, soothe skin conditions, treat osteoporosis, and even reduce the risk of heart disease. The humble oat is one of the most remarkable foods in the modern world!This episode features an interview with Kat's mom about a favorite family recipe, Oatmeal Drop Cookies. While they're no-bake, they can prove tricky to get just right.Then, Mary Izett, co-host of Fuhmentaboudit! shares some of the history and background of rolled (or Old-Fashioned) oats and recommends some new craft beers being brewed with oats.To wrap things up, Cathy Erway, host of Eat Your Words, shares some very clever ways to use toasted oats as a crunchy salad or dessert topping. Scroll on to see her recipe for Peachy Salad with Savory Toasted Oats, so you can put this technique to the test at home!Peachy Salad with Savory Toasted Oatsby Cathy Erway, via noteatingoutinny.comMakes 2-3 servings1/4 cup whole rolled oats2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oilpinch of salt, pepper, and cayenne pepper (latter optional)1 peach (or nectarine), thinly sliced1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oilabout 4 cups assorted baby lettucesHeat the 2 tablespoons of oil in a pan over medium-high heat about 30 seconds, or until hot. Add the oats and shake or stir the pan to coat them all in the oil. Reduce heat to medium-low and sprinkle with the salt, pepper and optional cayenne. Cook, stirring frequently, another 1-2 minutes or until the oats appear lightly toasted (careful to watch for any signs or smells of over-toasting or burning). Remove from the pan immediately and set aside to cool.Toss the lettuces and the peach slices in a large bowl, and drizzle in the balsamic vinegar and remaining olive oil. Toss to coat thoroughly, and divide amongst serving dishes. Top each with the cooled oat topping and serve immediately.Fresh Pickings is proudly supported by Bob's Red Mill.Music for Fresh Pickings is by Lee Rosevere.
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