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There's no single recipe when it comes to internal communications. But one thing that's consistent is the importance of employee feedback.   In this episode of Get Reworked, we talk to Judy Whitcomb, senior vice president of organizational strategy and effectiveness at Vi, a Chicago-based operator of luxury senior living communities across the US. Throughout her career, she's worked in HR, learning and development, marketing and communications. The pandemic and its aftermath put all that experience to the test.  Listen: Get Reworked Full Episode List "One thing we learned early on was that we had to be thoughtful and we had to be intentional about our communication strategy," Judy said. "And we couldn't share information with residents without sharing things with our employees at the same time, so we understood the necessity of communicating concurrently about what was going on." Highlights of the conversation include: How Vi adapted employee communications to the challenges of the last two-plus years. The keys to effective internal communications, whether it's in a crisis or normal times. The role of HR in employee communications. How to ensure that all voices are heard as part of an employee listening program. Why the company decided to rollout ViHive, its new internal communications app. Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak talk with Judy about learning management systems, how useful it is for HR to think like marketing and whether it's better to be an HR generalist or specialist. Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
For many companies, remote work was just a stopgap measure to address a temporary disruption to business as usual. For others, it's a way of life.  In this episode of Get Reworked, we talk to Betsy Bula, all-remote evangelist at GitLab, about how and why her company came to embrace all remote all the time, and what others can learn from their example. GitLab has collected the lessons learned in a publicly available guide to remote work that runs to the thousands of pages. Despite that experience and documentation, it remains a work in progress. "Even still, this has been a journey," Betsy said. "We're always iterating and making changes. Even for a company that's been long remote like GitLab, it's not a thing that always remains the same." Highlights of the conversation include: Just how successful remote work has been throughout the pandemic. Why GitLab decided to go all remote and how they overcame objections. How remote work is a constantly evolving set of practices. Whether or not a company should hire a head of remote work. Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak talk with Betsy about North Carolina basketball, the legacy of Duke's Coach K and why hybrid work as an operating model is overrated. Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
For many people, talking about pay is one of the most difficult conversations they have at work. One reason is that it's so tightly tied up into their perceptions of their own self worth and value.  In this episode of Get Reworked, we talk to David Turetsky, vice president of consulting at Salary.com and host of the HR Data Labs podcast, about pay transparency and why companies should be more open about what workers get paid. More often than not, secrets lead to deals that are ultimately bad for business. "Bargains are bad," David said. "People shouldn't be offered bargain deals. When recruiters hire people, they should be recruiting them for the job at the pay they're going to pay other people. And there shouldn't be this secretive back-and-forth." Highlights of the conversation include: Why it's so hard to talk about salary in today's workplace. How pay transparency can lead to greater pay equity. Why opening up with employees about pay won't lead to bad results for business. The role of regulation and legislation in making pay more transparent. Why basing pay on location is short-sighted in today's market. Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak talk with David about universal basic income, the importance of a realistic minimum wage, and what it will take for them to open up about their own salaries. Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
A craft circle may not be the first thing that comes to mind when you think about how to bring a dispersed workforce scattered across the globe together. But it might just be the answer you're seeking for the complex management challenges facing today's organizations. In this episode of Get Reworked, we talk to Molly Anglin, community manager at Valtech, and the firm's former chief strategy officer, Freek Bijl, about how and why they focused on communities of practice — what they call "craft circles" — to bring people together at the global consulting firm. After a period of rapid acquisition-fueled growth followed by a pandemic-forced move to remote work, craft circles became the way they wove a community out of separate global fabrics. "It was really important for us to have some kind of flexible system where it prioritized continuous learning support, finding people, sense making, and knowledge management without a really heavy handed kind of top-down approach," Molly said. Highlights of the conversation include: How Valtech created a community-based approach to management and knowledge sharing. Why historical approaches to knowledge management and intranet design are too static for the way work is done now. How leaders can support community development and sustainment. How to get employee buy-in when starting up a community of practice. Why a community-based approach to work is right for this moment Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak talk with Molly and Freek about whether web3 is overrated or not and bartending as the way to understand human psychology. Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
The reason why employees decide to quit is often not very complicated. But that doesn't mean the solutions are easy, particularly as the Great Resignation has legions of workers looking for the door. And with more and more companies heading back into the office, nearly every corporate decision is under a microscope. In this episode of Get Reworked, we talk to Beverly Kaye, career expert and author of multiple books on employee engagement, talent development and performance management including "Up Is Not the Only Way" and "Help Them Grow or Watch Them Go." Retaining your best people during times like this starts with knowing what employees are feeling, and then taking targeted actions based on that understanding. "Leaders have to know that people are coming back either burning, churning or yearning," said Beverly. "Burning meaning, 'I can't wait to get back and meet with my colleagues.' Churning meaning 'I'm coming back kind of half-heartedly. I don't know if I really want to.' And yearning, meaning 'Well, maybe now it'll be different." Highlights of the conversation include: Why the issues underlying the Great Resignation aren't new, but the scale is different. How to respond in situations where employees have the leverage. What managers can do to hold on to their people, and what to do when they can't. Why you don't need AI and advanced technology to boost employee retention. Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak talk with Beverly about the power of stay interviews, what it means to be "loose in the saddle," and whether bonuses and incentives are effective retention tools. Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
In many ways, the leaders organizations need today are exactly the ones they're most likely to overlook. In this episode of Get Reworked, we talk to Jennifer Kahnweiler, leadership expert and author "The Introverted Leader," about the strengths that introverts bring to the workplace and how organizations can tap into them during this particular moment at work. What's needed is a closer look at how we communicate and collaborate at work. Listen: Get Reworked Full Episode List "We have a world that's structured for extroverts. It's very fast-paced [and] it's not getting any slower," Jennifer said. "So much is geared towards teamwork, which really is not necessarily the strong suit of the introvert all the time. So some of the forces that we have actually in work structures and organizations really don't lend themselves to the sweet spots of the introvert." Highlights of the conversation include: The difference between shyness and introversion. Why work structures are biased toward extroverts. The strengths introverts bring to the disrupted workplace. How to balance introversion and extroversion in teamwork. What organizations should do differently as they head back to the office. Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak out themselves as introverts, talk with Jennifer about the viability of workplace personality assessments and engage in some introvert-friendly awkward silence. Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
The future of the metaverse may be the topic of the day for many tech pundits, but the reality is that it's already here. The virtual reality, that is. In this episode of Get Reworked, we talk to Derek Belch, CEO of virtual reality firm Strivr, about how VR is being used to train employees right now and what potential it holds for the future. We've entered a new era of VR technology, he said, and the recent buzz around the metaverse is only going to accelerate its use in the enterprise. "The effect on the human brain is so real," Derek says. "If VR is done well, the brain can't tell the difference between a virtual simulation and real life. So I think that's the difference is we're in that cheaper, lighter, faster era. And this technology that used to be very cumbersome, very expensive, very heavy ... that's all gone." Highlights of the conversation include: How an aspiring football coach turned into a VR training entrepreneur. When VR training is a good option for companies. The difference between VR and augmented reality. Why organizations that don't invest in emerging technologies like VR and the metaverse will be left behind. How Walmart used VR training to prepare employees for Black Friday and why he's bullish on its use for soft skills. What companies need to get started in VR for employee training and development. Co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak also talk with Derek about his career as a college football player at Stanford, how the end of his coaching career was just the beginning he needed, and why he's both a tech optimist and realist. Plus, Siobhan's got jokes! Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
The current moment is a powerful opportunity to reshape and remake work. But getting it right is both relatively straightforward and fiendishly complex.  In this episode of Get Reworked, we talk to Alan Pelz-Sharpe, information management expert and founder of advisory firm Deep Analysis about the road ahead. Organizations are poised to make giant leaps forward, he says, with powerful and useful tools to manage information and deliver better customer and employee experiences. But it's going to take a lot more than writing a check. "If people aren't prepared to make bold moves to get rid of decades of junk, if they're not prepared to be honest about how miserably inefficient some of their processes are and get rid of them, or completely rethink them, then it's limited," Alan said. Highlights of the conversation include: The problem with information management in companies today. Why it's long past time to clean out the digital junk in your data closet. Why you should approach customer experience and employee experience as one challenge. The No. 1 reason most business applications fail. Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak talk with Alan about the metaverse and web3, his side career as a DJ and what his photography background teaches him about digital transformation. Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
Many organizations have been serious about diversity and inclusion work for decades, so why has so little progress been made? In this episode of Get Reworked, we talk to Cynthia Owyoung, vice president of inclusion, equity and belonging at Robinhood and author of the new book "All Are Welcome: How to Build a Real Workplace Culture of Inclusion That Delivers Results." Cynthia shares insights and practical advice from her two decades of experience in a wide range of companies. The bottom line: If you're just making it an HR initiative, you're missing the point.  Listen: Get Reworked Podcast Full Episode List "When we view this work as primarily an HR initiative or something that only sits within talent, I think we're missing a huge opportunity," Cynthia said. "And we're also not addressing the broader influences and context within your business ecosystem that is actually going to make or break your success in this space."  Highlights of the conversation include: The evolution of diversity and inclusion to incorporate equity and belonging. How DEIB work can go beyond HR to be a driver of business and growth. How leaders can overcome their discomfort to be an advocate for DEIB work. The future of DEIB work in the hybrid world of work. Why the Great Resignation is an opportunity to really make a difference in this work. Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak talk with Cynthia about diversity quotas, algorithmic bias and why businesses should stop hiring for culture fit. Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
Could your TV be the answer to the challenges of the Great Resignation? It just might be, in part at least. In this episode of Get Reworked, we talk to Meredith Sadoulet, vice president of talent, strategy and experience at Comcast, about the story behind the development of Xfinity X1 Career Center, a job search destination launched on the Philadelphia-based company's cable platform in 2021. Meredith led the small entrepreneurial team within Comcast to launch this new consumer-facing job search tool.  Listen: Get Reworked Podcast Full Episode List "I can remember in the earliest days having some conversations with folks who said, 'I can't imagine that anyone would ever want to think about something serious like job search when they're watching TV,'" Meredith said. "Yet we had some market research and frankly, we had anecdotes. And we also had a gut feeling that there was an opportunity here based on what we were seeing with employment trends and a need for disruption."  Highlights of the conversation include: How Comcast discovered TV was a search destination for job seekers. What the Career Center does and how the company built it. How companies like Walmart are using the platform to meet their recruiting and diversity and inclusion goals. The effects of the Great Resignation on recruiting and job search. Lessons learned from operating as a startup within a larger company. Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak talk with Meredith about whether 5G is overrated or underrated, the enduring allure of business travel and bicycle racing as a form of relaxation. Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
Before COVID pushed many workers into remote work, collaboration consumed as much as 85% of people's work time. In the post-pandemic world it's gone even higher, adding five to eight hours to the average work week. We're collaborating more, which is a good thing, but we've entered overload territory. In this episode of Get Reworked, we talk to Rob Cross, professor of global leadership at Babson College and author of "Beyond Collaboration Overload," about what that means and how companies can make sure they're collaborating in the right ways. As companies ponder their return-to-office strategy, understanding internal networks and identifying who your organizational super collaborators are is critically important.  "They're in my mind the really big flight risks that a lot of the organizations are using the network analytics to understand," Rob said, "because if you force them back what you're doing is not just losing a person, you're losing that network too. And so the impact is quite, quite significant." Highlights of the conversation include: How Zoom fatigue is different from collaboration overload. How to drive better innovation from collaboration. The role of purpose and intention in building effective collaboration. How to build high quality relationships in remote and hybrid work. Who should take ownership of collaboration inside the organization. Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak talk to Rob about how actor Kevin Bacon is a model for the kind of networked connections we should be aiming for in organizations, and the pluses and minuses of New Year's resolutions. Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
Remote and hybrid work is a golden opportunity to make real progress toward diversity and inclusion goals, but only if companies handle it right. In this episode of Get Reworked, we talk to Joan C. Williams, professor at University of California Hastings School of Law and author of Bias Interrupted: Creating Inclusion for Real and for Good, about that opportunity and the role organizations can play in interrupting bias at work. Here's a tip: Just having a conversation about it isn't enough. "If you had a problem with sales, you wouldn't respond to it by having a conversation about sales, and then expect anything to change," Joan said. "You would analyze the sales process, figure out what's going wrong, develop metrics to establish baselines and measure progress, and then keep trying evidence-based strategies to achieve your goals. You wouldn't have a sincere conversation about sales and designate National Celebrate Sales Month and expect anything to change."  Highlights of the conversation include: Why diversity, equity and inclusion programs in many organizations fail to solve the challenge of bias. The places where bias in organizational systems show up and how that harms women and people of color. How to design hiring processes, performance evaluations and succession planning to be more equitable. Why change needs to come from the top and the bottom of the organization. Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak talk to Joan about why she has made studying and interrupting bias her life's work and talk about their bi-weekly live conversations with audience members on Twitter Spaces. Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
Employee experience has become a primary objective for organizations as they look to retain pandemic-fatigued employees and recruit in-demand talent. But it's easy to get it wrong. In this episode, Tom Dewaele, global head of employee experience at Unilever, shares how the London-based consumer goods maker creates a unified employee experience for 150,000 workers across 190 countries. The journey can easily end up with efforts fragmented across functions and multiple competing departmental initiatives. The end result is frustrated employees. "That's what triggered the thinking of starting to look at it in a different way, in a more end-to-end way and bring those different functions together under one single umbrella called employee experience," said Dewaele. Dewaele, the winner of Reworked's 2021 Employee Experience Leader of the Year award, shares what others can learn from Unilever's journey over the last few years. Highlights of the conversation include: The importance of having a single, unified vision for employee experience across the organization. How Unilever started on its employee experience journey. What employee experience leaders can learn from customer experience. How to balance priorities across regions and departments and still find space for experimentation. Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak talk with Tom about Belgian fries vs. their French counterpart and urge listeners to get their award applications ready for the coming year. Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
Hybrid work is the order of the day for many companies as they ponder their future. But what does hybrid work actually mean and how do you design it to work for both employees and the organization? In this episode of Get Reworked, Jim Kalbach, chief evangelist at digital whiteboard company MURAL, talks about how the current moment is an inflection point for designing places where people actually want to work. "I don't think it's a change in work that we've experienced during the pandemic," he said. "It's a change in lifestyle that we've experienced and because of that people kind of got a flavor of a different way of living and working. And I don't think they're ready to give that up." Highlights of the conversation include: Why you have to be intentional about how you design hybrid and remote work. How to use small moments within meetings to create a positive culture. How user experience and design thinking can be used to create effective hybrid work experiences. The 5 P Framework for thinking about hybrid work, and why policy and practice should drive your approach. ​Why now is the time to reinvent how you engage with teams and embrace a playful mindset. Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak talk about the oeuvre of Nicolas Cage movies and how the journeyman Hollywood actor just might be the panacea for what ails the digital workplace. Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
The past year-plus has been one giant, often unwanted and unanticipated, experiment at work. From emerging collaboration tools and AI-fueled bots to new working models like hybrid and remote work, organizations large and small had to get comfortable with being uncomfortable. New ways of thinking and working are a reality from the frontline to the C-suite. It's also quite obvious that it's still a work in progress. In this kickoff episode to Season 2 of Get Reworked, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak take a look back at some of what's happened and review their own podcast experiment.  The past year has seen dizzying advancements as well as consistent reminders that it's often the management basics that have the most dramatic effect. Highlights of the conversation include: Big workplace themes from the 2021 Digital Workplace Experience series. Why the basics are so important in the workplace of the future. Favorite episodes from Season 1 of the podcast. Plus, Siobhan and Mike renew their debate about whether or not raisins in cookies are a good thing. That and more hard-hitting commentary on what's next from the upcoming season of the Get Reworked podcast. Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
From established tools like Slack, enterprise giants Microsoft Teams and Google Workspace, and emerging whiteboard tools like Mural, we have more ways to collaborate at work than we've ever had before. But that doesn't mean it's all sorted out. In this episode of Get Reworked, Angela Ashenden, principal analyst in the workplace transformation practice at CCS Insight, shares why the technology is important but it's the human element that is perhaps the most tricky in the new world of collaboration. "There is this increasing requirement on managers to learn new skills in order to cope with the changes in the way that teams work today and the way that people work," Angela said. "And as we go into this kind of hybrid work environment, then there's a number of new things that come into that picture as well." Highlights of the conversation include: How collaboration is changing inside organizations in response to technology innovation. The ways management needs to change its approach to collaboration in hybrid and remote work environments. When asynchronous collaboration makes sense and when it makes sense to collaborate in real time. The critical importance of workplace agreements and policies that spell out collaboration expectations. Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak talk with Angela about her skepticism about the rise of mental wellness apps and reflect on their takeaways from the first season of the podcast. Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
In February 2020, Delta Air Lines was celebrating a record year for travel and looking forward to a 2020 that would potentially surpass even that. Thirty days later, nearly all of that business was gone. In this episode of Get Reworked, Brandon Carson talks about the experience of living through that moment and how it's opened up a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to redefine work. Until recently, Brandon was head of learning at Delta, one of the world's largest airlines, and recently took on a new role as vice president of learning and leadership at Walmart. He's also the author of a new book, "L&D's Playbook in the Digital Age." It's that learning and development focus that has him feeling more hopeful, not less so, about the future.   Listen: Get Reworked Podcast Full Episode List "We've got all these opportunities to connect to each other and learn from each other," Brandon said. "So it's an opportunity that is unlike anything we've had in the past." Highlights of the conversation include: What he learned about leadership and learning through lockdown. How companies can reset and rebuild their leadership bench for future success. What exactly is different about how companies approach employee development in the digital age. Why a learning strategy needs to be the business strategy. Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak talk with Brandon about AI, digital natives, 70-20-10 and the enduring magic of Whitney Houston. Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
Corporate social responsibility gets thrown around a lot in business today. Organizations regularly tout the steps they take to make the world a better place and how they're endeavoring to create a more diverse and inclusive workplace. How much of that is real? In this episode of Get Reworked, Malia Lazu breaks it down for us. She's a diversity and inclusion strategist, founder of consulting firm The Lazu Group, lecturer on innovation at MIT, and a former banker and community organizer. Suffice it to say, she sees the issue from many perspectives. "Right now, I think a lot of what we're seeing is performative," Malia said. "And you know, that's great. Performative is a start, but it's not going to be enough to actually have an impact. We have to move from intention to impact. And once we start doing that, I think we can all take off our skepticism hat a little bit. But right now, there's no reason to." Highlights of the conversation include: How to know when a company is serious about making a real impact. Why equity is the workplace standard that companies should measure themselves against. Why CSR and diversity and inclusion work takes practice. The Three L Process (listen, learn and loving action) for how to make a difference. The power of employee resource groups and how to ensure women don't continue to bear the brunt of the remote work downside. Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak talk about why corporate social responsibility is top of mind for businesses today. Listen in for more. Have a suggestion, comment or topic for a future episode? Drop us a line at editors@simplermedia.com.
The shift to remote and hybrid work is just the tip of the transformation iceberg. To make the most of the massive investment in digital workplace technology over the last year-plus, we need to think much more deeply about digital transformation. In this episode of Get Reworked, Anh Nguyen Phillips, global CEO program research director at Deloitte Consulting and co-author of "The Transformation Myth: Leading Your Organization through Uncertain Times," tells us why people are the linchpin in successful digital transformation.  "They have the creativity, the ingenuity, the passion," Anh said, "and all of that feeds in to creating the most impactful, innovative, life-changing kinds of technologies that we have, and that we will have going into the future. But we can't tap into that creativity and that innovation without focusing on the human element." Highlights of the conversation include: Why we need to focus on enterprise transformation, not just digital transformation. Why having a higher purpose is essential to making the most of digital technology. How digitally mature companies approach leadership and organizational culture differently. The five traits of organizations that get transformation right. Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak talk about their own underwhelming pandemic lockdown-inspired achievements. Listen in for more.
There is no status quo when it comes to skills. New technologies, new realities and new challenges are arriving at a rapid-fire pace, leaving many previously skilled and experienced people on the outside looking in. That's why many organizations are embracing the need to reskill and upskill their workforce. But what exactly does that mean? Shelley Osborne, corporate learning executive and author of "The Upskilling Imperative," explains and tells us why the ability to learn is the essential skill every organization and every individual needs to succeed. Interestingly, it's not about a specific skill. Rather, it's about creating an environment where learning can happen.  "When we do it well, and when we create these incredible learning cultures, and set people up to be growing and developing and upskilling, we make the best organizations — the most innovative, creative, interesting, amazing places to work," Shelley said. Highlights of the conversation include: How upskilling is different from reskilling. Why a learning mindset is the key to the future of work. The core tenets of a successful learning culture. How to avoid letting the mistakes of the past define how companies deliver learning in the future. Plus, co-hosts Siobhan Fagan and Mike Prokopeak share what teachers influenced them the most and come up with a new business idea.
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