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Get WIRED

Get WIRED

Author: WIRED & Condé Nast

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Get WIRED is a new podcast about how the future is realized. Each week, we burrow down new rabbit holes to investigate the ways technology is changing our lives—from culture to business, science to design. Through hard-hitting reporting, intimate storytelling, and audio you won’t hear anywhere else, Get WIRED is the must-listen-to tech podcast that sets the agenda for the week. Hosted by WIRED Senior Writer Lauren Goode.

23 Episodes
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This week we’re lending our feed to our friends at The Pitchfork Review podcast. On this episode, Pitchfork Editor Puja Patel interviews Laura Les and Dylan Brady of 100 gecs, a band that’s polarized pop audiences with their genre-mashing, glitched-out, Auto-Tune-infused style. The three also discuss the musical conundrum hyperpop, a recent term devised to describe other up and coming artists that are pushing the boundaries of pop music. But is it a new genre or just a Spotify playlist? Is it an internet subculture or a meaningless buzzword? And who gets to decide what hyperpop is, streaming sites or a select group of artists? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Introducing Checking In, the advice podcast where we answer real health and wellness questions from real people like you. Hosted by SELF’s Editor in Chief, Carolyn Kylstra, and featuring trusted experts, doctors, therapists, thought leaders, and even a few celebrities, we’re diving deep into what it really means to be healthy. Checking In launches on Monday, November 16th, with new episodes releasing weekly. Subscribe to get episodes right when they drop at 6:00 am EST. Listen to Checking In here: Apple Podcasts: http://listen.self.com/self-apple Spotify: http://listen.self.com/self-spotify Stitcher: http://listen.self.com/self-stitcher Or wherever you get your podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
If you know Pepe the Frog, it’s probably as a meme that white nationalists used to spread hate on the internet. But Pepe started out as a lovable character in a little-known webcomic created by cartoonist Matt Furie. This week on Get WIRED, Senior Editor Angela Watercutter interviews the filmmakers of the new documentary Feels Good Man about Pepe, meme magic, and Matt’s journey to try to take Pepe back from the trolls. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
We knew it might be an Election Day unlike any other. But after last Tuesday, it soon became evident that this year’s US presidential race would culminate in an election week. On this week’s Get WIRED podcast, we talk to Gilad Edelman, Lily Hay Newman, and Emma Grey Ellis about why the forecasting polls were so wrong (again), how we know we can trust the election results, and why people keep spinning up conspiracy theories online. Also: Election Memes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
TikTok the Vote

TikTok the Vote

2020-11-0228:201

You’ve probably heard of Rock the Vote, the MTV approved get-out-the-vote campaign aimed at mobilizing young people. But how do you reach young voters when everyone’s stuck at home and the sheer volume of political ads on social media can feel mind-numbing? WIRED Senior Writer Arielle Pardes takes us into the TikTok world that’s organizing to get out the vote through memes, mashups, and dance videos.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The Robots Are Coming

The Robots Are Coming

2020-10-2627:351

Boston Dynamics is one of those companies that either makes you feel like we’re living in a Black Mirror episode or like we’re on the cusp of technological innovation. Over the past decade they’ve made a name for themselves through viral videos that demonstrate unparalleled robotics engineering. You’ve probably seen some of these: robot dogs loading the dishwasher, a humanoid robot doing a backflip, a segue-like robot effortlessly moving heavy objects. And now, after almost 30 years, their products are finally on the market. Reporter Matt Simon talks to Marc Raibert, the founder of Boston Dynamics, to check in on the ambitious robotics company. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
California’s catastrophic 2020 wildfire season kicked off midway through the hottest August on record with a dry thunderstorm in which 12,000 lighting strikes ignited hundreds of fires over the course of a week. America’s best fire researchers have been trying to learn more about what causes fires—especially extreme fire events like fire tornadoes. Reporter Daniel Duane talks to Get WIRED Host Lauren Goode about his November cover story for Wired magazine, which goes deep into the cutting edge of fire research.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
As protests filled the streets this summer, WIRED Senior Writer Jason Parham went looking for radio broadcasts from 1992, when he watched Los Angeles go up in flames. What he found instead was a trove of broadcasts from throughout his 1990s coming of age, archived by a French YouTuber. Parham then talks with cultural critic Jace Clayton, also known as DJ Rupture, about how the move from analog to digital has changed our relationship to music. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Think about your favorite video game growing up. You can probably imagine exactly how it sounded and even hum some of the tunes. As it turns out, a lot of the iconic video game scores of the 80’s and 90’s were created by a group of women, young Japanese composers - sometimes just out of college. This music has such a strong legacy - but it’s almost impossible to find information about the women who wrote it.  So for this episode of Get Wired, Host Lauren Goode talks to Dia Lacina--a writer and video game music expert. Dia recently went on a journey to find out more about this group of composers—who they were, and what they worked on—and ultimately, how these women shaped the scores we know so well, despite working in a male-dominated gaming industry. And then later on in the show, we hear from Eímear Noone, a conductor who has brought 8-bit video game music to the symphony. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
In another special episode of Get WIRED, join WIRED 25 as host Lauren Goode sits down with Nextdoor CEO Sarah Friar to talk about the hyperlocal platform. They discuss human vs. AI content moderation, how Nextdoor is measuring its efforts to prevent racial profiling, and the importance of knowing at least six neighbors. You can watch past interviews and join the remaining WIRED 25 virtual events at events.wired.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
WIRED 25: Nia DaCosta

WIRED 25: Nia DaCosta

2020-09-2124:311

In this special episode of Get WIRED, join this year’s WIRED 25 conference as we sit down with filmmaker Nia DaCosta, one of the WIRED 25 innovators who are shaping culture and using technology to lead society through this period of global uncertainty. In 2020, the horror of a global pandemic, natural disasters, and police brutality are as tangible as the grip of a boogeyman. That doesn’t mean fictional dread no longer has its place. For Nia DaCosta, the director behind the upcoming remake of the 1992 horror classic Candyman, it is as relevant and crucial as ever. DaCosta’s breakout debut, Little Woods, was a Western thriller. Now, she turns to the horror genre for the Candyman remake produced by Jordan Peele and written alongside Peele. DaCosta speaks with WIRED senior writer Jason Parham about her upcoming film, Candyman (now delayed to 2021), the horror genre, and how the pandemic will change the future of the movie industry.  Find out how you can join the remaining WIRED 25 virtual events at events.wired.com. See the trailer for Candyman here and tune in next week, September 21st, for Get WIRED Host Lauren Goode’s interview with Nextdoor CEO Sarah Friar. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
In this week’s episode of Get WIRED, host Lauren Goode and reporter Ben Wofford tell the story of an election clerk and computer scientist who spent years at odds with each other over election security, until finally taking up arms to tackle the problem together. The problem? Too much power in the hands of a few private companies. We trace their tough journey to develop and build technology that could change the future of voting.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
This Fall, back to school is unlike anything we've ever experienced. Due to COVID-19, some school districts in the US are going entirely remote, while others are trying hybrid learning. Parents suddenly had to change plans. Teachers are watching the pandemic exacerbate the digital divide. And little kids who really hate Zoom now have to do it all day long. In this episode of Get WIRED, host Lauren Goode talks to Adrienne So, WIRED Senior Writer, about the chaos of raising her kids and figuring out her daughter’s first day of kindergarten amid the pandemic. Later, Education Technology Specialist Regina Schaffer tells us what her district is doing to address the digital divide and discuss the future of our schools. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
We're sharing the latest episode of our sister podcast, Gadget Lab. And we need your help! For our upcoming Back to School episode of Get WIRED, please call 415-534-9498 and leave us a voicemail about the challenges you're facing, and tricks you've learned for dealing with school and kids during the coronavirus pandemic. As smart speakers for the home continue to grow in popularity, police departments have started to take notice. Now, whenever attorneys and law enforcement officials are investigating a crime, they can put your virtual assistant in the hot seat. They can cross-reference a variety of information from smart devices, including location data, audio recordings, and biometric data. Together, it can paint a picture of where a suspect was and when, often far more reliably than any human witness. This week on Gadget Lab, WIRED senior writer Sidney Fussell joins us to talk about the strange murder case where a smart speaker became the star witness. We also share tips about how to manage the privacy settings in your own smart tech. Warning: This episode features a brief conversation about domestic violence and assault. Show Notes:  Read Sidney’s story about law enforcement collecting information from smart speakers here. Find more episodes of the Get WIRED podcast here. Recommendations:  Sidney recommends the show I May Destroy You on HBO. Lauren recommends Vanity Fair’s September issue, with a cover story about Breonna Taylor. Mike recommends the episode of the podcast Questlove Supreme with Bootsy Collins. Sidney Fussell can be found on Twitter @SidneyFussell. Lauren Goode is @LaurenGoode. Michael Calore is @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. The show is produced by Boone Ashworth (@booneashworth). Our executive producer is Alex Kapelman (@alexkapelman). Our theme music is by Solar Keys. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Last week, we took you inside a factory farm with the co-founder of Direct Action Everywhere (DxE), a group the meat industry says is one of the “most dangerous animal rights groups out there.” In this episode, WIRED senior writer Andy Greenberg joins us for another chapter in the story of slaughterhouse break-ins. This one unfolded alongside the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s an example of how everyday tech is being used for surveillance of typically secretive operations—in this case, a massive pig farm that is killing its pigs in a morally questionable way.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Who is an animal activist? What do they do? Described as “the most dangerous animal rights organization out there,” Direct Action Everywhere (or DxE) hopes to expose the controversial practices of the factory farm industry. A self-described “global grassroots network of animal rights activists,” DxE engages in non-violent forms of protest as a way of both educating the public and pushing reform. WIRED Senior Writer Andy Greenberg learned more about the people who make up this network of activists and their operations. In Part I of this two part story, we talk to Wayne Hsuing, co-founder and activist of DxE, as he describes the groups’ origin and his involvement in Operation Deathstar -- a sting operation (with a full Virtual Reality camera rig), in hope of bringing awareness to the practices of industrialized farming. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
On this special episode of Get WIRED, WIRED’s Editor-at-large, Steven Levy talks with Bill Gates— philanthropist and co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. At the start of the pandemic, the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation pledged more than $1 billion to vaccine development, and $100 million of that is specifically for Covid-19 vaccines. Meanwhile, he’s also become the target of conspiracy theories related to the coronavirus. They discuss everything from the US response to the pandemic, to a timeline when things might go back to “normal.” They also cover the recent Big Tech antitrust hearings, and of course, they talk about TikTok! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Virtual (Being) Insanity

Virtual (Being) Insanity

2020-08-0327:275

On the latest episode of the Get WIRED podcast, we attend a Virtual Beings Summit and contemplate what it means to be human. WIRED staff writer Emma Grey Ellis reports on how virtual beings are taking over our timelines—sometimes, without our even noticing. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Facial recognition tech has been critiqued for being inaccurate for a while now. But its problems became pretty clear last month, when the New York Times reported a story about a Black man named Robert Williams who was identified incorrectly as a suspect in a crime. In this episode, WIRED Senior Staff Writer Sidney Fussell, who covers surveillance technology, traces racialized surveillance tech to its origins, as far back as slavery and early prison designs. He draws parallels between the intentional, all-seeing design of the panopticon and the omni-present cameras that surround us today — and explains how these kinds of systems become so flawed in the first place.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The idea behind the Citizen app is that its users upload videos of the things that are going on in the neighborhood in real time — anything from as a gas leak to something potentially a lot more violent. It's an app built on the premise that the more information a community has the better off it is, but it also comes with all of the trappings and problems of a lot of community surveillance — the app has some toxic comments, it can lead to racial profiling, and it has sparked a lot of discussion about who’s benefitting most from all of these neighborhood alerts — the users, law enforcement, or Citizen itself. WIRED's Boone Ashworth has spent months on the Citizen app, trying to better understand exactly what its mission is, and what this kind of hyper-vigilance does to our psyches. But he's also been talking to people who are on the app, who rush to the scene to capture what’s going on in their neighborhoods; and he found one who is particularly interesting, and who agreed to take us behind the scenes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Comments (5)

Thomas Lanzetta

a

Sep 14th
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Thomas Lanzetta

**,

Sep 14th
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Thomas Lanzetta

**,

Sep 14th
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Jacqueline Lee Bellem

why do people have kids that can't stand to raise them... I just can't listen

Sep 11th
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Christopher Fetter

why would I want a (NON) Doctor/Computer coder to tell me about a virus. not listening.

Aug 17th
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