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GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp
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GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp

Author: Morgan Dixon + Vanessa Garrison

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GirlTrek's epic 21-day walking meditation series to remember where we came from and to gather strength for the road ahead.We're celebrating one Black woman and moments in history and using the story and lessons of our ancestors to help guide us through these uncertain times. Each and every day, we will convene a conversation with thousands of you to stay connected, have fun, and organize a national agenda.
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Something powerful. Energetic. A seismic shift in consciousness. While the world unraveled around us, we walked and trained like an army. Studying the 21 most powerful acts of Black resistance. And in that discipline, something was fortified inside each and every one of us. In the words the great Chadwick Boseman, who transitioned to be with the ancestors this weekend: “When God has something for you, it doesn’t matter who stands against it. God will move someone that’s holding you back away from the door and put someone there who will open it for you, if it’s meant for you. I don’t know what your future is, but if you are willing to take the harder way, the more complicated one, the one with more failures at first than successes, the one that has ultimately proven to have more meaning, more victory, more glory then you will not regret it. Now, this is your time. The light of new realizations shines on you today.” Today, as our final story and act of resistance, we will walk together and talk about the story and future of GirlTrek. We will welcome our newest vanguard of 100,000+ Black women who just completed training and tell them what’s next. We will celebrate our sisters and brothers who are in the struggle now and talk about how our movement can support their work directly. We will walk together in silence, as a moment of silence for all of our fallen heroes including our brother Chadwick. And on this powerful walk together, we will visualize the potential in our own lives and assess what is required of our bodies, our minds, and our spirits as we make manifest a real Wakanda.if you haven't completed your bootcamp journey yet, it’s okay —it’s not too late! You can join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at any time. Sign up at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Beyonce - Welcome Homecoming Live:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zya5a3xBcA0Richie Havens - Here Comes The Sun:https://open.spotify.com/track/0hhzJEusz6r7f0eL1Uc8kw?si=divTDZ44QMa4DPeBWMIdmABeyonce - Before I Let Go:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8305npLmIbE
August 28, 1833: Slavery was abolished in the UK. August 28, 1955: 14-year-old Emmitt Till was murdered. August 28, 1963: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his iconic I Have a Dream Speech.August 28, 2005: Hurricane Katrina made landfall in Louisiana.August 28, 2008: Barack Obama accepted the Democratic nomination for president, becoming the first black man to ever win the nomination and bid for the presidency. There’s something in the air. Can you feel it? There is a strong current of resilient resolve that has taken up residence in the hearts and minds of Black folks who understand, we’re not going backward from here. It’s revolution or bust. That feeling has become especially strong this August and we’re here to tell you, it’s not a coincidence. No, our ancestors are intentional people and they are calling us to examine the alchemy of this month in order to learn what is still possible. Which, in a month that brought us the Haitian Revolution, Nat Turner’s Rebellion, the March on Washington, the Watts Uprising and the births of Marcus Garvey and Fred Hampton, must be a lot.Today’s conversation will be a celebration of this phenomenon called Black August. We will start with the story of fallen freedom fighter George Jackson and will come full circle to the moment of now.Whether you are looking to join the rebellion in the streets, or have your own personal revolution, this is a conversation that you don’t want to miss.Join the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Public Enemy - Black Steel In The Hour Of Chaos:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZM5_6js19eMBeanie Sigel - Feel it in the Air:https://open.spotify.com/track/4rICUbwZZuqUOcgQgtux2k?si=4hmtbDraTyGhfL_BOBYl-AKendrick Lamar - The Blacker The Berry:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VdPtVZDspIY
"Oh Captain, My Captain."Remember The Dead Poets Society?  The movie with Robin Williams?  He took his students into the hallway to study vintage photos of long-gone students.  "Can you hear them talking to you?", he asked. "If you lean in real close, and listen, you can hear them whisper their legacy to you.  Seize the day! Make your lives extraordinary."  Well, that movie was awesome, but it was white as hell and this is Black History Bootcamp so this is what we want you to do. Look at the faces of The Harlem Hellfighters.  Study them. Know that these Black men are the reason Germany surrendered. They earned their name, The Harlem Hellfighters, by spending an unthinkable 191 days in all-out trench warfare.  On the frontlines longer than any other American unit of World War I.   They toured for over six months, the longest deployment of any and they - the 369th Regiment of Black men - made up less than 1% of the soldiers deployed yet they protected 20% of the territory assigned to the United States. And they lost more of their brothers - 1,500 lives - more than any other American regiment.  And America used them as human decoys to defeat the Germans.  When they came home, America treated them with disdain, disrespect, like second-class citizens.  Didn't want them too proud.  They might disrupt Jim Crow.  And America refused to honor the greatest hero of the entire war, Henry Johnson (although the French gave him their highest medal of honor).  So America, we won't ask for your respect.  No.  Not then, not now. We gave these heroes our own parade in Harlem on February 17, 1919. ...Welcome, home heroes.Please think of them. And think of all who fought with valor - Crispus Attucks, The 54th Regiment, The Buffalo Soldiers, The Tuskegee Airmen, Vietnam Veterans -  all of the men and women who in the armed forces today.  Think about the frontline soldiers in our communities.  The mail carriers and sanitation workers, essential Black people whose labor is the spine of American democracy.  Think of Jacob Blake, a man who had to show up for his community this week to settle a dispute because the police are not safe to call. And to all the men and women who fought to protect it, we make these solemn promises. We will never develop an appetite for war - because war is hell. Instead, we will thirst for PEACE, build moments to LOVE, and light fires of JUSTICE.  We will honor the flag you defended by taking a knee anytime this country forgets the value of Black lives.Join the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:The Dramatics - Get Up and Get Down:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZfMpbcI1NQBrian Courtney Wilson - Worth Fighting For (Live):https://open.spotify.com/track/51fegUPIH02heRh9fkkLwE?si=2Eow_7TTQyeuFC4z2JBv4Q
Walking has always been used as a tool for social change. In early June of 1966 James Meredith, who had become the first Black man to attend the University of Mississippi, set out to walk from Memphis, Tennessee, to Jackson, Mississippi, a distance of more than 200 miles, to promote Black voter registration and protest ongoing discrimination in the south. But James Meredith would never reach his destination.On the second day of his journey, a white man tracked him down on a dirt road in Mississippi and shot him several times.What that white terrorist didn’t know is that you can try and kill the revolutionary, but you can not kill the revolution.Not only would James Meredith’s March Against Fear continue without him, but it would enrage and embolden a young, brilliant activist by the name of Stokely Carmichael, who after being arrested following the march, left the jailhouse and let out what would become an iconic cry for BLACK POWER.Stokely Carmichael saw the writing on the wall. A young, brilliant organizer, who had worked closely alongside Dr. King and who was leading the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) shifted his focus from appealing to the moral center of a country that he said demonstrated it had “no conscious” to a radical liberation agenda for Black people. And we’re talking an agenda so radical that even the Black Panthers eventually couldn’t hang.Stokely Carmichael was the living, breathing example of speaking truth to power. He was an organizer who was involved in almost every major demonstration and event that occurred in the US in the early ’60s. His legacy can be seen today in the faces of marchers who chant with fire in their bellies “defund the police,” and across the diaspora in the movement for Pan-Africanism.This man, who would eventually be reborn as Kwame Toure, and who Rosa Parks once said could, ''stroll through Dixie in broad daylight using the Confederate flag for a handkerchief," PUT ON for his people.And for this sacrifice, we celebrate this freedom fighter with a major Black Power salute and a conversation that will breakdown his illustrious life.Join the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpt played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Brand Nubian - Wake Up (Reprise in the Sunrise):https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJeDHYsNkHIWhat's in a Name? ft. Kwame Ture (1989):https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGcl359SMxE&t=2s
...one little sentence tells us all we need to know about this man.  In a letter, his sister said this..."If they had not killed Cris, Cris would have killed them."Don't you ever get it twisted.  Crispus Attucks started The American Revolution. And today's conversation is about his murder.  This convo could not be more relevant.  The Boston massacre was a hot-sticky mess of 10,000 soldiers patrolling the colonies with impunity.  When the British tried to tax the people to pay for those soldiers, all-hell broke loose.  An over-armed police force against civilians. People like Paul Revere, Sam Adams, John Hancock, and every powdered wig we now celebrate as patriots were against the British armed forces.  They called themselves 'The Sons of Liberty" ...and yet, the first man to die in the name of said liberty was a Black man named Cris Attucks. He was not a casualty.  He was the leader of the rebellion.  This, my friends, was the start of your America. (In my Rasta voice, "Bullet, buullet!")Here's how it all happened.  One day at the barbershop...I kid you not, this is how the Boston Massacre starts... Let’s get into it.Join the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:2pac - Ambitionz Az A Ridah (Clean):https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWLljMr20MI&feature=youtu.beYoung Bleed, Master P, C-Loc,  Steady Mobb'n, King George, Gangsta T, Silkk The Shocker - How Ya Do Dat:https://open.spotify.com/track/1KLhUURHRl72xGO5A94lme?si=hqc2QOSER06fDNVMVcBDpA
Today’s walk is dedicated to a political organizer, military strategist, and master of guerrilla warfare, the one and only Queen Nanny of Jamaica. A woman who guided her people through an intense period of fighting against the British.From Queen Nanny, we learn the art of resistance. Get ready to take notes.Queen Nanny was the military vision keeper and spiritual and cultural leader of the Windward Maroons. A community of resistors, who had escaped the brutality of enslavement on the British owned sugarcane plantations in Jamaica. Thought to be descendant from the Ashanti Tribe in Ghana, Queen Nanny was a fierce leader who helped the Maroons fight two guerrilla wars. These wars forced the British to recognize Jamaica's autonomy, establishing their freedom.Queen Nanny baffled and infuriated her enemies. They couldn’t understand that the source of courage and fire came directly from her African ancestry, which she strategically kept alive through stories, music and customs within Nannytown, a village she established high in the Blue Mountains as a refuge for her people.There’s so much to learn from Queen Nanny’s story. It doesn’t matter if your battle is happening in the valleys or the hills. If it’s personal or professional. It doesn’t matter if you’ve already been served a defeat. There is still a path to victory. Just let the ancient wisdom of Queen Nanny guide you to where you need to be.It’s about to be a revolution in these streets on today’s walk.Join the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Burning Spear - Queen of the Mountain Live:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeTKvSf3Sa0Spice - So Mi Like It:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8305npLmIbE
We are the #daughtersof Cécile Fatiman a Haitian Voodoo Priestess who literally conjured a revolution. Her warrior blood runs through our veins. Our grandmothers and great-grandmothers -  themselves root-workers and prayer warriors - were women who learned the art of spiritual warfare from women like Cécile. That’s why we are so excited to introduce her to you on day 14 of Black History Bootcamp.On today’s walk, we’ll be talking about the Haitian Revolution and the gathering at Bois Caïman. This gathering, which took place on a hot summer night in August, was the site of the first major meeting of enslaved Blacks. During which, the first major slave insurrection of the Haitian Revolution was planned. And you know who presided over that meeting? That’s, right. Cécile.The gathering at Bois Caïman was part religious ritual and part strategic planning meeting and it set in motion the events that would lead to Haiti becoming the world’s first independent Black Republic. A nation which, to this today, is being punished for daring to rise up and free themselves by force. We’re going to talk about this and about the powerful community of leaders and activists on the ground now continuing the good fight.Join the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Toto Bissainthe - Dey:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1DcPdMZs9s
Once upon a time, Wangari Maathai saved Planet Earth. When people say they want to “diversify” the environmental movement, I cough on the arrogance.  Black women, indigenous women, and women of color around the globe are saving the planet.  Like, right now.  Like this actual second.  Planting, cultivating, harvesting, carrying, selling, cooking, composting, turning over soil, and doing it again.  And no disrespect to the card-carrying climate change activists – the Paris Agreement is essential – but please understand that while you are carrying protest signs, millions of African women are carrying seeds and meticulously tied bundles of the harvest to markets (with no carbon footprint) where they will sell locally.  Those same women will cook into the night, and compost what’s left, to grow what is needed the next day to save their nations. Today’s walk is dedicated to the legacy of Wangari Maathai for organizing women to plant 50 MILLION TREES to save Kenya from the brink of environmental devastation.  Her “Green Belt Movement” changed the very air, the earth,  and the water of the continent of Africa forever. We are proud of that.  But we are prouder of how she did it. How she showed up in the quiet moments when no one was watching.  How she survived the Mau Mau Uprising.  How she protested to free political prisoners. How she summoned the courage to stand in the front of bulldozers and speak on camera with a bloodied face. Oh, and she won the Nobel Peace Prize. But I guess she should’ve been at the climate march. Join today’s conversation so that I can fix my attitude. Let’s breathe some fresh air, sing at the top of our lungs, and rally ourselves to all be a little more like Wangari.Join the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music and speech excerpt played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Queen Latifah - U.N.I.T.Y.:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8cHxydDb7oTaking Root The Vision of Wangari Maathai:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5GX6JktJZg&feature=youtu.be
They killed him.  The official death report said natural causes but in a recent exhumation, his young body was riddled with bullet holes. Thomas Sankara was a folk hero.  He championed the people over the powerful.  He encouraged newspapers to tell the truth and - in an act of solidarity during his presidency - sold off the government's fleet of Mercedes and made all ministers ride in the Renault 5, the cheapest car sold in Burkina Faso at that time.  They called him the African Che Guevara. At 33-years-old, Sankara became the President of the Republic of Upper Volta. As a powerful first action, he changed the country’s colonial name – which was The Republic of Upper Volta – to an indigenous name - - Burkina Faso which means "Land of Incorruptible People". And incorruptible was his goal.  He refused foreign aid.  “He who feeds you, controls you.” He pushed African nations to collectively reject illegitimate debt from their colonizers.  He nationalized land and mineral wealth (which made the IMF and World Bank go bananas). And led a national campaign for self-sufficiency which included a literacy crusade, vaccinations of 2.5 million children, reforestation of the Sahal by planting 10 million trees, redistribution of land from feudal and tribal chiefs, community-built hospitals and schools, and women’s rights (outlawing female genital mutilation, forced marriages and polygamy).  The country thrived.  (Burkina Faso is the 4th richest gold producer in Africa).   When he was asked why he didn’t want his presidential portrait posted across Burkina Faso like other African leaders.  He said.  "There are seven million Thomas Sankaras." Let’s walk, talk, and learn more about Sankara, an icon of revolution, as we meditate on our own blueprint for liberation and social justice.  What do we really need? What’s on our agenda in 2020.  And what can we learn from Burkina Faso today?  30 years later, they are in a state of crisis.  100,000 people are internally displaced by extreme poverty, climate change, and terrorism. How did that happen? Is there a way to organize without centering a charismatic leader?  Join the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music excepts played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Fela Kuti - Zombie:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qj5x6pbJMyUBob Marley and the Wailers - War / No More Trouble https://open.spotify.com/track/7esv0HaNOrjRWJgyxqJ4c1?si=D0LPou-fSlmvpg0gO4kPbg
“Go back to Africa” They meant it as an insult. He meant it as a rallying cry. Today’s walk and history lesson is dedicated to the Honorable Marcus Mosiah Garvey. Some might call him the original African giant. Black, proud, and preaching the gospel of self-determination, Marcus Garvey hailed from St. Ann’s Bay Jamaica. The youngest of 11 children, Garvey was a political activist and entrepreneur, who spent his life helping to define the Black Nationalist and Pan African Movements. His vision -  big and scary to those invested in the oppression of marginalized people throughout the world - was to unite African, and people of African descent, across the diaspora and allow us to develop our own cultural, political, and economic systems free from foreign domination and outside influence. Now you know a vision this radical had to be met with opposition. Can we say FBI? These are the stories they don’t want us to tell. They don’t want us to realize that there is already a blueprint for this work. That blueprint includes a vision laid out by Marcus Garvey at a gathering in Harlem in 1921 that included thousands of delegates from more than 22 countries. On today’s call, we’re going to talk about what went down that at this international convention and how Marcus Garvey’s work and legacy live on today. Today marks 133 years since the birth of Marcus Garvey. Throw on some red, black, and green on top of that superhero blue and get ready to walk and talk with us as we celebrate and discuss his legacy. You KNOW this is going to be a good one.Join the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music and speech excepts played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Nas ft. Lauryn Hill - If I Ruled the World:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mlp-IIG9ApUMarcus Garvey, A Virtual Forum: 100th Anniversary of Convention of the Negro Peoples of the World:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vvBPLY9xJD0
An educator, writer, political campaigner, and activist. Today’s walk is dedicated to the bravery of Mary Church Terrell, a woman who played a central role in every major movement to advance the rights of Black people in this country, including suffrage, anti-lynching, and desegregation. Coining the term, “lifting while we climb”, Mary Church Terrell was one of the first Black women in the U.S. to earn a college degree and later went on to help found the NAACP and the National Association of Colored Women. Her resume alone would make her worthy of celebration, but it is her courageous defiance, put on display in two pivotal incidents – including one where she faced-off with one of history’s favorite heroes, Susan B. Anthony, that will be the central focus of today’s conversation.This is for every Black woman who has given up on intersectional feminism (because #tired), and for the ones who keep pushing to find common ground. We’ve got some stuff to talk about and a lot to learn from our foremother. A woman who was always willing to say the hard stuff, Mary Church Terrell.Join the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Donna Summer - She Works Hard For The Money:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09ZSKE38lTURihanna - Bitch Better Have My Money:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ToE26b2JyNc
Can we talk about radical praise? Can we talk about transcendent faith?  A Spirit that stretched from Africa to a tiny street in Los Angelos, California. Do. Not. Miss. Today!  Take a praise break! I’m about to shout right now.  God, I thank you for your grace. Today's walk is dedicated to the unsung heroes of the Pentecostal Movement.  ...to actual spiritual warriors.At the turn of the 20th century, America was at the height of lynching. Terror gripped Black homes. But they didn't run.  They grounded down - took to the woods - and prepared for spiritual battle.  Tent revivals, tarrying, drums, call and response. Hand clapping. Foot stomping. A revival of heart, mind, and body - night after night. A conjuring of justice. Gratitude for God’s Grace. Bigger. More connected. We chanted 2 Timothy 1:7. More power, more love.  You won't take our minds. It’s how we survived.  The fire reigned down. Healing. Protection. Insight. Divine peace. Ultimate resilience.  Harriet was born of that fire.  Fannie was born of that fire. King was born of that fire.  We are that fire. Here’s what you need to know. The biggest religious movement in American history was started by Black people. It happened in 1906 in Los Angeles. On a tiny street named Azusa. The Pentecostal movement was born. Newspapers came out, took photographs, and debated publicly about people speaking in tongues and being overcome with spiritual fervor. What they didn’t know then but we understand now is this -  that fire wasn’t born on Azusa Street. It was born in Africa. God covered our babies when men with guns came to destroy.  We are only here today because of the prayers of our foremothers in the bellies of slave ships. Our dance was perfected in Congo Square. But it was on Azusa Street that Black people made public the spiritual inheritance of Africa that lit a fire across America.  We've always been directly connected to God. They called it Pentecostalism.The Holy Ghost rained over this country in the fastest-growing religious movement in history.  A few important pioneers who believed that full sanctification or a supreme union with God on this earth was possible - being baptized in the Holy Ghost and filled with tongues - they believed that we ourselves could be Saints. In the beginning, it was intently and plainly called the Church of God to purposely shed all trappings of past religious distinction.  We are just God's church - that's it.  All are welcome. It evolved into what is now many beautiful denominations from COGIC to Apostolic. Today’s walk is dedicated to all of the unsung heroes who rallied an army of spiritual warriors to intercede at the height of American terror. Join the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Charles G Hayes & Warriors - Jesus Can Work It Out Remix:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRoe3iExVjUKirk Franklin - Stomp (Remix):https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JqBBpZvF4k
Today’s walk is dedicated to Nat Turner, the leader of the most famous slave uprising in the history of the United States.Nat Turner believed in signs and heard divine voices. On a summer night in August 1831, following a solar eclipse, Nat Turner, a Black man who had been sold three times in his young life, decided to take his destiny into his own hands by leading one of the bloodiest insurrections the country has ever seen. Some called him a villain, many others called him a hero. Today, we call him an ancestor and we honor his fight for freedom and seek true understanding from his story. We ask ourselves the hard question – how far would we go in the fight for our own liberation? Today’s conversation is for every person who has ever had a vision that you just could not shake. For every person who has ever stepped out on faith, despite fear crawling up your back. For those of us who believe that our steps are ordered and who are prepared to march into battle if called. Everything that you think you know about this story will be challenged. There is so much to discuss and learn!Join the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Mali Music - I Believe :https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=onNPKbOn8uUSunday Service Choir - Ultralight Beam:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nTgzYv7LLmc
“Mr. Chairman... my name is Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer, and I live at 626 East Lafayette Street, Ruleville, Mississippi, Sunflower County, the home of Senator James O. Eastland, and Senator Stennis. It was the 31st of August in 1962...”And that’s how it began. The most harrowing account of our hero being beaten in a jail cell by officers. Arrested for trying to vote. Her words so powerful, her eyes so honest and spirit so bright that the president of the United States of America, Lyndon B. Johnson, was terrified that she would so deeply move the nation in her national broadcast at the Democratic National Convention that he interrupted her testimony with a fake press conference. But he couldn’t stop her. Listen, when God is for you, who can be against you. We already knew that Fannie came to play zero games when she brought her white purse to the front of the convention and sat it on the table. Black People: bring your full selves to this movement and you will be unstoppable.No matter how you look, where you are, how you feel, you can do this. Join us today as we listen to the actual testimony together of one of the greatest in the game.Join the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpts played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Casey J - If God / Nothing But The Blood:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gaS59ddVkaoAudio of Fannie Lou Hamer's Testimony:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ML3WaEsCB98
Today’s walk is dedicated to Claudette Colvin and every Black woman who has ever felt invisible or who has ever been asked to labor on behalf of a movement that did not welcome or celebrate you. Thank you for your service and the way you show up for your people. Today you are seen and appreciated. On March 2, 1955, Claudette Colvin, a 15-year-old student, boarded a bus home from school and on that ride changed the course of history by refusing to give up her bus seat to a white woman. Her actions set in motion a critical legal battle. The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. made his political debut fighting her arrest and Claudette became one of five plaintiffs in the first federal court case to challenge bus segregation in the city of Montgomery. But this isn’t the story that history has told. It would be Rosa Parks whose name would ultimately go on record as the woman whose single act of courage inspired the most effective political and social protest campaign of the civil rights movement, The Montgomery Bus Boycotts.   So why wasn’t 15-year-old Claudette Colvin given her proper due? The reasons will outrage you, but the story is necessary to tell. The lessons to be learned are critical if we ever want to build a world that truly makes space for Black girls and women to show up as we are. This is going to be a conversation that you don't want to miss! We will be serving up truth, a whole lotta love, and a little bit of justice. All in the name of our good and faithful sister, Claudette. Join the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpts played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Chantay Savage - I Will Survive:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TMyCXqM8AKM2005 Claudette Colvin and Dr. Marion Woods at the San Francisco Public Library:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aNoCdzYpDgE&mc_cid=b79cda97c8&mc_eid=b187d8127e
ROOTS CHANGED EVERYTHING, PERIOD.Today’s 30-minute walk is dedicated to the exact moment that millions of Black people held their breath, waiting...  "Your name is Toby! Now, what's your name boy?"  Beaten, drenched, but unbroken, he threw his head back and inhaled. We inhaled with him. "KUNTA.  KUNTA KENTE"Roots changed everything.  A generation of Black babies protested in their mama’s bellies refusing to be called a slave name.  If your name starts with a K or ends in -isha, -anya or -yonce, you're welcome. Cicely Tyson became the patron saint of the natural hair movement with her epic braid pattern. Maya Angelou became everybody’s griot grandmother. Lavar Burton went straight to teaching a nation to read. John Amos became my baby's daddy (and Florida Evan's baby daddy on Good Times).  Black was in. Swoon.SO MANY juicy behind-the-scenes FACTS about this cultural phenomenon!  Did you know ABC tried to bury this movie!?Roots became the most successful film franchise in television history. The mini-series was watched by 130 million viewers - more than half of the U.S population of 221 million in 1977. “It was the largest viewership ever attracted by any type of television series in US history as tallied by Nielsen Media Research.Join the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpts played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Arrested Development - People Everyday:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cGusP7aCCYcThe story behind the filming of "Roots" - TelevisionAcademy.com/Interviews:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQw4qf2aG-Q&feature=youtu.be
Today’s 30-minute walk is dedicated to a living legend, the fearless Bree Newsome Bass.On June 27, 2015, Bree Newsome committed one of the greatest acts of civil disobedience seen in our lifetime when she scaled the 30-foot flag pole on the grounds of the South Carolina State House and removed the confederate flag. Carried literally by the faith of her ancestors, who’d been enslaved in South Carolina. Bree, a woman of just 30 with no training, made the ascent of a lifetime.  She climbed up the flagpole in a defiant act of bravery and snatched down a flag that was raised as a symbol of protest against the civil rights movement and the fight for Black liberation.  The saying goes, “If not us, who? If not now, when?” After nine Black members of Emanuel AME Church were massacred during bible study by a white supremacist, Bree Newsome said she realized that now was the time for courage and she never looked back.There is so much to learn from this young Black warrior queen, who upon reaching the top of the flag pole yelled down to the police below saying,  “You come against me with hatred and oppression and violence. I come against you in the name of God. This flag comes down today.”  That was some Miss Celie level, "until you do right by me," energy that unleashed a wave of justice that five years later is still reverberating across this country as monuments to the confederacy continue to fall.Bree Newsome is about that life and we're going to get into it on today’s call! And by the end, you’ll be walking away with some strategies and ideas to not only help the revolution but to also start toppling the personal monuments in your own life. The monuments you have built to things and people that never served you and should no longer be allowed to take up space in your life.Join the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpts played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Sheri Jones-Moffett - Encourage Yourself:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qAt2L7aeH1IBree Newsome: Charlottesville is Latest Chapter in Long U.S. History of White Supremacist Terror:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPSotUPQRsc
It happened on a Thursday.February 18, 1965.  The exact moment we fell in love with James Baldwin.It wasn’t because he was a boy genius who spent every day at the library. It wasn't event his fiery church sermons as a teen or loving debates with Malcolm X as a young man. It was on this day, that he was propelled onto the world stage.  He was raw, nervous, authentic.  A Black man with vocabulary as arsenal, able to tag a full picture of our pain.  This was his opus.  His coming out as our Jimmy, our defender against bullies on the schoolyard.  Baldwin stood toe-to-toe with “the father of conservatism,” segregationist William Buckley in the hallowed halls of Oxford under the glare of entitled white boys. By himself. With a cloak of our peoples' sorrow and swag flying from his tiny frame. He said, not today.  At that moment, he became our tragic hero - an outcast, small, gay, committed, way too smart for any neighborhood.  It was swoon-worthy.  And from there he went on a world tour of verbal lashing and protest speeches, articles, and books to demand the total liberation of Black people.  Let’s go on a victory lap for this man’s life.Join the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpt played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Janelle Monáe - Tightrope:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwnefUaKCbcJames Baldwin and Paul Weiss Debate Discrimination In America | The Dick Cavett Show:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzH5IDnLaBA&feature=youtu.be
On the night of June 1, 1863, Harriet Tubman arrived on a ship in South Carolina with 150 men ready for battle. She was the first woman to led an armed military operation in the United States, and what happened in South Carolina that night would solidify Harriet Tubman as one of the greatest military strategists the world has ever seen. Known as the Combahee River Raid, what happened that evening changed the course of history and gives us a powerful example of what liberation can look like. Are you ready to dive in? The walk and talk is going to be fire! We will do Mama Harriet proud. You already know! #WeareharrietJoin the second edition of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories and explore the pivotal moments from some of the most powerful movements in Black history.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Mavis Staples - Wade In The Water:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmxGqqZf8gcErykah Badu - Soldier:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4925nvQ3XfE
The Victory Lap

The Victory Lap

2020-07-0235:16

We did it! We just wrapped up #BlackHistoryBootcamp. It's been 21-days of life transforming lessons and walks courtesy of our foremothers. Over 100,000+ Black women and allies made a real change this month. Congratulations! Right now, all of the ancestors are standing together - cosmically cheering for you. So, let's celebrate. It's time to take a victory lap. Join us for a conversation full of our reflections and favorite moments.And if you haven't completed your bootcamp journey yet, it’s okay —it’s not too late! You can join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at any time. Sign up at  https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Beyoncé BLACK PARADE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJT1m1ele00
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