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noS2, E10. The 'Golden Zone' of 2021 - reflection.Healthcare ProfessionalsDigital HealthEmily FosterSun, 27 Dec 2020 20:00:00 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/e6hhMAd7vt4/golden-zone59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5fd7c47bcfcd77091d356b01

Join Emily this week as she talks about the "Golden Zone" of 2021. 
Taking the time out of our busy schedules to reflect and breathe before January comes (a traditionally very busy period for healthcare professionals). 

In this short episode she encourages you to;

  • Reflect on what you're going to stop, continue and start in 2021

  • Reflect on if your current business is working for you - is it feeding your passion to help people as well as your wallet; or are you feeling stressed about your situation? Do you need to shake things up?

This episode is brought to you by the new "Marketing Your Health Practice" Intensive programme - launching 2021. To join the VIP list as well as the FREE 6-week marketing e-course you can head to www.glowingpotential.com/marketing


 

















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Season 2, Episode 10 Transcript

The “Golden Zone” of 2021 - Reflecting and Looking Forward

I can't believe I am here recording the final episode of 2020, when I'm recording this episode is just prior to the week of the 28th of December, and I really find this period of the year, a nice time and sometimes you know you'll hear people call that period of time where you know you're not going to be disturbed by anyone else. 

The “golden hour” - you might be familiar with that concept it’s really popular in entrepreneurial circles, you know the golden hour people get up at like 4.30 in the morning to have their own time (I do NOT do this FYI!) - I don't have children myself but I have friends that do and I know that you are not very often getting a golden millisecond! 

But there are those times I think in our lives and it can happen, you know, once a week, once a month. Maybe you carve out time for it but it's it's sort of like that time where, you know, like, i what i kind of call that golden hour that golden zone is that time where I know I'm not going to be disturbed, and maybe I create that time or maybe it's luck so for me as an example, if I'm in. If I'm in, if I'm visiting my family in Toronto. There's a five hour time difference between there and London and so I know that in the afternoon in Toronto is a really great time for me to sit down and get some work done. If I am working because nobody's going to email me, because I know that they're either off work, or asleep, and so that time where you just get a little bit of a chance to breathe.

Maybe you've woken up early in the morning and you just get a time to reflect on maybe the previous week, maybe how you're feeling in that moment, just bringing awareness to the life that you're living - and that sounds deep but I think 2020 was a big year for that. I think a lot of us had the chance to step back, maybe some of you didn’t. 


Maybe some of you haven't had a millisecond all year or it certainly might feel that way if you're working in the NHS which I know a lot of you are so this year has been really different for a lot of people and so this this period of the year, towards the end of the year, regardless of if you celebrate Christmas or not I think it's quite common for a lot of workplaces to sort of shut down before January and so, you know, it's a really great time to reflect, it's a good time to think about your values as a business owner, as well as personally and really look and see if you're living in line with those values, if your business is the type of business that you want to continue with in 2021, or if you want to shake it up a bit. 

So, this, this period of time I really call it the golden zone. It's that time of the year that you get to reflect a bit - where your inbox isn't as busy, or you just get a bit more time to think. And it might not be over the holidays right it might be that Sunday before you go back to work after one or two weeks off if you're lucky to have that, it's that time, right before the new year, or starting back at work in Jan, especially for health care professionals, before things really take off in January.

So, today is a quick episode but it's an episode that I want you to reflect back on 2020 and just think, 

is your business or perhaps you haven't started a business yet you're looking to start one in 2021, you know, what do you want the year to look like, what do you want out of 2021

Is there anything that may be, you know what, what can you stop doing from 2020. And what you might want to add to your roster, and also things you want to continue doing that maybe you started doing in 2020 and actually worked out quite well for you personally so what's that stop start continue what things are you going to stop and start and continue with into 2021. 

The other thing is as well, thinking about, is this the type of business that you want to create for those of you who maybe launched the business in 2020. It was a rough year for that, and if you weren't on your game with digital marketing and you were trying to start solely an online business. It was tough. And so, you know, thinking about what can 2021 look like for your health care business or practice and certainly that's something that hopefully you'll find some of our content quite helpful with that's come from 2020, as well as some of our podcast episodes we have scheduled for 2021, but I really want to encourage you and I don't want to beat you over the head with this because I think there's a lot of people talking about this right now but this golden zone this time to breathe to pause to bring awareness to yourself and your business in quite a loving and accepting way you know how can you make 2021 work well for you and how can you build a business that is both, you know, financially stable and gives you the freedoms you want that way but also something that you're really passionate about. 

As healthcare professionals we get into health care nine times out of 10 because we want to help people. So when you have a business that you know maybe you're helping people but you're feeling stressed out all the time. That's not good either. So, take time. What do you want your business to look like in 2021, what has worked for you this year, what hasn't worked for you. And is there anything that you maybe want to start you have a niggling feeling something exciting that you know your intuition says jump in try this and it sounds lame but if you've had the thought of building a practice or a business or trying to build something online or even offline or partnering up with another health care professional for an offering, but you're too afraid to reach out, use 2021 as the year to do that. Health care is an industry that is going to grow - health and wellness is definitely growing in 2021 and so there is room for your idea if you haven't started a business yet - there is room for it. And people, even if they're in the same profession as you. No one will do it like you do you will still be able to get patients and clients, it's just about, you know, niching down and talking about what makes you different but that's not what this episode is about this episode is take this time in this golden zone, right before we launch into January, and think about what it is that you want for yourself and for your business, in 2021, thank you so much for listening for the take it online podcast, I can't say how much it means to me to know that there's people on the other end of the microphone and, of course, if you have any ideas for episodes or someone that you want interviewed, or topics that you want covered, please email us info @ glowing potential.com, I'd love to hear what you think and if there's any particular content you'd like to hear from us. 

Happy Holidays, and I will see you in 2021. 

S2, E10. The 'Golden Zone' of 2021 - reflection.https://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/golden-zoneS2, E9. Keep It Simple. Exploring an IGTV Digital Health Series with Health Psychologist Dr. Sula Windgassen, PhD.Healthcare ProfessionalsDigital HealthEmily FosterMon, 14 Dec 2020 07:00:00 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/wEHdZmld150/keep-it-simple59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5fd358858df3fe463c81a390

Ever wondered how to start your own digital/online health programme without breaking the bank?

Having initially launched the Telehealth Toolkit in a Facebook group with the focus of meeting our audience where they were at - Dr. Sula Windgassen’s 8 Week, evidence-based, Mind-Body Boost hosted fully on IG live (IGTV Series) caught my attention. 

Join me this week as I speak with the clever and charming Dr. Sula Windgassen, PhD (IG @the_health_psychologist_) on all things Health Psychology, Teletherapy in 2020 and Instagram. 

We cover:

  • How her service in the NHS dealt with Tele-therapy and some of the challenges Dr. Sula, and many other practitioners faced (and overcame)

  • How initiatives like a mini-course or series can be important for professional development

  • Her simple and personal approach to IG and hope it helps her to connect with her followers (i.e. real people!)

  • What she would do differently next time she launches the Mind-Body Boost

You can find more about Dr. Sula Windgassen on her Instagram account (@the_health_psychologist_).

Are you receiving the Glowing Potential newsletter? If not, sign up here to receive all of our latest tips and news direct to your inbox.


 

















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Season 2, Episode 9 Transcript

Take it Online with Emily Foster - Keep It Simple. Exploring an IGTV Digital Health Series with Health Psychologist Dr. Sula Windgassen, PhD.

Welcome to the Take it Online podcast. Take it Online is all about simple, effective ways to help you take your health and wellness content well, online. We'll feature stories, behind the scenes peeks, and general how to’s, as well as not to do’s for all things digital health. My name is Emily Foster, and I'll be your host for the Take it Online podcast. I'm a registered dietitian and I'm also the founder of Glowing Potential. Let's dive in.

Alright, everybody, welcome back to another episode of the Take it Online podcast. I'm really really excited as I often am to have Dr. Sula Windgassen with me today. She's a health psychologist, chartered psychologist and CBT therapist with a PhD in exploring how psychological therapy can improve physical symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome. So I know we have a lot of dietitians that listen to the podcast so interesting research topic for you, so be sure to check that out. Sula works full time in the NHS as a researcher at King's College London, you can find her on Instagram, which we're going to talk about a little later because she has a fantastic Instagram account at the_health_psychologist_ just for good measure. Right. Fantastic. Well, Sula, thank you so much for joining me today.

Yeah, it's my pleasure. Thanks for inviting me.

Oh, fantastic. Well, listen, as we were talking about just before we jumped on the call, I really like to highlight health care professionals doing, you know, interesting, different things online. And I think with your eight week Mind Body Boost Instagram course, which we'll talk about a little later, that just really caught my eye. And I think the way that you've been running that is phenomenal, really, and the simplicity, but also in the connection that you clearly have with the people either watching the recording or live. So that was, that's really interesting to watch. And I know that's still ongoing. So this podcast will release, and you'll still I think be running it, which is really, really nice. So we'll talk about that a bit later, but tell me a little bit about yourself and how you got into health psychology in the first place.

Yeah, so I did my undergrad degree at the University of Leeds, which was in psychology, and one of the modules that really stood out to me was the health psychology one. And we had a really engaging lecturer whose twin brother actually ended up being my PhD examiner. It's a small world of psychology. But he, yeah, he was really engaging and he really sold the area. And there was one particular area that he taught us about, which was psycho neuro immunology, which is all about how stress impacts the body. So there's amazing research about how wound healings impacted by stress and the mechanisms and neurobiological mechanisms behind that. And that mind body interaction, it just really sparked my interest. And I thought, you know, if, if something like stress can affect our bodies, so physically, in such an observable way, you know, there must be huge scope and you know, far wide reach in ways that our minds are constantly interacting with our bodies.

And then, during my undergrad, I was working as a marketing assistant in a small digital, well, it was it was an IT company, but it became more of a digital kind of agency thing. And so I kind of segwayed onto there, because everybody tells you how competitive psychology is, and you're not going to get a job and blah, blah, blah. So, you know, yeah, I tested it out, became a marketing manager for a year and really didn't like it. And got really, I think, just stressed really myself because everybody left, everybody, you know, all the students left the city, and I was still there in a job that I didn't really like. And then I started getting, what's it called, bladder infections, cystitis, but they kept evolving into different things. So it would be a bout of cystitis, a bout of thrush, a bout of something else, and then the sensation would stay, but the infection would go and it was just so uncomfortable. And it caused me a lot of stress, and that was feeding into it. And then I got really depressed about it all.

And my dad was doing, he's a psychiatrist, he didn't do any therapy, but he was doing a master's in mindfulness at Bangor University. And he was the first one to say, why don't you try mindfulness? And that didn't really appeal to me because it didn't seem to make any sense. But his partner actually got in touch and said, this is why, she's a clinical psychologist working with chronic pain and long term conditions. So she nicely explained the mechanisms behind why mindfulness would be a useful approach when dealing with something like I was dealing with. So from there, I really saw the benefits kind of firsthand of using that kind of approach on my physical and mental health and the two complementing each other. And it wasn't, you know, a switch, a light switch going off and the symptoms maintained, but gradually, they decreased, and I did see the benefit. So then I thought, I will go back and do a master's in health psychology. And from there on, it's just yeah, it’s kept me interested.

That's really interesting. It's really yeah, it's funny, because we were just saying off the call, because I was also a marketing manager for a year. I feel like maybe that's a rite of passage somehow. Anyways, yeah, that's, that's quite, that's quite interesting. Um, wow. Yeah. I mean, I find the area really interesting myself and working, you know, part of the work that we do with Glowing Potential as well as a consultancy, we actually work on a lot of digital health programmes. And so we could use working with somebody like you, but that's an off call chat. No, super, super interesting. So, you have a consultancy at the moment. So I know, so Doctor Sula works full time in the NHS, but you do do consultancy work with businesses. Was that a natural progression for you? I know, we have a lot of health care professionals listening who maybe want to do something outside the NHS, but aren't really too sure how or where to start.

Yeah, it's a good question. Because part of the training to become a health psychologist, you have to fulfil five different competencies, and one of the competencies is consultancy work, which is quite unique, you know, you don't do any other kind of psychology. And so that yeah, that was inbuilt within my training, and it got me used to negotiating contracts, although it's still something that I hate. But at least you know, you know the idea of what you need to scope for, spec for, that kind of stuff. And it also got me thinking about the different scope for working in the field of health psychology across different organisations, businesses and created some connections. And whilst I was working in the department at Kings and studying in the department, a lot of my colleagues were doing bits of consultancy here and there with different kinds of companies. There was a culture of kind of branching out from not just doing academic work. And actually, I think, especially if you're not doing clinical work, and you're mainly doing research work in the field of health psychology, it can be nice, because there's a real yeah, you can see how it's being implemented live, which obviously, is a lot more reinforcing, than the long path of research, which sometimes takes decades and decades to actually make it into implementation. So that was the kind of natural progression really.

I think that's great. Because often we, like you say, you can do all this research, and then if you don't see it really being implemented, it can be quite disheartening. I mean, I don't do research myself, but I can imagine that's quite, that consultancy piece makes it a nice, piece. Cool. Okay. So, you're working in the NHS, obviously, this year has been a rough one, but also perhaps, you know, for a lot of clinicians, you know, and obviously, and I think you phrased this in a, I'm gonna get it wrong, but in a time of crisis, or, you know, you were given up, you were privileged to help in a time of crisis. And you were able to sort of maybe expand your skills in a certain area, due to, you know, the pandemic. And so this year was different for a lot of different clinicians. And so how has it been different for you, I know telehealth obviously, has become a primary way to see clients. Were there any surprises with that any, you know, surprising discoveries? Was there more positive feedback than what you were expecting? Tell me a little bit about your experience with that this year?

Yeah, it's been really interesting, I think, you know, in the depth of lockdown. I mean, our service is really, really agile and quick in its response to the growing threat, essentially, of this pandemic. So we switch to home working really seamlessly and really quickly before many of the other services. So I was really impressed by that. And, yeah, there was a lot of kind of forethought there. And initially, there's a bit of excitement because it's completely new and you don't have the hassle of having to leave your house. But I think all of us kind of did, we were aware that actually at some point, this is going to get really old, not leaving the house, not seeing our colleagues and doing this all entirely over the phone. And one, you know, some of the challenges are, people don't cancel as much. So in our service, you have to overbook to make sure that you get your booking target. Well, when people aren't cancelling, you're inundated. So it's really busy.

And, I was trying to make it as equivalent as possible to being in the room with me. So I was trying to do mainly video calls, which is fine generally, but there are some drawbacks, and I think there was some research about how, you know, there's a slight lag, which means that your brain is doing a bit more work because the eye’s getting different feedback or whatever. And I was feeling completely knackered, my eyes were just hurting from looking at screens so much, because usually I would have seven hours or five hours in a therapy room at a whiteboard or talking to someone, whereas now it was a complete seven hours, you know, at a screen, and maybe longer depending on what I had in the evening. So that you know, really has a physical effect on just your resilience, and how tired, how energetic you feel, all the rest of it. And so that was tough. And I really did feel the effects of not having those moments, as well a reprieve of seeing colleagues in the office, just to have you know, that little oh, that was a tough session, or you know, what you think I did this, maybe I could have done this, which makes you know, they're really small interactions, but they cumulatively add up to make you feel a hell of a lot better. And so, that was tough.

But on the other hand, we were all really surprised, there's a lot of measurement that goes on in app services of, you know, how many people you're seeing, what the recovery rates are like. And our recovery rates didn't really drop at all, which everyone was really surprised about, given the climate, and also given that the medium had changed. So it showed that telehealth, teletherapy, it can be really effective, you know, it's not necessarily that different in terms of, you know, especially when you're delivering something like CBT, which is about the process. And so that was surprising and a nice surprise, too, because there's nothing like feeling deskilled, or like you're shortchanging someone. So yeah, that was a real positive. And also, I kind of discovered that I don't always have to do telephone calls. Sometimes I can call and save my eyes. And actually, sometimes that makes me more structured, so there's additional benefits.

Yeah, yeah, it was interesting because we, one of my other dietitian friends Maeve, she runs Dietetically Speaking, but we sort of did quite a bit, we put a something back in March together called the Telehealth Toolkit for nutrition professionals who were starting off in telehealth in private practice, but we had some people who were working within the NHS who took it earlier on in the year as well. And, you know, there is research to show that actually, you know, it doesn't have to be a video call. And like you say, you know, we didn't go into that much depth on it. But I think having worked with a lot of clients, myself in digital diabetes service, a lot of them preferred phone calls over video. And I think, you know, in some of the feedback we had, you know, I just can't, it's easier for me to process when I'm not trying to look at a screen, was a lot of the feedback we were getting. So it's interesting, because sometimes you assume one thing and actually sometimes it's the opposite that's true, isn't it? You don't know until you're actually working in the field.

Yeah, that's so interesting actually, to hear you say that because now I'm thinking back to my PhD and that was based on this big randomised control trial looking at remote therapy. But one was a website programme, but the interesting thing was that the website programme people are working through, but when they get the support from the health professional, that's just over the phone, not a video call. And the efficacy was, you know, huge, we had really great results on that. And yeah, so it just gets me thinking actually, could be more helpful sometimes to be on the phone rather than on the screen.

Yeah, yeah. Sometimes I guess, to track. I mean, personally, this is a personal thing, this is not based on research. But listen, you know, sometimes as a practitioner, I can, it's easier for me if I'm not also trying to look at the screen, to hear the change in the patient's voice and know that something is wrong or off then also, you know, I maybe it's a brain thing, maybe I'm just slow on the uptake, I don't know. But yeah, it is interesting from the practitioner perspective as well. And you know, there is definitely Zoom or video fatigue for sure. And like you say, I don't think you're alone. There's an article in the Harvard Business Review not that long ago about how you know digital therapy is great, but like what is the impact it's having. It talked about doctors but everybody I mean, how are, how are healthcare practitioners dealing with the digital services they're now offering, because fewer people are cancelling, like you said, and you know, you're staring at a screen all day, and that's exhausting.

So, interesting. All right. Well, I promised that I would talk about your eight week Mind Body Boost Course. And this is why I reached out to you Sula. I know we talked about this earlier. But you know, your Instagram feed is really, really refreshing. And I think, why, if you go and you look at, and we'll leave Sula’s information in the show notes below, but I really want you to go and have a look at her Instagram account, because the way it's very professional, and it's very personal. And I think those two things as health care professionals, it feels like a difficult line to walk. And so I just wanted to hear from you. I mean, do enjoy being on Instagram? It seems like you do. Maybe you don't? I don't know. Do you enjoy it? You know, how did you get started on Instagram? And sort of, you know, why continue with it?

Yeah, it's a really good question. And it comes at an interesting time for me as well. Because, I mean, initially, I started the account because I, before present role in the NHS, I was doing a lot of kind of research in Kings, and there's so much knowledge and amazing stuff that's going on. But there's, like we were talking about, it can be such a long road to get that implemented. And even once something's ready to go, there's even more red tape and it's hard to get that information out there. And at the same time, you're doing the research, or you're with the clients, and you're hearing the kind of impact of it not being out there. So I think it was just me wanting to try and pull as much information out of the therapy room and the research circles that I was privileged to be in and make it much more accessible. And I didn't really have any grand ambitions, it was just like, I'll just do that and see if it can be of help to a few people, that'd be great.

But also, it was helpful for me to really reflect on how I put information across. Because you're always having to adapt it in the quiet room. And sometimes you're a bit lazy with how you're adapting it and thinking about it, you just kind of say what you know, and you're not really thinking about the other person. But I had a PhD supervisor that was just like, as you write, just write really short sentences, and each sentence, the average man on the street should be able to understand. She said this to me again and again, and I was like, I know, I know, I tried. But Instagram has helped with that. Because it's, it's kind of, you know, people aren’t on there to read an essay, and they're not on there to, you know, get all of their educational needs on there, but to just passively kind of take in information. So, yeah, it was helpful for me to try and I guess formulate understanding in my own mind as well in a way that's going to be helpful for clients, but also for the general public. And then that helps me relearn and retains the information that I'm working with, because so much you get, yes, so much stuff that you're learning, and then it goes out the window. But if you've made a pretty picture about it, or you've you know, set that time aside to make some kind of a post about it, it stands out a bit more. And I was finding whilst I was doing that, those techniques that I was talking about were much more in the forefront of my mind in the clinic room.

So it's kind of a double whammy for me, but I do it kind of, initially it evolved because, and yeah, I blocked everyone I knew because I couldn't stand the thought of anybody seeing me talk to camera, i's not something that I'm comfortable, now I am but I wasn't at all comfortable with doing that. Yeah, and yeah, all of those things, but then eventually I got more comfortable and now I’ve not blocked anybody. As I've gone on, I think, you know, I don't know if you watched Social Dilemna?

No, I haven't yet. But I heard it's very good.

It's so interesting, because, you know, these platforms are geared up to try and keep you on there. And I was only ever on there just to disseminate some information. And then it suddenly becomes like this beast, because you're getting more interaction. And you're wanting to, I think an intrinsic motivation is to try and do stuff for people, help people. But then, you know, you need boundaries and Instagram circumvents those boundaries all the time, just in its automation of the rewards response that you're not really consciously thinking about. So, at this point, when it's a busier account, I'm kind of thinking I need to find a better balance so that I'm on there doing what I initially set out to do, but it's not, you know, yeah, it's not so automated that I'm on there, if that makes sense.

Yeah, it's interesting that it's, it's sort of started off as a bit of a not to start that way, but professional development really right sort of without even realising it, and then continuing it because you think, Oh, well, you know, I'm actually retaining some of the stuff that I'm listening to on a day to day basis. Do you find, it's interesting, though, when you say that shift and in your account now that you have more people following you. And setting boundaries is probably very difficult because I imagine being in mental health, especially given what's going on at the moment with the pandemic, even with the vaccine on the way, you know, you I suspect, you get a lot of DM’s. Am I right in assuming that?

Do you know what, I'm surprised that I don't get that many. I mean, I do get DM’s, but I don't get that many where people are asking me questions that it would be improper for me to answer. I honestly, probably could count on two hands, the amount of times that's happened. And I've had to say I can't answer. But generally people respect that boundary so far with me, which I really appreciate. Because I always find it really difficult to say I can't help you here.

Yeah. Oh, well, that's great. That's good to hear. I did think of that the other day. And of course, I have to ask her about that. Because it's either okay, or it's out of control. And I know, it can go one of two ways. So let's talk about the Mind Body Boost. So this is something that, and I love the comment that you made was, this is actually like, actually evidence based. And, you know, it's so funny, because as healthcare professionals, we do throw evidence based around a lot, but companies are catching on as well, from marketing perspective, that this is what people want to hear. And so it's becoming one of those terms. And it is a term that I use a lot as well. And, you know, your that comment that you made really made me think, because you know, a lot of companies are starting to catch on that this is what people want to hear. And it's the right thing. And so, you know, does that make it, you know, a non effective term now? I don't know, but, tell me about the eight week Mind Body Boost and what sort of the idea was behind that?

So, yeah, well, I think it was just a happy coincidence of a number of different things. So I've been thinking for a long while that I want to develop a protocol, like an eight to 10 week protocol for people with chronic or persisting bladder issues and your kind of urogynaecological issues, but I just can't find the time to do that. And so then, you know, lockdown was announced again, another one, and I just thought I want to create some kind of structure that will be probably similar to the sort of thing that I'm thinking of developing for people, women in particular, because that's where my area lies and that's where I see a lot of the difficulties and with these urogynaecological symptoms, so this will be a nice kind of, you know, more generalised way of setting up that structure and foundation, and at a really kind of helpful time for the general population.

But also for me, because lockdown one got really, really difficult at points. So I was like this, again, it's a double whammy. This can be helpful for other people, but it also keeps me structured myself. And so I kind of, it wasn't, I would love to boast that I'm really prepared and organised and everything but it was just I thought, I'm going to do it and an afternoon of kind of thinking of different principles of, you know, mindfulness courses that I've been on, research that I've consumed, you know, what I do in my practice, and how can I put this together in a way that's going to make a logical containing structure, but again, is going to be something that people can pick up and put down. So if they're not doing the whole 8 week thing, they can come in at any point.

And also, it's not going to add on to this sense of I need to, you know, be completely zen by the end of it, or have got my body into shape. Not, you know, there was amazing people doing all sorts of fitness stuff. But I think it was more about taking the challenge aspect out of it, and just trying to promote people to come more into the being rather than the striving, which I think is the conflict I'm seeing all the time in the clinic room and for myself, personally, is when we're in this state of kind of anxiety, it might not be that we're constantly worried about everything, but we don't know what's happening and that comes with a sense of anxiety. And so we kind of go into these automatic modes of, well, what can I do, how can I problem solve this and get on with it without really checking in with ourselves. So that was the aim and and scope really of what I wanted to achieve with that.

That's great. And I think for those of you who don't know, so this is, if you head to Sula’s Instagram, you'll see that this was run over Instagram Live and now sits within, oh, gosh, IGTV, you have it as a series as well. So, um, that was really interesting to me, because I think we tend to use the term you use, the phrase you use was this is when you introduce the course was this is decidedly non complex. And I love that because often I think we think that in order for something to be valuable, that it needs to be complicated, and I just think especially during lockdown that is the furthest from being true. So how was the reaction? Like is, you know, obviously, because you had the account on Instagram already, it was probably quite an easy, just okay, I'll put it on Instagram. I mean, was there any thought around that? Or if there wasn't, or even if there was, what has the outcome been of running it on your Instagram account?

Yeah, it's been a while it's been interesting. I mean, if I would have, if I would have spent more than an afternoon, thinking about putting it together, I would have done things differently. But I can talk about that in a moment. So I didn't really, you know, get anybody to sign up anywhere, or get a list of names. And again, part of that was also just because I didn't want people to put the pressure on themselves, I wanted people to be able to come in and out. And I didn't want the thing where they've signed up, and then they're not doing it, so they completely disengage, I wanted people to feel like they could come in and out. And so I haven't really taken much measurement, I can just get a gist of kind of how many people attend on Sundays. And generally, there's about, you know, at any given time, about 20 people on Sundays. I think for, the one that there wasn't, I can’t remember if it was last one or the one before, and that was interesting. I think maybe it was also because I didn't give that many, I didn't give really any reminders, perhaps.

But I wondered if it was about the focus of the week, which was checking in on our values. And I got a really interesting message from somebody, which I'm, which I'm really grateful for, and I got back to them as well. And I think I shared it on my stories, but it was about not having done the values exercise during that week, because they were worried that it would show them how little they're actually in working in line with their values, and they didn't want to be confronted by that. But it caused them to reflect on that. And then the outcome of that was actually I'm going to do it this week and just see. So I was very happy with that outcome. Because I thought a very interesting process and so useful just to notice that process in yourself.

But yeah, I'm digressing a little bit.

No, on that note, I think COVID has been really interesting, because I think it's forced a lot of people when they have been at home to kind of look at their values and perhaps realise that they aren't living in line with them. Or a lot of you, I think there's a lot of, you know, the word misalignment or, you know, a lot of people felt like, for the first time in a long time, finally had the time and space to even reflect on that. So, so interesting that that was the message you got?

It is interesting, isn't it? Because now's the time well, loads of people having babies and getting pregnant, will be having babies, and, or getting divorced. But it's true, isn't it, because when you're presented with this situation where you've got a lot more time on your hands for a lot of people, for some people, much less, but it's still a shift in how you've been living your life. So you are confronted by these choices that you've made and how things are going. And I think that can be quite a difficult thing to come to terms with. But it's still an important one to check in with because then by checking in, you're creating the opportunity for a choice.

Definitely. super interesting. So I guess my last and and this is, again, if you feel comfortable asking or answering this, this is only because you mentioned it. So you said you know, there might have been some things I would have done differently had I you know, maybe prepped more or know what I knew now, I mean, would you mind sharing a couple of things that you would have done differently next time? Or if you go to run something differently, you'd maybe think about?

Yeah, for sure. So I've got a placement student from King's College, who is going to be working with me on my Instagram account. And one of the things we're thinking about looking at is this Mind Body programme. And we were thinking, we'll get the feedback from the people that have engaged with this to the different degrees and see what's worked and what hasn't worked. So I think, you know, in hindsight, maybe what I would have done is, just done a bit of market research.

You know, what time’s going to be good, what formats would you like it most, what's going to help you engage, what's gonna get in the way, but I think we'll get that information this time round and it'll be helpful because there's already been one so we'll know, and it's not people kind of shooting in the dark. And then yeah, that can kind of guide I suppose, more the formatting and the presentation and delivery I think of things, rather than the content. I think the content I'm quite happy with, and that's the part that I did really think about. And I drew on kind of, yeah, things that I'm really, really familiar with, yeah, legitimately evidence base. But yeah, getting that feedback. And I think maybe what I started to do kind of a little bit into it was, when I was getting messages, about people's reflections from doing the activities, then I was getting, giving them voice notes to reflect. So not not a specific advice, but just kind of allowing them to reflect a bit further. And maybe some generic bits of advice, you know, if mindfulness practice is difficult because of X reasons, and you know, I can help with that. And I think maybe, at the outset, I would have perhaps offered that a little bit more, made that more explicit, so people could feel a bit more supported, or thought about different ways that I could offer that, depending on numbers. And so yeah.

That kind of thing is, that's really interesting. Yeah. And, you know, I think this, this time period has been a really, really interesting time to trial new things, you know, it's been a bit of a catch, you know, 2020 has been a year where you've had a big sort of captive audience of people at home, and, you know, not necessarily time rich people, but people who are at home nonetheless and so it's been interesting, from our point of view, as well, to see what's working and what's not. But what we found is, as well with some of our programmes was that it was much easier to get feedback because people were at home. So even if they weren't necessarily engaging the way that we wanted them to, in the particular programmes, we were able to get a hold of them and ask, you know, what can we do to make this better for you, like and understand the people we were serving a bit more.

So even if, and I really encourage people who are listening, if you're running something right now, whether it's on Instagram, whether it's, you know, webinar series that you're doing, whether it's for a company that you're working with, or a trust, you know, now's a really great time to get feedback, because I have personally found this year that people have been really willing to give it and it's been much easier to collect feedback than it has been in other years. I don't know why that is. Like I said, maybe people are at home. You know, they're happy to talk to somebody. But yeah, interesting times. You know, Dr. Windgassen, what an absolute pleasure. Thank you so much for coming on the podcast today. I really, really appreciate it. You know, I've learned so much about your business, how you set up your course, as well as health psychology, which is, which I'm sure you get a lot of questions and might get more from this podcast, from students who are interested.

Yeah, happy flying the flag for health psychology.

Awesome. That's great. Well, anyways, you can find Dr. Windgassen and I'm gonna give her Instagram handle once more. I'll leave this in the show notes at the_health_psychologist_. Don't forget the last underscore! Fantastic, Sula, thank you so much for your time today.

Pleasure.

Thanks so much for listening to the Take it Online podcast. If you want to know more about building out your own digital health programme, you can find us at www.glowingpotential.com. If you liked this episode or other episodes like it, please click subscribe and leave us a rating. It means a lot. Thank you.

S2, E9. Keep It Simple. Exploring an IGTV Digital Health Series with Health Psychologist Dr. Sula Windgassen, PhD.https://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/keep-it-simpleS2, E8. PR for Healthcare Professionals in Business with Expert, Lucy WernerHealthcare ProfessionalsDigital HealthEmily FosterMon, 07 Dec 2020 07:00:00 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/zAbKnKuX2GM/pr-for-healthcare-professionals59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5fc851c74b97230d050927ae

A fabulous episode for healthcare professionals wanting to up their small business PR game! This week, Emily speaks with Lucy Werner a PR expert and co-founder of the PR and branding agency, The Wern.

Join Emily and Lucy as they discuss:

  • What is PR and why is it important for healthcare professionals in business?

  • What to do if you're nervous to put yourself "out there"!

  • A discussion on what to do when what you say gets taken out of context.

  • Practical tips on how to try and avoid PR mishaps.

  • 3 Cards from Lucy's fabulous PR Tips deck:

    • "Write More"

    • "Use Your Own Voice"

    • "Invest in Professional Photography"

A huge thank you to Lucy for coming on the podcast. You can learn more about Lucy and her work at The Wern at www.thewern.com.

Are you receiving the Glowing Potential newsletter? If not, sign up here to receive all of our latest tips and news direct to your inbox.


 

















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Season 2, Episode 8 Transcript

Take it Online with Emily Foster - PR for Healthcare Professionals in Business with Expert, Lucy Werner.

Welcome to the Take it Online podcast. Take it Online is all about simple, effective ways to help you take your health and wellness content well, online. We'll feature stories, behind the scenes peeks, and general how to’s, as well as not to do’s for all things digital health. My name is Emily Foster, and I'll be your host for the Take it Online podcast. I'm a registered dietitian and I'm also the founder of Glowing Potential. Let's dive in.

All right, everybody. Thank you so much and welcome back to the Take it Online podcast, today I have with me, the very lovely, very talented, Lucy Werner. Lucy is the founder of The Wern. It's a PR and branding, consultancy and training hub for startups, entrepreneurs, and independent brands. She's also a writer, speaker, blogger, teacher, and podcaster on all things brand building for small businesses, you can find out more about The Wern at www.thewern.com. And you can pick up her book, which we'll talk about today, Hype Yourself, a no nonsense PR toolkit for small businesses at your preferred book retailer. Welcome, Lucy, thank you so much for joining me today.

Thank you for having me. It's an honour to be here.

Perfect. So today, for those of you who don't know, Lucy, obviously, I've just given an intro there. But Lucy is really a PR expert, but as healthcare professionals, which if you're listening to the podcast is probably you. You know, I just want to talk a little bit about sort of what PR is Lucy, and really why it's important for health care professionals who own a small business.

Yeah, I mean, I think people run, I think people on a basic level sometimes think that PR is selling yourself into a newspaper and paying for an article, and actually that's advertising. Traditional PR is sort of, I guess, getting yourself into the media, like the actual original press release is all about kind of getting a story written up into into the newspaper. But for me, and you know, PR stands for public relations, and I think that applies to anything that you are doing in the public eye. So talking to new connections, how you're responding during a pandemic, for example, what you're putting out on your social media channels, have you got an industry white paper or report that you're putting out there to talk about the work that you do, like that is all PR for yourself, for your expertise, or for your business or your brand.

That's great. And I guess I just want to back up a little bit, I realise I launched into the intro there. But when did you start The Wern, when did that all, because Lucy, for those of you who don't know, works with Hadrien, which is her business partner, as well as partner in life, and actually I have a lot of respect for that, my parents have been in business together for over 35 years. So I know that's not always easy going especially during a pandemic.

Yeah, just before the podcast started I did just say to you, I really want to go out so I can get away. Yeah, you know what, it works fine when we're working on our own stuff, you obviously worked with Hadrien on your branding, which we were just talking about. And in that respect, I kind of don't really have much to do with it other than when the work comes out the other side and I might be promoting it on behalf of the business. It’s when we have to work on stuff together that it gets a bit tricky, which is generally our own PR and branding, so when we have to say, we're not great at that, so just to push the boundaries of that we decided to write the next book together in a pandemic, just to add that extra level of danger. Yeah, like you know, the relationship wasn't struggling enough with the two children and sharing an office living room. Yes, we just thought we’d throw an extra layer in there for fun.

And when did you start The Wern, when did that start?

Yes, actually, it's gonna be my sixth birthday next week. So yes, 2014. I'd worked in publicity for over 10 years before I set it up and I kind of went out as a freelancer really from my, I was a bit disillusioned in my corporate job. I was promoting stuff like, all the stuff that healthcare professionals would love actually like e-cigarettes, 5.5% summer wine…I mean, honestly, like what's the point it may as well be 0% alcohol. And yeah, and I just didn't care, I didn’t care about the clients. And really a large chunk of what you're doing when you're PR’ing yourself, is you're selling yourself. And it's not sales, not directly sales, but a part of the reason we buy into small business owners is because when you actually meet the founder, and you hear them tell the story, it really connects with you, and it makes you go Yeah, and that's kind of why I left to set up my own thing, as I was meeting all these wicked people, that had cool side hustles, or who ran brilliant businesses, and they didn't know how to do publicity and agency fees in London start from three, four, five grand a month on retainer.

So I was like, there's got to be a better way to service these people that want to get themselves out there. And so I've spent the last six years muddling my way through different ways of trying to help people do that.

That's great. And yeah, you know, I think as Lucy mentioned, Hadrien did do the new branding overhaul we did back in January, and I just, I just love it. So if you are interested in any of those services, they are great and we actually are going to talk about your PR tip cards today as well, which I think are fantastic, such a fun way to talk about PR. It's so easy to do like a video or something, but to actually come up with a product that helps people learn more about it, I think is really valuable.

Well, you know what, that was also a bit of a, I guess that was my introduction of showing Hadrien into the business as well. It was like, oh, I've got PR tips, but here's how, like the branding partner behind it that helped, made them.

Yeah, yeah. That's great. Oh, fantastic. Well, it's great to hear more about your business, I didn't know that you've been going for six years. So that's fantastic. And, you know, really important to draw sort of a line between advertising and PR, and that there is a difference there. And I think it's really interesting, the comment you made around how you were meeting sort of small business owners, and you know, people tend to buy into small businesses, more than they do big businesses, because they know the people behind it.

And as healthcare professionals, I always try and talk to my clients around, you know, building trust as a healthcare professional is so important. And so getting your name out there so that people can learn that you even exist is sort of the first step to that. So a lot of the healthcare professionals that I work with are, you know, especially if they're just starting out in business, are sort of nervous to put themselves out there. What would your advice be to someone who feels a bit nervous about taking those first steps?

I think it's about thinking about what it is that you're nervous about in the first instance. So sometimes people just don't want to put their, their face to their business. And to that, I guess, I would just defer back to the comment you just made about a second ago where, you know, we do like to, people do buy people, and we do emotionally connect. I was actually writing, as part of the second book, I've been doing research, and there's actually university research out there that shows that we actually emotionally connect to brands that have faces attached to them or even branding with faces on. And I think that's a you know, that's probably a number 10 in terms of how far you can go.

But some people just don't even show their faces at all, and when you're a faceless entity, it is just harder to get people to connect, and you are just putting a needless barrier up to stop people from building that connection and relationship with you. So I guess that's sort of number one. And number two, I guess, another sort of barrier to stop people, is they worry about maybe things they’re saying being taken out of context. There's quite a bit of a cancel culture on social media and I think that people worry about saying something provocative, and that they'll be backlash. And I think you know, the problem is in this social media age, whatever you say or do, yes there’s a chance of that.

For example, I saw a business owner talking the other day about how they weren't going to be giving free products to influencers during a pandemic because they needed to make money. And it got on the BBC, and it was picked up in a few other places. And there were people literally ripping into her, like does she not care how she was made, like, how are these people say, like really attacking her for something essentially that I was like, she's actually doing a good thing, she's trying to make money for her own family, she's not giving freebies, I don't understand where this backlash is coming from. And it wasn't coming from influencers, it was coming from, like several members of the public who were kind of attacking her for being selfish, and I think she's just like, water off a duck's back, I don't care, my sales have increased off the back of that post, sort of thing. And so I do think it is about having a bit of a tough skin and accepting the fact that people aren't going to like you sometimes, or they're going to have the wrong impression of you. And it doesn't matter how many times you say, you are something, people will misinterpret it.

But ultimately, you know, we're obviously just at this point of recording, I know it's going to come out in December, but there's a lot going on in the US political environment right now, as we're waiting to see what happens with Trump and Biden, there's a lot of chatter in the media, when there were things like Brexit. When you're thinking about those things that create a lot of voice and amplification around it, it's controversial, it's combative. And as much as you know, some people feel very angered about Brexit, and what was happening at that time. The reason the Brexit, one of the reasons, other than any conspiracy theories, today with Russian hacking, one of the reasons these people get through is because they connect with people emotionally, and they say stuff, and they don't care what it is that they're saying. They're not careful about it.

You know, sometimes the people who tried to be factual and give statistics and be very correct, it doesn't, that doesn't always resonate. It's saying something combative that actually gets people to connect with you, so it is just putting yourself out there a bit and just being brave.

Yeah, you know what, I love that comment, because I feel like, not I feel like, I see and, you know, myself included, to be quite honest, sometimes with the fact that, you know, as healthcare professionals we are taught, like, be evidence based, don't say something unless you're 100%. And even when it comes to sort of a professional opinion, even if you've been in a particular specialty for you know X number of years, you're still very careful about what you say, because that's sort of the culture of healthcare, particularly in the UK, that everything is very, very monitored, people have to be, people are conscious that they don't want to say the wrong thing. But actually, that makes it really difficult to take that mindset on social media. And even when you're giving a comment to the press, or you're helping a journalist write an article, and you're trying to give them you know, some facts that they can put in there. But that is really difficult for healthcare professionals to not be like that, and go a little bit off piste and give their opinion, because I think, yeah, that I liked how you made that comment, because it is a very difficult thing for us as healthcare professionals.

And I think, you know, let's just do some caveats here. I'm not saying to like, make something up, to get some kind of, you know, it's not about making false claims. But I think there is also so much red tape around what you can say, and sometimes that's a good thing, and sometimes, that's not a good thing. And, you know, I kind of have had experience where, there's alcohol brands, for example, who are saying their products make people happy. And I'm like, you can't say that. But equally, there's sort of, you know, I worked a lot with Moju Drinks, for example, they have like cold pressed shots. And we know, factually, and historically, that taking products like ginger, or products like turmeric have health benefits, but they can't, because there's no actual guideline in that space for them to be able to say that, they can't make any claims about anything that drinking turmeric or ginger can do for you, even though we all know, we all have some kind of level of awareness that Turmeric is anti inflammatory, for example. But as brands, it's a really hard place to navigate to make health claims. And yeah, I do feel for that space, It's a bit of a minefield.

Yeah. And even you know, there was a lot of, I don't know if you saw the article, and in the interest of time and not being incredibly controversial, there was an article that was out a couple months ago and it was around, it basically targeted healthcare professionals who were working with brands, and was talking about how it was unethical. And I don't want to get into that article today, but I think stuff like that really sends the wrong message, because actually, we want qualified people who have been to school for particular medical things to work with brands who are able to help get the correct messages out there. So yeah, it's an interesting space I think.

Anyways, moving right along from that. Just to summarise, number one, you know, you need to put a face to your business, you don't want to be a faceless entity and you need to, like you said, you know, there's research coming out that shows actually people want to connect with your brand. So are they good friends, better if there's a face there.

And just a caveat on that, having a personal brand doesn't mean you have to be showing your personal life. It is just a personal part of your brand. You can just be showing like 3% of your true personality as a reflection of your brand. But definitely try and get your face out there where you can I think.

That's great. And then the second one is, if I'm summarising this correctly, have an opinion. Like don't be afraid to get involved in some of the conversations that are going on.

Yeah, definitely. Don't worry about being combative. Just accept the fact that some people aren't going to agree and not like you. And that's okay. They're not your people.

Fantastic. That's great. I'm kind of rolling off the back of that, before we move into your very lovely PR card deck. One of the comments, or one of the questions I got before I was going to do the session with you today was around people, healthcare professionals who've worked with a journalist maybe once in the past and have had a negative experience. Perhaps they've worked with, I don't know, somebody in the media and to help bring out an article or particularly something that's already been recorded, so it's not live. And they've worked with a journalist or someone similar to that, and then that piece has come out maybe a day or so later, and they feel like their words have been taken out of context, and they're getting a lot of criticism around that piece. I guess the two sort of questions I have for you around that, is one, how can you I mean, not prevent that from happening, because you probably maybe can't 100% prevent it, but how do you help to prevent that from happening? And also, what do you do if it's already happened? What are some sort of key things that we can do as healthcare professionals if what we said has been taken out of context?

So, first of all, I'd say, really have a look at who is writing the article and check what stuff they've written in the past, and is it a bit click-baitey? By that, I mean, is it a bit of an attention grabbing headline, but when you go through, there's not really any substance to it. So that would be the first thing, like when you know who the name of the journalist is, check what they've written before and see what their kind of style is. There are certain news outlets, let's just say, that are a bit more interested in getting clickbait and trying to create a debate online. Then other publications that might have a bit more of an education or an informed entertainment side. So, I think it's having a bit of integrity about the publications that you work with that’s going to help prevent it.

If you know it's a bit of a news grabby site, that's probably going to be a bit of a red flag that you just need to be mindful of, it doesn't mean don't do it, just be careful. And you know, I've experienced it myself, in some ways, where I’ve provided a quote, and then the facts were manipulated in to something quite different. And when I read it, I thought, I didn't say that, and that's not true, but it was squished to fit into the article. So I'm fully aware that even from a seasoned, seasoned PR professional, this happens. In this instance, it wasn't damaging to me, it was just incorrect, like the story was incorrect, so I didn't feel the need to ask for a correction.

One of the things you can do is ask the newspaper in question to add a correction, and they are obliged to print that. And the second thing I would do is, I would own it, if it's really bad, and it's potentially quite damaging, I would own it quite quickly. And just say, you know, this is what I quoted, this is what was said, for clarification, this is what I meant. And so I try and get that kind of information out there quite quickly. And I think, you know, this is probably more on the crisis PR end of things, is it just that it’s annoyed you and it's annoying your ego that it's sort of not quite right, or is it really going to professionally damage you, as if so, that's where we need to sort of, be on it. Because if it's just a bit of an ego thing, and check with a friend, because they'll be able to tell you if that's the case or not, I wouldn't worry about it. But if it's professionally damaging, then yes, of course, you need to get that matter in hand. And you also should let that journalist know why it can be especially damaging.

And lastly, I know a lot of people do ask to have a read-back before an article goes to print, and generally speaking, this doesn't happen. Particularly if we're talking about a fast news cycle, you know, they're writing that day for the next day, they don't have time to get everyone to proofread it. But, there are times when you can proofread it. And that's more for what I call a feature or long form article. And that's going to be something that's not maybe written to a news deadline, it’s a wide interest piece. It might be something you read in the weekend papers, for example, or more of an investigative article. And yeah, you see people writing stuff like that on like, even like female sites like Refinery 29, or Stylist, so you know that it's a bit more in depth. Those guys probably will give you a bit of a read-back, particularly if it's a sensitive issue. So I think it's knowing when, if it's a news service, you're probably not going to get a read-back.

If it's a feature writer, or a freelance writer that's not working on a bigger piece, you can definitely ask, and I think it's always good to say that, if you are talking about something sensitive, just to caveat it, to say like I do not mean x, y and z. You should also get an idea from when a journalist is asking you questions, what the angle of the article is going to be, that's going to help you as well. So you know, I can tell even from doing my own interviews, I can tell, I can feel when the pieces going down a particular route, and actually sometimes written questions easier to handle than a phone interview question. So I always think if someone is going to phone you to chat through the questions, to ask to have a glance at them in advance, just that you can get a feel for how you want that conversation to direct. And also to make sure that you're adding in, you know, anything that you feel like is going to be an additional backstory to it.

That's great. That's really helpful. Lucy, thanks for your thoughts on that. Because I know there are a lot of questions around sort of not even really crisis management, but like you say, there's also an element of check your ego at the door, because it might not actually be that bad. You just might feel a little bit taken advantage of, which isn't a nice feeling. But if it's not going to damage your brand or your business, then maybe best to let it go. Okay. Well, thank you for that. That was extremely helpful.

So for those of you who don't know, Lucy has PR cards, which are pretty, Lucy, can you explain those to me?

Yeah, they're kind of like prompt cards really. I think I am, I saw places like the school of life, that had these prompt cards for your mental health, or they're like conversation starters, or ways to sort of bring in more mindfulness. And I just thought, you know what, so many people might come for a workshop with me, or they read my books, and they go off into the wild, and they're kind of like, oh, actually, where do I need to start today or what should I do?

So they're this kind of little kickstart, really to just remind you of the little things that you could do to just make sure that your PR is on track. Because even with myself, it's like, I know what I need to do, but every now and again, I think, oh, yeah, should sort out some new press shots, or whatever it is that we’re talking about that day.

That's great, and they are really nice cards. We actually are giving these away as a bit of a prize, so stay tuned to the end of the episode to hear a little bit more about how you can get your hands on these cards. Okay, so what we're going to do is we're going to pull three cards from the PR deck, and I must admit, I already have them. I don't know what they are, but I've pre selected them, so I'm not fumbling around. Okay, here we go. So we're gonna pull a card and then we're just going to discuss it. Lucy's going to give her insight as to as healthcare professionals running small businesses, how we can sort of implement the card. Right Lucy, are you ready?

Yes, let’s go.

Okay, right. Card Number 44. There are 52 of these puppies, they’re pretty nice. So this one is ‘write more’. Do you want me to read the little blurb? Would you like to?

Yeah, read me the blurb.

So write more; writing is a muscle, the more you exercise it, the easier it becomes. Start flexing yours through blog posts or opinion articles and remember audiences engage with stories, not writing skills.

Yes, I think a lot of people are put off from writing, because they think that they're not a writer. And I actually I remember going to, I go to a lot of like training, even in PR for myself, just to make sure I'm keeping my PR muscles flexed, and I saw a journalist talk at a Guardian masterclass about how they're not looking for the best writers. They're looking for the best stories. And I think that's the thing, like, even if we see somebody speaking, and they're a bit jittery, or a bit nervous, we don't really care, if what they're telling us is funny or engaging. Like you need, quite often to think about comedians, like pacing the stage, like you're not bothered by it, because you know that what's coming up is going to be funny.

So I think there's a lot of barriers to people writing in that they think that they maybe aren't like the world's best writer, but actually, it’s just sort of starting and getting, just literally just starting to write and getting into a regular writing habit is so good. And also the more content you put out, the more you get a feel for what resonates with your audience. And it helps you to become known for something.

Yes, and I actually really struggle with this because I really dislike writing. And it's only recently that I'm actually, that's why I chose the podcast, not a vlog in terms of my content, but we've started running the transcripts for the podcast as well, because some people, you know, prefer to read, than they do listen as well. So yeah, that was something that we've done. Write more. Okay. Are you ready for the next one? Here we go. Number 52. I feel like bingo, get your number out. Use your own voice. Nobody talks, the way you talk. If you are a small business, using your voice and telling stories in your own way on social media is key.

Yeah, so I rip into LinkedIn language quite a lot. So I play sometimes this game called LinkedIn bingo with myself, where it's somebody going ‘I'm excited, I'm delighted, I'm thrilled to say’.

I'm excited all the time. But genuinely, I say that in conversation.

So I know exactly. If you do use it in conversation, that's fine. But when you see Jeff from IT, saying, I'm really excited about, you know are you Jeff, are you really, and and it's sort of this weird corporate language. And I remember when I was a junior PR, you have press release writing training, and we all had to write a press release, and the trainer said, right, how many of you started your quote, with ‘I am delighted to announce’ and everyone’s hands like shot up and she was just like, now imagine you’re a journalist and you’re receiving multiple press releases a day, and the quote in the press release is the bit that shouldn't be…Press releases have to be factual, right? So they shouldn't really be about the why. It's more just like, these are the facts.

The quote, that's your section, to be really emphatic, and really convey the emotion and why are you actually giving it. And so if someone’s just going ‘I'm delighted to announce’, I think, would you chat to your mate like that, if you met up with your mate. I don't think I've ever texted a friend going ‘I'm delighted to announce I've got a second book deal’. You just don't talk like that. And I don’t worry that my language isn't professional, I guess I am sort of sat, weirdly people talk a lot about imposter syndrome and I'm like, yeah, you know, I've got that in life. But in work, I didn't get the memo. And I'm like, no, I'm good at PR, but I really enjoy it. I'm really good at it. So I have no problem with talking on social media like I do in real life, because I'm like, I've got the knowledge. So I am not going to appeal to a very straight laced corporate entity, it's not going to click. And that's cool. Like, a lot of the people who follow me are in the creative space in some way.

Even if it's talking about like healthcare professionals, there's still creativity in that, I think people worry the title of what they do actually really limits it and I think like, you know, at the moment, I'm working with a laundry tablet brand, which on the cusp, sounds very dry, but they’re super cool, and they have really like down to earth language. And so I think yeah, basically on that note, it's just avoiding the corporate spiel pitfalls. And think if somebody is meeting you in real life, how do you speak and literally, like type up, it's funny that you think you don't like writing, because I was thinking, you should just be talking into your phone and recording it, and then transcribe it and then you’ve got your blog post written.

Yeah, we use Otter AI as our transcriber. It's pretty great. It's funny, though, isn't it? Because I think people use that corporate language as structure. Because if you're using that language, you're not really putting yourself out there are you, because it's not you.

No, you know, it's a bit like on the other end of the spectrum, people who post holidays shots of their hotdog legs going, like, hashtag bliss. And I'm like, have you ever used the word bliss? Have you? Like, we just, and it's because of our like, echo chamber that we're surrounded by? So it's just like, keep focused on like, writing how you want to talk.

Yeah. Yeah. I love that. Okay, last one. In I feel like these are maybe, we have this idea of doing like these business oracle cards, not like actually making them, but just doing some fun videos. And I feel like this is my, maybe what I should be doing. Invest. This is number eight, invest in professional photography, you are doing yourself and your business a disservice. If you don't have any decent images, get plenty of you and your product and update them regularly.

It's like I predicted that at the beginning. Yeah. get decent headshots, man, like, honestly, the amount of time that I've been able to get clients into stuff because they have photos. and nine times out of 10, if a client is included, they are asked to provide photography. Also, if you can provide really good imagery, specifically in landscape, as well, you can quite often dominate the page of the paper, or the other online article, because we read in landscape format, and most people don't think to get decent sets of landscape imagery. Next time you look through your weekend newspaper, just have a look at all the different stories that are only based on landscape images, like there's not even an article, it's just the photo. I also think as small business owners, we have to invest in ourselves. And if you're spending money on photography for yourself, then you're gonna have to put yourself out there after that.

Yeah, yeah, that's right.

It's a good kind of, you know, you build it and they will come type thing.

What I really liked, what I think, is what I want to sort of mention here is that I think a lot of healthcare professionals go for, I don't want to use the word, I don't want to use the word stuffy, because I don't think that they're stuffy. I think you feel like you have to have these super business-y, like corporate photos, if you are a healthcare professional. And I think this is the one, like you can get some really nice photos of you just kind of looking like you. It doesn't have to be you in your NHS uniform, if you have that. It can be just you as a human being, because I feel like these photos, especially if you're posting them on social media, it sort of introduces people not only to what you do as a healthcare professional, but to who you are as a person. Does that make sense?

Yeah, it totally does. And I think that's why for me, there's a lot of really clinical photography of people against the white background. And it's not about you finding a jazzy graffitied wall and standing in front of that, but actually having some colour or something of interest in the backdrop, that's not too jazzy and distracting, but it's just, you know, just creating a bit of contrast, is really nice to look at. And, you know, I get compliments a lot when people talk to me on Zoom at the moment, because I've got these rainbows in the background. And it's because we're sick of staring at people's white walls. Like that's what we do all day, we’re having a bit of a nose into people's houses, well obviously we bought in a bit of branding into our office, and I joked with you that it's funny that you had so many plants in your background, because it's so on brand for you like your branding, but I actually think having a bit of your personality in your photos is quite key. People forget that. Like they just think, oh, it's about what I'm wearing or just being on a white shot, but actually having something that's related to what you do, through your brand or your personality, is a good thing to do, basically.

Yeah. Fantastic. Oh, great. Well, I love these cards. So I want to just talk a little bit, I'm conscious of your time Lucy, I just want to talk a little bit about, just wrap up today talking a little bit about your book Hype Yourself, which is very exciting. And you were saying that it's coming out the audiobook version, which I will also be buying that, I bought one of your books a while back, but I will definitely be buying the audiobook because I very much enjoy listening as opposed to reading. Reading tends to be a slog for me, but the audio book is coming out on December…it's supposed to be out.

Yeah, it's slated to be out December 1st, so it should be out by the time your listeners are hearing this and ready for Christmas, ready for Christmas sales. And yeah it’s essentially like a walk in toolkit really, so the book starts off with your strategy, and then what tactics you need, and then how to actually use that strategy and tactics out into the wild. So kind of everything that I've learned over the last 15 years into a book for 15 quid, so if you want to just sort of start getting access to me and maybe can’t afford a PR Freelancer or to hire an agency, it's a good starting place, I hope.

No, it definitely is. For those of you who haven't already picked up the book, I'm going to talk at the very end of the episode after we say goodbye to Lucy today a little bit about how you can get your hands on a set of the PR tips as well as Hype Yourself the book, but the book is really fantastic. It's got, I think it's really practical. So I know used it when Hadrien was going through my branding and helping me set all that up. So I sort of worked through that as a bit of a workbook. So I cannot tell you how great the book is. And I'm not just saying that because Lucy's on the podcast. I'm saying that because if you haven't picked up the book yet, I really think you should as a small business owner. Um, fantastic. Well Lucy, thank you so much for joining me on the podcast today.

Oh, thank you for having me, the pleasure’s been all mine. And I hope that if anybody's got like any quick questions or anything afterwards, always feel free to DM me on socials. And if it's a quickie, I always respond. And then if it's a bit complicated, I'm like, oh, that's too much.

All right, and it's your Instagram handle is @wernchat, and is it the same across Twitter as well?

Yeah, Twitter, Facebook, and then LinkedIn, you can find me on LinkedIn. Yeah.

Thanks so much, Lucy.

Thank you.

Well, there you have it. That was Lucy Werner from thewern.com. And you can get your hands on the PR tips deck, as well as the book Hype Yourself in our little giveaway. It's December, why not? You can head to our Instagram page at glowing_potential. Find the post that relates to this podcast episode. You’ll see us. There's a really awesome picture of Lucy and I on the Zoom call today holding up the book Hype Yourself. So have a look for that post and just all you have to do to enter is leave us a comment as to one thing that you learned or liked about this week's episode. Thanks so much for listening and we'll see you again next time.

Thanks so much for listening to the Take it Online podcast. If you want to know more about building out your own digital health programme, you can find us at www.glowingpotential.com. If you liked this episode or other episodes like it, please click subscribe and leave us a rating. It means a lot. Thank you.

S2, E8. PR for Healthcare Professionals in Business with Expert, Lucy Wernerhttps://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/pr-for-healthcare-professionalsS2, E7. Vaccine Hesitancy: Effective ways to talk to your clients and audiences as an allied health professional.Healthcare ProfessionalsDigital HealthEmily FosterMon, 23 Nov 2020 07:00:00 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/az8sY11tobo/vaccine59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5fba2d515779397619c91334

Vaccine hesitancy is a real challenge and concern, even before COVID-19. In January 2020 the WHO released "Urgent Health Challenges for the Next Decade" - which included Stopping Infectious Diseases and Earning Public Trust - both of which tie into vaccine hesitancy.

Join Emily as she discusses the latest news (11/20), facts and figures around vaccine hesitancy and how we, as allied health professionals, can and need to do our bit to help stop the rise of it. 

We talk about: 

  • Facts and figures in the US, UK and CAN around vaccine hesitancy

  • The 4 groups involved in vaccine hesitancy

  • 7 keys to talking to your audience about the vaccine as an AHP


 

















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Tools for talking about vaccine hesitancy

with your clients, in your social media and beyond.

Reliable Sources

World Health Organization

Vaccines and immunization: Vaccine Safety

Q&A by the WHO: https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/vaccines-and-immunization-vaccine-safety

Vaccines and immunization: What is vaccination?

Q&A by the WHO: https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/vaccines-and-immunization-what-is-vaccination

Country-specific campaigns & resources

UK
NHS: Why vaccination is safe and important: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/why-vaccination-is-safe-and-important/

Canada
Immunize Canada – immunize.ca – Vaccine Safety (Video): https://www.immunize.ca/vaccine-safety

US
Vaccines: The Basics – CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/vpd-vac-basics.html

Research articles & Resources for HCPS on Vaccine hesitancy

  • Vaccine Confidence Project. COVID-19 and influenza vaccine confidence. Webinar. November 2020. LINK HERE.

  • Macdonald, N, and L Pickering. “Canada's eight-step vaccine safety program: Vaccine literacy.Paediatrics & child health vol. 14,9 (2009): 605-11. doi:10.1093/pch/14.9.605 - LINK HERE

  • Vaccine hesitancy: a generation at risk. The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, Volume 3, Issue 5, 281. - LINK HERE

  • Draeger Eleanor, Bedford Helen E, Elliman David A C. Should measles vaccination be compulsory? BMJ 2019; 365 :l2359. LINK HERE.

  • Godlee Fiona. What should we do about vaccine hesitancy? BMJ 2019; 365 :l4044. LINK HERE.

  • GOV.UK. Vaccine Hesitancy: Guidance and Intervention. LINK HERE.

  • Bednarczyk, Robert A. “Examining the "why" of vaccine hesitancy.” Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association vol. 37,4 (2018): 316-317. doi:10.1037/hea0000596. LINK HERE.

  • European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Vaccine Hesitancy, resources & publications.

    • Let’s talk about hesitancy: enhancing confidence in vaccination and uptake. LINK HERE.

General news articles

New Statesman. Heidi Larson interview: How to tackle Covid-19 vaccine hesitancy. November 2020. LINK HERE.

Urgent Health Challenges for the Next Decade. WHO. 2020. LINK HERE.

CBS NEWS. Americans' "vaccine hesitancy" could be a barrier to defeating COVID-19, doctor warns. Elizabeth Elkind. September 2020. LINK HERE.

Global News. A coronavirus vaccine is almost ready. But will you take it? Kamyar Razavi and Carolyn Jarvis. LINK HERE.

WiRED. The Covid-19 vaccine will need to have a flawless PR strategy. Amit Katwala. November 2020. LINK HERE.

The Guardian. It's the 'vaccine hesitant', not anti-vaxxers, who are troubling public health experts. Gaby Hinsliff. November 2020. LINK HERE.

 

















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Season 2, Episode 7 Transcript

Take it Online with Emily Foster - Vaccine Hesitancy: Effective ways to talk to your clients and audiences as an allied health professional.

Welcome to the Take it Online podcast. Take it Online is all about simple, effective ways to help you take your health and wellness content well, online. We'll feature stories, behind the scenes peeks, and general how to’s, as well as not to do’s for all things digital health. My name is Emily Foster, and I'll be your host for the Take it Online podcast. I'm a registered dietitian and I'm also the founder of Glowing Potential. Let's dive in.

Hello, and welcome back to another episode of the Take it Online podcast. I'm your host Emily Foster and today we're going to be talking about a really timely topic. Given the vaccine news that has come out, we're going to be talking about our role as an allied health care professional in minimising vaccine hesitancy. For those of you who don't know me that well, I'm a bit of a communications nerd, I really like to learn how to best word things, how to best, you know, spread the word. Right - you get the idea. If this sounds interesting to you, if you're an allied healthcare professional that is getting a lot of questions about the vaccine from your clients and your patients and you're not really too sure where to signpost people to or you're not really too sure what to say, because it's not your exact area of expertise, then this is something that I think you'd find really, really helpful.

A timely time, I think to talk about vaccine hesitancy as I received an email this afternoon from the NHS asking if I could help with vaccine rollout. I'm sure there are many, many, many health care professionals that received that email today and many more, who will be contacted. So all really good things, all good news, really in the news around the vaccine trials, and the success that they're seeing with with more than one vaccine trial, which is fantastic. But as we all know, and it's being covered more and more in the news, so I'm recording this on Friday, November 20, and already there are tonnes of stories about how, it's great that we've got this vaccine coming, whichever vaccine it ends up being after the trials are fully complete.

But what happens when there is a lot of vaccine hesitancy, so a lot of people who maybe don't know a lot about the vaccine or don't feel comfortable, and we're going to talk about that a little bit more. But I wanted to give you some stats as to, in the US, in Canada, as well as the UK, what we're looking at in terms of figures for people who wouldn't take the vaccine, or are on the fence about it.

So in the UK, there's an article in The New Statesman, and there's a lady by the name of Heidi Larson, if you haven't heard of her, she's in charge of the vaccine confidence project, a really interesting project. I'm gonna link to all of this in the show notes below for you. But that project at found out via survey that 7% of respondents would definitely not take the vaccine. And now that's gone up. So that was back in May, so 7% of respondents would definitely not take the COVID-19 vaccine, and now that's gone up to 17%, and that article was in on November 19. So yesterday, we're recording this on the 20th, so that's quite a lot of people.

So in that article, they talked about how there are a lot more hardliners than there were six months ago. In the US, there was a poll done in mid May by the University of Chicago, and the associated press, and they found that only half of Americans said that they would get the COVID vaccine, and about one in five said that they would refuse, and one third said that they weren't sure. Lastly landing on Canada, according to a survey carried out by global news between October 23 and 26, just 54% of the Canadian public is willing to take a vaccine as soon as they can, of that figure only 22% feel strongly about taking the vaccine right away. So the numbers vary, but the message is still the same. There's still a significant amount of people regardless of where you're living, that are hesitant to take the vaccine.

Now there are a variety of reasons for that, and we'll go into a couple of those today. But just to outline the episode a little bit, so I’ve run you through some stats, I'm going to talk to you a little bit about some of the research and news articles I've read, and then I'm going to pull some key communications tips coming from some of these research articles and some of the educational resources from some of these sites that talk about how as a healthcare professional, you can talk to your clients and your patients about vaccine hesitancy. So some really great takeaways in this episode.

Right? Okay, so let's talk about the term anti vaxxers. So the term anti vaxxers, actually is something that Heidi Larson and this was out of a Wired article called ‘the COVID vaccine will need to have a flawless PR strategy’, and that came out in November 2020 as well. And what was talked about in that article is labelling people as anti vaxxers could actually be unhelpful, so people don't necessarily, people who are on the fence, which the Guardian had an article about as well not too long ago around it's the vaccine hesitant, not anti vaxxers, who are troubling public health experts. But going back to the Wired article, what it was saying is that actually labelling someone, as you know, nobody wants to be labelled, well some people do, but the majority of people who are genuinely scared, do not want to be labelled as anti vaxxers, and is, you know, kind of focusing on anti vaxxers, also negative in the fact that it gives them more of the limelight as well.

So it makes that group seem bigger than what they are, and I don't have the facts and figures on how big that anti vaxxer group is, however, we know that there's a lot more people who are on the fence about the vaccine than there are completely against it. So we don't want to label people who do have questions, and there is nothing wrong with having questions. There's a lot of misinformation out there, we know this as health care professionals, and so we should not be discouraging people from asking questions about the vaccine. So think before you use the term anti vaxxer. Is that really helpful.

Another really great quote that came out of that Wired article and again, I'll link to this in the show notes, was it said, ‘the problem from a PR perspective is the same one that has plagued us all throughout the pandemic, a lack of clear information, it's vital that people are given certainty if the vaccine rollout is going to be successful. The more you give a gap for the public to fill in, the more you're giving an opportunity for rumours to form’. I'll read that again, ‘the more you give a gap for the public to fill in, the more you're giving an opportunity for rumours to form’. Now, as a dietitian, we see this a lot, right? Those of you who are nutrition professionals are nodding and thinking, oh my goodness, there's so much information, misinformation out there and it's almost like, if you're not proactive about it enough on social media, it sort of runs away on you. So something that we're not unfamiliar with as healthcare professionals, for sure.

So think about the term, anti vaxxer, and think about how, and we'll talk about this later in the episode, you can really talk to your audience, whether that's in your email list, whether that's when you have one on ones with patients, whether that's on your social media, right? A lot of you even if you only have, you know, 100, 200, 300 followers, that's still quite a lot of people that you have the ability to influence and to send reliable resources to during this time of incredible confusion, fear and uncertainty. So you have a big role to play as an allied health care professional right now, especially when it comes to the topic of vaccine hesitancy. So do not think that your 50, 100, 200 followers on Instagram, Twitter, your mailing list, your mailing list, all of these things, no matter how small, make a difference, so do not forget that.

Right, okay, so let's talk about some great resources to go to as a health care professional who's looking for more information on how to talk to your patients and your clients about vaccination. Now, I don't know at the time of this recording how they're going to roll out the vaccine. One of the things that I did read when someone, there was a debate article written in the BMJ and it was around, I'm gonna find it here, it was around, should vaccine, and a lot of them are from childhood vaccination literature, obviously that was kind of more well developed, we didn't have a massive pandemic on our hands. So there are some really great how to talk about vaccine hesitancy from 2016 to 2019. And it's around childhood vaccinations, but the same concepts apply for what we're dealing with right now with the pandemic and vaccination.

So what was interesting was around, should vaccination be mandatory? and this article actually talked about how that could be counterproductive, because they would say that it would damage the public's trust in health professionals and disproportionately affect children of poor parents. And that was an article by the BMJ, should measles vaccinations be compulsory. So we need to think about how we frame this as well.

So you know, we really as healthcare professionals need to take the middle approach, if you will, and answer people's questions, try to make people feel like there's absolutely nothing wrong with feeling nervous or scared or uncertain. And there's a lot of uncertainty around at the moment, but actually, that this is completely effective, and it's going to help with your protection of yourself and your community.

So let's talk now about some practical ways as healthcare professionals that we can talk to our patients, to our clients, in a way that is effective, in a way that is inclusive, and is going to help people feel more at ease around the vaccination. So an article that I'm going to link to, that I found really, really, really well written, was called ‘let's talk about hesitancy enhancing confidence in vaccination and uptake’ and this was written by the European Centre for disease prevention and control, and this was particularly around again, childhood vaccination, but the concepts really apply here, across the board. And for those of you who are looking for more specific COVID-19 vaccine confidence pieces, there's another really great webinar by the vaccine confidence project. They ran that I believe on November 9 2020, and again, links in the show notes below, and some of the takeaways from that I'll also talk about in this section, but I think that's a really great webinar for those of you to watch who are more interested in this topic. Okay, so let's talk about that. Let's talk about hesitancy enhancing competence in vaccination and uptake. So in this particular document, they talk about how four key groups were identified when it comes to vaccination hesitancy.

So the first was the hesitant. The second was the unconcerned. The third was the poorly reached, and the fourth was the active resistors. So let's circle back to the hesitant, the hesitant was known as those who have concerns about perceived safety issues, and are unsure about needs procedures and timings for immunisation. So that last bit, more around children's vaccinations, but we can think about this.

These are the people who are sort of on the fence. So maybe they've got a couple of concerns, exactly what it sounds like, they're hesitant, they're just not 100% sure if it's for them. We want to put it that way. Okay. second bit, the unconcerned. These people consider vaccine a low priority because they don't have a real perception of the risk that these diseases pose for which you can be vaccinated for. So that's the second one, the unconcerned.

The poorly reached were those who had limited or difficult access to services related to social exclusion, poverty, and in the case of more integrated and affluent populations, factors related to convenience. So this one is a bit different out of the other three, in that it's more, and you know, maybe it's a bit harder to change, in the regards of as a healthcare professional from a communications perspective. But I think it's important that we acknowledge that, so the poorly reached. And then the last are the active resistors. Right. So these are the people that we hear often about in the news that I was talking about earlier, that actually isn't as big as the group that is the hesitant, so the active resistors are those with personal, cultural, or religious beliefs which discourage or exclude vaccination.

And I think it was really important to go through those four key population groups, because everybody is different, and everybody's reason for being concerned about the vaccine might be different, is different as well. And so it's just important that we think about those things, so the hesitant, the unconcerned, the poorly reached, the active resistors. And the way that you communicate with those groups will be different as well.

So let's talk about that. Let's talk about some key tips to talking to your patients, your clients, whether it's online, on social media, in your email list, in one on one group appointments. However you communicate with your patients or clients, let's talk about how you can talk about and help to reduce vaccine hesitancy. I've got seven here that come from that document, and I'm going to elaborate on them a little bit. And again, this is all going to be linked to in the show notes below.

So the first item I'm going to talk about is be mindful of those one way transmissions that we sometimes do, as healthcare professionals, usually, because we're short on time, or we think that the client or the patient gets it, so we don't spend too much time on it, and we don't leave a lot of room for discussion. It's really important that when we talk about the vaccine, or we're giving information, or even just in general conversation with our clients and our patients, even in an informal setting, that we put an emphasis on a two way conversation. So that's one of the tips that came from that, and I definitely agree with that on many different levels of communicating when it comes to, you know, health comms. So one, focus on trying to generate discussions, or at least getting feedback from when you're having those conversations about the vaccine.

The second tip is trying to reframe the conversation from vaccine safety, to protection. So the idea is that, not that vaccine safety is not a concern for people, but that the idea is to focus your communications efforts on the protection. So the fact that they're protecting themselves, their families, their communities, from a seriously and potentially deadly disease, such as COVID-19. So really focusing on the protection aspect of the vaccine is very important and not discrediting the fact that people have concerns about the safety. That is something that you can refer people on to resources or learning more about how a vaccine works, the more we know, we tend to be less afraid. So reframe the conversation to focus on protection versus vaccine safety. It's not to not talk about vaccine safety when those things come up as a question, but really leading the way on on the protection front. And something that came up in that in that article was around much of the success of the anti vaccination lobby is attributable to their ability to keep debates focused on vaccine safety, as opposed to the serious harm to health, which they prevent. So remember that, so our job as healthcare professionals is to focus on the protection aspect of the vaccine and have conversations around that.

The third key tip that it talks about is reinforcing vaccination as the social norm. So we see this a lot on social media, right? So when it comes to you know, that's how trends work. So all of a sudden, you notice that more and more people are doing a certain thing, and then you're interested in that because it's like a TV show, I don't know if those of you who are listening have watched Schitt’s Creek, Canadian show, but it's fantastic. And there's a bit of like a tipping point for these things isn't there? So more and more people start to hear about a show because more people rave about it, more people watch it, you think, oh gosh, well, I'll give it a go. And all of a sudden, it becomes the norm to watch that show. If you haven't watched that show, then you feel a bit excluded. So because you feel excluded, you watch it.

So maybe that’s not such a great example, I don't know, I thought it was pretty good. So one of the tips it gives is reinforce vaccination as the social norm, being unprotected is socially unacceptable. And again, I think I want to go back to using that term of anti vaxxers. I don't think we want to alienate people who have questions. I think we should encourage people's questions. I don't think that's a bad or wrong thing. But it's that idea of the more that people are talking about the protection element of the vaccine and you know, generating valuable discussions, I think the better off we will be combating vaccine hesitancy or addressing, I don't like that term combating, addressing vaccine hesitancy.

The fourth tip is to actively counter misinformation, right. As a dietitian, I know a lot about this. I feel like we are constantly combating Dr. Oz or the latest Netflix show and I'm sure every other health care profession has its own demons in that light. So actively counter misinformation, I think we're quite good at that. But this is something for the vaccine that we need to be a part of. If you see something on Facebook, and you know that it's wrong, I know when it's your off time, you don't want to comment on things. But please do your part, when you see stuff that you know is blatantly wrong, tell people, this is wrong.

And maybe you just have a, you know, a link in your phone or you've got like a statement that you can copy and paste, because maybe you start to see it a lot. Here's some valuable resources that you can go to that are reliable and trusted, and, you know, here you go. So actively counter misinformation. I know, sometimes, not sometimes, it feels like a full time job as a health care professional, especially if it's your area of expertise, which I know vaccination for a lot of you probably is not. But it's still important, when you see things that are wrong, do your bit, tell people. The other piece is guide patients to reliable sources of information. So we just talked about that, you know, counter, actively counter misinformation, and a part of that is guiding patients to reliable sources of information.

And then the second to last point was know more about the communities you serve. So if you have, and this is for those of you who are specialists in a particular area, and maybe that's related to the types of patients or clients that you have, or maybe your specificity lies in the local community you serve, maybe you serve a particular client or patient group, or particular location of the country, whatever that looks like for you. Know, really know more about them and think about how, you know, vaccine hesitancy is playing out in that particular community that you are serving. Are there things that are specific to that community that you can talk about? And again, it's not about alienating people and calling them anti vaxxers. Like, what can you start a conversation on, that is very, very specific and resonates with that community that you serve. And it can help people feel more at ease with the vaccine, so know more about the communities you serve, so that you can make more helpful recommendations.

And then the last one, again, it's not something like before, that we can really, I guess do a lot about I mean, it depends on the position that you're in. So I don't want to blanket statement that, but it's around the poorly reached. So coming back to those four key population groups, so those with limited or difficult access to services related to social exclusion, poverty, and in more affluent populations related to factors of convenience.

The last tip, it says vaccinate, vaccine, vaccination journeys need to be made easier. So I don't know, maybe you're a key stakeholder in where or how people are getting to vaccination clinics in your area, when that becomes relevant, or however that rolls out. I have no idea at this time. But you know, that's perhaps something to think about if you're a part of helping to set up some of those clinics within your own community. So something to think about.

So let's recap. So one, be careful of those one way transmissions, we want to have conversations on social media and with our emailing list and in group programmes about this. It's not a one way transmission. Second one, focus on protection versus safety of the vaccine. And it's not to say that the safety isn't important, but like we talked about, much of the success of the anti vaccination lobby, for example, is attributed to the debates focusing only on vaccine safety as opposed to the serious harm to health, which vaccines can help to prevent. The third piece is reinforce vaccinations as the social norm. So talking about it on social media, the more people that can talk about it in a positive, informative way, the better off we'll be. So reinforce vaccination as the social norm.

Actively counter misinformation, send people to reliable trusted sources of information, and know the communities you serve so that you can make more helpful, realistic recommendations. And if you are a key stakeholder, you're helping to set up any of those clinics or however that you know forms in the near future, think about vaccination journeys, and that group that's the poorly reached, how can we reach them better, and can you make any suggestions that might help those groups?

So I'm going to link to all of this below in the show notes. If you don't know what a show note is, you can access our episode here today, and the summary and the links on www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/vaccine. Again, that's glowingpotential.com/podcast/vaccine and we're going to have a little info pack on how vaccines work. So we're going to, and this is not from me, this is just basically curated resources from reliable spots. So we're going to have resources for the United Kingdom, the United States, as well as Canada. So you'll see some video versions from each of those countries as to how vaccinations work, as well as linking out to the supporting sites for those videos.

We’ll also link to all the articles that we talked about today, that if you want to know more about this idea, or the research done behind vaccine hesitancy, and this obviously was just, you know, a scratch on, it probably doesn't even scratch the surface of vaccine hesitancy. You can head there and do your own research, especially if it's something that you want to write a blog post on, or you've got some stuff you want to share on social media. And we are using the hashtag ‘AHP’s talk vaccine’, and you can see the summary of this blog, sorry of this podcast, today on our Instagram feed, that will go live on Monday. The same day that we're releasing this podcast episode, so you can find us on Instagram at glowing_potential. We're also on Facebook and you can find us on Twitter at glowpotential.

So lots of places to find more resources from today's episode or find the resources from today's episode. I really hope you found this useful. If you did, leave a comment on one of our social media posts. Let us know what you liked about it what you're doing in your clinics in your settings, whether that's NHS, or your own private practice or beyond. I'd love to start a conversation on this and know what you're doing out in the field to help you know address vaccine hesitancy. I think we've all got our part to play in this, and you know, let's address questions like professionals here. Let's not alienate people. Let's help people feel safe and that they're able to do their part. Thanks so much for listening, and we'll see you again next time.

S2, E7. Vaccine Hesitancy: Effective ways to talk to your clients and audiences as an allied health professional.noVaccine hesitancy is a real challenge and concern, even before COVID-19. In January 2020 the WHO released "Urgent Health Challenges for the Next Decade" - which included Stopping Infectious Diseases and Earning Public Trust -Vaccine hesitancy is a real challenge and concern, even before COVID-19. In January 2020 the WHO released "Urgent Health Challenges for the Next Decade" - which included Stopping Infectious Diseases and Earning Public Trust - both of which tie into vaccine hesitancy. Join Emily as she discusses the latest news (11/20), facts and figures around vaccine hesitancy and how we, as allied health professionals, can and need to do our bit to help stop the rise of it.  We talk about: Facts and figures in the US, UK and CAN around vaccine hesitancyThe 4 groups involved in vaccine hesitancy7 keys to talking to your audience about the vaccine as an AHP    Tools for talking about vaccine hesitancywith your clients, in your social media and beyond.Reliable SourcesWorld Health OrganizationVaccines and immunization: Vaccine Safety Q&A by the WHO: https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/vaccines-and-immunization-vaccine-safety Vaccines and immunization: What is vaccination?Q&A by the WHO: https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/vaccines-and-immunization-what-is-vaccinationCountry-specific campaigns & resourcesUK NHS: Why vaccination is safe and important: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/why-vaccination-is-safe-and-important/ Canada Immunize Canada – immunize.ca – Vaccine Safety (Video): https://www.immunize.ca/vaccine-safety US Vaccines: The Basics – CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/vpd-vac-basics.html Research articles & Resources for HCPS on Vaccine hesitancyVaccine Confidence Project. COVID-19 and influenza vaccine confidence. Webinar. November 2020. LINK HERE. Macdonald, N, and L Pickering. “Canada's eight-step vaccine safety program: Vaccine literacy.” Paediatrics & child health vol. 14,9 (2009): 605-11. doi:10.1093/pch/14.9.605 - LINK HEREVaccine hesitancy: a generation at risk. The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, Volume 3, Issue 5, 281. - LINK HEREDraeger Eleanor, Bedford Helen E, Elliman David A C. Should measles vaccination be compulsory? BMJ 2019; 365 :l2359. LINK HERE. Godlee Fiona. What should we do about vaccine hesitancy? BMJ 2019; 365 :l4044. LINK HERE.GOV.UK. Vaccine Hesitancy: Guidance and Intervention. LINK HERE.Bednarczyk, Robert A. “Examining the "why" of vaccine hesitancy.” Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association vol. 37,4 (2018): 316-317. doi:10.1037/hea0000596. LINK HERE. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Vaccine Hesitancy, resources & publications. Let’s talk about hesitancy: enhancing confidence in vaccination and uptake. LINK HERE.General news articlesNew Statesman. Heidi Larson interview: How to tackle Covid-19 vaccine hesitancy. November 2020. LINK HERE. Urgent Health Challenges for the Next Decade. WHO. 2020. LINK HERE. CBS NEWS. Americans' "vaccine hesitancy" could be a barrier to defeating COVID-19, doctor warns. Elizabeth Elkind. September 2020. LINK HERE.Global News. A coronavirus vaccine is almost ready. But will you take it? Kamyar Razavi and Carolyn Jarvis. LINK HERE. WiRED. The Covid-19 vaccine will need to have a flawless PR strategy. Amit Katwala. November 2020. LINK HERE. The Guardian. It's the 'vaccine hesitant', not anti-vaxxers, who are troubling public health experts. Gaby Hinsliff. November 2020. LINK HERE.    Season 2, Episode 7 Transcript Take it Online with Emily Foster - Vaccine Hesitancy: Effective ways to talk to your clients and audiences as an allied health professional.Welcome to the Take it Online podcast. Take it Online is all about simple, effective ways to help you take your health and wellness content well, online. We'll feature stories, behind the scenes peeks, and general how to’s, as well as not to do’s for all things digital health. My name is Emily Foster, and I'll be your host for the Take it Online podcast. I'm a registered dietitian and I'm also the founder of Glowing PotentiHealthcare Professionals, Digital Healthhttps://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/vaccinehttps://www.ecdc.europa.eu/sites/default/files/media/en/publications/Publications/lets-talk-about-hesitancy-vaccination-guide.pdf S2, E6. 3 Secrets for a Successful Telehealth Practice with Special Guest Maeve Hanan, RDHealthcare ProfessionalsDigital HealthEmily FosterMon, 09 Nov 2020 14:03:10 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/KElEzw8lj3o/3-secrets-for-telehealth59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5fa94b40116faf366cfa10c4

As a healthcare professional, you’ve probably had your fair share of telehealth consults this year - in this week's episode of Take it Online, Emily and special guest, Maeve Hanan from Dietetically Speaking and Nutrimote cover three secrets for a successful telehealth practice.

These are things you might not have thought of that can make a big difference to your bottom line as well as stress levels!

To learn more about the Telehealth Toolkit for Nutrition professionals head to Glowing Potential >>

Listen in as we discuss:

  • Software/Platform considerations - saving you money and time.

  • Discovery call game plans - setting boundaries and bridging the gap between your clients' challenges and your solution - making more sales.

  • Having a plan for uncomfortable situations - helping you to stay calm, comfortable and professional.

Links Mentioned: 

To learn more about the Telehealth Toolkit for Nutrition professionals head to Glowing Potential >>

Are you receiving the Glowing Potential newsletter? If not, sign up here to receive all of our latest tips and news direct to your inbox.


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Season 2, Episode 6 Transcript

Take it Online with Emily Foster - 3 Secrets for a Successful Telehealth Practice with Special Guest Maeve Hanan, RD

Welcome to the Take it Online podcast. Take it Online is all about simple, effective ways to help you take your health and wellness content well, online. We'll feature stories, behind the scenes peeks, and general how to’s, as well as not to do’s for all things digital health. My name is Emily Foster, and I'll be your host for the Take it Online podcast. I'm a registered dietitian and I'm also the founder of Glowing Potential. Let's dive in.

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Take it Online podcast. Today I am so excited to welcome back one of my dear dear friends whose birthday it was this weekend. A warm welcome to Maeve Hanan from by Dieteticallyspeaking and Nutrimote.

Thanks so much. I'm delighted to be back on.

Yeah, and today we're talking about our favourite topic, doesn't matter what allied healthcare profession you are because this is a great topic if you are interested in telehealth. Now you'll see Maeve was with us back in, oh gosh, I don't even know what the month was now, but back with us in season one of the Take it Online podcast for sort of general telehealth tips. But I think we’ve run the Telehealth Toolkit a few times now and we wanted to talk to you today about the three secrets to a successful telehealth practice.

Now this is something that, these are sort of the insider tips, the questions that Maeve and I get when we're in running the Telehealth Toolkit, and I think they’re some of the most important questions, do you think Maeve?

Definitely, and as you're saying, it's, as you know, we've all been gaining more experience in telehealth and the whole landscape is changing, and there are certain questions or considerations that are cropping up again and again, so I'm excited to chat about that today.

Awesome. So as we said, the topic today is three secrets for a successful telehealth practice, and today we're going to start off, actually Maeve is going to lead us into, and by the way, if you want to learn more about Maeve, you can go to Nutrimote, I'm going to link to all this in the show notes, you can link to Nutrimote, and you can see her or find her at Dieteticallyspeaking, so I'll link to all of her stuff in the show notes below.

So without further ado, Maeve is going to lead us in on the first of three secrets for a successful telehealth practice, and that is all around software and integrations and all of that good techie stuff. So without further ado, Maeve please take it away.

Thanks, Emily. So yeah, we thought this was a good one to mention, because there’s a whole section on software in the Telehealth Toolkit, but there was one specific consideration, that is important to highlight. It is around those software integrations, and it's really about getting the most from the software that you're already using, or one that you're maybe considering switching over to, because a lot of the time we think about it, we think, okay, you know, what are all the things I need in terms of software for my telehealth practice.

But actually, a lot of the software's are, you know, they're adding on extra features all the time, because they know that people need a variety of features. So they know we need like bookings, and we need payment processing, and we need to store notes, you know, there's all these things. So a lot of the practice management software in particular, you know, is almost a one stop shop, where it kind of has everything that you need, and it may be that you can actually save yourself a lot of money if you're already paying for something. It may be that, you know, maybe even a few months ago, you might have had to have a separate note system and a separate video software and separate booking software. But then it might be that the service you're actually paying for, for your notes, you know, since then may have added in a booking feature, a payment processing feature. So it's just really important to have a look at that, and to look at what are the integrations.

Generally there's actually a section called integrations within software, and it might be that you have to sort of manually add them or it might be that they just link up really easily. And it can be thinking outside the box a little bit as well, it can be you know, it links up with your accountancy software, it links up with your website, and it just means that you can get a lot more from possibly something that you're already using.

Maeve, this is something, can I just stop you there for a sec. This was something that happened a lot during COVID, didn't it? Since March, we've seen a lot of software updates, am I correct in saying that?

Definitely, and it's I guess, you know, a lot of these companies they're just listening to the audience and seeing what the need is, and there are certain companies as well that used to, you know, have more slightly more of a niche focus, but have actually sort of developed into practice management software. So there was a few that within our Telehealth Toolkit, we used to have them under the electronic health record section, rather than the practice management section, but then with all the additional features that were being added, we actually moved them into the practice management software section. So that was definitely something that we noticed over the past few months.

Yeah, I love that, and also, Maeve and I were actually talking before we jumped on to record this podcast about sort of different experiences we had had with this exact thing, and one of the things when we were designing a, sort of a nutrition and lifestyle programme for a particular client of ours, we were using the Healthie software. So those of you who maybe are in nutrition or do some more health coaching stuff, Healthie with an ‘ie’ at the end was one that we were using, and that was a practice management software that at the time didn't have group, I think they had just started to add in sort of group appointment options.

But we were looking for our clients to be able to download, you know, resources, PDFs, that kind of thing. And actually, we had started to look at other software's or other ways of setting up almost like a, not a membership site, but sort of a an online course setup. And we nearly, literally we were about to press go on another software, to kind of roll out this other information we wanted people to be able to download, and we ended up finding out very very close to that happening that Healthie had actually just, I think it was in beta, I don't even think every account had it, but had just rolled out the ability to kind of set up an online course. I mean, it wasn't a full blown online course, but people could go through and they could download different PDFs in an order, and you could send out emails, and so on and so forth.

So we were actually able to save ourselves quite a bit of money each month for ourselves and actually for the client, which was a big win. So definitely worth having a look at what it is that you already own, or what it is that you already pay for. Because oftentimes, they're just updating so so quickly, that you can save yourself a lot of money.

Definitely, and I think it's something that it might be, you know, when you're looking at setting up your service, it might be that you did spend a lot of time looking at the different features trying it out. But it's quite natural that we just get into our routine of things, and we might not think to look and see what's changed, or even if we get an email about an update, you know, we might not have time to look into it. But it is worth actually making that time to see, you know, is there something extra that maybe adds extra value to your client, or it helps with streamlining or it's something that you're actually looking at, and you're willing to pay for another software, you know, maybe it's there already. So it is definitely worth taking our time to check that out.

Absolutely, and we were talking about before the different sort of tiers, so sometimes there are the free tiers of the software’s, and then there are the, you know, more advanced tiers, the business or whatever tier that they want to call it. But actually, if it takes you quite a lot of time to, you know, to do these features manually, and you're just, you don't want to pay for the higher tier of the product, you can actually save yourself a lot of money by just looking and going okay, what is my time worth, and how much will it cost me to do this manually versus just paying the software to be able to do it for me?

Yes, absolutely, that's an experience I had. So the booking software I use is called 10to8, and I was using the free tier for ages. I mean, you get like really good features on the free tier, but then when I eventually went and upgraded, it has been worth its weight in gold. It's like, you know, I can now customise all my messages, so that everybody gets their individual link to their video consultation, and they get all the reminders, and it's easier to communicate with clients in there. So it's just way more streamlined, and I save so much time. So sometimes it really is worth it based on the amount of time that you can save, you know, for that whole process.

Yeah, and it just depends as well I think on what sort of, how far along you are in your business, or where you're sort of allocating your budget. That sounds really like, boring, ‘oh, look at your budget’, but really, though, doesn't it? I mean, it just depends, really, sometimes we need to spend more time on things because we just don't want to spend the amount of money, but there is that that sort of line of, it might actually save you money because it's saving you time. So yeah, worth thinking about, cool. Any more comments on software?

I think that was the main points related to those integrations, so really you know, just take the time to check out the things you're already paying for, the software maybe that you already enjoy using, are there any extras that you know, maybe would add value to your service or you know would just be helpful for you. I'd have a look at this a little bit outside the box, in terms of, if you're trying to choose another software as well, you know, what integrates well with that. So as I said, you know, it's fantastic if your accountancy software can link up with your payment processing software, and maybe that links up with your website, so it can just be really nicely all connected together.

Maeve has summarised that brilliantly. If you are new to the whole online business thing, please set this up at the very beginning, because even if it's, you know, it's not the full kit and caboodle, but have these like, connect things at the beginning. I'm doing recently, I owe my accountants my books from last year, by the end of next week, and I am very stressy because I did not set up everything or I kind of changed software's midway through. So yeah, if you set this stuff up at the beginning, it just makes it so much easier.

It does, yeah, and I guess that's what we share. You know, when we're going through the Toolkit, we're trying to help people to learn from our experience, because you know, we have spent the time trying things out, seeing what works, what doesn't work.

So yeah, set that stuff up. Maeve’s a clever cookie, guys. Take her advice when it comes to software. Cool. Okay. Do you feel like we're ready to move on to discovery call bits?

Yes, sounds good.

Perfect. All right. So our second point today, so our second secret for a successful telehealth practice, say that four times fast, is around well planned discovery calls, the sort of discovery call gameplans.

Hi, there. Thanks so much for listening. I hope you're enjoying the episode so far. I wanted to let you know that this episode is brought to you by the Telehealth Toolkit for nutrition professionals. If you like this podcast episode, you are going to love the Telehealth Toolkit. We're launching it this Sunday November the 15th, and you can find out more at www.glowingpotential.com/telehealth-toolkit. Maeve and I will be running that, we're really looking forward to it, and we hope to see you there.

And we get this question, actually it wasn't something that I thought, so I kind of look after the marketing side of the Toolkit with regards to running that section. Maeve and I sort of switch on and off on who leads which section, and when I was sort of putting the marketing piece together and Maeve and I were going through it and sort of spitballing ideas, we didn't really think of discovery calls.

But when we ran the first and second Telehealth Toolkit, we found that we were getting a lot of questions around you know, are discovery calls worth it? Because a lot of people were used to doing face to face consultations and the discovery call wasn't really something that was needed. Maybe you got your consultations through referrals, or just that clinic kind of fed you referrals, and so discovery calls were something that people were seeing other people do, but didn't really know if they were effective or not. So I just wanted to share today some some tips for discovery calls, and Maeve please jump in here as and when you feel like you know, I haven't covered something fully.

But with discovery calls, it's really important that you have a game plan, because they effectively are a sales call, and I know we don't want to think of them as that but everybody is selling something. Even if your dietetic services or whatever other health services you're running online, even if they're paid for by that person's insurance or something else, we're selling behaviour change. So even if your service is fully paid for, you are actually actively selling something on your call. So don't shy away when I tell you that discovery calls are effectively sales calls, because they are, and what you're selling in this particular case is behaviour change, our, you know, quality of life. So when people work with you, as a healthcare professional, they're looking to better their quality of life ultimately, and that is huge.

So let me start off by saying, you should not feel awkward about selling your services, because the service you are selling is better health and what is more valuable than that, I really don't know. So if you need more support with sales, we do give quite a few sort of book recommends and things like that in the Telehealth Toolkit as well, but for those of you who follow Nutrimote, Dieteticallyspeaking or Glowing Potential as well on Instagram and other social media channels, we give you some top tips on that as well, but coming back for a moment, so discovery calls, they are sales calls, and if you go in with a game plan as to what this discovery call needs to, what needs to happen on that discovery call, you'll feel better about it.

So the first thing is, you need to know why you're doing that discovery call in the first place. And depending on what type of practice you're running, or what you specialise in, it might look different to you, or for you rather. So you need to know, as an example, it might be that if you're a specialist in a particular area, you need to know if that particular person is a good fit for your practice, are they within your scope to help. The other thing is as well is maybe if you're just starting out in practice, maybe it's not so much about knowing if that person is within your scope to help or if they really fit within that specialty you're looking to serve, but perhaps it's a little bit of market research for you.

So those of you who are new to running a business, it might really help you to understand the types of clients that you're attracting to your practice. And if that's something that you want to continue with, or if maybe you're not phrasing things properly on your website, or in your social media, i.e. you're not using the language that those particular clients or patients are using to describe their own problems. So discovery calls can be really helpful for market research, it can be really helpful to know if that person is within your scope of practice to help if you're a bit more of a specialty service.

But regardless of why you choose to do your discovery calls, one of the things that people often trip up on, is really practising moving that information that people give you on that discovery call. So bearing in mind discovery calls are more for the ideal patient or client or the interested patient and client to talk, as opposed for you to talk. So the whole point of that discovery call is for them to describe to you about the problem that they're having, and then for you to be able to bridge to the solution. So that is that bit in the discovery call that often people trip up on is bridging from the problem to the solution that you're offering, because that's when people start to feel it gets a bit salesy.

But it's not salesy, this is the bit where you're taking, you're showing that you've been an active listener. So you've been asking questions on the call to gain more information, and then towards the end of the call, you're looking at taking that information and moving it into, okay, I've heard you say to me, that you're having challenges with x, y, and z, it makes you feel frustrated, it makes you feel upset, and then bridging that to the solution. How would it feel to you if we could help you solve that problem? And start to bridge that gap between the problem that they're having, and then the end solution and helping them sort of visualise what it would look like, after you worked together. What would it look like to have your IBS symptoms under control? Or at least, you know, feel like you're moving in the right direction. How would it feel to go to the grocery store and know what you need to be purchasing when you have an egg allergy, what to look out for on the label.

So that bridging that problem to the solution is a really important thing in discovery calls and I think Maeve you made this comment early on, you know, setting boundaries, and even having something like a clock. So you can get sort of timer apps that can come up on a call, and it's just so if you've said that the discovery call is going to be 20 minutes, stick to 20 minutes and have a bit of a game plan as to how long each section is going to take.

So how long is it going to take for you to have that small talk, how long is it going to take for you to learn about that particular interested client or patient, and then how long is it going to take for you to kind of take that information they just told you and help guide them through to the solution that you're offering. Maeve do you have any comments on that at all?

That was a really good summary, and definitely from my experience, that piece that you mentioned there about boundaries, so definitely time boundaries. And also, I guess, in terms of the information as well, so it's not a mini consultation, it's about you finding out about that client. And as you said, you know, bridging that gap and telling them about your services. And again, we shouldn't feel guilty for that, because that's why they booked the call, they want to find out about your services. And I think it's just I guess, working in healthcare and things, especially if a lot of us maybe have started out in the public healthcare setting, that it doesn't always feel natural to us, or you know, we feel uncomfortable with that. But that's literally what the client wants, and they're not expecting you to make that into a free consultation for them.

So yes, I think that's some really, really important points there, and also what you said about it being a two way street, so it's about you learning about the client and seeing if they're right for you and your service, because I think a lot of the time, and I know I felt like this when I started out with discovery calls, but it was around, I need to sell my service and I need to get the client interested, you know, and it wasn't really about actually is that client right for me and my service, and actually bringing that into the equation has been really helpful because it is that two way street.

And I think when you, like you say Maeve, when you know, when you put those boundaries in place, and when you are, when the prospective client feels like there's that two way exchange, that you're really listening to them, you've got that clock up there, your time is valuable, like putting all of those things, putting those boundaries in place, actually makes you look more professional than if you just give an hour and you were only supposed to be 25 minutes. So you know, it's not just about you either, is it, it's if that person thinks it's only going to take 20 minutes, and it takes an hour, well, maybe that's not necessarily a positive thing, that person might have somewhere to go. And it might look like, oh gosh, well, you know, if they couldn't wrap the discovery call up, what's it going to be like when we sit down and have a consult. So you know, setting boundaries is never a negative thing, I don't think.

Perfect. Okay, discovery call game plan. So, you know, make sure you know why you're doing discovery calls in the first place, go in with a game plan, have a couple of questions that you're going to ask them, remember that it's them speaking more than you, because you're listening, so that towards the end of the call, you can really have a good idea as to a, if this person is a good fit for your services, and b, if they are, sort of showing them what it would look like for the two of you to work together in the language that that prospective client has just used. So it takes practice, don't be frustrated, but the more you do, and the more you practice, the better you get.

Absolutely, and actually, I've just found it really helpful in terms of setting expectations with clients as well, because you have that really kind of honest discussion from the get go. And it's about this is my services, this is what I can offer, and then it's really up to them about you know, if that's for them. And sometimes you're offering other options that you know, if it's sort of on the fence, and if it's you know, maybe, and, you know, I can also signpost you or refer you on to this other service, a lot of the time, people value that sort of option or that transparency, but I found they still tend to go with your service, but it's just a boundary thing, you've set those expectations.

Yeah, and the other thing that I see that kind of, you know, gosh, we're recording this on a Monday guys, I'm feeling like I need another cup of coffee. What I wanted to say that made me think of that, when you just said that Maeve is what I see a lot of healthcare professionals doing is when the service that they've booked, the discovery call doesn't fit their needs, you try and make this like bespoke tailored service on the fly like, oh well, if that doesn't work for you, if you can't afford an hour, maybe we could do a half hour and then we could do another…just don't do that.

I think it makes it really complicated, and when you start to, I mean, we're moving kind of away from discovery calls here, but I see this happening right here, this happening a lot on discovery calls where, you know, you can kind of feel that the client or the patient isn't interested, or maybe the discovery call hasn't gone the way that you wanted it to. And so you do this mad scramble thing at the end, where you start, you know, trying to negotiate services and prices, and what I just want to say is, don't do that, stick to your guns, if you need to change your services up or pricing up later, that's fine. But don't do it on the fly, because you end up losing a lot of money that way, and you end up actually looking less professional. And if you just stick to your guns and say, well, you know what, it's been a great call today, I'm going to follow up with an email, and if you have any questions, let me know, and you know, I'd be happy to work with you, here are the services that we could work together on.

But I think doing that mad sort of scramble thing at the end, makes you look desperate. And it also puts you in a position where you can lose a lot of money in your business, if you're doing that with every discovery call. So just be aware, stick to your guns, set the boundaries, your services are your services, your prices are your prices, and if it's not a good fit for that client, then that's okay. There will be others that come along.

Yeah, exactly.

Cool. All right. Do you feel ready to move on to the third section?

Let's do it.

Alright, so the third section, we were going to call, Maeve and I were laughing at this beforehand, and we're going to talk about this as sort of like a communication policy, but it's not really, what we wanted to talk about for the third secret to successful telehealth practice, is to think ahead about some of the awkward situations that can happen when we're working in telehealth. So Maeve do you want to kind of maybe start us off with what we were thinking around this section?

Yeah, so it’s something that's come up in the Telehealth Toolkit discussions and also then just in, you know, different Facebook groups or just other conversations with our colleagues, and it's about these kind of inappropriate situations that might arise. And because, you know, possibly related to the whole telehealth setup, in terms of if somebody you know, does something inappropriate in the call, if somebody, you know, feels like a bit protected, because they're behind that screen. And also because we might be more isolated ourselves in terms of, you know, it's just us in a room with our laptop, rather than being like in a department or, you know, with those extra sort of support measures around us.

So it's about really just kind of being prepared for these unlikely situations. Obviously, they're not, you know, the norm or anything like that. But these things can happen and just, you know, having a bit of a game plan again, for, you know, what might you do in these various situations?

Yeah, absolutely. And I'm laughing because Maeve and I, when we were talking about topics, I think I suggested something around like how to deal with weirdos, to which Maeve was like, no Emily, that is extremely unprofessional, and it is, but in all seriousness, thinking about, so there's two ways to think about this, this third piece, so you're thinking about things ahead of time. So because often, I think what we think about when we say that, or when I certainly thought when we ran the Toolkit, what I always thought about was, how do we, you know, we constantly as healthcare professionals, how do we protect the clients data, how do we protect the client, how do we make sure the client or the patient is looked after?

And we very rarely think about how do we make sure that I am protected? How do we make sure I am safe? And how do we make sure that I am looked after? And that is really important when you are working on your own. And I think right now, especially during the current circumstances, when most of, I would say most people are, all of their health consults are online, and so how do you make sure that you are protected, and you are safe? And part of that is thinking about how you would deal with these situations ahead of time like Maeve was saying.

And looking at the other side of the fence, how do we protect our patients and clients, or how do we spot red flags, and that's something that we talk, we're not going to get into that today, but that is something we talked about in the Toolkit with regards to you know, how do we, in terms of safeguarding, so all this stuff that we would have, if we were working, let's say in an NHS setting, that would already be, we'd already know, sort of, we'd have those. I don't want to get technical, but like we'd have those standard operating procedures, so what you do if this happens, and we have all that when we're working for larger organisations, but when we work for ourselves, we don't tend to have that.

So, you know, what do you do if you notice, it looks like someone is self harming, what do you do if someone seems you know, like, they're really struggling with their mental health, and you've got concerns about where that's going, and you can't get a hold of their GP? I mean, how do you deal with some of these situations? So we do cover that in the Toolkit, but today that third secret for successful telehealth practice is thinking about those situations in advance, where they can put you in a really awkward, uncomfortable situation and really thinking about those ahead of time. So as an example, if you feel uncomfortable, someone's making comments while they're on the Telehealth, or maybe they're doing something, you know, that isn't appropriate, like they're taking off bits of clothing.

And I know, some of you on the podcast episode listening today might think, oh my god, has that happened to people, and it has happened to people. So that's why you need to think ahead of time, if it were you, what would you do? You know, it could be something as simple as saying, I'm going to end the call. And if you thought about it ahead of time, if you know what you're going to do already, it frees up thinking room for you to deal with that situation. So if you already have a set of steps that you know, you're going to take, then that frees you up to think of other things in that particular situation. Does that make sense Maeve, what have you got to add there?

Yeah, definitely. Again, there's other ways of doing it, so say in my appointment policy, I have outlined under my communication policy that, you know, I don't deal with inappropriate behaviour and outline that the call will be ended, and those kinds of things, you can actually have it set out within an appointment policy that people agree to before they sign up. And sometimes, you know, that can be helpful in terms of if there's any sort of backlash from the clients or you know, anything like that, it's you know, well, this was actually the agreed policy to begin with. It doesn't necessarily have to be done that way, it can just be a plan that you have for yourself, or even just to, to have a think about, okay, you know, what are these possible situations that could arise, and what way am I going to respond?

And it's, you know, it's remembering, as Emily said, definitely if you don't feel comfortable, you can definitely end the call, you can follow up with an email. And then it's about, you know, if you don't want to work with that client, that's within your rights as well as a clinician. So it's about, what do you do from that end of things, or whether something needs to be escalated to the police or, you know, reported to somebody else. And so, you know, it is definitely worth just having a think about those situations, and just getting a little bit mentally prepared in the off chance that something like that might happen.

And I think as well, just because it's online doesn't make what's happened to you less important. So you know, just as much as someone can make you feel uncomfortable or do something inappropriate in an in person setting, it is just as inappropriate to do that in an online setting. And because people feel more protected or less like they're going to get caught in an online setting, we do sometimes see those things happening more in telehealth than you would do an in person clinic setup.

So if this has happened to you, I'm so sorry if something like that has happened to you, but know that it's not okay. And it's not less important, because it's happened virtually. And you know, you can take up serious situations with the police, I certainly encourage you to have like a practice buddy or someone who is a healthcare professional, you probably, if you've been practising, even for, you know, a year, you probably have people in the health space that you can talk to about this, but do talk to people about it, because you can kind of be left feeling quite violated after something like that happens.

And you might be talking yourself down saying, you know, nothing really happened because it was just over a video call. But actually, you should talk about these things, because they aren't less important, because they happen virtually.

Yeah, absolutely, definitely agree with that piece about having that virtual support network as well, just to kind of talk it through and to, sort of, you know, get it off your chest and possibly, you know, get advice. Because if you were in that maybe like an NHS setting, you know, you’d have colleagues there, you'd have, you know, possibly security there, you'd have, you know, managers where you could escalate things. So it's important to take care of yourself in that way, to have that support network and to have your plan.

Fantastic. Right. So let's recap here. So three secrets for a successful telehealth practice. So make sure you double check before you go purchasing other software's or other platforms to do things for you, that you double check what your software's already do. And as Maeve brilliantly pointed out, these things change all the time. You might have really done a lot of research upfront to make sure you chose the right software for your business, but double check, have a look, if you're looking for something else in your business, it might have been added to that software you already have.

Number two was discovery calls, have a game plan, right, know why you're having the discovery call in the first place, set boundaries, as Maeve brilliantly talked about. And know or practice moving from that problem, so talking about the issues and the challenges that your client or your potential client or patient is having, and bridging that gap between that problem and the solution that you're offering, getting them to sort of visualise what it would be like after you've worked together and they've reached their goal, all of that good stuff. So setting boundaries and having a game plan for discovery calls and not being afraid of the word sales, because we're always, all of us, are selling something.

And then the third piece, wrapping up, make sure that you think ahead to some maybe unforeseen circumstances or things that are a little bit more uncomfortable, because when you're working in a private setting, particularly, you know, in the virtual space, it can feel quite lonely. And you want to make sure that not only you're protecting your patient, but that also you're protecting yourself as an individual. And so thinking ahead on these things, sets you up for success, makes you feel valued and sets boundaries early on with those clients and patients.

So that is it from us today. Thank you so much for joining us and you can find out more about the lovely Maeve Hanan at www.dieteticallyspeaking.com. For those of you who are nutrition professionals, you can find her on the remote nutrition hub at www.nutrimote.com. So Maeve, thank you so much for joining me today.

Thanks, Emily. I always love chatting about telehealth with you.

Yeah, and I'm sure we'll see you again soon. Thanks. Bye.

Hi there. Thanks so much for listening. I hope you're enjoying the episode so far. I wanted to let you know that this episode is brought to you by the Telehealth Toolkit for nutrition professionals. If you like this podcast episode, you are going to love the Telehealth Toolkit. We're launching it this Sunday November the 15th, and you can find out more at www.glowingpotential.com/telehealth-toolkit and Maeve I will be running that, we're really looking forward to it, and we hope to see you there.

Thanks so much for listening to the Take it Online podcast. If you want to know more about building out your own digital health programme, you can find us at www.glowing.potential.com If you liked this episode or other episodes like it, please click subscribe and leave us a rating. It means a lot. Thank you.

S2, E6. 3 Secrets for a Successful Telehealth Practice with Special Guest Maeve Hanan, RDhttps://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/3-secrets-for-telehealthS2, E5. Focusing on the good to make it great: the benefits of building on what's working in your health practice!Healthcare ProfessionalsDigital HealthEmily FosterMon, 26 Oct 2020 07:00:00 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/9VNcBpU_eUw/focusing-on-the-good-to-make-it-great59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5f924966dfec2546ae8ac7ba

Join Emily this week as she chats about the benefits of focusing and building on our strengths. Often times we give much of our focus and energy to what we are doing that’s “bad”, not working well or not our strength (as a business owner or, in general, as a business).

🌟What if we focused on what was going well and built on that?

🌟What if we turned what we were good at, into what we were great at? Would we be more passionate? More inspired? More memorable?

🌟What if we focused on efforts that worked well in the past to market our services and worked to build and improve on those efforts? 

When we move from good to great we become more memorable to our audience and, in general, more passionate about our work because we ENJOY what we’re doing. 

Listen in to hear more.

You can learn more about Glowing Potential at www.glowingpotential.com

Are you receiving the Glowing Potential newsletter? If not, sign up here to receive all of our latest tips and news direct to your inbox.


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Season 2, Episode 5 Transcript

Take it Online with Emily Foster - Focusing on the good to make it great: the benefits of building on what’s working in your health practice!

Welcome to the Take it Online podcast. Take it Online is all about simple, effective ways to help you take your health and wellness content well, online. We'll feature stories, behind the scenes peeks, and general how to’s, as well as not to do’s for all things digital health. My name is Emily Foster, and I'll be your host for the Take it Online podcast. I'm a registered dietitian and I'm also the founder of Glowing Potential. Let's dive in.

Hi there and welcome back to another episode of the Take it Online podcast. Today I'll be speaking about moving from good to great, so often in our businesses we focus on what hasn't worked, or we focus on things that we're bad at and try to improve on that, and actually, that can be counter productive. I'm going to talk about why I think that is in this episode, as well as how you can make a bigger impact by focusing on what you are good at to make it great. If that sounds of interest to you, stay around and we'll get started.

Awesome. So I'm going to talk about two areas of where I think you should be focusing on the good to make it great, and it's within your own business as a business owner. So it could be, this is one of the topics we’re going to be talking about. So it could be that you're great at public speaking, it could be that you're great at writing, it could be that you are fantastic at taking research and throwing it into bite sized chunks so that your potential patients and clients can really understand what it is that you do and the experience that you have in a particular area.

Whatever it is, as business owners, we, particularly healthcare professionals, we're really good at identifying what we are bad at and what needs improvement, and we're so quick to jump on those things that we're bad at and need improvement and focus on improving those as opposed to stepping back and having a look at what we're doing that is good. Because sometimes if we, now it doesn't mean that you shouldn't ever focus on improving yourself in skills that you're not great at, but a lot of people would argue that actually when you can, if you can, to outsource things that you are not good at, because it gives you time to focus on the things that you are good at, so that you can become great at them. And where the benefits lie in this as a business owner, particularly as a healthcare professional in business, is it gives you two things.

When you are great at something, perhaps you are a good public speaker, but you take time to learn how to story-tell, maybe your goal is to be a TEDx speaker, as an example, you take the time to learn to story-tell and you work with a public speaking coach, or you take a course or whatever that looks like for you. But you move from being a good public speaker to a great public speaker. What happens when you move from good to great in something, two things. One, you become more memorable. The second thing is you usually become more passionate about your work, because the reality is if you're great at something, people probably aren't going to stop telling you about it, you will know if you are great, just like you know deep down when you do something that you're good at something, sometimes we just know, we feel good about it, we feel in flow. We know this is our strength. We're not nervous, maybe we're a bit nervous, but we're more excited than nervous. So you know, that passion really comes through. So when we move from being good to great at something, we usually become more passionate.

But the second thing is, is that we also become more memorable, right? We can usually tell, we usually remember two things, and it sounds awful, but we do usually remember two things. One, what was really crap, and two, what was really fantastic. Everything else is somewhere in the middle, and we know this from going to, I'm going to stick with a public speaking example, but we notice from going to conferences, right? I mean, you can get the most boring research topic, but if you have somebody talking about it, who is extremely passionate about their work, and one of their strengths is being able to break down that, you know that thesis or whatever it is that they're presenting on into something that you can understand and relate to, that is fantastic, because that person and that research will be remembered.

So when you focus on building on things that you are already good at to make yourself great, you become more memorable, which, you know, ideally leads to more patients and clients contacting you, and you become usually more passionate, because you enjoy what you're doing. You're not spending time trying to get better at something you're not that great at, and it's, it's sort of a chicken or an egg thing here, because if you are really great at something, or sorry, if you're good at something, and you move to being really great at something, usually that will open up other opportunities, which usually means more money, which usually means that you can look to outsource some of those other things you aren't that great at.

So sometimes you just have to bite the bullet, invest in yourself to become great at something, as opposed to just sticking with the status quo, being good, you know, getting by and focusing on the things that you know, you're not that great at, but that you kind of be want to be more well rounded on. So you become more memorable, usually become more passionate. So things to think about as a business owner with regards to what are you good at, taking stock of that, and looking at how you can choose a few items to become really, really great.

The second piece where moving from good to great, where that is extremely helpful is in your marketing efforts, and why that is, again it comes back to the same thing. We often, when we go to launch something or we start a new social media platform, maybe we join tiktok, or we join Instagram, we start a blog, we start a podcast, we're very quick to sort of judge that and look at what isn't going well, right? We look, ‘oh, god, that's so bad, I don't like that, that's not going well, and that's actually not helpful. I mean, it's good to acknowledge that something has not gone well, but to spend, you know, a lot of time on that particular thing is a wasted effort. You are much better, taking stock, going what worked, what didn't, dropping the things that didn't work, and building on the things that are working for you. That is huge.

As an example, when you go to boost a Facebook post as an example, I'm sure you've all seen on Instagram or Facebook, I mean to say, you know, people who boost this post get X amount more engagement, or whatever it's saying on its little pop up. It makes no sense, and people will tell you this who are in Facebook advertising, it makes no sense to boost a post that has not done well. Because crap is crap, guys, sometimes things flop, it just doesn't go well, and it doesn't mean you should keep trying to push it. Just let it go and have a look at some of the posts that did do really well, that did get a lot of engagement, and maybe they're not the ones that you thought were going to get that engagement, but they did.

So it really makes a much bigger difference to spend your time focusing on things that are working in your marketing plan, and acknowledging the things that aren't, but not spending so much time on them that you feel bad and you just get caught up in perfectionism to try and fix it.

So the other thing is as well, when you take stock, going back to that previous comment, as a business owner kind of working on what you're good at to make yourself great at it, you can tie this into your marketing efforts as well. So if there's something that you have as a skill, as a business owner, maybe it's a movie or audio editing, maybe it's, I keep using public speaking, maybe it's public speaking, whatever that is for you, if you have a particular lean towards a piece, or a type of content development, then do that, because it just makes it so much easier for you. More fun, more passionate, that comes through.

So when you are marketing something, whether it's for the first time, or whether it's the second, third, fourth, 10th time, it doesn't matter, have a look back in the past to see what has worked, what hasn't, and then when you go to build your marketing plan for another launch, whether that's a service or a product, then it allows you to go, okay, you know, learn from my mistakes, but not get caught up in them and start to build on the stuff you've tried that has worked, to make it great.

And if you're sitting here and you're thinking or you're standing here, you're on a train or whatever you're doing and you're thinking, I really have no idea what I'm good at, my top tip for you today is to ask people, ask people that have worked with you before, ask your family, although be picky who you ask and ask your friends. Because when you start to see a pattern emerge, that will become clear to you what you are good at. So if for the first bit where around, you know, focusing what you're good at, focusing on what you're good at, as a business owner, if you're a bit lost in that, or you have kind of a couple areas that you think you want to focus on, ask your friends, family, and ideally, some of your past patients and clients, if you have a good relationship with them, to get a feel for what your strengths are.

Sometimes we can't see them ourselves, and what's interesting when we ask other people, and again, we want to be selective about who we ask about this, because I don't know your relationships with your family, but sometimes these unexpected patterns emerge, and it's really interesting for us as business owners to maybe identify something that we didn't know was there. So I’ve given you an exercise for the business owner skills piece, so asking friends, family, colleagues, be selective around that to see if there any patterns that come up around things that are strengths for you. If you don't have a good idea already what they are, still might be an interesting exercise for you.

But the second piece is if you are launching something, and I mentioned this, because we're in the autumn, we're in the fall of 2020, and a lot of people are ramping up for January / February launches, and so if that is you, it's worth even if you haven't launched that particular product or service before, writing down, take an hour to grab a cup of coffee or tea, whatever your favourite is, and just write down things that have worked and things that have not worked in the past. Take note of the things that haven't worked, and the things that have worked, build them into a launch plan, look to see how you can build on those to make this launch, whatever it is that you are launching, or building upon in your business better.

Without further ado, I will leave you to the rest of your day. Thank you so much for listening. I hope that you found this episode helpful. I really think that we do spend a lot of time, forget business owners, but as people in general, and you know, it's easy to feel down at the moment, so take the time and start to focus on what it is that you're good at, some of the successes that you've had, and look to see how you can build on those, because it's a way more productive use of your time and it will give you the results that you want to see if you are consistent with those things you are great at. Have a great day. Thanks for listening, and we'll see you again next time.

Thanks so much for listening to the Take it Online podcast. If you want to know more about building out your own digital health programme, you can find us a www.glowingpotential.com. If you liked this episode or other episodes like it, please click subscribe and leave us a rating. It means a lot. Thank you.

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S2, E5. Focusing on the good to make it great: the benefits of building on what's working in your health practice!https://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/focusing-on-the-good-to-make-it-greatS2, E4. A Patient-centred Approach To Developing Products For Your Business or PracticeHealthcare ProfessionalsDigital HealthEmily FosterMon, 12 Oct 2020 06:00:00 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/nreELy1QN4s/a-patient-centred-approach-to-developing-products-for-your-business-or-practice59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5f82a41427466f23a4e45019

This week on the Take it Online Podcast, I (Emily 👋) talk about how and why to build a product out that is patient-centred. 

Back in March when Maeve Hanan, my friend and fellow healthcare professional, began building out the Telehealth Toolkit, it really started as a project to help other healthcare professionals dealing with the sudden change to virtual consultations troubleshoot, connect and adapt. We didn’t imagine that 8 months later we would be talking to universities and membership groups who were interested in the course. (Which pssst. stay tuned we are launching a new version of soon!).

Join me in the episode as I talk about why keeping the people you serve at the core of the product you are building leads to a powerful shift in how people view and talk about your product

Discussed in this episode: 

  • Keeping your patients and clients best interests at heart 

  • Getting the people you serve involved in your product development

  • Stepping forward as an expert 

You can find out more about Glowing Potential on our website

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Season 2, Episode 4 Transcript

Take it Online with Emily Foster - A Patient-centred Approach To Developing Products For Your Business or Practice.

Welcome to the Take it Online podcast. Take it Online is all about simple, effective ways to help you take your health and wellness content well, online. We'll feature stories, behind the scenes peeks, and general how to’s, as well as not to do’s for all things digital health. My name is Emily Foster, and I'll be your host for the Take it Online podcast. I'm a registered dietitian and I'm also the founder of Glowing Potential. Let's dive in.

Hello, and welcome back to the Take it Online podcast. I'm your host, Emily Foster and today we're going to be talking all about patient centred product development. So for those healthcare professionals in business, which is probably you, if you're listening to the podcast, this is the episode for you, if you're looking to, not for, if you're looking to build out a product and you're just not too sure where to start, or if your idea has legs or not. So welcome, if that sounds of interest to you, let's get started.

So we talk a lot about being patient centred when it comes to our care, patient focused as well, you might call it that instead. But basically putting the patients and the clients in the centre of the care, so helping them to make decisions that are informed and guiding them along that journey, along with several other things. But today, we're going to be talking about why when you're developing products for your healthcare business, you need to keep that patient centred mentality in mind as well. So I'm going to walk you through three key things as to why patient centred, product development is key for your business.

So let's start with the first one. The first one is at the end of the day, when you keep your clients or your patients best interests at heart, you do what's best for them, and in turn, that is also as a business what is best for you. So first and foremost, when you're building out a product, you want to make sure that it has your clients, your patient's best interest at heart. You don't launch something purely because you think that there's a gap in the market, you don't launch something because you think it's gonna make you a few bucks quick, you launch something because you feel like it's going to be impactful for the people that you are serving, and ultimately, that will come through.

Now what I and my colleague Maeve from Dietetically Speaking, some of you might know her from Nutrimote, we developed out the Telehealth Toolkit back in March, and this is a product that we built out really not thinking to be quite honest that it was going to be, you know, as big of a deal as it ended up being. We wanted to bring healthcare professionals together, we wanted to kind of share best practices, talk to people about the problems that they were having, troubleshoot all of that good stuff. And what it ended up being was something that people found really useful, and we've been able to launch again and again, and we've even been in talks with the British Dietetic Association as well as several universities.

So I just wanted to point back to the fact that this was something we launched, because we knew it was going to be valuable, we were getting a lot of questions about it, and we had expertise in the area that we could share with others. So when you're building out a product, really do that check, you know, do you have your patients, your clients best interest at heart, or is this just something that's going to be sort of quick and easy for you to do, and maybe make a quick buck. And it's not that those things are bad, and you should feel ashamed about that, but if you're looking for a product that's really going to resonate, and sell again and again to those patients and those clients that you serve, and you want to make sure of course, that you have their best interests at heart and in return, you will see the benefits of that.

So the second thing I wanted to talk about in terms of patient centred product development, is when you constantly and consistently keep your patients and your clients at the centre of what you are building out, it makes it a product that is almost developed for them and by them. Now you're doing the legwork on that, but you are asking for feedback, you're responding to it, you're getting testimonials, and when people feel involved in the development of a product, they feel like they've got a stake in it. So when you start to roll that out time and time again, those people will promote that product for you, and that is so powerful. If you haven't heard of social proof before, it's basically just a fancy term of saying that when people say that you're great, it's better than it means more to other people than you just saying you're great. So when someone promotes you on social media, without you prompting them to do that, or your name comes up in a conversation when you're not there, maybe you're not even aware of it, that is huge social proof that what you're doing and who you are, and what your business stands for, is worthwhile, and people should check that out.

So when you build with your clients and your patients in mind, and you get their feedback, and you respond to their feedback, you really get their buy in, and that is really, really powerful when it comes to relaunching that product, time and time again. Now, what I'm not saying is that you have to ask them, you know, what would you like me to build out, there's a Henry Ford quote that says, you know, if I'd asked people what they had wanted, they would have just said faster horses. So you are still the healthcare professional, you're still the expert in that field, but you want to get that input from your patients and your clients so that you build out the most helpful and practical version of your product possible.

The third thing is when you build a product that is patient centred, so when you use that sort of mentality, when you're building out the product, and you go to launch it, it really positions you as the expert in the field, because what you are saying to people, is, hey, I'm the expert in this subject, but you're the expert on your body, and so I've made sure that I've included other people along the way in this journey, so that I can make this as appropriate and as applicable for you as possible. And I think it's like anything in sort of health in general, regardless of how long you've been in your particular specialty, is that the more you know them, the more you realise, you don't know. So when you include other people along the way, it just reinforces the fact that you are an experienced caring, and clever business person and healthcare professional, and launching your product is more than just making a quick buck for you, you really want to make sure it's going to have an impact in people's lives.

So let's recap those three key things. So the first one, when you build a product, whatever that is big, small, high ticket item, low ticket item, when you build something that's patient centred, when you include patients and clients in your product development, you keep their best interests at heart, and that comes back full circle for you, you look after your patients, they will look after you. Number two is when you build something out with people helping, giving feedback, testimonials and acting on that, people feel like they have a stake in the product. And that's great, because when you go to launch that product time and time again, you get that social proof that what you're doing and what you've done is very impactful for people. And then the last thing is that people see you as the expert because you haven't just waltzed in as a know it all, you've gone, do you know what I need more than just my impact to make this product work and resonate with people and make sure it has the biggest impact it possibly can.

So those are really the three key things for why I think you should look to build out products with that patient centred approach. Again, you know, we really were so, I think, blown away by the feedback we got from the Telehealth Toolkit. And I really can tell you, I've built several products now and I can really tell you that that product was built very differently, because we didn't really intend it to roll out the way that it did in terms of you know, now we're launching a pre recorded version, with some live Q&A’s coming in December, so you know, it really evolved. But at the very, very beginning, we kept the people we were serving healthcare professionals, we kept them front of mind, and we asked for feedback, and we made sure that we were answering the questions that people had around telehealth.

So if you can take those three things that we just talked about, I really think you can build something that's impactful, that will make a difference in people's lives, and the products that you build, people will help to promote for you, and that is so incredibly key, because you can have a great product, but if nobody knows it exists, and nobody's talking about it, it's really difficult to get off the ground. So keep all of those things in mind. I'd love to hear what you're building in your health business, you can drop us an email at info@glowingpotential.com. We're always looking for healthcare professionals on the podcast to talk about what they've done to take their businesses online, so if that's of interest to you, I'd love to hear from you. Again, that's info@glowingpotential.com.

You can also follow us on Instagram at glowing_potential and we're doing an IGTV ‘Grow October’ series at the moment, so a tip a day, working day of the month, knowing you don't need to be doing those things on weekends guys. And so yeah, join us there on at glowing_potential for Instagram for our ‘Grow October’ series. There's some great giveaways as well, and this podcast is being released on October 12, which is actually Canadian Thanksgiving. So happy thanksgiving for those of you who are celebrating it in Canada, and my European friends, we are giving away some stuff the week of the 12th, so stay tuned for that, particularly on our Instagram account.

Thank you so much for listening, and we'll see you again next time.

Thanks so much for listening to the Take it Online podcast. If you want to know more about building out your own digital health programme, you can find us at www.glowingpotential.com. If you liked this episode or other episodes like it, please click subscribe and leave us a rating. It means a lot. Thank you.

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S2, E4. A Patient-centred Approach To Developing Products For Your Business or Practicehttps://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/a-patient-centred-approach-to-developing-products-for-your-business-or-practiceS2, E3. Taking Physio (and other physical therapies) online w Special Guest Madia RashidHealthcare ProfessionalsDigital HealthEmily FosterMon, 28 Sep 2020 19:24:30 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/f16lpyHOOHA/taking-plysio-online-with-madia-rashid59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5f642119c8b45a24a277d024

This week’s Take it Online podcast episode features the highly talented Madia Rashid, Chartered Physiotherapist from Physio4Me in South London, UK. Madia and Emily talk about how to take a physical therapy online. 

Madia shares her insights on:

  • creating a community with classes

  • tips for helping clients/patients to self-assess during Telehealth consults

  • how to add value using simple digital tools

  • how digital burnout is real and how she avoided it

Physio4Me primarily focuses on women’s health in south London - you can find more about Madia’s services at www.physio4me.com and on Instagram at @physio4meuk. 

A big thanks to Madia for coming on the podcast!

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Season 2, Episode 3 Transcript

Take it Online with Emily Foster - Taking Physio (and other physical therapies) online w Special Guest Madia Rashid

Welcome to the Take it Online podcast. Take it Online is all about simple, effective ways to help you take your health and wellness content well, online. We'll feature stories, behind the scenes peeks, and general how to’s, as well as not to do’s for all things digital health. My name is Emily Foster, and I'll be your host for the Take it Online podcast. I'm a registered dietitian and I'm also the founder of Glowing Potential. Let's dive in.

Alright, hello everybody and welcome back to the Take it Online podcast. Today I am so pleased to have with me, Madia Rashid. Madia is a chartered physiotherapist in South London. She's been a physiotherapist since 2007 and started off her career, as many of us do in the NHS, and she actually went full time with her company Physio4Me back in 2016. So she's a bit of a veteran to the business healthcare world, and she specialises in women's health, which I know is of interest to a lot of you who are followers on the podcast, and you can find more from Madia at physio4me.com.

So, Madia, welcome to the podcast.

Thank you so much.

Yeah, I was really excited to have Madia with us today, because as you know, I'm a dietician, and we've heard a lot from other dietitians, but not a lot of other ahp’s. So really excited to have Madia here today. And Madia, tell me a little bit about sort of the service offerings you have with Physio4Me and sort of how that all started.

So, um, I was working in the NHS, and I then fell pregnant, I was looking for services around where I moved to, and I just found there was nothing around in the area, and I just felt like there was just a massive hole. And I've always loved classes; I've done it since I was at uni. So I thought I'll look for like a pregnancy class pregnancy ply class, and I just couldn't find anything in my area. So I ended up going to a standard class, and I spent half the session sitting there because it wasn't appropriate for pregnancy. And I've just, the inner style for me was just like, this is so not right, I am pregnant, that does not mean I'm ill and I can't move and I shouldn't be active. So that really kind of hit a spark inside me that I wanted to learn more about the changes, you know, we go through in pregnancy, and then when I realised that connection, I was just like, I need to shout about this to all my peers and all the people that live around me in my community.

So I slowly started running some classes near me in the evenings whilst I was still doing my NHS job, and then when it came to my second pregnancy, I decided that I was just so busy with my private work, and the flexibility that it could possibly offer me, I had to take the leap really and went full time private. So I offered pregnancy and postnatal classes, and I started bringing in my health education of women's health into that. So I, for my interest, I kind of really engaged in my kind of CPD and training and learnt more about the changes our body goes through, and how as women, we are so strong, but we tend not to prioritise ourselves once we have our child. And then, you know, in circumstances, it's understandable but I think it was just kind of changing that mindset of people around me and offering the kind of knowledge and skills I had as a physio to the peers that I was spending all my time with and playgroups and you know, all my meetups.

And no doubt you were getting questions about it anyways. Sorry, go ahead.

I was just gonna say, it's just so annoying and frustrating that that knowledge just wasn't there. Like, you know, every time she’s gone ‘do your pelvic floor, you've had a baby or go and do this’, but nobody really teaches you how to do any of this stuff. Um, so yeah, that really, really hit a spot with me.

Yeah, and it sounds, that's a really familiar story as well isn't it, that sort of business owner entrepreneur story where you sort of look around, you're looking for a service or a product yourself and you find it doesn't exist, or if it does, it's not in the country you want it in. And so yeah, creating sort of that thing that you've experienced yourself that you can't find, I think is a really common story. And also, as you mentioned, the flexibility piece, because, you know, I talk to a lot of AHP’s as well who, you know, maybe, you know, they have kids and they go back to work in the NHS, not necessarily the NHS, but maybe in other sort of employed settings, and that flexibility just isn't there. And they might like the career that they have, or the, you know, the, the therapy that they offer to patients, but they're just, they're just not able to sort of maintain that momentum without the flexibility.

So that's really interesting that you mentioned that and, and the other thing is as well, I went to a telehealth conference last week, it was virtual, but they talked about women's health and there was a couple of products and apps and platforms, by I think it was around five female founders. Some were in the breastfeeding space, others were in monitoring, others were in menopause, and they were saying the question got asked as to you know, what is the biggest thing you do to market your services. And the woman who ran the menopause platform said education. She said that the majority of people come to them through just googling online. What it is that they, you know, that their bodies are going through, because women don't know. And I think that it's shocking that you know, in 2020, still we don't have adequate education on our bodies as women. So yeah, I think what you're doing is is a great service.

I think that is it. It's not like you're leaving your career because you don't enjoy it, and actually, it's almost the opposite. You're so passionate about what you're doing, but you're kind of like you want the everyday common person to know about it. Because with pregnancy and women's health is, until things get really bad ,you don't get to get any kind of input. And sometimes you either don't think you get input and it will make a difference because you're never sold that story, or secondly, you don't feel like you have a problem like say leaking. You think, oh my mom had it, my auntie had it, and nothing can be done about it. And you have no education that actually, it can be different, like it doesn't have to be that way. And so yes, there's a lot of health promotion and education. And then with the whole googling and videos etc, I found is, there's a lot of information out there, it's hard to absorb it all. But also it's hard to filter out what's correct or not, because there's so much, and anybody can write anything they want really. And so I thought that was really important, and different countries have different guidelines as well and different kind of healthcare. Like obviously if you go for somewhere in say Europe, you know, they got their post physio in you know, post birth, they've got all their sessions, different types of postnatal care, compared to what we have here in England. So I think it has to be relatable to our clients really.

Definitely. And so, you know, now that COVID-19 has happened, it's really sort of accelerated the digital space for both private and public health care services. And so for you, I mean, had you started to experiment, had you started to experiment with sort of online offerings or sort of added value pieces? I know, you had done some stuff in the way of a YouTube channel. So talk to me a little bit about sort of what your business looks like, in terms of service offerings or added value, pre COVID-19, and sort of how maybe COVID-19 accelerated or forced you to experiment with some more maybe online or or digital offerings.

Sure. So um, as you touched upon the YouTube, that as I said before, about the information not always being correct, so I started YouTube pre COVID. Just as a way of getting information out which was correct, it was a way of providing a platform to my current clients as a reference point. So if I said, oh, you know, we've gone over a pelvic floor exercises, say, I'll be like, okay, and this is the link for the pelvic floor video, just as a recap, and it just kind of reinforced a message. It offered more compliance, because they had a rough reference point to go back to, instead of kind of having to jot notes, and kind of thinking I better not ask her again, because like, I haven't done my homework. So that's where YouTube originally started from, because I'm not a person who really felt like I was very photogenic or was like, had any real editing skills at all. So I literally just started on my phone and just went with it. And then from there I have had following from obviously people who I don't know, and they really appreciate getting access to that information. So that was my kind of my added value as such.

In terms of my kind of typical diary pre COVID, so I have three children, so I've kind of organised my business around the children, which totally works from a balance point for me. I was running 15 classes a week so that was pilates based, so yeah, busy. For older women, as I had pregnant people come in, they would want me to see their mom’s and their mother in law's, so I had an older women's class as well, as I started seeing more people going into menopause. And yeah, so that was kind of the style of classes I was running throughout the week over three different areas in South London. On top of that, I ran three days of clinics, so these would be one to one, either pilates, or physio based, on kind of pelvic health, so any leakage issues or education side of things, and also physio, so pregnancy aches and pains, postnatal kind of tummy gaps that needed rehab. So that whole women's health physio element and pelvic health element was encompassed in my clinic.

So when COVID hit, I suppose I was aware, a lot of my clients tend to have like a European background, so I have quite a lot of Italian clients. And I suppose they were aware of what their families were going through, and so they were a bit more reluctant to come in person to classes before it was quite a restriction here. And I kind of saw that kind of trend coming through and I'd already in my head thought, you know what, I've got to prepare. So I started researching how I can kind of still provide what I do, on a more virtual kind of platform as such. So what I did prior, so the schools closed two weeks after I went virtual, I started running all my classes through zoom, which at the time I knew nothing about. And it wasn't the most popular platform ever, I'd never heard of it before. It was just what came up through my research of what it could offer in terms of being able to see my clients. Because I knew a lot of platforms like Facebook Live as such, they can see me but my real thing is I want to be able to see who I'm talking to, how they're exercising, that's totally my ethos of small groups, and being able to make sure that people are doing things correctly. And a lot of education is not just about following a class and going away and forgetting about it.

So I then kind of as COVID was hitting, I transferred my classes over to zoom. And also my clinic became virtual clinics via zoom. I’d started looking at booking systems, so it made it as minimal admin as possible because I now then had three kids at home who weren't going to school, and my husband at home, so let's make that four kids.

I think many people share the same sentiment.

And it wasn't even so much of, oh I’ll just work the same hours I used to work before, because that wasn't so much the problem, because the way I designed the business was a lot of my classes were in the evening when the kids had gone to sleep as well, because, that's kind of what my clients are doing the same as well. But the element of the exhaustion of having kids all day long, and doing this, you know, there was a real element of burnout being a potential. So when I refined it down, I brought my classes down to five on 15 classes a week, and I kept my clinics as ad-hoc, so almost as if they were kind of emergency appointments initially, whilst I got my head round juggling the family and work life, and the potential of you know, what if I get ill. You know, I'm getting everybody to commit to me but you know, and how I made that transition really was by asking my clients. Asking if we weren't allowed to meet in person, if I was to offer you a platform where we can both still see each other, would you be interested, and if you were, what would you expect to pay? Because obviously, this has never happened before, there's no one you can market research to compare. Obviously, there's lots of fitness memberships and things like that, but you know, I feel this is this was different, what I offer is different.

So I put that question out there. I made myself vulnerable. I put it out there, didn't know what to expect, but if you don't ask, you just don't know. You know, you can’t assume. To my great surprise, everyone was like, oh my goodness, if we could carry on, that would be the best thing ever. We're happy to pay what we're paying already, we just want to see you, and we just want some normality and some routine into our lives. And I was like, perfect, that's it, that's us done. I would say probably, 85 to 90% of my clients made that transition from that point of view. I was. I am very, very fortunate to have a very loyal client base, and they're very committed to staying fit. So they followed me through, which for me is obviously, I'm very grateful for, because I know a lot of businesses obviously, were affected quite heavily and as a physio, you know, we are very hands on and even now going back to where we can see in person, I still can't touch my clients in the class. So I’m like move that foot and move that leg and I just want to touch them. But that's just me.

So for me it was a very big mental move from physically being with people. And, um, but yeah, so that was the kind of transition. Um, and with the physio obviously, a lot of it went back to education, a lot of self assessments, I was talking them through how to say assess their tummy gap, kind of use words which they would relate to to be able to tell me. So for me, I'd be like, oh, what's the tone in the tummy, I'll be feeling that and writing that. But, you know, tone is not necessarily the right word, because a lot of clients were just ‘my tummy’s just squidgy’. It doesn't matter if it's firm, it will still always be, always too squidgy, because it's not the level they want it to be. So it was kind of finding more verbal cues, to find out the information I needed, instead of all the kind of tactile feedback that I would normally use. As physios we’re so hands on, it was quite a transition.

I find that really interesting. There's three things that I really love that you just said there. The first one, I'm gonna go back to the beginning, you talked about the real potential for burnout with the exhaustion, and I think a lot of people really thought when COVID-19 hit that, hey, it's great, I can work from home I'll have all this time. And actually, you know, burnout is a real thing when it comes to running virtual clinics from home because I think there's this notion that you can fit more in, but you're still one human being right. So I love how you said that. And I love how you know, reduced your classes from 15 to five to really focus on you know, that transition and making sure everybody sort of understood and was able to take advantage of what was going on, ut also without you becoming exhausted. I really admire you for that, because actually, I think a lot of people tried to do more than what they were doing already, in the middle of a pandemic.

Absolutely. Absolutely. And you can't keep that going, you just can’t keep that consistency.

No, definitely. The second thing that you mentioned, which I loved was around that self assess, like teaching your clients and your patients to sort of self assess, but learning the language that they use for their challenges, and trying to or what, what's going on and you trying to explain it in their language, when you have in your head what you would call it in your chart notes. So yeah, I think that's really important, as well, is just, you know, sort of flipping, okay, how can I take this physical service and make it that the client understands what I'm asking them to do, so that I get the feedback I need to make the recommendations that that they're going to see changes with. So that's really great, I think to sort of acknowledge, to reflect back on that and go, this is actually what I had to do in order to change my services to being more virtual.

And the third thing that you mentioned that I want to dig a little bit more into is you mentioned that, you know, 85 to 90% of your clients were happy to go virtual. And I think that's really a testament Madia to how loyal a following you do have that they've continued with you since like, March. I mean, we're not talking like one or two months here. It's now what is it mid September. Tell me a little bit about and I really try to drive home with the AHP’s that I work with, that you don't need a massive audience, you don't need a massive following. You just need a small group of people who really believe in what you do and you really make the time to build those relationships. Tell me a little bit about how you do that in your business. I mean 85 to 90%, that's fantastic, that's really good.

Thank you so much. Um so as I said the groups are, although most people probably join them thinking they're joining an exercise group, a lot of it is about education, it's about relationship with me, it's about relationship with each other in the group and building that kind of accountability with each other and having the element of a social because like, say for example, eight o'clock group everybody's just literally put their kids to bed and ran out the house. You know, everybody's exhausted, you've already got a common feeling there between all the members within that kind of in that group or such. And, you know, there's so much you can learn, so the relationship is with me, but it's also with each other as well. And I tried to maintain that in between the classes as well, so I've set up kind of a whatsapp group for each class.

So I’m kind of in and out of the groups just to kind of see how they're going after the class and just, you know, it just builds that bonding, that accountability, the education element, the reinforcing that, you know, as mums, we do need to take priority over ourselves. And there's not just a one hour in the, you know, however many hours there are a week that you're focusing on yourself. So I think the element of then being in a situation where you are in COVID, you're self isolating, you're not seeing other people, you're not even getting to see family members that you want to, you know, that's quite a shift for all our mental states.

And I think I brought that element of normality, example being with the zoom is that not only could they see me, they can see each other, and they could still have that little chat like they would on a weekly basis in person. And yeah, I still made them work as hard, and this was the funniest thing. They were like, oh my gosh, we thought you'd be like, we'd be able to hide, you wouldn't be able to correct us and you know, and actually, I could see them better. Um, so yeah, there definitely wasn't anywhere to hide. So I would say like the remaining 15 to 10%, so we had about maybe two to three weeks, probably two weeks left before this term was ending, so everybody kind of gave it a go.

And I would say it was that kind of 10% of people that when the new term was due to start, so kind of after the Easter break, they either had fatigued out, because everybody was doing zoom quizzes and everything else, or they realised they either didn't have the technology that made it clear for them to see me etc, or it just wasn't for them. Because they just didn't get when they can talk, or when somebody else can talk, and, you know, it just wasn't right for them. So I kind of, I kept in touch with them, and that's where I used to feed in some of my YouTube videos that I would record, so that they were still getting an element of me, they were still getting familiar exercises to what they had before, and so they weren't completely out of the loop. But for the other like 85 to 90%, most of them kind of totally upped their games.

Most people were subscribing to maybe two classes a week from having one before. And yep, they were all paying the same because that's the feedback that they gave, and it was lovely because I really felt the love back in terms of it's always been a two way relationship with me and my clients, in the sense of, I offer as much as I can, and they are really supportive in terms of, you know, paying, paying on time, the flexibility element of it, or so, you know, they supported me through lock down basically, by staying with me and you know, and financially paying services when the situation might have not been that easy from themselves at home either. And they kept me going, you know, kept me having a bit of normality in my life by being able to talk to them. So, you know, it totally worked.

I think what you're describing there is really community, isn't in the classes. So you really try and, you know, build that sense, well not build that sense…You're building a community with each class that you have, which is clearly evident when COVID-19 hit and they stayed with you and they wanted to keep that community during, you know, what was a really stressful time for a lot of people. Do you think in terms of moving forward, you know, when things with COVID start to settle down a bit, are there elements of this virtual part of your business that you've now sort of built. Will you look to keep that or will you look to go back to more of what you had before COVID, will it be a hybrid, what do you foresee in the upcoming maybe 12 months?

Yes. So I've gone back to running some sessions, in terms of classes in August. In terms of clinics, physios were one of the kind of first professions, as coming under medical, I could go back to seeing people in person, so I've been seeing clients in person since July now. I would say clinic wise, pretty much everybody wants to be seen in person. There's a lot of physios that are only kind of online still and for me, most of the clients that come to me is because they want hands on, which is fine. And in terms of kind of groups, I've kept a kind of almost hybrid, of offering live zoom during the live class. So I've got the class running in person, I've got zoom running for those that potentially are still self isolating, who are high risk, who just are running late and they just can't leave the house. So it's opened that eye up of offering an extra element to what I was offering before, so they definitely go hand in hand.

Whilst I was doing this in COVID, I actually built up a library of all my talks or my videos, I produced almost a membership group I would say, of all the virtual information. Now obviously, that's of high value, and that is something I will be continuing, of offering an online membership, because it reached people that couldn't make the time, who didn’t live in my area, who heard about me from their friends and family that live near me, but they're far away, and they were like, no, we only want to see you because you trust our family, and they recommended you highly, only one day. And I'm like, I cannot travel to East London to see you.

So it has opened and is opening more and more opportunities to me in that sense of offering online clinics because I know they can work, I know they have value. And I think this was the thing of initially, as a physio, being so hands on, you're like, oh, no, I must charge less, I'm not going to be offering the same level of service, etc, etc, etc. And I think that was a mindset within ourselves of how we value our skills and our expertise. And I think that has completely shifted now for me, and I think there is so much we can offer even if it's an interim before they can find someone more local to them or you know, whatever it means but yeah I definitely think there is a lot of potential online for our client groups on and to spread that health promotion message that you know we want to promote in our personal businesses or our personal ambition to get out there really.

I love that, some really great thoughts there Madia. Guys, I was saying to Madia earlier, because my name is Emily Foster, I mean it's a pretty like, you know run of the mill name, so gosh, you move beyond Sarah and I'm done for. Just because I'm conscious of your time and you know, sort of wrapping up for other sort of therapists, or people offering more of a physical service like physio, what are your top tips to either adding value or taking some of their services online?

Sure, I think there’s loads of potential, as I said, don't be afraid of it. As I said, my Youtube channel started with me, never even taking pictures of myself, let alone sit in front of a camera. So I think my top tips are, don't take yourself too seriously. Like, if you don't want to watch what you've recorded, don’t. You don't have to torture yourself to that point. Be creative, let your personality shine, you've obviously got the talent and the knowledge and that is of high value to our target market, our clients, you know, and you're kind of doing them a disservice by not sharing that with them. I would say secondly, invest in very simple equipment, like I literally do editing on my phone. I've just got a simple iPhone, I've got a tripod., and that's literally all I've needed. So just kind of focusing on your microphone, I would probably say would be the biggest investment you kind of need to make.

So equipment and yeah, valuing yourself and be creative, you know, don't feel you have to do things in a certain way, there isn't really a right or wrong way. And as you can see, with my kind of journey over these last six months, I've asked my clients what they want to see. And I've kind of just provided that in a space that is user friendly for them and is accessible to them. You know, zoom is like, what, 14 pounds a month, that's, you know, less than I pay rent. So it's not an expensive way of, reaching, and of serving your clients really.

Fantastic, Madia, honestly, some really, you know, thank you so much for sharing some of your insights with us today. I really found it interesting. I'm sure that a lot of the other listeners who maybe and, again, offer more sort of physical therapies and are looking to sort of add value and take their services online. So thank you so very much for being with me today.

Absolute pleasure to share it with you.

Well, thank you and you can find more from Madia at Physio4Me.com or follow her on Instagram at physio4meUK. Madia, thank you so much, and have a great week.

Thank you so much. Thank you. Bye.

Thanks so much for listening to the Take it Online podcast. If you want to know more about building out your own digital health programme, you can find us at www.glowingpotential.com. If you liked this episode or other episodes like it, please click subscribe and leave us a rating. It means a lot. Thank you.

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S2, E3. Taking Physio (and other physical therapies) online w Special Guest Madia Rashidhttps://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/taking-plysio-online-with-madia-rashidS2, E2. A Simple Way to Build an Audience Online as a Healthcare Professional in BusinessHealthcare ProfessionalsDigital HealthEmily FosterMon, 14 Sep 2020 12:12:46 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/JKvYgj8Z-N0/simple-ways-to-build-an-audience59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5f5ad5710ef3986a9d925e3f

One thing I think we can all agree on is that in order to sell your products and services - you need people who would be interested in buying them to know that you exist. 

As a healthcare professional you may feel that this just isn’t your skillset - “building an audience” sounds like a marketers job - not yours! Well, I’m here to tell you that you’re exactly the right person for the job. You help people all the time, creating trust and (hardest of all) behaviour change.
You see, the key to building an online audience is something we can all do and we can do it through consistency. Consistent content creation on a key platform of your choice will help more people to know, like and trust you. Choosing one platform will also help you focus your time and effort on building the relationships that matter. 

What we cover in this episode: 

  • The “4 C’s” of consistent content creation and building an audience: 

    • Create 

    • Curate 

    • Collaborate 

    • Connect 

PLUS one extra nugget of info you should definitely consider.

As mentioned in the episode, if you loved this weeks content and want to learn more about ways you can easily and effectively take your health business online you can download our Take it Online Playbook #2: A Simple Way to Build an Audience Online as a Healthcare Professional in Business at www.glowingpotential.com/tiop.


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Season 2, Episode 2 Transcript

Take it Online with Emily Foster - A Simple Way to Build an Audience Online as a Healthcare Professional in Business

Welcome to the Take it Online podcast. Take it Online is all about simple, effective ways to help you take your health and wellness content, well, online. We'll feature stories, behind the scenes peeks and general how tos, as well as not to dos, for all thing’s digital health. My name is Emily Foster, and I'll be your host for the Take an Online podcast. I'm a registered dietitian and I'm also the founder of Glowing Potential. Let's dive in.

Hi there and welcome back to the Take it Online podcast. Welcome back, season two, episode two, how very exciting. My name is Emily Foster and I'll be your host for today and most days, and today we're talking about a simple audience building strategy for health care professionals who want to take their practice or business online, which if you're listening to this podcast is probably you. So stay tuned, we have four different things for you that you need to be thinking about, as well as sort of an added bonus that I'm going to throw in towards the end because I think it's something that people often overlook when it comes to building an audience. So, if that sounds of interest to you, a simple audience building strategy for healthcare professionals. Let's get started.

Let's start off by saying that there's no one right way to build an audience, right. I think most of us if you have a look online, people have gone about it a ton of different ways. They've used various platforms, maybe they've been on several social media platforms, maybe they've been on one. Maybe they had a really successful blog, but I think regardless, podcasts like I'm doing now, regardless of what other healthcare professionals or wellness businesses have done, if you look around, the ones that are successful, it doesn't really have to do necessarily with the platform that they have chosen, or if they've done more video content or more posts. The one thing that I think you'll agree with me on that makes an audience building strategy successful is consistency. And that is a dreaded word for any small business owner, because you are busy and it is hard to be consistent.

But the one thing that I want you to take away from this podcast today is regardless of what you do when it comes to trying to build your audience, you need to be consistent in order to see results. And what do I mean by results? Results, I mean people, more people who are beginning to know, like, and trust you, and people begin to know like and trust you when they see content from you often. And so the only way to do that is to be consistent. That's how people get to know you. That's how people get to like you. And that's how people get to trust you, and ultimately purchase your products or your services. So the simple strategy I'm going to talk to you about today, and again, you know, there are more than one ways to cut a cake, you might listen to this episode, and you might think this isn't for me, I've heard something else, I want to try that and that is absolutely fine. But I'm going to give you an idea today that hopefully you can take some bits and bobs from and implement to build a successful audience building strategy.

Okay. When I say audience, what do I mean by audience? I just mean more potential clients, potential patients that know who you are. Your audience, and this is something actually to take into consideration. A lot of healthcare professionals will start a social media account or a blog or a podcast or whatever form of content, and they will build an audience that is of other healthcare professionals. So you'll see the number going up on their followers, but when you look to see who's actually following them, you might notice that it's not people you don't know, it's other people in your industry. And that's great if you're trying to sell to other people in your industry. If you are not, those audience members, those followers, they're not going to buy from you.

So just because you have a massive following, whether it's you know, people subscribing to hear from your blog, people, subscribing to your podcast, people on your Instagram account, whatever, it doesn't matter how many people you have on there, it matters that the people you have, that audience you're building, are actually people who are interested in hearing from you and are potentially interested at some point down the line purchasing some of your products or services. If they're not, why are you doing it? It's not a feel good thing guys. Who cares if you have 3000, 10,000, a billion followers. If some of those people aren't interested in buying from you, why do you care? It doesn't matter. So you have to be specific when you are trying to create an audience.

In our case, we’re talking about people who want to purchase your products or your services. You want to create content that will resonate with that audience, not like-minded peers. That's great, if that's what, you know, a lot of people use their Twitter accounts as an example to connect with other healthcare professionals, but that's not going to help you bring in more clients and patients. So you need to think about what audience you're actually trying to build and then create content that's specific for them. So when I talk about audience, that's what I'm talking about, our potential patients and clients. We're not just talking about follower numbers or subscriber numbers, we’re talking about people who are interested in your products and services. Maybe not now, but at some point.

This podcast episode is brought to you by the Take it Online playbook series. This season, we have six playbooks that will accompany six lovely podcasts, allowing you to help take what you've listened to in the podcast and put it into action in your own business. Sound great? You can find out more at www.glowingpotential.com/tiop.

Fantastic. So we've defined what an audience is in relation to this podcast episode. And we've talked about how there are many different ways to cut a cake, meaning that there are lots of different platforms you can choose to build your audience that's going to be interested in your products or services. Okay, it doesn't matter what platform you choose, as long as the platform, and I say platform, it could be social media, could be blog, could be podcast, could be YouTube, whatever. Just as long as your ideal patients and clients are on those platforms, which if you’re choosing a major one, they probably are. And the reason why I suggest focusing on one platform, you might hear that called a ‘hero platform’ is because I'm a really big advocate of being live on social media. People are on social media, to be social. So you need to be able to carve out time to interact to comment on other people's stuff, to respond to your stuff. And that's really difficult to do as one person, if you're across a bunch of different platforms.

So in my opinion, I think it's a better use of your time to choose one place and be there consistently, show up and be sort of helpful to your patients and your clients, as opposed to being spread all over the place in hopes that you will have more eyes on your content that way. I think you'd agree that you'd rather create a better experience, than more experience. So part of the quality over quantity is what we're going for here.

All right, let's talk about building an audience. So how do you create an audience? Well, we talked about being consistent. So how do you be consistent, I have four C's for you today and the first one is an obvious one. It is create, and the first ‘C’ create is for you to create some original content, stay away from stock imagery. It doesn't have to be a perfect photo or video clip, just show up and on a regular basis, create something original, okay. And ideally, this is something that shares your expertise. It's great to show people a behind the scenes piece, but you want people to ultimately follow you because they're interested in your products and your services and their potential clients and patients. So in order for you to start to build that audience that's interested, you need to start putting content out there that shares your expertise.

So create original content consistently. And a great way to do that, and the similar way to do the other series that we're going to talk about is sit down and create original content either once a week or once a month or once a quarter. And these are things that can go out on a regular basis. So you're not stressing, especially if your business is your only source of income. Sometimes we pick up bigger contracts, we have more clients, and we feel like we've got to make hay when the sun shines. And so it's really difficult when that happens to be consistent with content. So prepare for that in advance and batch your content ahead of time, it makes it way easier. So the first ‘C’ to being consistent, is create original content. And you can do that by by batch content making or just setting aside a certain amount of time each week to do a video or create some posts that are original to you. They don't have to be perfect, but remember, we want people to start to know, like and trust you. The best way for them to do that is to see you as a healthcare profession and see your original content and what you stand for and what your expertise is.

The second ‘C’ I have for you today is collaborate. So a way that you can create consistent content on a platform, i.e. building your audience faster, is to collaborate with others. So it could be other health clinics, it could be healthcare professionals, it could be brands. For those of you who have a slightly bigger following, you might be interested in partnering with brands that have the same values as you. Of course, you want to check in with HCPC for updated guidelines, or if you have particular membership guidelines that you need to follow as well when it comes to working with brands. But collaborating with others that have the same values as you is a great way to build your audience quickly. Okay, so this could be other healthcare professionals that have complementary services to yours, so great examples could be an occupational therapist and a physiotherapist, it could be a physiotherapist and a dietitian. Whatever that looks like, whatever healthcare profession you are in, there's always another professional that's probably got a small business that would love to work with you and partner up to do something great.

And that something great, doesn't have to be massive, it could be something as simple as you do a post swap for each other. And what's great about that is that you both get to tap into each other's audiences. Alright, so if you're just starting out, this can be a little bit difficult because if you don't have a larger, not a larger audience, but if you don't have a growing audience yet, this can be difficult to do, so it might be a little bit further down the line for you, but there's no harm to reach out. There's always value that can be created with other healthcare professionals on your platform. So it's a great way to meet people, and it's a great way to tap into each other's audiences and maybe if you click, there's some potential sort of products and services that could come out of that as well. But collaborating with others is a great way to be consistent and grow your audience.

The third ‘C’ I have for you is to curate, just a fancy word for share, sharing other people's content. The one warning I would give with this, that a lot of people don't do, that can get you into hot water, is before you share something, just double check that the people that you're sharing it from, whether it's just an image that you found that you liked from somebody else's Instagram account, or whether you're, you know, re-tweeting. Whatever that looks like for you, just double check that person's account before you share something from them. When you share something, whether you like it or not, you're sort of endorsing it, and so you just want to make sure that you're sharing something that aligns with your brand values.

As an example, that's just a fancy way of saying, you know, they're on the same page as you, i.e. you wouldn't want to share something and then find out a week later that on that person's account, three posts before the one you shared, they shared something that was completely non evidence based. And then you think, oh, gosh, I got to take that down, but people really liked it. So just avoid those situations altogether, definitely share other people's content, but just suss them out a little bit before you share the content, just to make sure you don't put yourself in a situation that you don't want to be in. But sharing other people's content is fantastic. Of course, always make sure that you give references, make sure if it's photography, that you're getting permission from people, and it's going to vary from platform to platform, but it's a great way to be consistent with content without constantly having to create your own.

The last ‘C’ that I want to talk to you about today is connect, a little bit different than collaborate, because connect is more finding where your ideal patients and clients are. So maybe they're a part of certain groups, maybe they're a part of, you know, certain charities they're interested in or they're following. So it's really about thinking where your audience is, and then trying to make connections with those groups to create content, whether it's with them or whether it's with them in mind. So as an example, it could be something like you connect with a local food bank, or you connect with a local sort of activity charity, and you work with them to create out content or you promote their, if you have a bit of a smaller following, it might be something like you promote some of the events they're running in your area, and you write posts around them, but you know that your ideal audience, your ideal patients and clients are following and getting involved in their content in their sort of local groups or groups online, and so you want to be present in those. So connecting.

Another great example of this, and it's going to depend on the platform that you're on. But connecting is also about participating in the content that other people are sharing. So if you know that your clients and your potential patients are on a particular Facebook forum, if they follow a certain YouTube channel, that's a great opportunity for you to kind of get in there and become a known member or known person in some of those spaces. And it's not all about promote, promote, promote, you want to be helpful. You just want to start to build the awareness that hey, you know what you're talking about, you're here, you're ready, if people want to ask you questions, you're good to go. So connecting, finding those spots where your ideal clients, where your ideal patients, are online, related to the platform that you're on, and getting involved in those conversations and  really connecting with people and those organisations that you're, you know, potential clients and patients are in.

Right, let's review here. So how do you create? How do you build an audience? Building an audience, we talked about being consistent being the really big key. So how do you build an audience with consistent content? Well, one, you need to create original content, okay, people need to know like and trust you, and the best way to do that is to share your expertise in the way that you want to share it. So creating original content can be made easier by batching your content, so sitting down ahead of time and putting your creative hat on. Number two is collaborating, so we talked about collaborating with other people clinics or healthcare professionals to create stellar content and meet other people in your industry.

Number three was curate. So this is sharing other people's content just with the red flag there, or just with the head nod to say check out anyone's account before you share it on your own, especially as a healthcare professional, you want to make sure you are only sharing the best of the best, because you are the best. So make sure you share the best. And the last one is to connect with groups that you know your ideal clients and patients are getting involved in. And this could be on forums, participating in that, it could be linking up to share content from different charities and things.

I'm going to end the episode today and talk about that fifth nugget that I said I was going to drop in towards the end of the podcast episode that I thought that you needed to know about. This fifth nugget is, regardless of whatever platform you are on, those relationships with those clients, you do not own. So if Instagram as an example, one day changes their algorithm, or they decide like they did with Facebook a while ago that business accounts or business pages weren't going to be as easy to push out to people anymore, so you needed to kind of pay to get those out there. If a platform decides to do, that big audience that you have built, you might be now forced to pay to get them to see that content. And that makes it really difficult, especially if you've put all your eggs in one basket and built out an audience on a particular platform.

Now, you might think, well, Emily, you've just told me to go out and build an audience on a particular platform, and you're right, I have, because from a realistic perspective, it is really difficult to be in five places, even two places at once. And so I do advocate for people to spend more time on one platform and make that sort of their egg, if you will, than trying to spread yourself too thin over several. But what I would say, the big suggestion that I have is when you are building those relationships on those platforms, is to have a backup. And I think the best backup that you can really still offer to this day is an email list.

Now you don't need to get fancy, you don't need to be sending out an email every week if that's too much for you. You could be sending out something quarterly. But what I would do is try and direct those relationships, once you've started to build them on whatever platform you have, to an email list, and the reason this is, is because you own that email list. No one can take that away from you, unless someone revokes their email from you, which is different right, because of data privacy and protection. But you own that email list. And that is very, very valuable, because that means that you own those relationships with those potential clients, those potential patients.

On Instagram, on Facebook, on Twitter, it is much more difficult and you are totally at the whim of the algorithm. If one day Twitter decides that it only wants to show your tweet to three people unless you pay 100 bucks, guess what, they can do that. So that audience that you build, it doesn't necessarily mean that it's secure for forever. And like I said before, we saw those changes with Facebook not that long ago. And so when you're building out on any platform, social media platforms are still great for awareness, you still want to be on them, you want to build those audience members, but what I would suggest to you, is try and funnel those people into an email list. And it could be something like you know, the incentive to that is maybe you get on once a month and you do a live Q&A over Zoom, or you send out a quarterly newsletter or whatever that looks like for you and your business. But I would really recommend that, get on, you know, a platform be consistent, but what I would really advise you to do is to try and also have some way that you can collect email addresses as well, because ultimately, that is the link between you and that potential client, that potential patient, and if for whatever reason, that particular platform changes, you don't have any control over that.

So that's not something to scare you. That's not to say not to be on these platforms. Obviously, it's a good business move, it's free to be on these platforms. But you do need to really, really think about those relationships and how do you kind of collect them so that when you maybe launch a new product or a new service, you have a direct line to those relationships and there's no hurdles you have to jump over, like paid ads, etc, etc, to reach that potential client. So just something to think about. And other than that, good luck.

If you have any questions, you can drop me an email at info@glowingpotential.com and we do have a playbook. This is our second out of the six playbooks that we'll be having in the season this autumn. And this playbook is all about what we talked about today, so the four C's, creating original content, curating, collaborating and connecting, and some ideas on how to do that effectively. Alright, for the PDF, you can go to www.glowingpotential.com/tiop and for those of you who bought the first one, thank you very much. This is a great follow on to that. Our first playbook was all around seven ideas for online offerings for healthcare, businesses and practices. So if that's of interest to you, this is a great sort of follow up one to that to build out an audience that would be interested in those online offerings.

Without further ado, I will leave you there, thank you very much for listening to the Take it Online podcast. If you liked it, please press subscribe, and otherwise I will see you next week. Thanks so much for listening.

Thanks so much for listening to the Take it Online podcast. If you want to know more about building out your own digital health programme, you can find us at www.glowingpotential.com. If you liked this episode or other episodes like it, please click subscribe and leave us a rating. It means a lot. Thank you.

S2, E2. A Simple Way to Build an Audience Online as a Healthcare Professional in Businesshttps://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/simple-ways-to-build-an-audienceS2, E1. 7 Easy, Effective and Budget-conscious Online Offerings for Your Healthcare PracticeHealthcare ProfessionalsDigital HealthEmily FosterMon, 07 Sep 2020 09:40:47 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/HCFrVcNl1PE/7-online-offerings-for-your-healthcare-practice59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5f55aab87d0bb54905a8eaf1

This week on the Take it Online podcast marks the beginning of season two, with episode one covering seven ways you can (easily and budget-consciously) share your health expertise online. These are simple, builder-friendly offerings that keep your patients and clients at the heart of your business whilst keeping in mind your limited time as a business owner.

Some examples we cover in more detail in the episode include: 

  • No. 3: Quizzes 

  • No. 2: E-courses 

  • No. 5: Exploring Audio

As mentioned in the episode, if you loved this weeks content and want to learn more about ways you can easily and effectively take your health business online you can download our Take it Online Playbook #1: 7 Easy, Effective and Budget-conscious Online Offerings for Your Healthcare Practice at www.glowingpotential.com/tiop .


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Season 2, Episode 1 Transcript

Take it Online with Emily Foster - 7 Easy, Effective and Budget-conscious Online Offerings for your Healthcare Practice

Welcome to the Take it Online podcast. Take it Online is all about simple, effective ways to help you take your health and wellness content well, online. We'll feature stories, behind the scenes peeks and general how to’s, as well as not to do’s for all things digital health. My name is Emily Foster, and I'll be your host for the Take it Online podcast. I'm a registered dietitian and I'm also the founder of Glowing Potential. Let's dive in.

Hi there. Welcome back to another episode of the Take it Online podcast, as always, I'm very excited to be here with you today to launch episode one of season two. I hope that you enjoyed season one, and I hope that you got a lot out of it. Season two has got a bit of a different vibe to it. We're going to take what we talked about in the podcast, and for those of you who are interested, who feel like you want more information for it to help build out your online offerings, there will be playbooks associated with six out of the 12 podcast episodes we're going to be doing this season.

Our episode today is all around seven online offerings specific for healthcare professionals that you can build, and so starting off with a really simple one, we're going to walk through seven offerings that you can build and yes, there is a playbook that will go with this. It will give you software, it will give you ideas on how to execute these ideas, and we're not talking anything huge here, just two sides of A4, but super practical, if any of these are of interest to you. So we're going to get started, it’s so nice to be back, thanks for joining me. If you have a friend that might be interested in this episode, maybe they're just jumping into the online world as a healthcare professional, whether it's a side gig, side hustle, or whether they've just launched into private practice full time; this is a great episode to start off with when it comes to brainstorming some ideas for your healthcare business, that doesn't involve your time every time you help a client.

So without further ado, let's jump in, seven health specific online offerings that you can build out to help serve more patients, more clients. Let's get started. Great, so let's talk about the first one. The first one is super simple, super easy. If you're new to the online space, you want to take your expertise, you want to help more people, whether that's as a download on your website, not all of these you have to charge for. So what we're going to be talking about today, some of these ideas, you know, you might not want to charge for them, or you might have patients that have already paid to come and see you, clients that have already paid to come and see you, and you just want to give them some added value stuff, you know, improve your service, all that good stuff.

So the first one, we're going to start with today, are goal sheets that are specific to your practice for your patience. So as an example, you could build this out in a PDF format, you could build them out on something like jot form; so Google Docs, or Google Forms, something where it's basically like an accountability template. So maybe you have people that are on a package with you, and you want to make sure that they check in every once in a while, and maybe you're not even monitoring that sort of form that often, but it helps your patients or your clients stay sort of accountable. So that's one thing, so accountability is huge, people pay for accountability all the time. Think of business coaches or business mentors and the amount that you can pay on that. So your health practice, whether it's, you know, public or private, creating something that helps people stay accountable, and helps them stay connected with you can be super helpful.

So don't underestimate the goal sheets; it could just be something really simple like a branded PDF, and if you want to know more about how to create something like that, that's going to be in the playbook, but a really great software to kind of start with that I talk about all the time is Canva. So if you're not familiar with Canva, have a look at that. And again, there's more on that in the playbook.

So, number one, our goal sheets or accountability sheets that are specific to your patience or practice. You can brand them, you can jazz them up, but most importantly, just make them super simple and easy for people to fill out. Nothing big, nothing complicated, but a really great introduction to sort of that online offering for your patients or your clients.

Number two, if you haven't thought of this before, this is a really nice, easy one, anyone who's using an email software already, it will have the ability to do this. MailChimp, ConvertKit; again, we'll talk about that more in the playbook if those specifics are important to you. But an e-course is something, basically what it sounds, it's a series of set emails. We call that an automation, something that someone signs up for, and it automatically goes out. We're not creating a ‘make work’ project here, I don't want you individually sending out emails, even if you're just copying and pasting them; please jump on an email software, most of them you start off free. So an e-course, super simple, maybe it's, you know, a three week course, they get an email once a week, or maybe every day for a week, whatever that looks like for you. But it's basically just little bits of information, usually practical things that people can implement easily into their lives. And often e-courses on their own aren't really paid for items, but they might be like a ramp up for a bigger product or a bigger launch that you're doing.

And the great thing that I like about this particular episode, but about these online offerings in general is that they don't have to be in isolation of what you're running physically, with patients or clients. So what I mean by that is that you can have a really great in person practice and also offer some killer online stuff that helps bring more people back to you or, or new clients into your practice on a day to day basis, so don't feel like you either have to be 100% online, or 100% in person.

And some of you might be like, ‘okay, Emily, I've got that, I get that’, but a lot of people don't. So, you know, you can have some great added value online pieces that help ramp up the stuff you do face to face with your clients or your patients. So an e-course is a great way to do that. Maybe to support clients, maybe those of you who offer packages, so maybe you offer an initial consultation with a set number of follow ups. In between those follow ups, if you don't have the capacity to offer something like checking calls or, you know, chat groups or office hours or something like that, if you're not offering that, which that's not for everybody, then offering something like an email automation to help people feel supported. It's still coming from you, it's still coming from your email, it's just something that you've taken a little time to set up ahead of time. So it's still your content. It's still your tone of voice. But it's something that it's not taking your time in between every single follow up for every single client.

So I hope that makes sense; e-courses can be great again, for launch build ups, they can be great for lead magnets as well. But it's something if you have email software already like MailChimp, ConvertKit, set something like that up. They're super simple, they're super easy, and it really doesn't take a lot of your time and can deliver great added value for your clients or patients.

Number three, though, I absolutely love, are quizzes. People love a good quiz. I mean, how many of us have taken those quizzes? You know, what type of animal are you? What's your spirit animal? What's your, know you're like ‘well, you're a freak, I'm not taking what's my spirit animal quiz’, you get the idea. People love quizzes, whether they're fun and silly, whether they're serious and maybe more on the helpful side of things; you can have these in your practice. And they can be really great tools to get people's email for your email list and you feel like you've given back a bit because people are getting advice. I really think quizzes were sort of the first form of personalised offerings that you could give, because people felt like, ‘oh, I answered these questions, and then I get this outcome that's tailored to me’. In a really basic format, it allows you to provide some more tailored advice.

One takeaway here, make sure you have some kind of disclaimer, if you're going the more series helpful route for the quiz for your site or for your patients and clients. Just you know, obviously saying that the advice that's given through this quiz is different than it would be in a consultation, so if you need more tailored advice, to reach out to me. But also, that can be a great prompt for people maybe to book a discovery call with you. Lots of great opportunities. So there's lots of sort of platforms out there that allow you to do this. Some of them ranging from free to paid for; we're going to give some options in the playbook. You probably know of some already, but quizzes are great. They are lots of fun for people to take, they're a great lead magnet, but they also can be a great way for you to provide some more specific advice based on the challenges that people are having.

Number four, a bit more of a time intensive one, but definitely worth it, especially if you work with multiple sort of coaching clients, or you work with a lot of clients that have several follow ups with you is the ‘office hours’. I call that in quotes, as most of you in university would have had profs that would have done office hours, and basically it's just a really great way to you know, connect with those clients that maybe can't afford a higher price package with you, but you still want to offer a great level of care, and you can do that through group office hours.

So you could do one to one office hours, that’s obviously trickier to manage, so you might give people sort of five to 10 minutes slots, but oftentimes people will go over that. So I can really recommend here that group opportunities for this are a bit easier to manage in terms of time, but office hours, whether it's video, so using something like Zoom, or Skype, or using a chat function, so WhatsApp for business, there are other apps that you can use, depending on what nutrition or health software's that you're using.

There are a couple different platforms that allow group chat now, and so if that is something that if you deal with a lot of one to one clients, and they're not going to be able to pay to see you more frequently, but they want that higher touch product that the group office hour solution, whether it's a chat group, or whether it's a sort of Zoom group, whatever you use for your video conferencing can be a really great way just to touch base with people.

And also sending out the recordings afterwards, if that is of interest to you, because what that can do is that can answer questions that other clients might have that might not have been able to make the session or had forgotten to ask live during your office hours. So really easy to fit into your schedule. If you're somebody who likes making sure your patients or your clients have that high touch value with you, then that's a great way to offer that without taking up hours and hours of your important, limited time.

Number five is the loved e-book. Everybody loves an e-book. Maybe you're like ‘no Emily, I hate e-books to be truthful’. I’m not a huge fan of e-books, because I don't like reading I much prefer podcasts and audiobooks. However, there are some of your clients that are going to love just being able to read something. So e-books are great way to go, a really fancy way of just saying a longer worksheet or PDF. It's a great resource, and number, I'm not going to really go over e-book too much. I think that's something that's easy for people to create, most people are quite familiar with it. We'll touch on it a little bit in the playbook, but an e-book is a great opportunity for you to take some material that you probably have written, whether it's old blog posts or old emails you've written and make them into a sort of a larger book type format.

The number six that I wanted to roll off of that, that's a great option, is an audio file. So whether that's a guided meditation, whether that's exercises, audio files are a great added value, and they're a great upsell item as well. So as an example, maybe you sell the e-book, and then you have, you know, for an extra nine pounds, you can get the audio file as well. I’m just throwing nine pounds out there as a general thing to use, but audio files are a great option, or a great upsell.

They are easy for people to listen to on their commute, or if they're busy doing something around the house, it's a great way to reach your clients. So if you have an e-book, what I really encourage you to do is as an addition, or an added value, or an upsell to that e-book, or that written information you already have, that you offer that in an audio format, because you'll cover more people. More people are likely to read the content that you have, if you have it widely available in more formats. Don't overlook the content you already have. You might already have a lot of stuff written. So it's a great opportunity to put that together into an e-book and then potentially take pieces of that and use audio as an opportunity to upsell or just add value to your current clients and patients.

All right, the last one and possibly the most obvious, maybe the one you thought I was going to lead with. But obviously online courses are a hot topic right now, and they don't have to be huge giant things in order to be successful and helpful and effective. So online offerings could be, sorry, online courses could be anything on, you know, you could launch it on Teachable, you could launch it on Thinkific, you could launch it on Kajabi. And there are so many different budgets as well for these different online course platforms, but a lot of them have a free tier; so, I encourage you to use that if it's a new offering that you're launching, and really consider if something massive is the best thing to launch with.

Bite sized information, people are good with and also thinking about, you know, just because you want to launch an online course, doesn't mean you necessarily need an online course platform, it might be something that you know, you want to trial something with a secure Dropbox download, or, you know, you set something up. Squarespace as an example has a digital download section. It really doesn't have to be overly complicated. An online course could be a package of software's you already use to deliver it, i.e. maybe Zoom and MailChimp. Certainly, we've done a lot of stuff like that with Glowing Potential before moving to a larger platform for the clients that we're working with.

So online courses sound big and scary, they absolutely don't have to be and in fact, I encourage you to think about smaller opportunities of content that you could roll out in an online course format for your current patients and clients so you can begin to get feedback on things to then maybe roll out something bigger in the future. That might be different for you depending on what stage you're at in business, but an online course is definitely something to think about. And again, like I said at the beginning, it might not be something that you're charging for, it might be a lead magnet, it might be an added value for the patients and clients you already have.

But don't think you have to spend a tonne of cashola on the online course bit, because there are lots of tools that you can use that keep it relatively low budget for you and can allow you to test out if that works for your clients and your patients and for you, because ultimately it's you that's going to be building this out.

Fantastic, so we've gone over seven health specific online offerings that you can build with your expertise that are super simple to build out. We talked about goal sheets or something that allows people to remain accountable. We talked about e-books, we talked about e-courses, we talked about quizzes, everybody loves a good quiz. We talked about audio files as a great upsell, or taking something that you already have and making that available for customers who prefer to listen to things as opposed to read them. We talked about office hours, so a bit more of your time, but offering that in either a chat or a video set up using whatever software that you already use. You don't need to overcomplicate it. And then the last one, of course, that we talked about were online courses, not making it overly complicated, keeping them small at first, testing them out, testing out that software as well, and then rolling out a bigger option of that, if that is of interest to you.

So, we talked about a lot of stuff today. I just want to recap that all of these tips as well as software's and platforms to build these out and top tips will be in our very first Take it Online playbook. You can find out more on the playbooks at www.glowingpotential.com/tiop, that's Take It Online Playbook. We've made these super accessible, they're short, they're practical, and they're only £9.99. So that's www.glowingpotential.com/tiop, and the playbooks are all going to be available for £9.99. So there'll be six playbooks at the end of this series, and this particular season is a lot of fun, because we've already done a lot of the pre recordings for things.

Our next episode is really practical, because we talk about how to build your audience so you can bring more people in to these online offerings. So I hope to see you again next time, I hope that you grab the playbook. If you have any questions, you can drop us an email at info@glowingpotential.com. Other than that, as always, I wish you all the very best and thank you so much for listening. We'll see you again next time.

Thanks so much for listening to the Take it Online podcast. If you want to know more about building out your own digital health programme, you can find us at www.glowingpotential.com. If you liked this episode or other episodes like it, please click subscribe and leave us a rating. It means a lot. Thank you.

S2, E1. 7 Easy, Effective and Budget-conscious Online Offerings for Your Healthcare Practicehttps://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/7-online-offerings-for-your-healthcare-practice012. How to Choose the Right Digital Tool to Offer Your Online Health Offering in Three Simple StepsHealthcare ProfessionalsDigital HealthEmily FosterMon, 06 Jul 2020 17:02:30 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/NakHpwGGnEA/choose-the-right-digital-tool59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5f0353c1b701b617926d5cef

It’s so easy to overcomplicate an online offering for our business. How many course-building tools have you read about? Schedulers? Apps? Platforms? It’s a bit of a minefield - especially if you have shiny object syndrome. I definitely do. 

So how do you make sure you get the right tool for the job? Join Emily from Glowing Potential as she brings you through three easy steps to choose the right tool for the job!

As discussed in this episode:

  • Ask yourself; what do I need this tool to have to deliver this offering?

  • Ask your patients and customers; what do they value

  • When comparing different tools available to you ask yourself - what are the nicest, nice to have’s? 


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Episode 12 Transcript

Take it Online with Emily Foster - Choosing the right digital tool in three easy steps.

Welcome to the take it online podcast. Take it online is all about simple, effective ways to help you take your health and wellness content well, online. We'll feature stories behind the scenes peaks, and general how-to use as well as not to do-s for all things digital health. My name is Emily Foster, and I'll be your host for the taken online podcast. I'm a registered dietitian and I'm also the founder of glowing potential. Let's dive in.

Hi there and welcome back to another episode of The take it online podcast. I'm really looking forward to today's episode because it's something that I really struggle with shiny object syndrome. What we're going to be looking at today is choosing the tools to build out your online health offering, as opposed to trying to make the offering fit the tools that you really want to use. So we're going to talk about that today. If you're a health or Wellness Business, healthcare professional with your own practice, this will definitely resonate. And there'll be some great top tips in here. So hopefully you stick around, let's dive in.

I think it's pretty safe to say that a lot of us as healthcare professionals, or as business owners in the health and wellness industry, that we like to play around with the newest tool on the market, I think that's pretty common for business owners, if you don't fit into that category, that's okay. The skin kind of be grouped in with the product overwhelmed category as well, ie you see that there's so many tools out there, but you just don't know what to use. And so you end up trying to use a whole bunch and then it ends up getting really confusing. So I wanted to make today's episode because I recently had an experience where it was very, very easy to choose a more advanced tool than what was needed to build out the offering. And we ended up going with the tool that was the more basic tool to build out an online offering and it ended up definitely being the best way to go. I'm going to share that with you today.

I want you to stop and think about maybe a time that you saw a product that looked really neat, whether it was a scheduling platform, or a an electronic healthcare records, software or telehealth software, or even just something that was supposed to help make your business maybe provide something online. And it looked really funky. It looked really flashy, you know, had all the bells and whistles, and you decided to roll something out on it. And it flopped. Have you ever done that? Have you ever tried something whether it's like a trial version of a product or something that you thought was going to work really, really well and it popped up and so you jumped on it and then you started using it. And then it just didn't work the way you wanted it to? Or you started to find out maybe halfway through using it that it missed out on some really key features that actually you needed. But you were so excited about this new fancy software or offering that, that you just bought it or you just decided this is what you needed. That's not uncommon. And a conversation I had with someone not too long ago. He said to me, Emily, you have to be careful that you don't solutioneer the problem. You have to be careful that you don't see something that looks really exciting, and you want it to work so badly that you just cram this idea into this software offering. And what ends up happening is that you end up choosing something or paying for something that doesn't actually meet the need of what you're looking for.

So how do we prevent that from happening?

How do we make sure that we choose the correct tool for the job, as opposed to trying to make the offering fit with the tool we thought was cool. I'm going to give you three steps on how to do that. And the first step is let's talk about this in the way of if you're trying to build out an online offering for your business. Now it could be you can use the same steps for if you're looking for a software for scheduling or if you're looking for something to organize your time. Like you You know, you can't decide if you want to choose Trello or Asana or Wunderlist, or something like that, you can apply these steps to that as well. But let's talk about this in the lens of choosing a tool for an online offering.

So the first step is, what do you need this tool to do? I.e. Do you need it to host videos? Do you need it to grade a test? If that's the case, then you want to make sure that the tool that you're using is going to provide you with the data exports that you need to grade these tests. Do you need it to schedule something?

Really have stop and make a list and you don't want a ton of things on this list but you need a good amount of things that you 100% need this tool to do. Does it need to facilitate discussion? Does it need have an app? Does that tool need to also be an app that your patients or your clients can download? Stop and make a list of the things that it must have before you even start looking at the software out there for you to provide an offering? What do you need this tool to have?

The second step is what do the people that you're going to be giving this offering to want? Maybe they don't want something super complicated. Maybe they want to be using a tool like Facebook groups, like zoom like Skype that they already use in their day to day life. What you have to remember and this step is so important is that there is a learning curve for any new software that you use.

So just as, there's a learning curve for you to build out on a particular platform. There's also a learning curve for your users as well. So, bear in mind, this is meant to be really simple offering. If you don't want to spend time on explaining how to use this particular tool, it's worth thinking about the tools that your clients your patients already use. That is really important because you might think something looks new and shiny, and therefore your patients and your clients want to use it, when actually you might spend a lot of time explaining a new tool. If it's a little bit complicated, even if it's not a little bit complicated. Sometimes the solution is thinking about and asking really, what your clients and your patients, your customers, how they want to be communicated with what features they see as necessary. So they might when you spoke into your patients or your clients or even thinking about some conversations you've had with them or looking at what other people in your field are offering, having a look at that can provide you some really good insight. So thinking about what it is that the patients and the clients and the customers are going to see as needing to be a key feature. And maybe one of those key features for them is they've already used the software before because they don't want to learn how to use something else. There's a really big desire to overcomplicate things when you're building out an online offering, because you feel like it needs to be this big thing in order for it to be effective. And that is absolutely not the case. That's actually almost the opposite of the truth. Most of the time. People want simple solutions. How can you teach me something in the shortest amount of time with the littlest amount of effort possible? Think about it, if you could, if you needed to learn something, let's take a let's take, this is a good one.

Let's take how to know what goes into the recycling bin versus garbage. Okay, this is one it's different depending on where you live. And it is constantly something that terrifies me every time I move into a new house, what the heck goes into the bins?

If I want to learn what goes into the bins if I had the option of buying a sticker that told me what needed to go in the bins versus taking an hour-long online course as to what goes into my bins. What am I going to I know what I'm going to choose, what are you going to choose if you want to learn something? You don't always want some big built out option, you just want to know the facts. So think about your offering it maybe doesn't need to be as big as what you think it needs to. And so spend some time in the second step, figuring out what people actually want.

The third step is what are the nice to haves? So you know, what you need to build out the offering. You understand what your patients, your clients, your customers are after. And then what are those features those options on a platform, if it maybe had them that would really elevate the offering to the next level. And an example of this might be that it's I know I've mentioned this before, but maybe the data exporting is really Good. So that's not something you 100% need, but maybe it's really helpful for you, for you, if you're able to download an Excel file or a CSV after your maybe course, as an example is finished, I don't know what that looks like to you, but there might be things that you would think, ah, you know, actually, this is a, this would be a really nice to have. And it's nice to have staff is when you can start to look at the software or the tools that are out there on the market. So you've identified what you need, you've identified what your people want. And now you're sort of comparing the products on the market and you're seeing, you know, okay, what are some nice to haves, I see that tool A and B offer scheduling, but I see that tool C has a better data export which is more important to me which is a nice to have that I value. More. So those are the three steps. One, what are your must-haves? What must you have? That works well on the platform, so isn't a side show. So as an example, and this wasn't a bad software, I don't want to name names here. This wasn't a bad software. It just wasn't right for what we needed. So we had a software we were using that hosted videos. But it wasn't its main function. And so when we started to run sort of videos off of this platform, we had a lot of issues, and it worked, but it didn't work well. And so for us at that point in time, it would have been important where we were in that stage of our program to move to a different tool. So that was something we learned the hard way, but that's why you need to think about what do you absolutely need to have working on a Hundred per cent really well, for your offering. The second thing is what do people actually want? We've talked about this, but really thinking about, you know, do people want a new tool, maybe they don't, maybe they want you using something they're already familiar with using. And then that makes the whole learning curve much easier for both of you. And then the third thing is when you start to compare the different tools that are out there, what are some nice to have’s that you see kind of commonly popping up on the tools that you're looking at? And sort of prioritizing them as to Okay, what would really push this offering to the next level? I want to make a comment here as well. It's okay for these things to evolve organically over time. So you might start by using tools that your clients use your patients already use, and you just want to get the content out there to them in a super digestible, fun, interactive way.

But as that offering builds and you learn a bit more about what people like about the offering and what people maybe want improved upon, maybe then you start to look to evolve into a different tool, or maybe you add another tool into that offering.

I'll give you an example.

So we launched the telehealth toolkit for nutrition professionals with nutritional, which is a company that brings remote nutrition professionals together. And this toolkit that we developed, we thought when we initially launched it, should it be an online course? Should it be a just a PDF that we sell to people and we knew that it needed some kind of PDF or ebook format because there was a lot of content and you know, neither of us really wanted to build out A big online course on something we weren't too sure if people were going to be interested in. So we thought, Okay, well, we'll build out this PDF, we'll build out this sort of ebook type thing. And we'll see if there's interest. And then we started to think a bit more, you know, actually, I can't remember who, which one of us suggested it, but we were talking about it. And we said, you know, everybody buys something that they know if they read, whether it's a book, or maybe a course or something, that if you know, if you read it, your business would improve. But you don't read it because it's boring, or it's hard to get through and especially the stuff that's boring and hard to get through that stuff is important usually to read, but we just don't. And so the discussion that we had was okay, well, if we have this PDF, this toolkit, are people really going to read the whole thing? And the answer that we came to is No, probably not. But we want people to read the whole thing, because you're not going to get the results that you want, if you don't read the whole thing. And so we thought, Well, what if we take that ebook, and we walk people through it. So we have sort of a week-long and Facebook group that runs and we just discuss the different sections of the toolkits with the customers. And we launched that and the feedback we got was phenomenal. It was way better than what Maeve and I thought it was gonna be. I mean, we knew it was gonna be good, but we didn't think it was going to be that good. People really liked it. And that's a great example of something that we could have and we did discuss this something that you could have taken and made into this big complicated thing. But really, what People wanted was the PDF that they could read, maybe print out if they wanted to, and people to answer their questions and walk them through the toolkit. So that you know what if they didn't feel like reading it, someone was basically going to read it to them every evening for five days.

So that's just an example of really thinking about what your customers, your clients, your audience, your patients what they want. Right and not over complicating it. Okay, don't overcomplicate it for them, don't overcomplicate it for yourself to build out. So with that, let's recap.

Number one, think about what you need number two, and write it down.

Number two, think about what do your patients, your clients your customers want.

And three, what are the nice to have’s as you start to compare the different tools that you want to use, and with that, make your decision because the worst thing that you can do is

Spend your effort, your time, your money on this big fancy solution that you don't actually need. So, if you're building anything out, let us know. I'd love to hear about it. Our email is info at glowing potential.com. Equally, if we can help, and we do you offer sort of an hour and a half sessions for small businesses and healthcare practitioners. That is something that we just started offering because we know for some of our smaller clients that you just want sort of an hour and a half a two-hour check-in you don't want a big drawn-out thing or you just want someone to bounce ideas off of. So we are now offering that and you can find out about the telehealth toolkit for nutrition professionals as well as the small business strategy session at glowingpotential.com. We are actually launching the telehealth toolkit on July 20. So we've got the early bird fee going on at the moment. If that's something you're interested in head to glowingpotential.com if you want to get there quickly going potential.com/telehealth-toolkit.

Thank you so much for listening, and we'll see you again next time. Thanks so much for listening to the take it online podcast. If you want to know more about building out your own digital health program, you can find us at www.glowingpotential.com If you liked this episode or other episodes like it, please click subscribe and leave us a rating. It means a lot. Thank you

012. How to Choose the Right Digital Tool to Offer Your Online Health Offering in Three Simple Stepshttps://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/choose-the-right-digital-tool011. 7 Ways to Find Clients for Your Online Healthcare Practice or BusinessDigital HealthHealthcare ProfessionalsGuest UserMon, 29 Jun 2020 13:13:00 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/IxvGpVyzA_4/011-7-ways-to-find-clients-for-your-online-healthcare-practice-or-business59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5ef3519937cfa455b6f0fbcb

In this episode, Emily reviews some simple and effective ways to bring new clients and patients into your healthcare business or practice. Listen to the Glowing Potential Take it Online podcast this week to start reeling in those clients! 

In this episode, Emily reviews:  

  • Making a list of potential health and wellness referrers and reaching out 

  • Being clear about the benefits of your experience and the value you bring to the table for clients and patients

  • Focusing on a couple of areas vs. trying to serve everyone and why this is important  

  • Partnering up or aligning with a larger programme or practice

  • Big groups of people vs. pulling them in one by one

  • Refer a friend scheme

  • Picking some places where your ideal clients and patients are and becoming known in that space


If you liked what you read and or listened to here – we put together a weekly newsletter that unpacks the podcast topic and gives more tips for healthcare professionals and businesses taking their expertise online. Click here to sign-up. 

Episode 11 Transcript

Take it Online

7 Ways to Find Clients for your Online Healthcare Practice or Business

Welcome to the take it online podcast. Take it online is all about simple, effective ways to help you take your health and wellness content well, online. We'll feature stories behind the scenes peaks, and general how to as well as not to do for all things digital health.

 

My name is Emily Foster, and I'll be your host for the taken online podcast. I'm a registered dietitian and I'm also the founder of glowing potential.

 

Let's dive in.

 

Hello there and welcome back to another episode of The take it online podcast. I'm your host Emily Foster, and today I'm going to be speaking to you about seven ways to find clients for your online health consultancy. Now that could be your health practice, it could be whatever you want to call it. The bottom line here is that you're a healthcare professional, who works one on one with clients and wants to bring more of them into your business. We'll talk about seven things today. If that sounds of interest to you, stick around, let's dive in. 

 

Well, I'm really happy to have you here today. Because I think this is a question not I think this is a question that I get a lot. I know a lot of my peers that are in private practice or run their own businesses and maybe not 100% of their business is one to one clients, which really, that's not I don't think that's such a common model to have any more is purely one to one clients. And it's because it's exhausting. It's really time consuming. And so a lot of people will do a bit of one on one clients, and then bring in other larger pieces into their business. So we're not going to talk about that piece today. What we're going to talk about is for those of you who are running a one to one online or digital health practice, doesn't matter what kind of healthcare professional you are maybe your physio, maybe your OT, maybe you're a dietitian, I tend to go to a lot of allied health care professionals that listen to the podcasts. That's fantastic. This is what we're talking about today is how to bring more one on one clients into your practice. 

 

So the first tip I want to give you is making a list of potential referrers and reaching out to them. Now that sounds really simple. And you may have heard that before. But if you haven't done that, I really encourage you to do so. A lot of other healthcare professionals doesn't matter if they're the same profession as you actually ideally they're not going to be in the same profession as you. You want to make a list of those people. Maybe they're in you start with your local area. So yes, you have an online practice, but people might feel more comfortable. Having an online console with you, when they know you live in the same area as them, it sounds silly, but it's about that trust aspect. They know you're not some random person from somewhere else in the country. And obviously you can see clients from around the country from around the world, make sure you are insured for that that's a session for another day. But making a list of potential refers, and maybe starting, like I said, around locally, and then reaching out to them individually can be really helpful. Now, not just from a client bringing more clients in perspective, that's the obvious one. But the other thing is, is that it helps to build your network and if your eventual goal is to work one on one, or sorry, for yourself full time, it's really nice to have a network of other health care professionals that can kind of know what what it's like And maybe not all of the people you'll have in your network are running their own businesses, maybe they're practitioners within other practices. But it's really nice to start to build up that that network for yourself as well. So, in terms of what you need to be thinking about when you want to make a list of potential refers, like I mentioned before, ideally, they're not in the same profession as you. And the obvious one with that is that and, you know, you, obviously, you know, if they're the same question as you they can do relatively the same things. Now, unless there's a caveat here, unless the person that's in the same profession as you maybe has a specialty that is complementary to your own. So maybe as an example, you're a fertility specialist dietician, and then you have a you know, weaning and try a paediatric dietitian that you refer patients onto once they are finished working with you. So that's just a good example of, you know, maybe one healthcare professional looks after one stage for the client. And then they sort of refer on to you if and when that client needs more support in a different area. So that can work really well. But the other thing is as well, when you're really making that list of potential refers, is looking for other healthcare professionals that also complement your skill set. So we talked about that if they were in the same profession as you, but you might, you know, want to pair up if you're a sports dietitian, you might want to pair up with a sports physio, you know those common things and it sounds really simple, but that's a really good way to start making a list of potential refers is think about, okay, what would be a good complement to the service that you're offering and the skills that you have? And what are some other types of health care professionals might be interested or need more support in a particular area. So make a list of those potential refers before you make the individual list of people in your area make a list of sort of complementary skill sets that you want to be looking for. And then the next part is just reach out. There's no right or wrong way to do this. Some people ask me, you know, do I cold call? Do I email do I knock on their door and the reality is, is that you are going to feel comfortable in I can't suggest to you what you feel more comfortable in doing but if you feel more comfortable calling call if you feel more comfortable going to their office, do that if you want to email do that. I think you really just the idea is here is it you're not just it's not a sales call. You're looking to build a relationship with this other health care professional and yes, there's gonna be some monetary benefit to that in the long run. But at the end of the day, we can also all learn from each other. So it doesn't need to be some big awkward thing. You don't need to go in there feeling like a pharmaceutical rep. You can just go in, and you can have a conversation with the health care professional. It doesn't even have to be, you know, you don't have to launch into the conversation about, you know, them referring people on to you right off the bat. One of the things that that I really like to do when I was doing a lot of one on one work was if I wanted to set up a console, or if I wanted to set up sort of a relationship with a particular healthcare practitioner, if it was something that I could look into, I would go in and I would meet that particular health care professional as a client. If that was appropriate, obviously, you know, it depends if they're in a super specialist area, then that's different. But why I like to do that was that I would know the experience that my clients were going to have because not only are they going to refer people to you, but ideally you if there's that beneficial relationship and that and that benefit to the patient, ie the patient, or the client will benefit from a consult from them, then that, you know, then you're going to refer back to them as well if that relationship has been formed, and you know that they do a great job. And so I would always try and book in as a client with a health care professional if it was appropriate before sort of asking them if if, you know, they wanted to grab a coffee and then maybe, you know, move it to are you interested in referring people to me? Now, that's the way that I like to do things. I'm a very relationship person. I like to build relationships with the people that I'm working with. Because I want to trust that they're going to give my patients the best experience possible and that, you know, they know what they're talking about. So that's what I like to do, you don't have to do the whole relationship thing. I mean, Jesus, you're not dating them. And, but you do want to make sure that they they are competent and give good customer service. And you know, they love what they do, and they're good at it. So first things first, write down a list of professions that might have a complementary skill set to you, and then start to list out maybe some people in your local area that you can reach out to. Now the benefit of this and this is one of my seven points as well. The benefit of this this is really section two is that it is way more efficient for you to make relationships with people who are going to refer multiple people to you than it is spending your time trying to pull in clients one at a time, because that takes a lot of effort and we'll talk about how to do that. There are ways to do that. But it takes a lot of time. And it takes a lot of strategy to pull in clients one by one, and it's not the most efficient use of your time. So making a list of the potential refers and reaching out to them building those relationships, which help you as a business owner anyways, and can really make a big difference in bringing those one to one clients into your practice or your business. 

 

So the second point that I sort of mentioned there was around working with or going after larger groups of people than trying to pull people one on one. And that's pretty, you know, that makes sense when we say it out loud, right? So it makes more sense to go after something that will send you more clients than it does spending the same amount of time that's going to bring you in one client. And so a great example of this is public speaking, right? You go you give a talk that you're really passionate about the You know a lot about it maybe takes you half an hour, maybe it's taking you a bit longer to prep for it. But instead of spending that hour or half an hour talking to one person on, let's say, a discovery call, you have just spent half an hour or an hour doesn't matter could be public speaking could be a webinar talking to 10, 20, 30,  40, 50 however many people and so it's just a much more efficient use of your time. And it doesn't mean obviously this doesn't replace things like discovery calls and they certainly have a place. However, if you are looking to bring in more clients to your online health consultancy as a health care professional, you need to think about what the best use of your time is. And so if you can go and speak to people that represent a group of people, ie like those health care professionals that can refer to you or health clinics. or what have you, those people that represent a group or by talking literally to a group of people through public speaking or a webinar, that can be a really great way to get your name out there and ultimately, boost the amount of people who know like and are beginning to trust you ultimately leading to the more clients coming into your practice or business. 

 

Another really great way to find more clients for your online consultancy, your practice your business, is to be clear about the benefits of your services. And why working with you online is a really great experience. You need to get really good at your elevator pitch. You need to be able to tell people in under 30 seconds what it is that you do, I mean, forget even under 30 seconds, you should be able within 10 seconds to have a really clear explanation on what it is that you do the value that you bring to the table for your clients, your patients, your customers. And so why this is really important is that it's not easy for someone to buy from you if they don't fully understand what you're selling. And so in order for them to understand the value that you bring to the table, you need to be able to articulate it. So find some time to really get clear about what your unique offering is what makes you different, as a healthcare professional, as a business owner, and be able to articulate that to your potential patients and clients. So my fourth tip for you that's related to that, is that when you are offering services, don't offer anything to everybody. Okay, try and pick a few specialist areas, or at least niche down into a couple of areas that allow you to get really clear on how you speak about what you offer. So as an example, it's okay to take a variety of patients and clients, if you're getting referrals from other health care professionals and they say, Hey, you know, Sarah or Emily, can you do this? And you say, Yeah, no problem. I can do that. But when you're trying to sort of build your online following, really try and focus in on a couple of areas, maybe it's digestive health, and heart health, I don't know pick whatever works for you, whatever you're comfortable and passionate about, but choose a couple of areas because when you start to become a generalist, which I think a lot of us start out as, as healthcare professionals, we start off as generalists and so we're kind of used especially if we've worked in the in the public health sector. We tend to, you know, have this mentality because we've had to treat everybody before maybe We've worked for somebody else. And we get used to kind of our language becoming the, hey, you know, I can offer you this, this, this, this, this and none of its really connected. But when you're running your own business, it's much easier to market and talk about your services. If you're niching down, you're focusing in on a couple of areas. So my suggestion for you if you're trying to find more clients for your online health practice health business, is to think about some areas that you can specialise in, and it doesn't have to be hyper specialist, but I would really give a thought to sort of 123 things that you can niche down in and it makes your marketing so much easier, and it makes that elevator pitch so much easier. And it makes it much more clear to your potential clients or potential patient what it is that you do. So that's my fourth tip for you is think about the areas that you can sort of niche down focus in on specialise in whatever you want to call, it makes it much easier for you to attract those clients. 

 

My number five tip that goes back to looking to sort of reach out to larger groups of people or someone who represents a larger group of people as opposed to pulling people one by one is partnering up and, and or aligning yourself with a larger programme or private practice or health business. So it could be this could go one of two ways. So maybe you partner up with that health care professional that does the same thing as you, but their practice or business has gotten too big for them to see all of their clients. So they would get probably a kickback of some of the clients that they're sending you because maybe you're working with or under their brand, but that's a great way for you as a freelancer or as a healthcare professional in business to sort of start to build your client pace and get that experience online as well. The other thing that you can do here is align yourself with a programme with a health programme that's running. So there are a lot of digital apps and things at the moment that offer health coaching or nutrition coaching and they look actively for those people that they can send their clients to. So again, you work kind of under the umbrella of another business, but you're not working for them. They farm out those patients, those clients when they get them so it can be a really good feeder for you for your one to one clients. And it helps to build your name in the industry as well. So, to summarise that up, you can either partner up with a health care professional who's in the same realm as you, but maybe they just have too many clients that they can work with themselves or you partner up with another health programme that's running to sort of offer consults on behalf of them. So some things that you might not think about might be when you look at a jobs that are going. So things like indeed, are really great places to see what health care programmes are running our job sites, so people that are looking for health care professionals, and you'll notice that they might post it as a job offer, but actually, they're looking for freelancers. And so it might, you might find that it's a really good fit. And equally, there are opportunities that I've gone for that have initially been sort of job roles, and they were very happy to farm them out to a company like glowing potential. So just bear that in mind. You can look at sort of job boards that are out there and it gives you a nice feel as to who is looking for what in the industry. that you're in. 

 

So number six is a really simple one to do. It's sort of a quick action point, if your health business or your practice, if it's appropriate for you to do this, you can run a refer a friend scheme. So it's really simple if you have a practice or maybe a product or something like that, that is applicable for you to do this with something really simple like offering you know, if somebody refers a friend, they get 10 pounds towards their next product with you or next service and their friend gets that as well or there's a discount code or something like that. So if you have this is really good for customers that rave about you those ones that are telling anyone and everyone about the service that you provide and hopefully you have a lot of those those patients and those clients. And so if it's appropriate for you to do that, and it makes sense, a refer a friend scheme can be a really easy way to not just bring in more customers, but reward the patients and the clients that you already have with something like a giveaway or a product that you offer. That can be a really nice thing for them. 

 

And my very last tip, which probably should have been the first but my very last tip is when you want to bring more clients into your online health practice or business, you want to pick a couple of places where you know that they are. So that's why kind of all of these things like understanding what it is exactly that you offer and what makes you unique and kind of focusing in on a couple of areas doesn't have to be super specialist area, but you know, talking about a couple of things that you're really proficient in that your experience is in. And so when you have those things in mind, you can then pick a couple of places online. Could be forums or Facebook groups could be at when things get back to normal in person meetings, conferences, those sorts of things. Pick two to three places where your ideal clients are, and start to get active in those places. And it doesn't mean promoting your stuff. It means becoming the go to person for help in that area. So if you're a part of a Facebook group, pitch in, when you can answer people's questions, be aware of, you know, group rules, that's important. And that's why you're not throwing yourself out there and and promoting yourself and all those services that you offer. No, you just want to help people focus on answering people's questions and becoming that subject matter expert in that forum on Quora in that local meeting, wherever it is, but be regular in those places. So you want to bring more clients onto your online help business or practice, pick two to three places where those clients are and make yourself known as the specialist in that place, the helper, the go to person, and that will definitely help people understand who you are, what you do, and begin to trust you and ultimately bring those clients into your practice or business. Fantastic. 

 

So let's recap here. So seven ways to find clients for your online health practice or consultancy. First one, make a list of potential refers and reach out to them. Second thing and it kind of leads back into that point that I just said, look for big groups of people versus pulling people in one by one into your business. It is so much easier. So think about that when you can. Three be clear about what it is that you do and the value that you offer, okay, you have to become articulate, you have to be articulate about what it is that you offer and the value that you bring to people. The fourth thing, think about specialising or niching down or focusing in on a couple of areas, as healthcare professionals, we're really bad at offering everything because usually that's what we are trained in from a baseline. And then we sort of specialise as we get later on in our careers. But if you've been in a public health environment, and when I say public health, I mean, like NHS can be private health as well, Nuffield, that kind of stuff. You usually have to offer everything to everybody, but in your own business, so much easier to market your stuff and talk to people about what it is that you do when you are more specialised or focused in a couple of areas. Fifth thing, partner up or align with a large programme or practice so that they can help feed those clients into your business. Maybe when you're starting to get your business off the ground, the six thing refer a friend scheme. Really simple, really easy to do. It might not be appropriate for your practice so I'll let you make the decision on that one but it can be a great way to kind of you know, help promote your business by word of mouth so those people who really know like and trust you they have bought from you before they're a current client or a patient they become your spokesperson and it's so much more powerful someone shouting about how good you are then you shouting about how good you are. So if it's appropriate for you refer to friend scheme is a pretty good one. Last one, pick two to three places where your ideal clients or patients are and make yourself known as the helper in that space. So whether that's Facebook Cora forums, local media, meetings, whatever, take a couple of places and just focus on helping people. Okay, focus on becoming a subject matter expert in your area within those groups. And that helps people that builds awareness. And it helps people to know like and trust you, and then go on to buy from you. So obviously, there's not a direct link there when you're the key thing with this here is if you're on a forum, or you're on Facebook, make sure whatever if it's if there's a profile link so that they can click on you to find out more about who you are, make sure that you have the links to your business, all set up there as well. And not all the time because there are rules around this. But if you do offer a product that's really going to help that person, then it is absolutely appropriate to drop that in the forum. But watch everything's going to be different. Particularly with Facebook groups and rules. So just bear that in mind and tread cautiously when you're doing that. But if there's a profile involved, make sure you have that set up.

 

So, hope you found that helpful. Seven ways to find more clients for your online health business or consultancy. If you have any questions, you can drop me a line at info@glowingpotential.com and if you've liked what you heard today, you want to know more we do a newsletter every week that goes into a bit more detail on what we discuss in the podcast episodes and you can go to glowingpotential.com/sign-up that's glowingpotential.com/sign-up. Have a great day. Thanks for listening.

 

Thanks so much for listening to the take it online podcast. If you want to know more about building out your own digital health programme. You can find us a www.glowingpotential.com. If you liked this episode or other episodes like it, please click subscribe and leave us a rating. It means a lot.

 

Thank you.

011. 7 Ways to Find Clients for Your Online Healthcare Practice or Businesshttps://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/2020/6/24/011-7-ways-to-find-clients-for-your-online-healthcare-practice-or-business010. Building a Digital Rapport: Why No One’s Clicking Your “Buy” Button and How to Fix It!Healthcare ProfessionalsDigital HealthEmily FosterTue, 23 Jun 2020 06:22:40 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/KQyCLShxSyc/click-buy-button59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5ee8c337f156dc620d26519c

You’ve spent hours writing beautifully crafted blog posts, countless days posting on Instagram and LinkedIn, only to launch something in your health business that falls flat. How heartbreaking right? Well - you’re not alone.
You need to think of your "buy" button as a special gift for the wonderful people that you have built a digital rapport with. These lovely people know, like and trust you and feel that the buy button is well timed, presenting them with an opportunity to improve their health with someone they trust. 
Show that buy button to someone who knows nothing about you and... well… things get awkward. You probably wouldn’t ask someone to marry you on the first date... would you?

In this episode, Emily covers: 

  1. Understanding that there’s a spectrum that your audience (potential patients, clients and customers) sit on from cold to HOT HOT HOT! People need to know, like and trust you before they grab that hard-earned cash. 

  2. Focusing on building a digital rapport with your potential patients, clients and customers before trying to sell them something. Keep content practical and simple, be consistent with delivery and be yourself. 

  3. Evaluating if your current CTA’s (Call to actions) are appropriate and think of what the next logical step would be for someone reading a particular piece of content to take. 


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Episode 10 Transcript

Take it Online

Building a digital rapport: why no one’s clicking your “buy” button and how to fix it!

Welcome to the take it online podcast. Take it online is all about simple, effective ways to help you take your health and wellness content well, online. We'll feature stories behind the scenes, and general how-to’s as well as not to do’s for all things digital health.

My name is Emily Foster, and I'll be your host for the Take it Online podcast. I'm a registered dietitian and I'm also the founder of Glowing Potential. Let's dive in.

Hello friends and welcome back to another episode of The take it online podcast. I'm your host Emily Foster, and today we're going to be talking about building Digital rapport, why no one's clicking your Buy button and how to fix it.

Now sounds like a pretty great title, doesn't it? Great if we can just get people to click on the buy button, whether it's on social media or on your website, then we're all set. We're all ready to go. There's a problem with that. And the problem is, if you're new to marketing, or if you're new to business, in general, it's important to understand where your audience - so those patients, those clients that haven't had a consult with you yet or haven't bought anything from your business, they are on a spectrum of cold to hot. And depending on what platform you're on, or the type of content that they're reading, or if they've heard of you before, this is going to change where they are on that spectrum.

So that's what we're going to talk about here today. And as healthcare professionals and as health and wellness businesses, how you can use what you're already good at, which is building a rapport with people. So building that connection with somebody before you care for them, whatever it is your healthcare profession is, and understanding that you need to do that online as well. So if that sounds interesting to you, that's what we're going to be talking about today. And I'm looking forward to it. Let's dive in.

I feel like this episode really rings true for a lot of us because sometimes not sometimes, all the time when we're creating this content, which is what we're told to create all the time, which feels so exhausting, especially if you're working one on one with clients a lot. And at the end of the day, the last thing you want to do is create content for your business. And yeah, so we can feel exhausting and it can feel like if you're creating this content, you're putting the blood sweat and tears into your content, and you're not getting The uptake that you want. So let's say you create something and you have a Buy Now button at the end. If no one's clicking buy now that can be so disheartening. And I totally get that. So we need to talk today about why people aren't clicking that Buy Now button and I'm going to help you understand that and also send you in the right direction as to what you need to do to get people to purchase your stuff. So today isn't so much about how to create a digital product for your health business, but how do we make sure that you are presenting people with the opportunity to buy when they are ready to do so. And one of the things that if you haven't listened to it, episode nine with Sarah Almond Bushell, fantastic example of a health care professional who has taken her expertise online. She's built out several digital products but why The conversations we had in that episode was around Sara understanding her audience, she realized she had built out some of these offerings and she just wasn't getting the purchases that she wanted. And she'd worked really hard. She knew the products were really good. And they touched on all the pain points of a lot of her audience. But she recognized sort of after she launched some of this stuff that her audience wasn't big enough. And also at that point in time, obviously, things have changed for Sarah - but not without effort. So her audience wasn't big enough. But also maybe she wasn't marketing it in a way that she is now she understood she had to understand where her audience was at what questions they were asking and the stages they were in. And so that's kind of what I want to touch on today. Understanding that your audience is so important, not only the size but the relationship that you have with them. And that is something we talked about in episode nine. So if you haven't listened to that I really encourage you to.

So how do you start building that digital rapport and getting people to click the buy button?

Well, there's three things, three action points or things I want you to understand today. And I'm gonna go through the first one now. So the first one is you need to understand that there is a spectrum as to where your clients are in the buying process or getting to know you. So what I mean by that is that when somebody sees a post on social media, or they read a blog post that you've posted, or you share it on LinkedIn, or maybe they come to your website, for whatever reason, and they've read something of yours, they are going to be at different levels. So they are going to either I have already a digital relationship with you. So I maybe they read your blog quite regularly maybe they've been following you on Instagram for a while they comment on a lot of your posts, and they are sort of moving towards the trust zone. So they're becoming a sort of a “hotter” customer/lead, if you will, or a hotter potential client. And what that means is they know you, they like you. They trust you. They demonstrate that through the actions they've taken on your website and perhaps to on your social media channels and maybe even in your emails that you've sent out. And so these people that are warmer that are more engaged, that have more of a digital relationship with you are the type of people that when they see a Buy button, they are not 100% going to click on that obviously, but they are way more likely to purchase from you. Then somebody Who is not familiar with your content, so on maybe you know, they've seen a couple posts from you on Instagram, they haven't signed up for your newsletter yet, or they read a couple blog posts. But that's really all they've done. They haven't followed you on social media, or they haven't watched a webinar that you've done, or they haven't taken the next sort of step to learn more about you. And why that's really important to understand. So that person would be on sort of the colder spectrum. So somebody who knows nothing about you whatsoever and maybe clicks on blog post for the first time is a cold lead, so a cold person, and then somebody who knows a lot about you would be a hot person so they know you. A really hot person would be somebody who's maybe purchased something from you before already. So when you go to launch another product, they're very likely to be interested in it doesn't mean they're going to buy But they're going to contemplate it more than somebody who's read one or two of your blog posts. So it's important to understand that there is that spectrum of where those potential clients, patients customers sit. And so the first step for building a digital report and getting people to click on that Buy button, it's understanding that that spectrum exists. And then understanding where your clients are in that spectrum.

So if you're new to blogging, where you're new, not to blogging, if you're new to having an online presence, you've just taken your business online, and it's very likely that the people that you're talking to, if you were to post a Buy Now button for something you were running, you probably wouldn't get a lot of uptake no matter how good it was. Because you don't have that online presence. You haven't built that digital rapport with your patients, your clients, your potential patients, clients and customers.

So the first step is In all this is understanding that that spectrum exists, your audiences can be from that freezing to hot, hot hot, having purchased from you before, and you need to understand when you're creating content and call to actions which we'll talk about in a minute that you need to have some understanding as to where the majority are the clients that you're aiming that particular piece of content at are at in that spectrum.

So to lead on from that the second point that I want you to understand is that this is fixable right? So if you're sitting here and you thinking, Oh shit, great, Emily, I’ve got no warm people on my list or on my social media accounts. I'm new to this. I'm not very consistent. And you know, people know me but they don't know me very well. And so this is fixable, and the beauty is as a healthcare professional or as a health and Wellness Business, you get into business in the first place for most people, because you care about people and a lot of the work that we do as health care professionals or health businesses, is build relationships with people. So this same thing works for marketing your services online, taking those that that expertise you have, and selling it to patients, clients and and potential customers. So this is fixable.

So what you need to do to move clients or customers, patients on that spectrum from a colder lead to a hotter lead to somebody who's more likely to click that Buy button, is by making an effort and taking time to build that relationship. So things you can do to build that relationship consistency. This is a hard one, right? And one of the big ways that you can kind of be consistent In your content is batch content development. So you can sit down for a day a month, or you know, I know people who even batch their content out in quarters. And when I say batch your content, all I mean is sit down and write a bunch of stuff for the upcoming weeks. So take that expertise that you have, and share it, share it, take the time to sit down, get it down on a Word document, and then schedule it into either it's your social media scheduler or your email scheduling. But you need to be consistent to build that relationship. Because if all you're doing is sending an email, once a quarter, you're not top of mind for those people who when they do have an issue or want or need your expertise, they won't think of you they might think of somebody else. So what you want to do is you want to be top of mind and the way that you do that is by consistency, but it's also by understanding your audience and creating content that is relevant to them. And I've talked about that before. But this does link back to that cold versus hot client piece in terms of where they are in that spectrum. So it might be that you and I think, you know, and we need to think about this as healthcare professionals, because often, we use a lot of sciency jargon, and we can do that maybe, I don't know, maybe that's for some people a confidence thing because they want to prove they feel like they need to prove what they know. For other people, they might think well, that's what you know, my patients my clients want is they want this complicated information. And the reality is, isn't most of the time people want simple takeaways. So when you're creating this content, do think about Okay, is this you know, this content I created this blog post or this email I'm going to send out Could this be simplified? More, can I maybe take this email that I'm going to send out to my email list? And could I make it into two, maybe even three emails to make it more to make it more simple to make it more practical for people. So meet clients, where they're at is where I'm going with this. So be aware if sometimes maybe the content that you are making isn't resonating with people, not because it's wrong or unhelpful, but maybe it's just not practical enough, there aren't enough key takeaways for people to feel like they want to read more. So one, be consistent with your content to make sure it's simplified, it resonates with people, and that there are some practical takeaways. And then the last thing here with building that digital relationship other than those, those couple of things, is be yourself. And it sounds a bit mom, like be yourself. You're great. But I really mean that because there are so many other people in the fleet, you know, I'm a dietitian, you might be a physio or an OT. And there are tons of people that do the same job as you, but no one doesn't like you do it. And that sounds lame. But that's what gets people to read your content is your professional outlook, your opinion, your spin on things. And so don't be afraid to have an opinion all obviously stay within your scope of practice, whether you're a healthcare professional, or your health and wellness business, or stay in your lane of things you are qualified in. But don't be afraid to have an opinion on stuff and offer that simplified practical advice. Because at the end of the day, that's what most people want.

How do I take this person's expertise and implement it into my day to day life, so focus on building a genuine digital rapport with people talk to people the same way you would talk to them if they were in person with you. Just because it's online doesn't need to be, you know, the healthcare professional robot giving clinical advice. Don't move into that zone. People want a personal experience. So when you're trying to build your digital rapport, think of those things. So think of being consistent. Make sure the content is simple, it's practical, and be yourself because ultimately, that is why people will continue to follow you follow you subscribe to whatever channels you have, and ultimately, hopefully somewhere down the line, purchase a service or product from your business.

The last thing is having the appropriate call to action. So CTA some of you might have heard of that before. All that stands for is call to action and basically what that is That's the next step, the next action that you want people to take. Then after reading that piece of content, whatever that is, so as an example, it might be a, you know, a quick example is a blog post, you have a subscribe to your newsletter at the bottom, you've got a podcast episode, maybe you've got check out our free webinar on how to start your own podcast. So it can be it's the next step that you want people to take. And the reason why this is so important is because often what people get wrong, is they've got the right content and the wrong call to action. So you've got really relevant content that somebody has just had just just read and thought, Oh, this is great, but maybe the call to action you have at the end of it isn't appropriate for that content. So like I said, spoke about in step number one, you need to understand where people are in that spectrum of knowing liking and trusting you so are they cold? Have they never really heard of you before? Are they hot, hot, maybe they've purchased a cheaper item from you in the past and ebook or maybe even a full-blown course, understand where people are at. So more personal experiences where people are probably more likely to buy would be if they're on your email list, because at some point, they've signed up for that, which means they probably read some of your other content before giving you their personal data access quite a big step right, giving you permission to email them into their inbox when we all get a billion spam emails a day. So they giving you that permission, that's quite a big deal. So you need to understand that what piece of content you're writing is going to dictate what call to action you want to have there. But not only that, but where that particular content is put up. So a tweet as an example, probably people are not going to buy through a tweet. So as an example, a tweet might be, you've pulled something from a podcast episode. So a key takeaway or you've pulled something from a blog post, or you've posted a recipe and you've said, click here to watch me on YouTube, making this recipe that is an appropriate call to action, asking somebody to buy a 2000 pound course in an Instagram post probably is not going to work for you. Now, if it does, happy days, but the reality is, is that people probably are not going to click on that. If they've seen a couple of posts from you. If you have a larger following, maybe they also follow you on different accounts, and they listen to your podcast regularly, etc, etc, maybe that podcast by now sort of button in the link, maybe that will work for you. But the reality is, is a lot of people will choose maybe one or two social media platforms, and they'll try and, and sell things on there. And the reality is, is that social media is very much when you're first starting out and even in the first couple weeks of your business, it's about or yours, it's about building a relationship with your audience. So showing what you know, but also that you're able to give them those simple practical tips. And then it's not wrong to talk about your products and your services on Instagram or on Twitter or LinkedIn or wherever you you post on social media or other content platforms, but know that people are probably on there not to buy but to be sold And learn things. And so don't expect people just to click the Buy Now button. You want to think of a funnel. So you want to think of, Okay, I've got my social media accounts, people are getting to know me here, they're seeing the videos I'm putting up. They're reading my blog posts, they're seeing my recipes on Pinterest, they're really getting to know me. And my key is that I want to get them on my email list so that I can form even a stronger digital rapport with them, so that when I go to launch my next product, they're much hotter than if they just followed me on one platform. And so it's about trying to get people to want to get to know you and sign up for more information from you, because the information you're giving them is relevant. It's practical, it's interesting, and ultimately, they'd be worse off if they didn't Sign up for that email list or your podcast, etc, etc. So oftentimes the What am I getting out here, oftentimes the call to action is not a Buy Now button, it's a button to get them to to take the next step is to get to know you more intimately to build that digital rapport. So if it's Instagram, then maybe you want them on your website and then either reading a blog post and then your blog post, it's your podcast and then maybe you're after your podcast, it's your newsletter, so on and so forth, but that people need to know like, and trust you before they buy from you. And so don't expect by putting a Buy Now button on Instagram and no one clicks on it that it means your product is bad. It doesn't. It just means that you haven't spent Time to build the digital rapport with your audience. So understand where your potential patients, clients, customers are on that spectrum from cold to hot. And this is going to differ for different people, but maybe what you pitch so that the content that you write on social media for something that you are rolling out in your business, a product or a service, that pitch is going to be a bit stronger in your email than it is going to be on Instagram, because maybe you want people to sign up for email. So you've built a bigger report. So understand that that cold to hot lead for your audience exists. So where are they they're understand that you need to focus on building a genuine rapport with your audience. So being consistent, keeping those tips simple and practical, so they can understand your expertise and go You know what, actually this person explains this really, really well. And I need to know more. I don't want to know more, I need to know more, because it makes my quality of life better. I don't want anyone. I don't know if anyone actually thinks this makes my quality of life better, but you get the idea. And speak. B, be yourself. So speak as you would to people. In person as you do online, people want those personal experiences. And then the last piece that we talked about is have an appropriate call to action. What is the next logical step that someone is going to take after reading that post? It's probably not by now and that's probably why your Buy Now button isn't working. But if you had that by now in the right place after they've gotten to know you a bit better, then you are going to say rocking and rolling but that is so lame. That's such a If you get it, you need the appropriate call to actions otherwise people just aren't going to click on it. So that's it from me. Thank you so much for listening to the take it online podcast. If you like today's episode, please subscribe, leave us a rating. Also, you can sign up for our newsletter to get more in depth takeaways from the podcasts weekly, as well as some special editions on key strategies to take your healthcare business or practice online. And you can find that all at glowing potential.com Thanks so much. Thanks so much for listening to the take it online podcast. If you want to know more about building out your own digital health program. You can find us at www dot flowin potential.com If you liked this episode or other apps So like it, please click subscribe and leave us a rating. It means a lot. Thank you

010. Building a Digital Rapport: Why No One’s Clicking Your “Buy” Button and How to Fix It!https://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/click-buy-button009. A Case Study: Taking Your Health Expertise Online with Special Guest Sarah Almond Bushell, RDHealthcare ProfessionalsDigital HealthEmily FosterMon, 01 Jun 2020 15:41:04 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/kuWmQpUi2JI/sarah-childrens-nutrition59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5ed520c808fd7e4e5c327fd8

This week on the Take it Online podcast we speak to the lovely Sarah Almond Bushell - “The Children’s Nutritionist”. To look at a fabulous example of how healthcare professionals can take their expertise online. Sarah has numerous “Playbooks”, an online course as well as a membership site (coming soon!). 

We discuss: 

  • The beauty of taking your expertise online as well as inspiration on how to do it

  • The fears that healthcare professionals have when developing digital services

  • Why growing your audience as well as building a relationship with them is so important

 and more. 

Resources discussed in this episode: 

You can follow Sarah on Instagram or check out her website.


LISTEN WHEREVER YOU ENJOY YOUR PODCASTS:

 

















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Episode 9 Transcript

Take it Online with Emily Foster and Sarah Almond Bushell


0:08 

Welcome to the take it online podcast. Take it online is all about simple, effective ways to help you take your health and wellness content well, online. We'll feature stories behind the scenes and general how to use as well as not to do for all things digital health.

 

0:31 

My name is Emily Foster and I'll be your host for the taken online podcast. I'm a registered dietitian and I'm also the founder of glowing potential. Let's dive in.

 

0:46 

Hello, everybody. Thank you for joining us on the take it online podcast today I have with me the lovely Sarah Almond Bushell, also known as the children's nutritionist you can find her at childrensnutrition.co.uk Sarah is a registered dietitian and children's nutritionist with over 20 years of NHS and private practice experience of working with families. She helps with weaning babies, fussy eaters, healthy eating food allergies, constipation, important one, weight issues, diabetes, and more. Sarah, a big warm welcome. Thank you so much for joining us today.


Oh, thank you so much for having me. I'm really excited to be here.

Yeah. And I I'm so excited to have you. So Sarah and I met a couple of years ago and her business really in the past couple years with all the digital offerings and stuff you've been putting out there has really changed and grown, hasn't it?

 

1:41 

Yeah, it's absolutely it's very different now to how it was when I first met you.

 

1:45 

Well, exciting, cool stuff.

 

1:48 

Well that's why Sarah is on the podcast today is because really she does and I encourage you to have a look at her website. It's really she does have so many. You're really great example, Sarah, of how a health care practitioner can diversify and sort of take their knowledge and expertise and be able to really help a lot of people and with a variety of different offerings. So I'm really excited to hear more about that. But before we dive into that, tell us a little bit about you, where you from, what do you like to do in your free time? And what's the most exciting thing you're up to at the moment?

 

2:22 

I'm a dietitian. I've been working about 21 years. And I'm originally a Jordy but actually live on the south coast of England and which is lovely. And what do I do in my free time? I don't really have very much free time, but I still work full time for the NHS. Yeah. So alongside that I run the children's nutritionist which is my business. And I do that in my spare time. So that's my evenings and weekends kind of taken care of. And, but I guess I'm also a mom, I've got two children and I Have a dog. So if you've got any spare time you might, I'm on the beach with my husband and my kids and my dog.

 

3:06 

That's exciting. Wow. I mean, if you've seen if you've seen Sara's website and some of the products and services she has, it's really impressive that you're, you're, yeah, that you're still working for the NHS full time and doing that. So hats off to you. And thank you for everything you're doing in the NHS at the moment with your private practice or business or however we want to call that your children, the children's nutritionist site, if you will, what does that business? What does that look like for you at the moment? So is it mostly online? Is it mostly in person products? Walk us through that a bit?

 

3:39 

Yeah, sure. So it's 100% online. I don't see any patients want one anymore. I guess I do enough of that in the NHS. Yeah. So I blog and I have spent a lot of time working on my website and improving the SEO and getting more visitors to my web. sight and have some digital products. And I run an online course. And I spend a lot of time on social media growing my audience and just becoming a bit more visible. Really. Yeah.

 

4:13 

And that was Sarah mentioned something offline that we'll talk about in just a moment around sort of building that audience up. So we'll talk about that cuz that was huge for your business, wasn't it? It was, it was massive. Yeah.

 

4:25 

Yeah, absolutely. It was the turning point, actually.

 

4:29 

That'll be nice to hear more about that. So kind of jumping back. You're 100% online. So what was kind of a thought process with that? Did you go into it thinking that everything was going to be on what did you sort of turn that corner between “I want to set up this online as digital business” for you know, children's nutrition. So what was appealing to you about that?

 

4:55 

What it was actually, if I really think back what it was, I listened to what One of your old podcast episodes where you interviewed a dietitian in America called Erica Julson. Yeah. Yeah. And she had loads of different ideas of things that you could do online. And I just thought, This is great. This is not what happens in the UK. And I could really fancy investigating that a little bit more. And I think it was on that podcast that she recommended a couple of people who then went and listen to their podcasts. It was Amy Porterfield, who was all about online marketing yet with Pat Flynn who was all about passive income. Yes, the whole notion of passive income really appeals I mean, why wouldn't it appeal making money when you're not doing anything? Yeah, that's kind of where I started from and how I kind of went down the whole online route. And I think also because I'm working full time for the NHS. I didn't really want to be extra In any more of my time for money, I wanted to kind of make money without having to spend too much time on it.

 

6:08 

Yeah. Yeah. And I think as well, you, I guess from you know, for those of you who are maybe just working it not just but only working in the NHS at the moment, or regardless if you're a dietitian, or you're an OT, or your physiotherapist or whatever that or you're a wellness business, whatever that looks like, for you, I think the key thing to take away from a series sort of your position is that you saw a lot of the, like, the type of clients that you then were making products for in your private practice in the NHS, am I correct in saying that?

 

6:43 

Yeah, absolutely. So seeing them day to day in the NHS, and I didn't really want to have to do the same at the weekends and in the evenings.


So is it is it safe to say that maybe the idea you had for these products and things Not that you were obviously not suggesting you were talking about that within your NHS role but but like you were being asked maybe the same questions by people in the NHS, by your sort of your patients in the NHS. And so maybe you had a good idea from a private practice perspective, if people are asking me if parents are asking me this, then maybe other parents are interested outside of the NHS in this as well. Does that make sense?

 

7:24 

Yeah, absolutely. So, so in the NHS, I work with families, with children with Type One Diabetes. And so there's very specific dietetic aspects that I look at there. But actually, these are normal, healthy kids, and they have the same issues that all children have. So So issues around, you know, babies who were on toddlers who were first eaters refusing foods, constipation, that kind of thing. Even when, and you know, we see some very, very young babies with type one diabetes in the NHS and there's all of this sort of General stuff around food and feeding that you didn't need to dietetic or a medical referral for that I could give that sort of advice out online. And without necessarily needing to worry about having someone's full medical history or anything like that. And the other issue I found was that I was seeing lots and lots and lots of people who would get in their nutrition and feeding advice online. And it was rubbish. It was all sorts of nonsense that was being talked about. And I spend quite a lot of time sort of dispelling myths and make an alternative suggestions. And I just thought, you know what, there needs to be someone shouting a bit louder than all of these other so called experts out there to get the right information across to the parents, because I think you know, so many people have things to say when it comes to food and feeding, but there's not actually that many of us who are really qualified be doing it.

 

9:00 

Yeah. Yeah, it's Yeah, it's a bit of he, he or she who shouts loudest, isn't it? And those people who shout loudest aren't, like you say aren't necessarily qualified. But you obviously have been doing a great job because Sarah is up for the organics weaning award so and have a look at that if you if you know Sarah already, definitely vote for her have a look at the other people but 10 I think Sarah was pretty great. So you're up for the organic weaning awards, and we'll post a link to that in the show notes below. No problem, but I think you're right. You know, we really and I think as healthcare professionals, and this again goes outside of Nutrition and Dietetics but as qualified healthcare professionals, it's important to boost each other off if you see a physio or an OT or somebody else offering advice, who's qualified in their fields, boost them up, right it really, it really makes a difference and it helps get more qualified voices heard and safer voices heard, which I think is so important and why sort of taking your stuff online, whether it's a course or a worksheet or a cheat sheet, or whatever that looks like for you and your business is really helpful. I get this question a lot from sort of health and wellness businesses and healthcare professionals is around the fear or anxiety of launching something digital. And there are many reasons for that. But I wanted to ask you before you sort of launched some of these projects, projects or products that we'll talk about in a moment, did you feel any fear around it or anxiety and maybe could you share what some of

 

10:33 

those were? Yeah, absolutely. So my my biggest fear was being called out publicly and told that actually, Sarah, what you're saying there is not right. Yeah. So guess it. Guess what I've learned is that's called imposter syndrome. And lots of people have that. And, and it did actually happen to me and I was called out it was last summer. I remember very clearly just yet to a conference and it was an advanced course on feeding therapy. And I'd been always posting on Instagram, in my stories, all the little snippets and information that I'd learned. And I was called out by someone, it was a so called parenting experts, but actually, not anybody with any qualifications but very, very well known very high profile. And, and it was basically told I was wrong, right. And I was absolutely devastated. I was absolutely gutted. It was and, you know, I just wanted to crawl away under a rock and hide for a few weeks. And, you know, the, the, the actual posts that I put out about it had so many comments on it that I think it probably did quite well for my discoverability on Instagram. But I ended up having to switch the comments off because they were awful. They were really, really awful comments and it was all driven by this very high profile person. Yes. And both I was the professional that I am I went away, I went back through my notes, I contacted the course organizer and just clarified that what I was saying was right. And they came back to me and said, Yep, yep, absolutely. Here's the references. And I went and put a post out on social media in, you know, again, saying what I wanted to say and backing it all up with evidence for grace, you know, I was right. And then and I think the biggest learning point for me there was the fact that as a healthcare professional, you only ever say what is evidence based, you're not going to start making things up, you know, just to get a few social media followers. And I think that's a real quality assurance thing for people you know, they can trust us because what we say is 100% evidence based Yeah, so So yeah, that was my fear being called out but and it happened that happened and what it still does now, I still get nothing to that degree, but I still now and again, get caught out by people, sometimes other healthcare profession.

 

13:01 

But I always know I've got a backup. I've got the evidence to back up what I've said, Oh,

 

13:05 

yeah, yeah. And I think you know, anybody who's looked at it, the larger you get, the more people you have reading your stuff, whatever that stuff is, the more people you're gonna have a lot of people who love it, and you're going to have people who don't agree. And so, you know, I think it's a fear that a lot of people have and it is completely normal to feel that way. And, you know, I really want to take my hat off to you because I think it's really, you know, it's really important. It's really great that you continue to do what you do after you had that first really negative experience. And because it's so important to you know, stand up for yourself and also also stand up for the profession as well. Right. And and, yeah, and that there's more you know, and it's like anything I think nothing is very few things are black and white. There are a lot of gray areas. Sometimes it's a matter of opinion and I think, you know, as healthcare or wellness professionals, and, you know, it's okay to give an opinion, but it's great. Yeah. Yeah, you're

 

14:10 

absolutely right. And I think, you know, at the end of the day as a as a health care professional, you interpret the research in your own particular way and it's okay to put that across to people. You don't have with the consensus if actually what you interpret things differently. And actually, that's what makes you unique. Absolutely. Absolutely.

 

14:32 

Awesome. Well, that's a nice kind of a nice that a nice ending story there which is, which is good. So your biggest fear happened, but you got through it, and your business is still growing, which is great to hear. So when you there, so can you tell us let's let's let's ask this so what offerings because I think it would be good for people to know who maybe have seen your stuff before. What offerings or types of offerings do you currently have? have available?

 

15:01 

Yeah. So um, so the main thing I have is I've got an online baby nutrition and weaning course, which I actually launched about 18 months ago. And it it did all right, but it wasn't doing as well as I wanted it to. Okay. And what I realized was, I needed to be more visible. So I kind of kept it going. But I really worked hard to increase my visibility, and to have more people coming to my website, more people on my social media. And so and that really helped. So of course, and I've also recently developed what are called playbooks which are very many guides that people can download for 10 pounds for they're cheap, they're easy for people to access, and they've done really, really well. So they're just there. They're almost like a paid lead magnet in a way because it's an No brainer. And then people download it. And then that leads them into my online course or, or onto a waiting list for my exciting project that I'm working on at the moment. Which is

 

16:13 

my membership site. And they toddlers. And yeah, well mums have toddlers, not toddlers themselves.

 

16:21 

So yeah, that'd be interesting with it. And although I'm sure every stranger things out there at the moment, do anything at the moment, I think to keep children and and themselves entertained while at home.

 

16:35 

And so, so I'm what I'm interested in. I love the playbook idea. I think the idea of because a lot of people feel like oh, my context content out there, and it's for free. And it just goes to show that like you say, if you have a really valuable resource, you can still charge a bit for it, and still have that that work is a bit of a lead magnet for you as well, which is great. The question that I have for you is that so you have an online course you have already so let's see. Start surfing the bottom. So you have the playbooks, which is sort of that that 10 pound mark, then you have the online weaning course. And then you have the membership. Yeah. So what's the reason that you and I'm gonna talk about software in moments? I think people will be interested in that. But was there a reason that you decided to go the online course route for the weaning course and more of a membership model for the toddler and parenting one?

 

17:26 

Yeah. So um, so just going back a little bit, actually. So when I first started doing all of my online work, it was it was blogging, and the topic that I used to blog about a lot was babies and weaning. And that's because I've worked with some high profile weaning experts and baby brands. So we're kind of the area that I was had information on already. So I didn't need to reinvent the wheel. I can repurpose what I already knew. And that's how that's how that grew. And so The course was, was the blog but bigger. So it kind of expanded from there and packaged up and in a really nice. What do you call it like a success path. So you start at one chapter, then you work through the various different chapters and it takes you right through from when you start weaning at six months or so, right until your baby's first birthday, and that's when the course ends, right. So that's that was that one. And then the membership was because all of my course mummies got to the end and said, well, that's great, Sarah, but what's next?

 

18:37 

Like, oh,

 

18:38 

I don't really have anything for you. So for awhile, I started doing one, two ones. And it was it wasn't

 

18:45 

that at

 

18:46 

this point. It wasn't it wasn't every single person that came through, but they kind of got to that toddler stage where the little ones were starting to refuse foods that weren't eating very well. And moments have gotten themselves into this situation. Whether we're opening the fridge at night and looking at it and thinking, oh my goodness, what am I going to cook for dinner tonight, so they had no inspiration, they were back at work. So they were really busy. They knew that whatever they were going to be feeding their child off was going to be rejected or thrown on the floor. And then you know, when the child is gone to bed, they might be hungry, and they'd wake up in the night and want milk and then you know, it was just ballooned into this huge, big problem. And so, what I wanted to do was I wanted to put something together to help them with that. And the reason why I decided to do a membership rather than a course for that was because there's so much information for mums and dads at this stage, because Don't forget about

 

19:43 

the dads.

 

19:46 

never see occasional dad on my course not many. Yeah. But there's so much information and putting it in a course just felt too big and overwhelming and I didn't want people to get into a course and go I can't do this. Some stuff that's too much to do. So with with the memberships, there's some I've kind of broken it down into my three pillars. So I've got nourish, nurture, and thrive. And these are the three pillars that underpin everything I do in my business. So the nourish part is obviously the bit about food and nutrition and cooking and menu planning and shopping and reading food labels and all of that kind of stuff so that they can get that bit right. Then the nurture part is all about parenting and how you respond to your child around feeding and meal times. So what I see a lot of offers is parents who are insanely frustrated because their child won't eat and they're encouraging them to eat by offering ice cream for dessert, or here's an iPad, you know, and then the child eats away. Yeah, just one more mouthful, that kind of thing. So the nurture, part of it is all about how you parent around foods and it's around having boundaries, but all And rules, but also some sort of flexibility within that so that the child grows up feeling to have a good relationship with food, actually, that's what I mean

 

21:10 

here. And then so are you. Sorry, go ahead.

 

21:14 

And then the thrive part is just taken into account the child's development, and how that changes through stages and what parents can do in order to appeal to the child at each different stage. So that might be things like getting them involved in food preparation, or growing food, but also it's how they talk to their children around food so that the child understands. And ultimately what we want to do is for that child to grow up to have to be able to make good decisions as an adult or as a young, young person, when it comes to eating and drinking.

 

21:49 

That's great. And so with the really, really interesting to hear about all that as clearly, like you said, you know, you really took the time to understand your audience as well and know and I think the thing about knowing knowing your audience, your patients, your clients, it's not just about what topics they want, but it's how they want that information given to them. So like you say, you know, they didn't have time to sit down and go through this course. But that wasn't the way they wanted that information. Once their child hit that year mark, they needed it in a different format. So really interesting, and really, you know, good for you for picking for picking up on that as well. And so with that, so if the online course is or you live in that, or you is that sort of a pre recorded course and then membership, you're live on that a bit or or how does the structure of that roughly work?

 

22:42 

Yeah. So So going back to what I said earlier about passive income and wanting everything to be passive. Yes, of course, is totally passive. Okay. Which is brilliant because I sell that in my sleep, you know, people sign up for that. And it's, it's the access, it's not dripping So they access all the modules all at once they can do it in their own pace. Yeah. I run a private Facebook group just for course members. So if they've got questions in there, and I'm answering questions, I can do that anytime. That's been a lot of work. So so that is totally passive income for me. And I've got quite a complex sales funnel that leads through to the to the course. Yeah, and so I so I have a, I've got a lead magnet that I run Facebook ads to, that converts really well. And I do some retargeting as well with that. And then they enter a automated nurture sequence where I deliver really, really high value information, useful information to them. And they also get an invitation to join my private not my Yeah, it is a private Facebook community, but it's a one on one and then they get entered into a sales funnel, which I use a software called deadline funnel and, again, yeah It's a software called deadline funnel. Okay. Okay.

 

24:02 

And we'll link to that in the show notes as well, I think

 

24:05 

it's been really good because what it does is it and it, you set it up. So you have a link to show them the course as it as it is at the time that I'm offering it and then an expired link. And so that course is never available unless they're in that deadline window funnel, so it drops down as well. So each each sales email they get from me has their countdown timer showing, and you can see it counting down so they get I think the seven day funnel that I have there, and I get loads of people buy on the last day. Yeah, and then you know, take it down take it

 

24:44 

by now. I think if you're sitting at home or wherever you are listening to this and you're thinking, oh my god, I have to set up all these funnels and Facebook ads and I don't even I'm still trying to set up this course and I'm I don't know what do I do? Just take a deep breath because that wasn't the phrase. Sarah didn't start with all of that. And I think that's a really important part to think to talk about. So please, I'm going to link to some of these. So Sarah mentioned before and Amy Porterfield, Pat Flynn, and they both have really great podcasts. And I'll link to some of the things we talked about today the show notes below. So if you are interested in exploring some of these things, as well as Erica Jolson, she's called the unconventional rd we'll link to that all in the show notes below so that you have that. So please don't get you know, this is something that works for Sarah as well. It might be different for you, but but really interesting to hear sort of what's going on behind the scenes in order to drive and those those viewings as well. So we're not the viewings, but the fun putting my house up on the market. Can you tell those viewings? Yeah. So, yeah, basically, right. So you you told us a little bit about how sort of you how, which was my next question, really, how do you sell these offerings? I think that's the other side of the coin where people are like, well, this is great. I have this, this, this, this beautiful course that I built. But how the heck do I sell it? So So yeah, so I think you talked a little bit about that. But are you? So I guess my question is sort of simplifying the question a bit. And is it all on? Is it all sort of Facebook ads and things like, what's your main How do you? What's the main way that you sell or promote your products?

 

26:34 

Social media and email marketing? Okay. Yeah. And what I've found over the sort of 18 months or so, is that it it's taken a lot of trial and error to get it to a point where it's selling at a rate that I'm happy with. And, yeah, you're absolutely right. You know that sometimes really complicated what I said earlier, but it has taken me 18 months to get there. And what I've actually found, as I've gone through this is I have turned into a bit of a tech geek and I absolutely love for tech

 

27:12 

results when it's working well, right.

 

27:15 

Definitely. Yeah, yeah. And I think, you know, when you said to me earlier, what do you do in your spare time, that's what I'm doing. In my spare time. I'm learning new systems and processes. And actually one of the other things. One of the other ways I make money at the moment is I have these power hours, which are where people can book an hour of my time to ask me anything. And you know what, nearly everyone who books with me is either a dietitian or another healthcare professional. And it's very rarely for dietetics

 

27:43 

it's Yeah, yeah,

 

27:45 

yeah. So wait. Yeah, absolutely. And I don't you know, I'm not a I'm not an expert, but I know what I've learnt and it seems to be working. And I think that's and I think that's what People have noticed, you know, and the thing Yeah, you do that and, you know, how does it work and all that stuff. So that's, it's just something I've found that I've enjoyed. And it's great to be able to help other people as well who in same situation. I'm just trying to get there. Definitely. Absolutely. And I think

 

28:17 

really, so. Okay, let's, let's recap. So you have, which I think you know, and I think as well, being a business owner, myself, I love the variety and the work that I do as well. And I think what you've got here, you've got the NHS stuff, you've got the online course the members club that's watching or that's launching soon, the playbooks the power hours, like, Yeah, kind of the beauty of being a small business owner is you can do whatever you want with your business.

 

28:44 

Yeah, absolutely. Why not? Yeah, absolutely. And the other income stream I have is through affiliate marketing. So that's by putting affiliate links into my blogs. And actually, just for a bit of inspiration for people for the last three months. I've hit six figures in my business and I am delighted.

 

29:02 

Wow, good for you.

 

29:04 

Oh, get to 2020 got there with it by the end of the first quarter. So yeah,

 

29:10 

Wow, well done. Well done. Well, there you heard there you have it there You heard it here. You know, as a healthcare professional regardless of if it's nutrition, or if it's video or OT, or wherever you are, if you're a wellness business, it is possible to make credible online offerings and have the work for you as a business owner, as well as your patients, your clients and your customers. So and Sarah, honestly, it's been like so interesting to hear about your business. I knew that you had a lot on the go, but to hear sort of some of the behind the scenes, I can't thank you enough for sharing that with me and with with our audience today. So I really, really appreciate that

 

29:53 

question. It's my favorite topic is absolutely fine.

 

29:57 

The last question I had is do or what not do you? Because obviously you do we just we just talked about that now. But what would be sort of your biggest piece of advice for healthcare professionals or Wellness Business wanting to take a bit or their whole business online?

 

30:17 

Right. So I would say,

 

30:20 

carve a niche out for yourself. Don't try and appeal to everybody, because you're appealing to no one. So really, really, really niche down. And if you can pick up a niche of a niche that's even better for definitely that. And what's worked for me is consistency that's helped with my visibility. So I made an effort to about two years ago to post one post every single day, at the same time of day on Instagram and Facebook. And that's worked well for me and more Pinterest. Actually, I found Pinterest has actually been a great driver. For me. It's good to know actually. And then I think the last thing probably Is mindset, I think you've got to believe you can do it. And you've got to live the life now of who you want to be in five years time.

 

31:12 

Oh, I love that. That's so good. That's such a nice way to wrap it up. There. You heard it live the life you want. Now, it sounded better when Sarah said, awesome. Okay, well, I'm gonna do and stay on the line. Sarah, I'm gonna wrap this up here. Thank you so much for joining us again, Sarah is up for the organics weaning awards. So do check those out. We'll link to that in the show notes. And if you want to follow her on Instagram, you'll find her at at the Children's nutritionist. That's Instagram and then you can check out her website at Children's nutrition.co.uk Thanks so much, Sarah. Thank you.

 

31:55 

Thanks so much for listening to the take it online podcast. If you want to know more about building out your own digital health program. You can find us a www.glowingpotential.com If you liked this episode or other episodes like it, please click subscribe and leave us a rating. It means a lot. Thank you

 

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

009. A Case Study: Taking Your Health Expertise Online with Special Guest Sarah Almond Bushell, RDhttps://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/sarah-childrens-nutrition008. Telehealth Tips with Special Guest Maeve Hanan from Dietetically SpeakingDigital HealthHealthcare ProfessionalsEmily FosterTue, 05 May 2020 12:56:23 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/MYNPvJQ3Z7g/maeve-telehealth59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5eb1621890eeaa3bc41435c8

Even before people had to stay at home (most of us anyways - thank you, key workers, <3) telehealth was moving into the spotlight in a big way. In this week's episode of Take it Online, Emily and special guest, Maeve Hanan from Dietetically Speaking and Nutrimote cover three keys for bringing telehealth into your health and wellness business/practice.

We'll discuss:

  • What is practice management software and do you need it?

  • GDPR and Data "Stuff" - rough and ready conversation on how to navigate it.

  • Maeve's top tips for getting your telehealth consultations to run smoothly.

and more!

Links Mentioned: 

To learn more about the Telehealth Toolkit for Nutrition professionals head to Glowing Potential. 


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Episode Transcript

Episode 8 - Special guest Maeve Hanan

0:08 

Welcome to the take it online podcast. Take it online is all about simple, effective ways to help you take your health and wellness content well, online. We'll feature stories behind the scenes peaks, and general how to use as well as not to dues for all things digital health.

 

0:31 

My name is Emily Foster, and I'll be your host for the take it online podcast. I'm a registered dietitian and I'm also the founder of glowing potential.

 

0:40 

Let's dive in.

 

0:45 

Hello, welcome back to another episode of The take it online podcast. I'm your host Emily Foster and today on the podcast we have a very special guest Maeve Hanan, you may know her from Dietetically Speaking, she runs some fantastic myth busting magic in the nutrition realm on various platforms on social media, and she's also got her blog which is dieteticallyspeaking.com. And her latest venture, which is a remote hub for nutrition professionals can be found at nutrimote.com. So this lady has got a lot of stuff going on and I have nabbed her for a very quick podcast episode, all on top tips for telehealth now maybe is not new to the game. She spent sort of the past five years in and out of telehealth, doing some remote working which we'll talk to us about today on the podcast. So this one short sweet and I hope you enjoy  - Welcome Maeve! Maeve is the brilliant dietitian behind the popular blog and social media accounts – dietetically speaking.

 

Maeve - I think one of the things that we will talk about today is telehealth and telehealth is really getting it's time in the sun at the moment. Hopefully it's here to stay. I know a lot of practitioners and wellness businesses are trying to take their services, their offerings online. So it's been kind of interesting to see that happen. I would say that probably that was happening before the whole COVID-19 thing and I don’t want to talk about that too much today. But obviously, it's really brought telehealth to the forefront in people's minds. But enough about that. We're going to talk about that in just a sec. Tell us a little bit about you. Where are you from? What do you like to do in your free time? What is the most exciting thing that you're up to at the moment?

 

2:53 

So I am from Ireland, and I'm currently temporary living in Northern Ireland. I'm not sure I do my free time at the moment, it tends to be kind of running yoga cooking. Yeah, watching TV. That's kind of most of my free time at the moment. And, and in terms of what I'm up to in terms of exciting projects and things. And what I'm most excited about at the moment is this new venture I've set up called nutriment. And basically, it is a hub for nutrition professionals who want to work online or who do work online. So it's all about working remotely. And so it's, you know, it covers all aspects of working online as a nutrition professional. And but at the moment, our main focus has been on telehealth just because so many people have had to make that quick change over, you know, related to the Coronavirus situation. And so yeah, but I'm excited because we set up a community. We have a Facebook group, and we're just adding different resources and things to the website all the time. That is Nutrimote.

 

 

4:04 

fantastic, awesome. And I'll leave that for you in the show notes as well everybody who's listening it is, you know, I've got to hand it to you because it's really difficult to run an engaged Facebook group and, and you've really done that in a very short space of time. So well done for that. So I know you talked a little bit earlier, when we were off offline about sort of your experience working remotely. I like to call it going rogue because I quite like that idea of sort of taking your practice and running with it. So you went on the road for what, over a year or a year doing it for about a year and a half. You know, tell us a little bit about that.

 

4:43 

And so that was about three years ago and so I started I worked in the NHS and about a year or two into my time with the NHS I start to do some work on the side when I started dietetic speaking. So it was mainly health writing bits of nutrition consultancy work. And then about three years ago when I decided to go traveling, and I became fully remote, fully freelance, and we travelled, we went to Japan. And we went to Southeast Asia and we travel around America. And because my partner is a web developer, he could work fully remotely. He was already working fully remotely. really jealous. So basically, I tried to find jobs online that were fully remote for nutritionists for dietitians. I just couldn't find anything. So I was like, Okay, well, I just have to become freelance kind of, set up by myself, look into telehealth, look into consultancy and all these other options. And so yeah, so that's what I did. I kind of I just started my remote practice at that time. And then I came back to Ireland for a bit to cover an in person maternity cover for a dietitian, and at the moment, I am fully remote again.

 

5:52 

Now I you know, which is you have a preference Do you prefer doing sort of the physical stuff for a bit before But do you do prefer working one on one with people face to face? Or more online? Or do you prefer? Do you like that balance?

 

6:07 

I think there's definitely pros and cons and overall in terms of like work life balance and lifestyle and everything, I'd much prefer being fully remote. And I do like that, you know, when you're in person with people, there is a different kind of rapport and connection and communication that you can get. And so I do definitely like that. But overall, if I think of kind of, you know, how do I want my life to be where do I see myself? It's definitely in the remote space.

 

6:32 

That's interesting, isn't it? And I, you know, we talked about this a lot of glowing potential as well, but they are definitely a different skill set. I mean, if you're a registered healthcare professional or your wellness professional and you're trained in your craft, if you want to call it that, then certainly you know, obviously there is crossover but there are some nuances aren't there for being digital than being sort of face to face with people there are sort of those nuances. It takes a while to get used to doesn't it?

 

6:59 

Yeah,  and I think you don't always imagine it beforehand. You're like, Oh, it's just the same thing. But I'm doing it through video screen and or computer screen. And But yeah, I think when you actually start to do it, some of those little differences do start to crop up. And it's like anything, the more practice you get, you know, you get used to it, and it's absolutely fine. And but I think a little bit of preparation, and just knowing where to find information and resources, that can be really helpful.

 

7:25 

Yeah, definitely. And, you know, there's no accident or it's no accident while you're on the podcast today. So those of you might know that Maven, I have partnered really nutriment and going potential and partnered up to put together a telehealth toolkit for nutrition professionals. Now I know not everybody on the podcast today is a nutrition professional. So what we've done is we've kind of pulled out three key pieces of the toolkit to share with all of you that you're going to find relevant regardless of what sort of health or wellness profession that you're in. So maybe we're going to walk you through sort of three key pieces that are coming from that telehealth toolkit that hopefully you can take away and will benefit your practice. So the first thing that Maven I wanted to talk about was around sort of practice management. And they've had when we were talking sort of offline had some great things to say about this. So maybe kind of coming from that telehealth toolkit also, at, you know, your past experience, what do you do with software that helps you to manage your practice? What are some sort of tips for that? And what are some sort of software's that help you do that and what does that even mean?

 

8:30 

Yes, very good place to start. And so practice management software, it's software that kind of brings together all the steps of a telehealth consultation. And so it's anything from taking bookings and appointment reminders, and sending automated forms and your client notes. And some of them have payment processors and things involved. So a lot of them are these kind of one stop shops where basically start to finish for your consultation. They have kind of solutions all the way along. And so some of the most common ones would be practice better healthy Kalix,  simple practice. They are all you know, they're slightly different and I always encourage people to look up individually and sort of do some of the free trials and things to see. Yeah, you for your practice. And because you know, they do all have different features and things and different price points. And, and it's just important to mention as well that you don't necessarily need to go straight away to a full practice management software. And there are more kind of lower cost ways of doing things. And so you can get free tiers of like booking software, for example. And then you can use video consultation software, just you know, zoom and Skype for Business and different kind of video platforms. And so, so there is like software you can use for each step of the process and kind of piecing it together. yourself. can be Little bit cheaper. Or it may be that you know, your clients are just used to using zoom or something. So maybe that's actually just more convenient. And

 

10:09 

because if you are already used to being on a platform, it makes your job a lot easier of explaining how to get on get on the video and have a smooth consultation. That's a really good point.

 

10:19 

Exactly. And I've actually just switched over from and one video platform, which is really easy, you just follow the link doxy.me and I've just switched that all over to zoom even though it was so easy to use doxy people are just really used to using zoom and it's what most people use for work. And so yeah, so I found that really helpful for my clients.

 

10:37 

That's great. That's awesome. So some great tips there. So one you know, you don't have to when you I think this is a really key point if you are sort of earlier on in your practice and you're experimenting with these things don't feel like you have to go out and buy the super expensive practice management software. I mean, when I say super expensive, a lot of these, you know, the price point is reasonable. But you know if you are just Starting out, then it might just be a little bit more than what you need. So have a look at those things, as Dave says, try the free trials. But those are some great examples. And we'll leave those in the show notes as well. So any sort of software you hear mentioned today, this isn't sponsored, there's no affiliate ads or anything like that. It's there's no click for money, which there's nothing wrong with but I just haven't been organized to put that together. So yeah, so

 

11:24 

all the links will be left with you in the show notes below.

 

11:27 

So the other question that I think may get a lot of questions on and I certainly get a lot of questions as well from other nutrition professionals and healthcare professionals in general, who are moving into private practice or sort of just offering services online. He's around GDPR and data and I think there's a lot of fear around this topic as well because nobody wants to make a mistake, or have a data breach, or all of those kind of intimidating thing. So maybe, and I know we talked about offline, a little ran around GDPR Data Protection, sort of what are some key things that we need to know, around GDPR data protection practicing online to keep us in our patients safe?

 

12:09 

Yeah, it's a really important topic. And as you said, it's one that a lot of us as healthcare professionals are very nervous about. And so that's where the toolkit itself goes into a lot more detail in terms of linking to different resources and breaks it down in more detail. But if I was to summarize in terms of some of the key areas, the first thing I would say, it's just really important to register with the tape, the Data Protection Association in whichever country you're based in. So wherever you practice, and so that's ICO in the UK, it's DPC in Ireland. And so it'll vary depending on different countries. And that's not expensive, is it? No, it's not at all No. And so yeah, and it's and that's just really important, because then you know, if there is a data breach or anything, and you know, you're already registered, so you're kind of you're doing your due diligence. There. You know, being registered and it's, it's something we have to do, because we are, we're processing this sensitive data. So that's the first thing, make sure that you're registered. And something else that would be really important would be. And actually one of the key takeaways from our whole section around GDPR is around transparency. And that's really, you know, why the GDPR was brought about in the first place. It's about, you know, being transparent and being responsible and how we are processing the sensitive data. So you know, the health records and, you know, even like name and address and everything. And so, so it's all about, you know, having it on your website disclaimer, being really transparent about exactly how you use how you process data, and what you would do in the event of a data breach. And I think that's one of the really important points to talk about. And then another one I think is important to specifically for healthcare professionals is around gaining consent. And so, again, we go into this in more detail in the pack. But what we really want to make sure is that we are gaining valid consent. And so some of the specific points to think about is, and basically, is it is it informed consent? So if somebody and do they know exactly what they're consenting to, and part of that involves explaining kind of the pros and cons and alternatives, and exactly what telehealth is, for example, so, you know, as health professionals, you know, we have an understanding of what telehealth is, but not everybody does. So, even just kind of spelling that out for our clients, so they know what they're agreeing to. And, and just making sure it's really specific, and it's freely given, of course, and so different ways so that there is really just one specific way of gaining consent. And but it's making sure really, that you have a record of this and that the client has given that of their own free will.

 

14:56 

Absolutely. And again, you know, we'll we'll link to We'll link to some links in the show notes below. But I think you know, the point you made there around GDPR, it is not, you know, it's not meant to be some big scary thing. Yes, we need to take it seriously. But it is about transparency. And it's ultimately about giving people control over their data. So if you don't know a lot about GDPR, I'll leave a couple of links in the show notes below. But really take the time to just kind of flip through this stuff and understand it. And the Ico has some really great information around sort of GDPR and checklists and sort of key resources and things like that. So you know, it's worth taking the time just to read through this stuff and and understand that it isn't black and white. There are a lot of gray areas, and they're not expecting you to be perfect. They're just expecting you to be honest and transparent and clear with how and what you're using people's data for and people so that they can request their data back or pull back their data. They don't want you to hold it anymore. It's Like unsubscribing, to emails, that sort of thing, it gets more in depth than that. But at the end of the day, it's about transparency, which is sort of health and wellness professionals is probably top of mind. So, you know, don't be intimidated by it and, and seek legal advice if you need to. A lot of lawyers will offer sort of free discovery calls and sort of point you in the right direction. And, and, you know, but I don't think I don't think that that's something that if you're just starting out in business, you need to, you know, go see a lawyer for tons and tons of legal advice, I think, through something like a discovery call, they'd be able to put you in the right direction. If you feel like you're, you're dealing with some if you're just not too sure what to do with with the data or what you're doing properly, but there's a lot of resources out there from the government from the Ico, etc, etc. Where you can kind of read through what you need to be doing to be really GDPR compliant but being transparent with your data. So that's a big topic there. We went further than what I

 

17:05 

do. But But takeaway, don't be afraid to seek legal advice if you feel you need it, be transparent and register with your data protection group.

 

17:15 

Yes, GDPR in a nutshell

 

17:16 

TGT the audit trail. That's right, a flying tour. And the last thing that we're going to talk about was around top tips for telehealth consultations. And we have a lot of these in the toolkit. But sad knave, I think you're going to take us through some really, really important ones today. Before I let you go because I am conscious of your time. I've grabbed me right before she's got a nutrition clinic. So so I'm very thankful to have her on the call today. Perfect mate. All right. So walk us through some top tips for telehealth.

 

17:45 

So I think one of the most important ones and it kind of it links into a lot of my top tips in terms of telehealth, and one of the kind of core things to think about is actually getting your internet connection really good. And on both ends. So obviously There's only so much you can do. And but if we prepare our clients for the consultation and just give them some basic tips about how to improve the internet connection, I think that's really important because obviously, our communication as healthcare professionals is really important. And we already have some communication barriers in terms of you know, it's difficult to, and to interpret body language and things like that through the computer screen. Absolutely. And so what we really need is to optimize you know, how we can kind of see and hear each other. So when there's a poor internet connection that can just make it really difficult. And so really even just some simple tips, so making sure that somebody isn't like downloading loads of files or, and nobody in the household using that internet is streaming video at the time of their consultation. So if they're watching Netflix or YouTube or something like that, that can take up a lot of bandwidth. And that can impact on their internet connection. So it will depend on how good their internet connection is. Start with, but that's always a tip that I give my clients and, and if and if things really aren't working, you know, then you can do the classic you know, turn things on and off and reconnect. And sometimes that's enough to just kind of reboot things. And I feel like I'm an IT person there. And then you can also recommend that they check the speed of their internet so you can do this internet speed test basically, if you just Google internet speed test, there's loads of different ones that come up. And generally, if it's above 20 megabytes per second, then that's a good strong connection for a video consultation. And otherwise, if the internet connection you know, isn't good, you can try turning off and the video sometimes that helps a little bit. And, and even just things in terms of the overall tech setup, so making sure it's charged and there isn't you know, loads of different tabs open and then having a backup to backup mordant. Exactly. And because you know, with all the will in the world, you can really organized, you know, your client can do everything that they can on their end. But perhaps the internet was down that day, there's a bad connection. And so having a backup, which is generally a phone call, so make sure that you have their phone number and they have your phone number. And I've you know, I've definitely needed to resort to that time so I think that will be some of the key areas that I would focus on.

 

20:22 

Absolutely. Those are some great tips and I think as well from a you know, we don't talk about this very often when it comes to digital health and and, but there is there is an element of practitioner or Yeah, really practitioner or healthcare professional safety. So when you are giving things out like telephone numbers, or if you're using something like WhatsApp groups or whatever, I'm bearing in mind that your telephone number is seen. So there are services that you can use to kind of so you get sort of a, like a fakie telephone number. But bearing that in mind, you know, if you're just starting if you're new to private practice, or you're new to sort of telehealth in general, and you know you're working from home. So you don't have that landline, maybe that you did before. And you want to want to use a telephone number as a backup. There are other services like ringcentral or you know, Skype numbers or things like that, that you can give out to people as well. So if you're not so comfortable with giving someone your mobile number, which maybe you're not, and then there are other ways around that too, so don't feel like you've got to give you got to give all of your practice your application to clients, your phone number, but I am conscious of time made. Thank you so so much for being here today. The lovely may from dietetic, Lee speaking.com. As well as neutral note calm, we'll link to all of that in the show notes. made. Thank you so very much.

 

21:44 

Thank you so much, Emily, it was lovely chatting to you.

 

21:46 

Yes and stay on the call because we will be going through a little bit. I'll bring you through a whistle stop tour of the telehealth toolkit if you're interested. Other than that, Dave, thank you so very much and you have yourself a great day. Thank you. You too.

 

22:00 

So there you go our little episode with me. I really hope that you enjoyed it. She's fantastic. As you can probably tell from my voice I really love working with Maven, this telehealth toolkit that we've put together for nutrition professionals has really been a labour of love for both of us. It goes through everything from telehealth workflow examples. So, ie how you set up tweaks or changes that you need to make that are specific for sort of a telehealth business. We talked about GDPR. We talked about the difference between sort of a privacy policy and T's and C's and what you need to have on your website. And we've got some email templates in there some pre consultation form templates, client notes, templates, I've got some of my marketing 101 stuff in there tips for successful telehealth comm consultations which may have kindly walked us through her top three but there are loads more in there and so if this is something that is of interest to you, I really encourage you to go to glowing potential.com. You'll see at the top of there, there'll be a blue bar that will say, click here for more information on the telehealth toolkit. So that's all there. So let's go in potential.com and you'll see the bright blue bar on the top that will say Click here for the telehealth toolkit in formation. 

23:37 

Thanks so much for listening to the take it online podcast. If you want to know more about building out your own digital health program, you can find us at www.glowingpotential.com if you like this episode or other episodes like it, please click subscribe and leave us a rating. It means a lot. Thank you

 

 

008. Telehealth Tips with Special Guest Maeve Hanan from Dietetically Speakinghttps://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/maeve-telehealth007. Testing Your Programme Idea: What You Need To Think AboutHealthcare ProfessionalsDigital HealthEmily FosterMon, 20 Apr 2020 15:21:00 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/qXqNWcXZwcs/testing-your-programme-idea-what-you-need-to-think-about59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5e9f0f3b30b979048112535b

Got a big idea for your business/practice? Join Emily as she walks you through why now is a fabulous time to build out an MVP/Pilot version of your big idea as well as what you need to be thinking about to make sure it's successful.

"This big, beautiful idea you have in your head for a health/wellness programme is great but realistically that's not what the end result is going to look like. You're going to learn so much on your first round of running any programme and a pilot programme is a fantastic budget-friendly way to work out any kinks!"

We'll discuss:

  • Who is your pilot for?

  • What success outcomes do you want to see?

  • How are you going to measure these outcomes?

  • What's your marketing plan?

and more!


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 007. Testing Your Programme Idea: What You Need To Think Abouthttps://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/testing-your-programme-idea-what-you-need-to-think-about006. Collaboration & UK Funding: Small Business Pep-TalkEmily FosterTue, 07 Apr 2020 15:20:00 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/qUJbj1sCwRI/006-collaboration-and-funding59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5e9f0f1786fecd1968ce82de

Collaboration stations everyone! Now is a fantastic time to collaborate with other businesses, combine skills and create something that's as fabulous as you are.
It's a bit of a challenge for small businesses at the moment which is why we've put together some current (06/04/2020) funding resources for UK businesses - grants for ideas, or services that can help people during COVID-19.

Just because you're a small business doesn't mean you don't have a massively great idea.

Join Emily as she walks you through 3 funding sources and reasons why you should look to collaborate vs. trying to do everything all on your own. 

Funding mentioned (and not mentioned) in the episode:


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 006. Collaboration & UK Funding: Small Business Pep-Talkhttps://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/006-collaboration-and-funding005. Marketing During Uncertainty: For Your Health & Wellness Practice/BusinessHealthcare ProfessionalsDigital HealthEmily FosterMon, 30 Mar 2020 15:19:00 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/AIZ8U-oSOF4/005-marketing-during-uncertainty59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5e9f0ef98355e9787284aa48

Marketing your product, programme or services is... challenging at the moment. Thinking outside the box as to how you can help your current customers, patients and clients is a must - and so too is staying away from empty "I hope you're well" emails.

Join Emily as she walks you through some key ideas as to how you can market your helpful, tailored and relevant products and services during this time of uncertainty.

We'll discuss:

  • Being sensitive but also helpful

  • Some consumer research about what the general public wants to see from brands

  • Costing is a factor but you can still charge for your offerings

  • Getting involved locally 

  • Bringing people together but thinking outside the box about how you do it

Articles mentioned in the episode:
I highly recommend you read both, but if I could only recommend one - read the second one. 


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 005. Marketing During Uncertainty: For Your Health & Wellness Practice/Businesshttps://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/005-marketing-during-uncertainty004. Tools of The Trade: 3 Online Course Platforms That Are Easy To Use - a Brief OverviewHealthcare ProfessionalsDigital HealthEmily FosterMon, 23 Mar 2020 16:18:00 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/St44udYrKNo/ep00459084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5e9f0e93f979aa339fe16db9

If you want to build out an online course or offering but you're not too sure what's available - let Emily guide you though three software platforms that are simple to use and with at least two that are within your budget.

All three platforms are market-leaders, great for all types of health and wellness businesses, but your preference may change based on what it is exactly that you want to build out for your patients/clients/customers.

We'll discuss:

  • ThinkificTeachable and Kajabi (course platforms)

  • Key feature differences

  • Differences in price

  • Differences in user experience


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 004. Tools of The Trade: 3 Online Course Platforms That Are Easy To Use - a Brief Overviewhttps://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/2020/ep004003. What Makes The Best Digital Health Content For Your Business or Practice?Emily FosterFri, 28 Feb 2020 14:18:00 +0000http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarketingBites/~3/bEOBCDHSDU4/003-what-makes-the-best-digital-health-content-for-your-business-or-practice59084aacd482e9bebd1de456:5e9ef20dea786561f34e5762:5e9ef2b56de7cc0b44ddc68e

So you want to offer something for your patients, clients or customers online but you're not too sure what would make the best content for a digital health offering.
Join Emily as she covers how to know what the best content is for your business or healthcare practice.

Topics discussed include:

  • What's working in your business or practice right now?

  • What are your patients, clients or customers asking you about?

  • What do you feel most comfortable and excited talking about? 


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Episode Transcript

Episode 3 - Take it Online Podcast

Welcome to the take it online podcast. Take it online is all about simple, effective ways to help you take your health and wellness content well, online. We'll feature stories behind the scenes peaks, and general how to as well as not to do for all things digital health.

My name is Emily Foster, and I'll be your host for the taken online podcast. I'm a registered dietitian and I'm also the founder of glowing potential. Let's dive in.

Hi there and welcome back to the taken online podcast. Today's episode is all about deciding on the content or the subject matter that you want your digital health offering to be - and usually if you're thinking about offering something in digital health, you fall into one of two camps. So the first camp being you know exactly what it is that you want to offer, you're just not too sure how to build it out. And if that's the case, then this is probably not the episode for you, although there might be some nuggets in here. And you're more interested in the how to build it out part, perhaps software's structure, what the evidence basis, all of that good stuff, and there certainly will be episodes in the podcast coming up for that. If you're in camp number two, the second camp being you know that you want to offer something online for your clients, your patients, your customers, but you're not too sure what the best subject matter or content is for you to be building out digitally. And so today's episode is all around that. If that sounds interesting to you, which I hope it does. Stay with us. Fantastic. You're still with us. So today's episode is all around.

How do you how do you choose what content, what subject? It is that you're going to build out this digital health offering? And this might seem like a question that, you know, you already know the answer to you might think, Well, you know, I want a program that's going to help people eat healthier, or I want a program that's going to help my employees sleep better. Or I want a program that's going to teach people how to cook. Great. But there is this element that and this kind of comes from marketing, but there's this element that if you are building something that is for everybody, then it's for no one. So again, I'll say that, again, if you're building something that's for everybody, then you're building something that is for nobody. And what I mean by that is that you can't be all things to all people and it's the same thing with your program. specificity is key here. If you build out a really massive program, If you build out something that has so much subject content, a it's hard for people to get through. But be. It's not. It's not really people aren't taking a whole ton away from that because there's too much to take away from it. So key thing to take away here more is not more, what do you need to think about? Well, if you haven't listened to Episode Two, you need to think about having conversations with your audience around what they want, what they value. But the second piece to this is diving deep into what's already working in your business, in your practice, wherever it is that your place of work is. And so things to look at are number one, what is already working really well for you right now. Is there a particular program that you're running in person? Are you offering one on ones or classes on a particular topic? And maybe you run multiple different topics, but you're finding that one or two particular ones? are really standing out. Is there something that people are? Is there something that people are constantly asking you about? Maybe you're not offering something with regards to that subject yet. But you're thinking about it, maybe that would be a good opportunity to pilot something digital. And then the third thing is, what do you feel really comfortable talking about? Or what is your specialty? So is there an area that you have over the years just gathered a lot of experience in? Is there something that over the past couple years you found that you really enjoy speaking about or that you get a lot of questions on so you just ended up learning a lot about it? Think about those things.

So the first one is what's already working really well for your business because the thing is, is that it is much easier to get people interested in something online if they've already been interested in something “in person”. So what I see working really well for healthcare practitioners and Wellness Business is, is when they are offering something digital as an add on for something that they're already running physically in store. Now, this might not apply for you because you might just have a digital business and that's fine. But for those of you who don't for those of you who work one on one with your customers, clients, patients, and these are the people that you're building out something digital for a really great way to sort of gently introduce them to something in the digital health space. And to also give your business and yourself a little bit of an easier route in to the digital health space is to offer something that's partially in person and partially online. And that's totally not cheating. A lot of people think that they need some massively built out only online thing, but that's just not the truth. And if you go through a lot of the guidelines around digital care, you'll see that it's not meant to replace in person care. So there are certainly still times where you need to see a doctor dietitian, physiotherapist, whatever. Or you you know, if you go to a fitness class because you're not following the class online, so you make yourself go in class once a week, and then you do maybe your, your app work out the other days of the week, whatever. So it's not cheating if it's partially in person or in a physical realm and then partly in the digital one.

If you have the opportunity to listen to Episode Two, we did talk about an MVP as well. So a minimum viable product and basically all that is is the smaller version of the big thing you want to build out to make sure that people are interested and actually going to show up and pay for etc, etc. The thing you are building, one of the ways you can do this, it actually is a great way for you to trial, something additional for your business in the digital space is, is there anything that you're doing already that you can repurpose? So what I mean by that is, do you run a live event or teach a class or anything like that, or you already running something that you could potentially film and use that as the content. So instead of having to do the triple, triple the amount of work to try and create something entirely new, can you repurpose something that you're already doing? Let's bring it back to the beginning. So the whole purpose of this episode is to try and help you narrow down what content you're going to build out on a digital platform. And the key thing I want you to remember here is to keep it simple, those big ideas that we talked about at the beginning of the podcast, so we said you know, I want a course that helps people to eat healthier or I want to course to help people learn how to cook. Those are all really great ideas. But there are so many subcategories within those big categories that you need to be focusing in on and how you decide what you're going to focus in on within those broad categories comes back to those questions. We talked about what's working for you right now in your business? What are people asking you about? And what is your particular specialty? What makes you unique? Don't be afraid as well of narrowing down too far for these concepts. The problem is when you go too broad, it's not only hard to get people to motivate people to finish or join into this thing that you're building. But it's also really difficult for you to market it and talk about it because it's so broad that he really has no one specific target audience, target patient target set of clients, target customers, so keep it simple.

Think about a way that you can trial this topic. Let's go through three examples of what you could set up in different scenarios. So the first example I'm going to give is maybe you are a physiotherapist who also works in a yoga studio. And you've been noticing that because a lot of your clients, they work on computers all day, a lot of them have really weak wrists. And so you end up talking a lot about alignment and yoga classes. And you end up getting a lot of questions because people need to strengthen their risks, or maybe they've injured at home, not at your yoga practice, and you're just getting a lot of appointments with people who have this wrist injury or they need to strengthen their risks. And so they're booking maybe 30 minute appointments with you. And it's becoming pretty clear that this is something you could offer something digital so perhaps you decide to build out a Module online, it's all about the anatomy of the wrist as well as how to keep it strong, as well as what to do if you've injured it. And maybe as a part of that, you also offer a one on one session. So you maybe do that through a video call, or perhaps you run the session live and then for those who can't meet the session live on the webinar will then be able later to watch that recording. So that's one example if your practice is getting a lot of questions about a particular topic of taking that topic and creating a digital offering for that.

My second example, is if you're a healthcare professional, perhaps you are a paediatric dietitian, as an example, or a paediatric nutritionist, and you run an event, maybe every quarter, that has to do with making a kid's lunch, and it's a fun workshop that usually put on people come with their kids. They make a lunch together, they learn about healthy eating. And it's over a couple of hours. But you only have a limited amount of availability for that particular class and you only really like to do it once a quarter. So you end up having to turn quite a few people away. And what you could do with that is you could do something like a live event. So you have somebody with you, who films it, maybe you're running at trial on Facebook Live or Instagram Live. And what you're able to do is have somebody else filming and answering questions as they come in on that particular feed. And that would be a really good example of something that you could run as a trial that then if you're getting a lot of interaction live, and you do that, because obviously on on Facebook Live or Instagram Live, that's going to be something free that people can watch on your regular feed. But maybe if that goes well that's sort of your MVP for something more like a live event. No Not necessarily a webinar, but sort of like a live summit, if you will. And that's something that you'll look to run the following quarter, because you saw that the engagement was really high online. So that's another example.

My final example is a spin studio. So a cycle studio, and you have a lot of new people, or you have a lot of people who are transients, so maybe you have a drop in style class, and people don't have to become members, they can just pay for the classes as they go. And so you get people maybe who haven't been to spin in a while, maybe they come all the time. But for the most part, you get quite a transient crowd, although you're always quite busy. And this example is around posture and alignment. So you get a lot of people coming and the instructor get asked a lot of questions around. How do I set up my bike? How do I know if the handlebars are too far forward? How do I adjust my seat? You know, and all of this stuff. You might say, well, that's not really digital health, but if they don't set up the bike properly, they can really end up hurting themselves. And then they definitely need some help after that. So it could be something where every time somebody signs on to a spin class, they get an email confirming that, but maybe they also have a little video embedded, that talks about how to set up your bike properly for proper posture. And that's something that's almost a preventative measure for you. And it could be something like if you if you want to know more about this, or if you want to book a 10 minute slot for five pounds to go through this with an instructor, you're welcome to do that. And there's a little you know, button there for people to do. And you might say, well, Emily, it should be the spin studios policy to get their instructors to help students set up their bike. Definitely, but if you can have something that's also another preventative measure of people hurting themselves, and it's an added value, and it puts people at ease, who maybe this is their first spin class in a while and they forget what to expect or they're not really too sure how to clip in, clip out all of that stuff that can be really, really helpful to also get people to attend the class as well, taking away some of that nervousness. So there you have it. three examples on some businesses that could take some opportunities for a digital health offering. You had the wrist care workshop that was online, you had the live event with the healthy lunch workshop, and then you had the how to set up your bike in the spin studio example. This podcast is brought to you by the ticket online newsletter if you like what you hear here, you can head to glowing potential.com and sign up for our take it online newsletter. So let's recap what we've talked about here today. is so important to remember that statement, if you're selling to everybody you are selling to nobody. And that same thing works for when you're trying to build out a course or a digital offering something of that nature. So keep it simple. Remember the questions that we asked earlier in the episode.

So what is already working really well right now in your business? Can you springboard something off that?

Is there something that you can do that will help make that offering you've currently got better? Will it be an extension of it? Or will you maybe do a live recording of something that you're already running to see if people are also interested in that in more of a digital space?

The second thing is think about what your audience what your clients, your customers, your patients, what are they asking me for? What are you getting a lot of questions on that. Maybe you're not able to answer right now because you're too busy. Or maybe you just think that it's really well placed for more of an online group setting. Or that there's a an app that you know of that maybe you could sign up for, that you could provide care through that would really improve the amount of questions and how you're answering them.

And then the last thing is, what do you feel comfortable talking about? What is your experience, so if you have a specialty in a certain area, or the way that you offer certain services, or the way you talk about them is really unique, that can make a digital offering really special? So think about those three things. Number one, what's working for you right now? Number two, what are your clients, your patients, your customers asking you about? And three, what do you already feel extremely comfortable talking about? What is your passion? What is your area of expertise, and something unique that you bring to the table if there's a unique way that you offer your Your services. So there you have it.

Hopefully that's given you a couple of ideas of what you could do to build out your digital health offering to take something that you do already in your business in your practice. Take it online. Thanks for listening, and we'll see you again next time.

Thanks so much for listening to the take it online podcast. If you want to know more about building out your own digital health program, you can find us at www.glowingpotential.com If you liked this episode, or other episodes like it, please click subscribe and leave us a rating. It means a lot. Thank you

003. What Makes The Best Digital Health Content For Your Business or Practice?https://www.glowingpotential.com/podcast/2020/4/21/003-what-makes-the-best-digital-health-content-for-your-business-or-practicenonadult
22 Episodes
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So many ideas, so little time. It's hard to know when, what seems like a great idea, enters your head if you should act on it or leave it be. In this episode Emily shares with you the 4-step way that she tries to decide if an idea is worth pursuing.Quick Overview:- What are your priorities?- What would success look like?- Does this success help your priorities- Planning your trial/decision point.Brought to you by: The Marketing Bites E-Blast – click here to catch Glowing Potential’s latest tips and training sessions directly to your inbox.
Webinars have been around awhile now but a lot of us have been nervous to “take the plunge”!If this is you, this is the episode for you. Join Emily as she walks you through 5 top tips of running a successful webinar and gives you 5 software options to try for your healthcare business. To read the full synopsis of this episode head to our podcast page here.Brought to you by: The Marketing Bites E-Blast – click here to catch Glowing Potential’s latest tips and training sessions directly to your inbox. Webinar Software Discussed· Webinar Jam· Webinar Ninja · Go to Webinar · Zoom Basic · Google Hangouts *Links in website notes.
In this episode, Emily explores questions asked recently by a former client. “Should I expect to be paid for these speaking, blogger or brand partnership activities?” and the differences between a brand partnership and consulting. We discuss the different types of "payment" to consider as well as distinct differences between partnering with a business or brand and offering consulting services. This episode is brought to you by: The DIY Marketing Bites E-Blast Sign up here for healthy marketing tips, tricks and trainings >>
Ever wonder how people get conference speaking gigs? Scratching your head about how you even start putting your feelers out there for brand partnerships? Wanting to write a guest blog post for your favourite blogger but have no idea where to start? This episode is for you. We review: - 6 Steps to creating and reaching out to grab these opportunities- Tips for landing conference speaking places, guest blog post spots, and brand partnership dealsThis episode is brought to you by The DIY Marketing Bites E-Blast! Sign up today to get weekly marketing tips for your healthcare business/practice >>Thanks for listening!
Oh me oh my! Another policy? Well... sort of. I'm a big advocate of setting boundaries on social media and a way you can do that is to have a quick and easy policy to refer to. Not something that's 26 pages in length, just 3 quick areas of what you will and won't tolerate as well as what your objectives are. We cover: - The two types of "attacks" on social media- Why you should have a "take it offline" policy- Deciding what you will and won't respond to- Deciding ahead of time what you want to be known for. Sponsored by: Glowing Social: The Social Media 101 Course for Science-Based Nutrition ProfessionalsClick here to find out more >>Doors closing soon, February 27th, 2018 - don’t miss out!
General Data Protection Regulations… wow, what a mouthful. Coming to the EU May 25th, 2018. How will these regulations affect your business and where to even get started? Join Emily as she discusses some learnings for healthcare business owners or freelancers from key articles on the subject. We discuss: Head to our website to read the full set of notes.- What does the GDPR Mean?- Where to start?- Demonstrating compliance. - Privacy Notices- How do I know if I can collect the data?- Data breach - what is it and how to deal with it.  Articles Discussed:- Enterprise Nation - What does the GDPR Mean for my business?- ico. - Getting ready for the GDPR- Marketing Week - How marketers should be tackling GDPR implementation  Sponsored by: DIY Marketing Bites - Sign up >>The e-blast that puts oomph in your marketing for healthcare professionals. 
Concerned, frustrated, worried, deflated about the recent social media changes and predictions for 2018? Have no fear! This episode walks you through 6 reasons why social media is relevant now more than ever and how you can “see the light” as to why your business benefits from it. We discuss: Head to our website to read the full set of notes. 1. Social Media is … FREE! How much more convincing do you need? 2. Social Media is about making real human connections.  3. Market Research - that comes to you!4. The latest research and breaking news in your field. 5. PR Opportunities and Social Proof. 6. Transparency - you’re a human being!  Looking to up your social media game?Check out the Social Media 101 Course for Science-Based Nutrition Professionals - Glowing Social >> 
Wondering what the social media trends are for 2018 that effect your health business? Join Emily on this short + sweet episode as she talks about ways you can “get in” on the trends and stay on top of social media in 2018. We review: - Live Streaming- Facebook Changes- Instagram Stories- General Social Media Usage Trends- Chatbots Sponsor today: Glowing Social - The Social Media 101 Course for Science-Based Nutrition Professionals Links: - SpoutSocial 2018 Trends - How to Get Started with Chatbots - Social Media Examiner - The State of Social - Buffer + Social Media Week - Entrepreneur - 2018 Social Media Trends
You’re on social media and are wanting to jump onto a new platform or perhaps you feel like you’re spinning your wheels on the platforms you’re already on. Have you given serious some thought as to who and where your audience is as well as why you are on social media? These are questions we must ask ourselves in order to get the most out of our platforms and focus on the ones that are best for our health businesses. Join Emily on this episode as she goes through the 5 steps to choosing a platform that will give you the quality interactions you want with your target audience. We review: - Exploring WHY you’re on social media- The importance of knowing WHO you’re targeting- Ways to find YOUR ideal clients/followers online- Experimenting and testing content and social platformsE-Blast Sign-Up: Sign up for the Marketing Bites E-Blast >>Live Webinar Sign-Up:Sign up for the LIVE Webinar “5 Steps to Picking the ‘Right’ Social Media Platform”>>
Side hustles, social media and partnerships - sound interesting to you? Helen West, co-founder of The Rooted Project joins Emily on the podcast today to discuss key lessons from the business and her career as a dietitian. Everything from how to partner with healthcare professionals to tips for social media (ahem! The Rooted Project won the CN Nutrition Social Media account of the year!) to planning a successful event in healthcare. A fun interview filled with key takeaways for your health business in 2018. Time Stamps: - Helens Journey & The Rooted Project Gets It’s Start [time 00:00]- Partnering with Other Healthcare Professionals [time 06:29]- Social Media Tips & Tricks [time 14:15]- Getting Events Right! [time 27:53]- Side Hustle Advice [time 41:45]Items Discussed: List-making, Helen uses AsanaThe Rooted Project: www.therootedproject.co.uk/Twitter & Instagram: @Rooted_ProjectListening in iTunes?Download the SOCIAL MEDIA & EVENT summary sheets here >>
Erica Julson, RD joins me today on the podcast to discuss her experiences as the "Unconventional RD" and shares ways healthcare professionals can get involved in membership sites as well as tips to build community. We review: - How to validate an idea (such as a membership site!)- How much time Erica spends updating her membership site - What are some membership site platforms? (Thinkific, Teachable, etc.)- How to work with affiliates- Facebook community thoughts- Online business courses for healthcare pro's Erica Julson, RD is a registered dietitian based in California. She runs the Unconventional RD Facebook Group and website. Her dietetics practice can be found at ericajulson.com. Reading this in iTunes?Download Summary Here >>
We all know that the “gold standard” is having some sort of layout to organize our content for the upcoming month(s) - but let’s be real, it’s hard and who has time for that? Well, if you can create yourself a framework it gets a whole heck of a lot easier. We review: Deciding on a template (mentioned: Asana & Trello), Identifying important key dates (mentioned: school holidays UK, and finding awareness days UK), Developing key messages and themes, Scheduling live participation, Content creation & curation. For December, as a holiday treat, we have a special set of a webinar trainings on Social Media! To find out more head to https://www.glowingpotential.com/hcpmarketingservices/.
We reviewed: 1. Finding your ideal clients ideal platforms via similar practitioners and businesses AND conversations!2. How to discover what's already working for you and why to build on it. 3. The importance of setting aside time to make and manage social media content. Liked this episode and what to put these into action?Check out the Checklist: "3 Things You Can Do Now To Start Getting the Most Out of Your Social Media Platforms" Reading this in iTunes?Download Checklist here >>
Nervous about getting the word out about your business? Maybe you're just not too sure how to start? Have a listen as we review; how experience builds confidence and what to do if you don't have experience and how to deal with shiny object syndrome. We end with 3 actionable ways to get your healthcare practice/business noticed. Enjoy!
Choosing a platform to build a website? or looking to change platforms? Big decisions. As a non-techy person you CAN build a website that suits you and your businesses needs. Here are the top 5 answers you must know about building a website. We cover updating websites, scheduling functions, where to get images from as well as blogging and content - do you really need it? Have a listen!
Not every branding guru is an expert in healthcare branding. Healthcare branding, is an entirely different sort of beast, aiming to engage both the healthcare professional and the consumer (or 'resumer'). According to our special guest, Vince Parry, there is an identity crisis within healthcare branding: "Good marketing is good storytelling. And the healthcare category could use a heavy dose of this advice." Jump into this episode to listen to us discuss the celebration fallacy, brand strategy in healthcare, the difference between consumer and 'resumer' as well as the importance of logos. Like the episode? You can check out Vince's new book at bit.ly/IdentityCrisisVince.
Attracting new clients and building brand awareness on any budget. Learn more about experiential marketing and the benefits for your healthcare practice. P.s. as a HCP you're probably really good at experiential marketing! Check out the referenced article from HBR re: Emotional Connection >> https://hbr.org/2016/08/an-emotional-connection-matters-more-than-customer-satisfaction.
Regardless of what stage you are at with Twitter, Social Media is constantly evolving and it can be hard to stay on top of it all. Tune in to hear the low-down on Twitter. Whether you’re beginner or advanced this recording from the live Taking on Twitter webinar will get you learning things about the platform you never even knew existed!
Your ideal client is begging for you to understand them better... well, maybe not but they will be thrilled when you begin to create content and services with them in mind! Buyer personas help you to hone in on exactly what your target market wants and needs. Creating a sheet profiling your ideal client (i.e. buyer persona) takes effort but it's completely worth it in the long run.
Unless you want to run around like a chicken with it's head cut off, getting specific with your healthcare business is crucial. Join Emily as she explores why specificity is a superhero and how you can get specific with your private health practice or freelance gig.
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