Claim Ownership

Author:

Subscribed: 0Played: 0
Share

Description

 Episodes
Reverse
Underperforming state agencies, a natural disaster, and a pandemic are among the many challenges that faced Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker and his former Chief of Staff Steve Kadish. Looking back during the final year of the Baker Administration, they say running a government is very different and often much harder than leading a private-sector company. And they share their four-part framework for breaking down complicated problems with many stakeholders to get results. It’s valuable for anyone in public service, as well as for leaders and managers in large organizations hamstrung by bureaucracy and politics. Baker and Kadish wrote the new book "Results: Getting Beyond Politics to Get Important Work Done."
It feels like a moment of panic for many. While there were some success stories in how public and private sector leaders managed the global pandemic, it isn't over, and many more crises -- from political polarization to climate change to new technological threats -- loom. But one leading political scientist is hopeful that countries and corporations can find ways to overcome their divisions and better collaborate on our most pressing issues over next ten years. He points to historic precedents and makes specific recommendations for the future, noting that in areas where political divisions cause roadblocks, it will be up to corporate leaders to ensure progress. Ian Bremmer is the president and founder of the Eurasia Group and author of the book "“The Power of Crisis: How Three Threats – and Our Response – Will Change the World.”
It's a cliche, but they say it's best to write what you know. That was the case for comedian Sarah Cooper, who rose to viral social media fame in the Trump era through her lip sync TikTok videos. She formerly worked at Yahoo and Google, and she found her way into comedy, in part, by looking at and pointing out the absurdities of corporate culture. She speaks about how humor helped her manage a team, why she took the big risk to quit her job, and how she's navigating the new work world of Hollywood. Cooper is the author of the forthcoming audio book "Let's Catch Up Soon: How I Won Friends and Influenced People Against My Will."
We’re all prone to procrastinate. We feel guilty about it. And yet, we still do it. Alice Boyes, a former clinical psychologist and author, says breaking the habit is more than simply a matter of discipline. She explains the different causes of procrastination and shares three approaches to beat it: through habits, emotions, and thought patterns. Boyes wrote the book Stress-Free Productivity and the HBR article “How to Stop Procrastinating.”
Not everyone likes everything about their job all the time. But we know from research that people who are energized by at least parts of their work perform better – and feel a greater sense of well-being. So there’s a huge benefit when teams and organizations encourage employees to spend more of their work day focused on their strengths and passions. In this special series from HBR, we’re looking at how to figure out what you really love about work and craft your current job around that. In this episode, we’re scaling up from self-help for individuals to advice for managers and explaining how they can balance these efforts with business goals. IdeaCast co-host Alison Beard speaks with Marcus Buckingham, head of research on people and performance at the ADP Research Institute and author of the new book Love + Work.
Most managers today are overwhelmed. Thanks to rapid technological change, flattening hierarchies, agile work, and new attitudes about talent, they have to do more than ever. Lynda Gratton, professor at London Business School and the founder of HSM, points to a few ways we can solve the problem: by training bosses to be people leaders, outsourcing some of their mundane management tasks, and even splitting the role so some oversee work and others focus on talent development. Gratton is the author of the book Redesigning Work and coauthor along with Diane Gherson of the HBR article “Managers Can’t Do It All.”
A lot of us are feeling unhappy and disengaged at work – and that started long before the pandemic. A big part of the problem, says Marcus Buckingham, is that we don’t take the initiative to do more of the tasks that we truly love. After identifying what most energizes and excites you about your current role or employer, you can try a host of strategies to shape your work around those things. In this special series from HBR, we’re looking at how to find love in your work. In this episode, we explain how to shift your current role to focus on what really drives you. IdeaCast co-host Alison Beard speaks with Marcus Buckingham, head of research on people and performance at the ADP Research Institute and author of the new book Love + Work.
Deborah Ancona, a professor at MIT Sloan School of Management, and Dennis Perkins, CEO of The Syncretics Group, have researched how family dynamics play out in the workplace. They say people often revert to childhood patterns at work. By applying a concept from psychology known as family systems theory, managers and leaders can come to understand how their past influences their behavior and thus can grow professionally. Ancona and Perkins wrote the HBR article "Family Ghosts in the Executive Suite."
At a time when 41% of us are considering quitting our jobs, it’s time for us to understand why and what we can do about it. In this special series from HBR, we’re looking at how to craft your current job around the work you really love. In this episode, we’ll explain how to identify which tasks fit that bill and can lead you to a more fulfilling and successful career. IdeaCast co-host Alison Beard speaks with Marcus Buckingham, head of research on people and performance at the ADP Research Institute and author of the new book Love + Work.
Politics has traditionally been a taboo topic to discuss on the job. But as people get more vocal about their views -- on everything from from climate change to racial justice, elections to invasions -- it's increasingly hard to keep debate out of the workplace. And that can lead to conflicts between colleagues. Julia Minson of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and Francesca Gino of Harvard Business School have studied how political polarization is affecting organizations and have advice on handling the challenges it presents. Together, they wrote the HBR article “Managing A Polarized Workforce: How to Foster Debate and Promote Trust.”
There’s been much talk about the Great Resignation and what’s driving it. The pandemic has exacerbated a long-term problem: many of us struggle to find any pleasure in our work. But quitting isn’t the only the solution. Often, it’s not feasible. In this special series from HBR, we look at a different path: figuring out what you really love and crafting your current role around that. In this episode, we dig into the data showing why people feel so disengaged and what they feel is missing from their work. IdeaCast co-host Alison Beard speaks with Marcus Buckingham, head of research on people and performance at the ADP Research Institute and author of the new book Love + Work.
Randall Peterson, founding director of the Leadership Institute at London Business School, studies coworker dynamics. He says lately, the idea of head-to-head competition for advancement has gone out of style in favor of a more cooperative ideal. In reality, he says, interpersonal relationships at work can be both. Sometimes you cooperate closely with colleagues. Sometimes you compete directly with them. And sometimes it’s most effective to work independently. He explains how to deal with each scenario. And he shares how managers can help their teams find the right balance. Peterson is a coauthor of the HBR article “When to Cooperate with Colleagues and When to Compete.”
As the acclaimed documentarian releases a new two-part PBS series about Ben Franklin, he describes how the U.S. founding father transformed himself from teen runaway to newspaperman, then inventor, then political elder. He explains what current leaders can learn from how Franklin approached business, scientific discovery, and his fellow nation-builders. Ken Burns, whose films have covered everything from the Civil War to baseball, also shares insights on how he and his teammates get their own groundbreaking work done.
Madeleine Dore, an author and podcast host, offers a cure for “productivity guilt.” That’s the cycle of dejection she says many of us suffer from when we never reach the end of our lengthy to-do lists (even with modern technology to make us more efficient). Instead of trying to optimize our time, she suggests ways we can step back, listen to ourselves, and plan our days around delight. She offers tips and tricks to make this transition and explains why it can be good for business overall. Dore hosts the podcast Routines & Ruts and wrote the new book I Didn't Do the Thing Today.
Over the past few years in the United States, we’ve seen some horrific examples of racism seize the public consciousness. Amid all these tragedies – and the protests that followed – U.S. business leaders promised they would do their part to fight the problem, making workplaces more diverse, equitable and inclusive. But now it's time to go a step further, say James White and Krista White, father-and-daughter authors of the new book, “Anti-Racist Leadership: How to Transform Corporate Culture in a Race-Conscious World”. They share their own experiences as Black Americans in the workplace and lessons from James' time as CEO of Jamba Juice. And they offer advice on how corporate leaders can promote lasting change in their own organizations and society at large.
Megan Gerhardt, management professor at Miami University, studies the impact of generational conflict on organizations. She says too many leaders see generational lines as a source of division that hurts productivity. But her research shows that age is often an untapped source of diversity. When age-diverse teams are managed well, members share more knowledge, skills, and networks with each other. To foster intergenerational collaboration, she lays out a four-part framework that starts with questioning assumptions and ends with embracing mutual learning. Gerhardt is a coauthor of the HBR article "Harnessing the Power of Age Diversity.”
"No regrets" might be a popular modern-day mantra, but it's virtually impossible to live your life without wishing you could do certain things over. Some people try to ignore these feelings; others wallow in them. But author Dan Pink, who recently conducted large U.S. and global surveys on this phenomenon, says the right approach is to instead carefully consider what we regret and why so that we can either reverse course or make better decisions in the future, as well as putting them behind us. Whether you're frustrated by bad career moves you've made, business ideas you didn't pursue, or relationships you've let falter, these regrets can be useful tools for personal growth. Pink's new book is “The Power of Regret: How Looking Backward Moves Us Forward.”
Keith Ferrazzi, founder of the consulting firm Ferrazzi Greenlight, led a survey of more than 2,000 executives to study how they reengineered operations during the pandemic. The research identified a kind of extreme adaptability at the team and organizational levels that helped some companies come out on top. Ferrazzi argues that after months of ruthlessly adapting, leaders should continue on a path of resilience and agility to stay competitive in the post-Covid-19 world. And he offers concrete steps to take. Ferrazzi is a coauthor of the new book "Competing in the New World of Work: How Radical Adaptability Separates the Best from the Rest."
Purpose has become a corporate buzzword over the past decade. Leaders are embracing the idea that companies can’t just do well financially; they also have to do good for society. But how many organizations are really walking the talk? Ranjay Gulati, professor at Harvard Business School, has studied how dozens of purpose-driven companies -- from Etsy in the United States to Recruit in Japan -- simultaneously pursue profits. He argues that while we all want a win-win, leaders must also sometimes learn to make thoughtful tradeoffs. Gulati is the author of the book "Deep Purpose: The Heart and Soul of High-Performance Companies” and the HBR article “The Messy but Essential Pursuit of Purpose.”
Jonathan Gottschall, a distinguished fellow at Washington & Jefferson College, has researched storytelling and its unique power to inspire. But as he spoke at business conferences and grew aware of the popularity of storytelling in the corporate world, he came to realize just how much stories can also manipulate and destroy. From addressing climate change to the Theranos scandal, he explains the ins and outs of stories and argues for establishing a culture of honest storytelling in business. Gottschall is the author of the book "The Story Paradox: How Our Love of Storytelling Builds Societies and Tears them Down".
Comments (84)

GBH

Ms. Gerhardt's certainly has done solid groundwork in researching and understanding cultural differences within the workforce. That said, large Enterprise firms which are highly segmented and siled often view age differently then does for example a online music startup. The former will typically have a broader, and more diverse workforce both age-based, and culturally whereas in this example the music platform company by their own blog post accounts has a workforce well under 40, is this unconscious or a more deliberate form of bias? Does her research show that smaller Internet companies tend to hire people much like themselves? In my experience having worked at a large professional services firm until being Riff'd at age 60, age bias and discrimination was not even a recognized or discussed topic, during my nine years at this firm. Ethnic and cultural biases both unconscious and conscious were often discussed at great length. Lastly large firms towards the reactive and not proactive stance and execution against societal challenges, therefore it would not seem intuitive to believe that exploring, discussing, understanding, and implementing the contributions, and learning differences amongst the five age groups she mentioned would be on most large firms radar let alone development plan.

Mar 15th
Reply

Hosein Vahdat

Amazing episode. thanks to all, especially Antonio

Mar 9th
Reply

Slavic Jakubko

Here I am reading a lot of useful information about earning, for example, https://2captcha.com/ on the Internet. Your comrades will also probably not know about this site and it would be better to let them know about it and as many people as possible

Feb 23rd
Reply

Red Arrow

Nowadays, it's not easy without work!

Feb 23rd
Reply

Timo Marquez

What about when the gaslighter is the CEO ?

Jan 12th
Reply

Felipe Dutra

Great episode!! So many valuable tips!

Sep 7th
Reply

kagimub

Truth is always the best policy. Thank you for this episode. #Honesty

Aug 18th
Reply

Mike Wood

n

Jul 13th
Reply

Huw Williams

ifbplki

Jul 4th
Reply

Shabnam Seyf

listening to this in June 2021 and it feels strange!

Jun 17th
Reply

Ehsan Teymouri

hi. how can I find transcription?

Jan 29th
Reply

Kyle Gonzales

interesting topic!

Sep 30th
Reply

Anthony Bowers

Brilliant episode. I don't wear a hoodie

Aug 29th
Reply

Anthony Bowers

Really enjoyed this episode. Turning potential into achievements.

Aug 23rd
Reply

Anthony Bowers

The shift from IT afterthought to CIOs being front and centre has been hard and fast.

Aug 3rd
Reply

SJ

no

Jul 29th
Reply

Anthony Bowers

Food for thought!

Jul 29th
Reply

Carolyne Gardner

anyone else experiencing poor sound quality?

Jul 28th
Reply

Anthony Bowers

Great to hear about her life's work. I wonder how things have come along re the protection of gold resources and the effect this has on women globally

Jul 26th
Reply

Anthony Bowers

The Cubicle...I am still not sold on this. Meaningful relationships require a degree of intimacy that you dont get in an open office cubicle

Jul 23rd
Reply
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store