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HISTORY This Week

Author: HISTORY

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This week, something momentous happened. Whether or not it made the textbooks, it most certainly made history. Join HISTORY This Week as we turn back the clock to meet the people, visit the places and witness the moments that led us to where we are today.

9 Episodes
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The DNA Debate

The DNA Debate

2020-02-2400:18:52

February 28, 1953. Two scientists, James Watson and Francis Crick, burst into a bar and exclaim that they have discovered the secret of life. But there was another person involved in the discovery of DNA’s double helix, a scientist named Rosalind Franklin. Why didn’t she get any credit, and what does her story tell us about the politics of discovery itself? For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
A Mole in the CIA

A Mole in the CIA

2020-02-1700:23:463

February 21, 1994. Early in the morning, FBI agents assemble near the home of Aldrich Ames. They wait for him to leave his house and then they pounce, arresting one of the deadliest double agents in CIA history. He received almost $2 million from the KGB, selling CIA secrets and lethally betraying undercover agents for years. Who is the real Aldrich Ames? And why does a spy turn on their own country? Thank you to our guest, Pete Earley, author of "Confessions of a Spy: The Real Story of Aldrich Ames". Find it here: https://amzn.to/31SYUfd For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
The Legacy of an Oscar

The Legacy of an Oscar

2020-02-1000:23:232

February 11, 1940. Hattie McDaniel becomes the first-ever African American to be nominated for, and then win, an Oscar. Her legacy is complicated. And the Oscar itself has been missing, mysteriously, for almost fifty years. What did it take for McDaniel to win? And, 80 Oscar ceremonies later, how do we understand her legacy today? Thank you to our guest, Professor Emeritus of Law, W. Burlette Carter. You can read her article about searching for the missing Oscar here: https://bit.ly/2OF5cts Thank you also to Hattie McDaniel's biographer, Jill Watts for speaking with us for this episode. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
When Black Men Won the Vote

When Black Men Won the Vote

2020-02-0200:20:205

February 3, 1870. The 15th Amendment is ratified, which establishes the right to vote for black men in America. While Jim Crow laws would grip the south by 1877, there was a brief, seven-year window of opportunity. Half a million black voters turned out at the polls, and 2,000 black officials are estimated to have been elected during this time. What did this moment of progress look like? And how do those votes still impact our lives 150 years later? Special thanks to our guest, historian and professor Yohuru Williams. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Surviving Auschwitz

Surviving Auschwitz

2020-01-2600:27:5412

January 27, 1945. This week, we commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, one of Nazi Germany's largest concentration and extermination camps. Auschwitz has since become a symbol for the Holocaust itself, but what did liberation actually mean for its survivors - and is the full story being forgotten? Thank you to Mindu Hornick and Bill Harvey for sharing their personal story of surviving Auschwitz and to Fulwell 73 for helping make it happen. Thank you to Jeremy Dronfield, author of the Boy Who Followed his Father into Auschwitz, and to the work of Robert Jan Van Pelt, curator for the international exhibit, "Auschwitz. Not Long Ago. Not Far Away." Archival material accessed at United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of The Steven Spielberg Jewish Film Archives of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of National Archives & Records Administration and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, gift of Thomas P. Headen. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
January 22, 1984. Apple launches the first Macintosh computer, with a showstopping Super Bowl commercial. The ad itself was revolutionary, but the product it launched almost single-handedly brought computers into the mainstream, changing the world as we know it. Special thanks to Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, author and producer of the “Making the Macintosh” digital archive. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
January 15, 1919. Boston PD receives a call: “Send all available rescue personnel...there's a wave of molasses coming down Commercial Street." The bizarre flood decimated Boston's North End. How did it happen? And why does it still affect us all today? Special thanks to our guest, Stephen Puleo, author of Dark Tide: The Great Boston Molasses Flood of 1919. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
January 11th, 1964. The US Surgeon General announces: smoking is killing us. It’s an announcement that changed the course of American public health – and took years to finally come out. But it was only the beginning of an uphill battle to take down an all-American pastime. This week we ask: why did it take so long for the public to learn this deadly truth? And why has it taken even longer for us to accept it? Special thanks to our guests, Dr. Boris Lushniak, 2014 Acting U.S. Surgeon General, and Dr. Mike Cummings from the Medical University of South Carolina. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
This week, something momentous happened. Whether or not it made the textbooks, it most certainly made history. Join HISTORY This Week as we turn back the clock to meet the people, visit the places and witness the moments that led us to where we are today. New episodes every Monday, starting January 2020. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Comments (6)

Keith Spiers

Excellent podcasts. My Alexa flash briefings include, History Today which I enjoy. The advertisements got me to start to listening History This Week. Thank you!

Feb 22nd
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Leslie Scott Grossman

commercials stink.

Jan 30th
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Heather Titmus

I loved this episode! Fascinating to learn about and the speakers make this and all of the ones I have heard from them so compelling

Jan 30th
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Jtuite

Excellent episode, well done!

Jan 22nd
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Leslie Grossman

Is it really necessary to have commercials in the middle of the Podcast? I just want to learn about history Selling spots to Candy Crush Saga is a total turn off.

Jan 14th
Reply (1)
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